counter create hit Lost & Found: A Memoir - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Lost & Found: A Memoir

Availability: Ready to download

Eighteen months before Kathryn Schulz's father died, she met the woman she would marry. In Lost & Found, she weaves the story of those relationships into a brilliant exploration of the role that loss and discovery play in all of our lives. The resulting book is part memoir, part guidebook to living in a world that is simultaneously full of wonder and joy and wretchedness a Eighteen months before Kathryn Schulz's father died, she met the woman she would marry. In Lost & Found, she weaves the story of those relationships into a brilliant exploration of the role that loss and discovery play in all of our lives. The resulting book is part memoir, part guidebook to living in a world that is simultaneously full of wonder and joy and wretchedness and suffering--a world that always demands both our gratitude and our grief. A staff writer at The New Yorker and winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Schulz writes with curiosity, tenderness, erudition, and wit about our finite yet infinitely complicated lives. Lost & Found is an enduring account of love in all its many forms from one of the great writers of our time.


Compare

Eighteen months before Kathryn Schulz's father died, she met the woman she would marry. In Lost & Found, she weaves the story of those relationships into a brilliant exploration of the role that loss and discovery play in all of our lives. The resulting book is part memoir, part guidebook to living in a world that is simultaneously full of wonder and joy and wretchedness a Eighteen months before Kathryn Schulz's father died, she met the woman she would marry. In Lost & Found, she weaves the story of those relationships into a brilliant exploration of the role that loss and discovery play in all of our lives. The resulting book is part memoir, part guidebook to living in a world that is simultaneously full of wonder and joy and wretchedness and suffering--a world that always demands both our gratitude and our grief. A staff writer at The New Yorker and winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Schulz writes with curiosity, tenderness, erudition, and wit about our finite yet infinitely complicated lives. Lost & Found is an enduring account of love in all its many forms from one of the great writers of our time.

43 review for Lost & Found: A Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    James Beggarly

    Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for the ebook. This is a very smart memoir about love and death. The author, a New Yorker staff writer, meets the love of her life eighteen months before her beloved father passes away. How to deal with the greatest happiness while trying to deal with crushing grief? The author gives us loving profiles of her family, her wife and her wife’s family, but also expands out to how history and some of her favorite authors have also dealt with love and death. An obs Thanks to Netgalley and Random House for the ebook. This is a very smart memoir about love and death. The author, a New Yorker staff writer, meets the love of her life eighteen months before her beloved father passes away. How to deal with the greatest happiness while trying to deal with crushing grief? The author gives us loving profiles of her family, her wife and her wife’s family, but also expands out to how history and some of her favorite authors have also dealt with love and death. An observant and very thoughtful book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ayelet

    Reading this, I really related to the duality of it all, and that life means experiencing the lost and the found and there's no way to have it just be one. Reading this, I really related to the duality of it all, and that life means experiencing the lost and the found and there's no way to have it just be one.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sue Trav

    I finished this book and waited a while before doing my review. There is so much to take in and process in this book and the writing is beautiful. I really like how the author split the book into three very distinct sections. Part primer on grief/grieving and part love story. I highlighted (digitally) so much of the first section (LOSS) to refer back to and then realized that because this is an ARC it will vanish from my bookshelf in about 50 days. Ah the irony that I will lose it! I will defini I finished this book and waited a while before doing my review. There is so much to take in and process in this book and the writing is beautiful. I really like how the author split the book into three very distinct sections. Part primer on grief/grieving and part love story. I highlighted (digitally) so much of the first section (LOSS) to refer back to and then realized that because this is an ARC it will vanish from my bookshelf in about 50 days. Ah the irony that I will lose it! I will definitely be getting another copy when it comes out next year to re-read and highlight again. So much good stuff in there regarding loss and dealing with death. I can't quote any of it here as this was an ARC but the first section on loss could be a self-help book for people in the throes of loss/grieving. I have not dealt with the loss of my aging parents yet but this will be extremely helpful when that occurs. The author does not gloss over any of her grieving process and it was heartbreaking to read. It also was a good reminder to spend as much time with my folks as I can. Reading this book made me wish I was part of her family and made me love her dad. I am sure that wherever he is in the Universe that he is proud of his daughter. Highly recommend this one. Thank you to the publisher and to NetGalley for the ARC of this book. What a treat this was to read!

