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The Art Lesson

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Tommy knows he wants to be an artist when he grows up. He can't wait to get to school and have real art lessons. When Tommy gets to school and finds out that the art lessons are full of "rules", he is surprised and dismayed. How the wise art teacher finds a way to give Tommy the freedom to create and stay within the "rules" makes a wonderfully perceptive picture book about Tommy knows he wants to be an artist when he grows up. He can't wait to get to school and have real art lessons. When Tommy gets to school and finds out that the art lessons are full of "rules", he is surprised and dismayed. How the wise art teacher finds a way to give Tommy the freedom to create and stay within the "rules" makes a wonderfully perceptive picture book about growing up and keeping one's individuality. Tomie dePaola is the author and illustrator of many beloved books for children, including the Caldecott Honor Book Strega Nona. Fans of all ages will be pleased to hear that The Art Lesson is, in fact, based on the artist's own experiences growing up, and offers a welcome glimpse into his past. This bright picture book is as covered with drawings as the walls of Tommy's parents' and grandparents' houses, and sends an inspirational message to budding artists and individualists. Break out the crayons!


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Tommy knows he wants to be an artist when he grows up. He can't wait to get to school and have real art lessons. When Tommy gets to school and finds out that the art lessons are full of "rules", he is surprised and dismayed. How the wise art teacher finds a way to give Tommy the freedom to create and stay within the "rules" makes a wonderfully perceptive picture book about Tommy knows he wants to be an artist when he grows up. He can't wait to get to school and have real art lessons. When Tommy gets to school and finds out that the art lessons are full of "rules", he is surprised and dismayed. How the wise art teacher finds a way to give Tommy the freedom to create and stay within the "rules" makes a wonderfully perceptive picture book about growing up and keeping one's individuality. Tomie dePaola is the author and illustrator of many beloved books for children, including the Caldecott Honor Book Strega Nona. Fans of all ages will be pleased to hear that The Art Lesson is, in fact, based on the artist's own experiences growing up, and offers a welcome glimpse into his past. This bright picture book is as covered with drawings as the walls of Tommy's parents' and grandparents' houses, and sends an inspirational message to budding artists and individualists. Break out the crayons!

30 review for The Art Lesson

  1. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Welcome to "Heather over-analyzes a children's book yet again!" I got this book at the library because I thought Margaret would like it. She's in a coloring phase and thought it would go well with that. The story started off nice enough. His parents and family are supportive of his desire to do art. When Tomie gets to kindergarten, he finds the quality of the art supplies disheartening. It was a nice reminder: it's probably better that my kids have a few good art supplies than a lot of crappy ones Welcome to "Heather over-analyzes a children's book yet again!" I got this book at the library because I thought Margaret would like it. She's in a coloring phase and thought it would go well with that. The story started off nice enough. His parents and family are supportive of his desire to do art. When Tomie gets to kindergarten, he finds the quality of the art supplies disheartening. It was a nice reminder: it's probably better that my kids have a few good art supplies than a lot of crappy ones. I think the quality of the materials definitely affects whether or not they'll want to continue with art. Who really wants to draw with those waxy crayons from the restaurant anyway? But then it just got crappy. Tomie wasn't allowed to use the crayons he brought to school- with no explanation. "You must all use these same crayons- and you can't wear down the points!" Oi. I hate that schools have rules just to have rules. And how are you supposed to use a crayon if you can't use the point? Then when he finally does have art class, it's about copying. The "compromise" of "you can draw what you like after you do what we say" is a slap in the face. "The most important things in school are crowd control and getting through curriculum. Actually encouraging you to want to learn and grow is something that might come later, after we regulate and put stipulations on you." Arg. Having worked in the schools- in fact in a school district that didn't feel art was important/academic enough for elementary schools, and having seen the herding and curriculum push, this just emphasized why I don't want my kids in schools. I think dePaola was lucky to go through all that (this was autobiographical) and still become an illustrator. I don't think he came out unscathed, though, because he doesn't seem to realize that the "happy compromise" was no compromise at all.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Janelle

