counter create hit Crossing and Cruising: From the Golden Era of Ocean Liners to the Luxury Cruise Ships of Today - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Crossing and Cruising: From the Golden Era of Ocean Liners to the Luxury Cruise Ships of Today

Availability: Ready to download

The master authority on ocean liners, John Maxtone-Graham now tells the story of the greatest ships of yesterday and today, showing how the post-modernist megaships compare in size and style with the classic ships of the past. He also offers a unique look at passenger life on early steamers and depicts the marvels and problems of the newest ships. 8-page insert.


Compare
Ads Banner

The master authority on ocean liners, John Maxtone-Graham now tells the story of the greatest ships of yesterday and today, showing how the post-modernist megaships compare in size and style with the classic ships of the past. He also offers a unique look at passenger life on early steamers and depicts the marvels and problems of the newest ships. 8-page insert.

29 review for Crossing and Cruising: From the Golden Era of Ocean Liners to the Luxury Cruise Ships of Today

  1. 4 out of 5

    Eric_W

    Imagine having a job traveling around the world on cruise ships and ocean liners and then writing about the experience. Surely that’s dying and going to heaven — assuming each ship has a well-stocked library, of course. That’s basically what Maxtone-Graham does. I had the good fortune last fall to stay at a small hotel next to Miami Dade Community College for the Miami Book Fair. The college is located a stone’s throw from the Port of Miami, where the cruise ships dock. What glorious ships. A cr Imagine having a job traveling around the world on cruise ships and ocean liners and then writing about the experience. Surely that’s dying and going to heaven — assuming each ship has a well-stocked library, of course. That’s basically what Maxtone-Graham does. I had the good fortune last fall to stay at a small hotel next to Miami Dade Community College for the Miami Book Fair. The college is located a stone’s throw from the Port of Miami, where the cruise ships dock. What glorious ships. A cruise around the harbor brought us close to seven of them that happened to be in port that weekend. Astonishingly, the newer ships, one of which was the largest in the world, dwarfed the S.S. Norway, formerly the France, a liner built several decades ago and at the time the largest and most prestigious.. Carnival Lines really created the cruise industry in 1972 when it purchased an older Canadian Pacific liner and converted it to Caribbean travel. Soon, for reasons Maxtone-Graham delineates, the company was immensely profitable and was buying and building all sorts of new ships. One amusing anecdote from Japan reveals that country’s rigid and paranoiac trade laws. The S.S. Vaal was in dry-dock being converted to the Festivale. From its previous trip it had seven tons of first-rate Argentinean beef aboard that Carnival offered to donate to the local poor. Japan’s strict import restrictions forbad the entry of any foreign beef into the country, so that was out. They were unable to dump it into the harbor because that might be polluting, so the company was forced to seal it up in large steel canisters and then dump it into the ocean for the sharks once the retrofit was completed. All the early conversions were of W.N.A. ships (built for the Winter in the North Atlantic) and were extremely well built, with reliable engines. They will last decades more. The newer vessels all have a much boxier look that has a tendency to catch the wind. One ship plucked out several bollards from the Miami pier there was so much wind pressure. Carnival’s director has a background in ship building and engineering, so he can speak the language of the ship builders — a handy ability. The mini cruise ship is making a resurgence although the newer ones resemble a scaled down version of their larger sisters rather than the yachtlike appearance of the original Polaris Stella. They cater to a more affluent and academic crowd that requires less external stimulation and entertainment. Originally these smaller ships thrived in the Mediterranean cruise business, until the 1985 hijacking of the Achille Lauro cast such a pall over the business that they couldn’t give cabins away. The larger Caribbean ships spend almost as much time in port as at sea, providing a continual opportunity for passengers to shop. The Normandie, despite her short life – she burned at a New York pier in 1942 – remains the ship with the most mystique, perhaps because she never lived to the end of her days. Her design was clearly beautiful: three (one fake) rakish funnels seemingly planted on the ship unlike previous ship designs that had rigid funnels held in place with ungraceful guy wires and swept back bridges (although they were later replaced when they proved unpractical). She had no sister ship; indeed, the concept was foreign to French shipbuilders and no equivalent phrase existed in the French language. Each Frenchbuilt liner was unique. She had long, graceful staircases that connected multi-level dining rooms with enormous multi-decked ceilings that created a ballroom effect for the black- or white-tuxedoed passengers. (I would have eaten in my cabin – the thought of having to dress for dinner is positively loathsome.) We have detailed descriptions of the Normandie from a series of preserved letters sent by Everett Moore to his family. He apparently did not socialize with the other passengers, much to the author’s consternation, but to my complete understanding. After all, why would anyone ever want to stand around over coffee or whatever, making small talk, when one can sit in the library overlooking the ocean with a stack of books. One of Maxwell’s most interesting chapters relates his experiences accompanying the delivery of some new ships to their new owners. In one case, he and his wife were the sole passengers on a huge new cruise ship. What a deal!

  2. 5 out of 5

    David

    The author really has a passion for ships and onboard life-and it shows. He transplants you to being on the ship. And although this book is nearly 30 years old at this point, as opposed to the book seeming obsolete-that makes the authors observations even more amusing. The author spoke about a cruise on the Carnival Fantasy (a new ship when written), and the author is amused how folks new to cruising find a waiter dropping a tray entertaining-and how one person even filmed it. In the age of cell The author really has a passion for ships and onboard life-and it shows. He transplants you to being on the ship. And although this book is nearly 30 years old at this point, as opposed to the book seeming obsolete-that makes the authors observations even more amusing. The author spoke about a cruise on the Carnival Fantasy (a new ship when written), and the author is amused how folks new to cruising find a waiter dropping a tray entertaining-and how one person even filmed it. In the age of cell phone cameras-how many would film it today? 30, 40, 100 folks each time in happened? And the author seems dismayed that ships need to keep schedules full, as new cruisers can't handle long, relaxing days at sea with nothing to do. What would he think of go-carts, movie screens, ice skating rinks, etc. The only criticism is the author's language is just a little too rich many times-I kept having to refer to a dictionary, and often times even the dictionary didn't have the words he was using.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Per

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erik Kalm

  5. 5 out of 5

    Leigh

  6. 5 out of 5

    Craig

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  8. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brian Brennan

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie Miller

  11. 4 out of 5

    John Patrick Schutz

  12. 5 out of 5

    William Lodge

  13. 5 out of 5

    Duncan Stuart

  14. 4 out of 5

    David Smith

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

  17. 4 out of 5

    Raquel

  18. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alan Shulman

  20. 5 out of 5

    Diane Killion

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  22. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Villines

  23. 5 out of 5

    June

  24. 5 out of 5

    Maki

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ankit Goyal

  26. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  27. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Davis

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.