  4. 4 out of 5

    sophie

    some beautiful prose, some happy lesbian moments

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Booty

    The foundation of Lost and Found is an essay which appeared in The New Yorker Magazine called “When Things Go Missing”. It is a superb essay, both entertaining and profound. Schulz weaves stories of her father losing things, why other people lose things and finally the loss of her father. Unfortunately, when transplanted as the “Lost” part of the book it did not take root. I think the reason for this is the material Schulz added regarding grief and loss. It was as if someone decided that Munch’s The foundation of Lost and Found is an essay which appeared in The New Yorker Magazine called “When Things Go Missing”. It is a superb essay, both entertaining and profound. Schulz weaves stories of her father losing things, why other people lose things and finally the loss of her father. Unfortunately, when transplanted as the “Lost” part of the book it did not take root. I think the reason for this is the material Schulz added regarding grief and loss. It was as if someone decided that Munch’s The Scream would look ever so much better with the facial features drawn in. There is no question that Schulz has a wonderful, searching intellect. Her writing style is almost Talmudic, starting out on one subject, digressing to another and then, pages later, returning to the first in some surprising way, tying the two together . However, I became weary making my way through the padding, refreshed only when coming to a quote from C.S. Lewis or Elizabeth Bishop. The Found portion of the book is more successful. Schulz meditates in wonder on how she came together with a woman so perfectly suited to her. The story of their partnership radiates with happiness. Alike in so many ways, different in others, C. is a perfect complement to Schulz. C., also a writer, also highly educated, is a Christian with deep roots in the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Schulz understands that in order to fully describe C. she must also do justice to the Eastern Shore which she does with lively, descriptive prose. Schulz at one point realizes that C. is the intellectual doppelganger of her beloved father. This would have been a much more successful book had it spent more time highlighting the lives of these two people, separated by decades, personal history and gender but united in intelligence and their love of Schulz. I received an ARC of this book from Random House through Netgalley.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Joyce Hamel

    Vicissitudes and Viewpoints The memoir opens with a loss and history of her beloved father, a Jewish refugee. He was brilliant, sometimes a lawyer, misplaces everything and had a sense of humor. Smart man, passed it on to his two daughters. The book evolves into the author’s acceptance of loss and her gracious acknowledgment of new beginnings, one being a new partner aka marriage. The writing is excellent but there was no revelations for me in terms of her writing (she writes for the New Yorker, Pu Vicissitudes and Viewpoints The memoir opens with a loss and history of her beloved father, a Jewish refugee. He was brilliant, sometimes a lawyer, misplaces everything and had a sense of humor. Smart man, passed it on to his two daughters. The book evolves into the author’s acceptance of loss and her gracious acknowledgment of new beginnings, one being a new partner aka marriage. The writing is excellent but there was no revelations for me in terms of her writing (she writes for the New Yorker, Pulitzer Prize recipient). She has all the credentials. Not her fault, but I needed more excitement in this memoir. My gratitude to NetGalley and Random House for this pre-published book. All opinions expressed are my own.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    Very intellectual examination of the loss of a father and falling in love with the person who will become one's spouse. For me, it was a tough read because the emotionally charged issues were written didactically. Very intellectual examination of the loss of a father and falling in love with the person who will become one's spouse. For me, it was a tough read because the emotionally charged issues were written didactically.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christine Livinghouse

    Oh I just couldn’t finish this- I think I need a better head space to read this- very sad and depressing. Also I could not adjust to he authors writing- it was very rambling and I felt like I needed a break every few pages.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Rather sad topic but some worthwhile background/comments on death & dying and moving on with your life. (Could have done without the chapter regarding background of "and" which was not really relevant and rather boring. Rather sad topic but some worthwhile background/comments on death & dying and moving on with your life. (Could have done without the chapter regarding background of "and" which was not really relevant and rather boring.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emilie

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anmiryam

  12. 4 out of 5

    sam

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gaël

  15. 5 out of 5

    Allyson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan Waters

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Isabella

  19. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Will

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  22. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tom Harmsen

  24. 4 out of 5

    Annie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Myarc

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mara

  27. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lisa-Marie Bellmore

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Lehmkuhl

  31. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Park

  32. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

  33. 4 out of 5

    Quaye Frietas

  34. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  35. 4 out of 5

    Casey

  36. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  37. 4 out of 5

    Noemi

  38. 4 out of 5

    Robert Chun

  39. 5 out of 5

    Blake

  40. 4 out of 5

    Jill McLaughlin

  41. 4 out of 5

    Kees Kees

  42. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

  43. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.