    Tomie dePaola is one of my favorite children's author/illustrators. I love that this book is about how he became an artist. It also discussed how other children have other hobbies and interests and talents, and how one finds a balance between conformity/following rules, and individuality. The main focus is on how Tommy (Tomie) develops and shares his talents with the world (including through this book) I especially loved the reference to the 64 box of Crayola crayons because everyone knows the Cr Tomie dePaola is one of my favorite children's author/illustrators. I love that this book is about how he became an artist. It also discussed how other children have other hobbies and interests and talents, and how one finds a balance between conformity/following rules, and individuality. The main focus is on how Tommy (Tomie) develops and shares his talents with the world (including through this book) I especially loved the reference to the 64 box of Crayola crayons because everyone knows the Crayola crayons drew so much better than "school crayons." This would be great to read with a few other dePaola books, and maybe follow it up with some coloring, with Crayola crayons of course!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    Young Tommy knows he wants to be an artist, but he has his hopes and dreams continually squashed by a by-the-rules school curriculum. I realize this is autobiographical, and every thing turned out okay in the end, but I still found it depressing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    J.N.

    My second read for Dewey’s Reverse Readathon. 32 pages. This has always been one of my favorite childhood books and it was a fun re-read as an adult. I could still relate to Tommy and wanting to be able to color with the better non-school crayons and being able to receive more than one piece of paper to draw on. I didn’t realize this was somewhat based on Tomie’s own childhood and that made this re-read even better. I’ve always loved his illustrations and this may be my favorite of his books so f My second read for Dewey’s Reverse Readathon. 32 pages. This has always been one of my favorite childhood books and it was a fun re-read as an adult. I could still relate to Tommy and wanting to be able to color with the better non-school crayons and being able to receive more than one piece of paper to draw on. I didn’t realize this was somewhat based on Tomie’s own childhood and that made this re-read even better. I’ve always loved his illustrations and this may be my favorite of his books so far. Loved seeing the support of Tomie’s family as well as the art teacher willing to compromise.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    This is a fun tale that shows the beginnings of Tomie dePaola's interest in drawing and his early years as an artist. The illustrations are classic dePaola and I love the characters from some of his other stories featured in the pictures in the background. The story also offers a glimpse into his family's background, with Irish and Italian extended family members, a stay-at-home mother and a father who is a dentist. The story is interesting; I love that it shows the frustration of a young child This is a fun tale that shows the beginnings of Tomie dePaola's interest in drawing and his early years as an artist. The illustrations are classic dePaola and I love the characters from some of his other stories featured in the pictures in the background. The story also offers a glimpse into his family's background, with Irish and Italian extended family members, a stay-at-home mother and a father who is a dentist. The story is interesting; I love that it shows the frustration of a young child with the rigid school rules and the compromise that an art teacher offers when young Tommy is determined to have his way. I also love that it shows him discovering both his passion and talent at a very young age. I hope our girls learn while they are still young what sparks a fire within themselves, thus helping to guide them on their journey to becoming an adult and finding an avocation, not just a job.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    This is a short autobiographical work about the artist author, and about how even as a boy he was an artist. It did bring me back to how I valued those boxes of Crayola 64 colors of crayons. (When I was a bit older and found boxes with an even bigger color selection of crayons, I was in art heaven.) I was a bit bothered by the form of the resolution this story had re the boy’s “permission” to be a the artist he was as a first grader, although Tomie dePaola certainly did ok with his background, s This is a short autobiographical work about the artist author, and about how even as a boy he was an artist. It did bring me back to how I valued those boxes of Crayola 64 colors of crayons. (When I was a bit older and found boxes with an even bigger color selection of crayons, I was in art heaven.) I was a bit bothered by the form of the resolution this story had re the boy’s “permission” to be a the artist he was as a first grader, although Tomie dePaola certainly did ok with his background, so I guess I shouldn’t be perturbed. This book did remind me of how art is sometimes taught in ways that do not encourage the creativity almost all children possess if allowed to express it. I admit inciting my attitude is not what the author/artist seems to have had in mind when he wrote and illustrated this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Luann

    My college professor read this to us in my "Art of the Picture Book" class. It is another great story from the life of Tomie de Paola. He knows he wants to be an artist when he grows up, so he draws pictures everywhere - once even on his sheets until his mom finds out. When he gets to school, he is excited to have art lessons with a real art teacher, but then finds out he is required to use school crayons, use only one sheet of paper, and COPY what the teacher draws for them. He does work out a My college professor read this to us in my "Art of the Picture Book" class. It is another great story from the life of Tomie de Paola. He knows he wants to be an artist when he grows up, so he draws pictures everywhere - once even on his sheets until his mom finds out. When he gets to school, he is excited to have art lessons with a real art teacher, but then finds out he is required to use school crayons, use only one sheet of paper, and COPY what the teacher draws for them. He does work out a compromise with the art teacher, and happily for all of us, really did become an artist when he grew up.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sadia Mansoor

    My 999th book here :D

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shauna

    Great biography of the author/artist when he was a little boy with wonderful illustrations, of course. He always had an interest of and a talent for drawing.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lorraine Ryan

    A cute little book that teaches children to do what they are passionate about and to never give on their dreams. I loved this book because it showed a child growing up and doing what he always wanted to do, draw. ‘Tommy’, is passionate about drawing and has always been encouraged by his family in creating wonderful pictures. He loved to draw his own pictures however when he started art lessons in school, this wasn’t always the case. He found his teacher dictated him into drawing what she wanted A cute little book that teaches children to do what they are passionate about and to never give on their dreams. I loved this book because it showed a child growing up and doing what he always wanted to do, draw. ‘Tommy’, is passionate about drawing and has always been encouraged by his family in creating wonderful pictures. He loved to draw his own pictures however when he started art lessons in school, this wasn’t always the case. He found his teacher dictated him into drawing what she wanted and not what he wanted. Tommy and his teacher soon worked out how they can let him draw his own pictures. A simple, yet happy story with excellent illustrations. I would recommend this book for children aged 4-8 years of age. If I was a child again, this book would encourage me to think of a talent I might have and to think about how I can practise at making it successful. It could bring up a discussion in class in relation to the children's talents and how they can make it their own.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Angelica Nucico

    This miniature autobiography is written and illustrated by Tomie dePaola. This book covers only a small portion of his life in extensive detail. The last part just lets the reader know what Tomie currently does. This book is illustrated very well and the characters all actually have a little character to them even there is not much time for character development in a short story such as this. Somehow Tomie manages to make each character very personal while still getting his point across, without This miniature autobiography is written and illustrated by Tomie dePaola. This book covers only a small portion of his life in extensive detail. The last part just lets the reader know what Tomie currently does. This book is illustrated very well and the characters all actually have a little character to them even there is not much time for character development in a short story such as this. Somehow Tomie manages to make each character very personal while still getting his point across, without making the book excessively long. The book is a very easy read and it is sure to please. The reader wonders the whole time whether or not Tomie will ever get to draw. They are also left frustrated every time Tomie is mad because the way that the author describes his experiences is very real.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Savannah Schneider

    This is another book I read to my little sister. She didn't seem to be interested in it much, and I found it incredibly boring. There was a lot of big words that I could barely even read so I don't think children will really understand it unless you substitute them with different words. I think it'd be more for a younger boy than a girl. It was about how the author came to be an artist. I would recommend it to young boys that are interested in art.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Season Neal

    What I believe to be Tomie dePaola's life story. A young Tomie dePaola is excited to begin school because of art class. Yet, when his dreams of art class are destroyed by a teacher who doesn't let the students be creative, the little boy doesn't let this bring him down. This is a cute story that students love and helps teach perseverance and believing in yourself.

  14. 5 out of 5

    FM Family

    My three year old LOVES this one. We're not sure why. It's one of those stories everyday stories where not much happens that sometimes I think kids relate to. Or maybe she's a budding artist and we haven't tapped into it yet. Or, most likely, she likes the meta quality of having a picture of Strega Nona on the wall at the end of this book, the story of the childhood of Tomie dePaola himself. I enjoyed the story even on multiple readings, and appreciate the childlike drama of getting 64 crayons an My three year old LOVES this one. We're not sure why. It's one of those stories everyday stories where not much happens that sometimes I think kids relate to. Or maybe she's a budding artist and we haven't tapped into it yet. Or, most likely, she likes the meta quality of having a picture of Strega Nona on the wall at the end of this book, the story of the childhood of Tomie dePaola himself. I enjoyed the story even on multiple readings, and appreciate the childlike drama of getting 64 crayons and having your teacher say you couldn't even use them and you had to use the SCHOOL crayons instead. Although I will say a weakness of this story is that the solution the art teacher comes up with seems lacking. Tommy was so excited to have the opportunity to learn from a real artist, and in the end, she's just showing him how to copy and then he draws another picture on his own? I'm hoping that she's providing some art tips in there somewhere too. Anyway, great, relatable memoir of a kid and some adults just doing their best.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ted Percival

    Disappointing story, clearly autobiographical that goes into a bit too much unnecessary detail. The lesson is that you can still use your Crayola™ crayons in art class if you follow the rules of copying the sample artwork first, even if you've learned that real artists don't copy and you have your own full set of crayons. The Crayola™ product placement is particularly jarring. They're just crayons. Kids shouldn't be making brand-identity value judgments. (Nor should adults.) It's a bit of a let do Disappointing story, clearly autobiographical that goes into a bit too much unnecessary detail. The lesson is that you can still use your Crayola™ crayons in art class if you follow the rules of copying the sample artwork first, even if you've learned that real artists don't copy and you have your own full set of crayons. The Crayola™ product placement is particularly jarring. They're just crayons. Kids shouldn't be making brand-identity value judgments. (Nor should adults.) It's a bit of a let down. Not an optimistic story or a strong lesson about being rewarded, just a middling tale of how maybe, after you follow all the rules, you'll get a tiny bit of leeway to actually express yourself. It might be a sad, realistic view of the world and its arbitrary rules and scant opportunity for self-expression, but that's not the kind of fun, optimistic book I want to share with my kids.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Atiyah Stewart

    This book takes you through Tommy's life as a developing artist. The main character expressed his love for drawing, but was met with rules about what he could and could not do with his art. Tommy drew many pictures that related to the events or people in his life. Although Tommy was a good little artist, he was met with a lot of push back from the adults in his life in regards to pursuing his dream. The illustration in the story conveyed a warm and adorable feeling for the reader, even when the c This book takes you through Tommy's life as a developing artist. The main character expressed his love for drawing, but was met with rules about what he could and could not do with his art. Tommy drew many pictures that related to the events or people in his life. Although Tommy was a good little artist, he was met with a lot of push back from the adults in his life in regards to pursuing his dream. The illustration in the story conveyed a warm and adorable feeling for the reader, even when the character had issues with conveying his art on many surfaces. I appreciate the author's delivery of informing the reader's of his past. He also gives young readers a sense of familiarity, as a young six year old boy who finds a knack for drawing. It is great to have a story that my daughter can relate to in retrospect of becoming an artist since she is beginning to draw more than circle people.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Erin Schoenherr

    1. Summary: This story is about Tommy comes from a family of artists and who loves art. He is excited for art class in school, but when he gets to school his art teacher is rude and doesn't let him be creative, the way he would like to be. Although, Tommy knows what the true meaning of art is because of his aunts. 2. Review: I think this is a wonderful story to read to young children because it tells a story about a boy who loves art! This book is relatable to children in school and experiencing 1. Summary: This story is about Tommy comes from a family of artists and who loves art. He is excited for art class in school, but when he gets to school his art teacher is rude and doesn't let him be creative, the way he would like to be. Although, Tommy knows what the true meaning of art is because of his aunts. 2. Review: I think this is a wonderful story to read to young children because it tells a story about a boy who loves art! This book is relatable to children in school and experiencing teachers like Tommy's. It is also relatable to children who love to draw or paint! It is a great read with great illustrations! 3. This book can be paired with "Henri's Scissors" by Jeanette Winter because they are both stories that have to with loving art and being artistic! 4. "Tommy knew that real artists didn't copy". This quote can be used to connect literacy to art and have the students create their own art and be creative.

  18. 5 out of 5

    M.M. Hudson

    Tomie dePaola is one of my favorite children's books authors. This particular book is a memoir. This book follows Tommy a budding artist who loved to draw from the time he was very little. His crayon pictures were all over his house and his father's barber shop. When Tommy got to go to school for the first time he was excited to take his first art lesson. Except that he found out he could only have one piece of paper and couldn't do his own art! Eventually, the teacher relented and he got to do Tomie dePaola is one of my favorite children's books authors. This particular book is a memoir. This book follows Tommy a budding artist who loved to draw from the time he was very little. His crayon pictures were all over his house and his father's barber shop. When Tommy got to go to school for the first time he was excited to take his first art lesson. Except that he found out he could only have one piece of paper and couldn't do his own art! Eventually, the teacher relented and he got to do his own art with his own big box of crayons. The book is adorable as it includes many of Tomie dePaola pictures for his book. The book gets 4 multicolored Stars. Disclosure: I own a copy of this book for my own collections the views expressed are 100% my own and may differ from your opinions. -Michelle

  19. 5 out of 5

    Julianna Muth

    "The Art Lesson" by Tomie dePaola is the story of a boy, Tommy, who wants nothing more than to have an art class with the art teacher in school. "He could tell she was an artist because she wore a blue smock over her dress and she always carried a big box of thick colored chalk." When Tommy finally has the opportunity for his art lesson, to his horror he is told he must use just one paper, use dull school crayons, and COPY the instructed drawing lesson. Luckily the art teacher recognizes Tommy's "The Art Lesson" by Tomie dePaola is the story of a boy, Tommy, who wants nothing more than to have an art class with the art teacher in school. "He could tell she was an artist because she wore a blue smock over her dress and she always carried a big box of thick colored chalk." When Tommy finally has the opportunity for his art lesson, to his horror he is told he must use just one paper, use dull school crayons, and COPY the instructed drawing lesson. Luckily the art teacher recognizes Tommy's need to create and a deal is struck. Tomie dePaola's books reference events from his childhood like "Nana Upstairs, Nana Downstairs," "The Baby Sister," where he paints an interesting picture of a little boy growing up in the 1940's. It is amazing to have the 20/20 hindsight and know that Tommy grows up to be an award winning, acclaimed artist and storybook illustrator. Any book by dePaola is a winner.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Minieri

    Realistic Fiction Awards: N/A Appropriate Grade Levels: k-5 Summary: The Art Lesson is a fantastic story based on Tommie dePaola's life--revolving around a young boy named Tommie who loves to draw. Tommie knows that being an artist is what he wants to do for the rest of his life, and by the end of the story it comes to fruition. Review: I am a big fan of Tommie dePaola's work and this story is no exception. The Art Lesson is a true "follow your dreams" story that will hit home with a lot of childre Realistic Fiction Awards: N/A Appropriate Grade Levels: k-5 Summary: The Art Lesson is a fantastic story based on Tommie dePaola's life--revolving around a young boy named Tommie who loves to draw. Tommie knows that being an artist is what he wants to do for the rest of his life, and by the end of the story it comes to fruition. Review: I am a big fan of Tommie dePaola's work and this story is no exception. The Art Lesson is a true "follow your dreams" story that will hit home with a lot of children. As always, the artwork is amazing and truly adds to the work. In-Class Uses: -Inspire children to share their own passions and future goals -Encourage children to use artwork as a form of expression

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Davidson

    Tommy's favourite thing was to draw pictures. In fact, he wanted to be an artist when he grew up. Tommy could hardly wait to start school where he'd have an art teacher, but when he got to school he found out he'd have to wait until grade one. When school ended that year Tommy practiced all summer. When school started again Tommy took his new box of Crayola crayons to use in grade one. Things didn't go as well as Tommy hoped, but when he followed his teachers' instructions he found their comprom Tommy's favourite thing was to draw pictures. In fact, he wanted to be an artist when he grew up. Tommy could hardly wait to start school where he'd have an art teacher, but when he got to school he found out he'd have to wait until grade one. When school ended that year Tommy practiced all summer. When school started again Tommy took his new box of Crayola crayons to use in grade one. Things didn't go as well as Tommy hoped, but when he followed his teachers' instructions he found their compromise was the best way to work out his problem. This is a delightful story about individuality and recognizing talent.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    The Art Lesson is the (sorta) autobiographical story of beloved illustrator and story-teller, Tomie dePaola. Fans of dePaola will not be disappointed with this charming tale of young Tommy, who knows he’s destined to be an artist. He’s given a big box of crayons for his birthday, but he’s bummed when he can’t use them at school. He waits all year to get lessons from a real art teacher, but is disappointed when he’s instructed do the same drawing as the rest of the class. Children and adults alik The Art Lesson is the (sorta) autobiographical story of beloved illustrator and story-teller, Tomie dePaola. Fans of dePaola will not be disappointed with this charming tale of young Tommy, who knows he’s destined to be an artist. He’s given a big box of crayons for his birthday, but he’s bummed when he can’t use them at school. He waits all year to get lessons from a real art teacher, but is disappointed when he’s instructed do the same drawing as the rest of the class. Children and adults alike will relate to dePaolo’s story and be glad to know that he persevered in achieving his dream, creating a delightful body of work and The Art Lesson is not to be missed.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Seems to be the tale of Tommie as a budding young artist. The pre k boy has a love of art and it's determined to be an artist. He is supported by his family but feels restricted by the lack of supplies and lessons at school. He ends up compromising with his teachers about how he can complete the lesson with the common supplies and yet have the opportunity to utilize his more advanced supplies as well. Teaching: - hard work leasing to profession - deferring to authority when desires are different Seems to be the tale of Tommie as a budding young artist. The pre k boy has a love of art and it's determined to be an artist. He is supported by his family but feels restricted by the lack of supplies and lessons at school. He ends up compromising with his teachers about how he can complete the lesson with the common supplies and yet have the opportunity to utilize his more advanced supplies as well. Teaching: - hard work leasing to profession - deferring to authority when desires are different from instruction - compromise - changes in school - children's focus translating to and leading to adult abilities

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ashlee Reed

    Age: Lower Elementary- (1st- 3rd) Genre: Autobiography Tomie dePaola wrote a cute story about how he became the artist that he is today. I really liked how her wrote it for children and and put it in the perspective that they would understand. I loved how the book showed passion and perseverance and following your heart. I think that this book could help teach these characteristics nicely. This is the type of autobiography I enjoy!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Allison Nicholas

    Primary Biographical Nonfiction I really like this book because it's a story of Tomie dePaola as a child. He both wrote and illustrated the book, which made it easy to see what was really going on inside his head. The book contains a valuable lesson that it's important to follow your dreams even when the people around you try to hold you back. I also liked that he included the ending so that you are able to see the happy ending - he grew up to follow his dreams and now is indeed an artist.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alissa Weiss

    Genre: Comtemporary Realistic Grade Level: Pre-K-K The Art Lesson will teach young children how to compromise and purse their dreams. Tommy is disappointed when his art teacher has the class merely copy pictures she is drawing. He wants to become an artist when he is older. His teacher encourages him to continue to create his own artwork after he has finished his art class assignment. The book also teaches adults to encourage children to pursue their areas of interest.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kaelin Miller

    This book is great in encouraging kids to follow their dreams in being an artist, or another occupation. I for one appreciate creativity and find it important to encourage kids to create whatever they want. If it's visual art, so be it. If it's any other creative art, that is great. I appreciate this book's encouragement of being creative and not copying teachers.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lara Lamb

    Little Tommy is a budding artist who marches to the best of his own drummer and likes to make art his own way, to follow his imagination. He is forced to follow a different set of rules while in an art class and has to learn how to keep his imagination but still follow the rules. It would be great to use in the classroom to describe how you can be creative but still following the rules.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

    Ages: 4 - 7 **Like my reviews? I also have hundreds of detailed reports that I offer too. These reports give a complete break-down of everything in the book, so you'll know just how clean it is or isn't. I also have Clean Guides (downloadable PDFs) which enable you to clean up your book before reading it! Visit my website: The Book Radar.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karli Hudson

    I liked this book! I thought it was an easy read that taught a good lesson about keeping one’s individuality and creativity in tact, while still following the rules. I enjoyed the ending of the book when Tommy and the teacher came to an agreement. I do with the text and images were a bit more exciting and engaging however.

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