counter create hit The New Global Student: Skip the SAT, Save Thousands on Tuition, and Get a Truly International Education - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The New Global Student: Skip the SAT, Save Thousands on Tuition, and Get a Truly International Education

Availability: Ready to download

Good-bye, Old School. Hello, Bold School! In 2005, Maya Frost and her husband sold everything and left their suburban American lifestyle behind in order to have an adventure abroad. The tricky part: they had to shepherd their four teenage daughters through high school and into college. This hilarious and conspiratorial how-to handbook describes the affordable, accessible, a Good-bye, Old School. Hello, Bold School! In 2005, Maya Frost and her husband sold everything and left their suburban American lifestyle behind in order to have an adventure abroad. The tricky part: they had to shepherd their four teenage daughters through high school and into college. This hilarious and conspiratorial how-to handbook describes the affordable, accessible, and stunningly advantageous options they stumbled upon that any American student can leverage to get an outrageously relevant global education. Ready to ditch the drama of the traditional hypercompetitive SAT/AP/GPA path? Meet the bold American students who are catapulting into the global economy at twenty with a red-hot college diploma, sizzling 21st-century skills, a blazing sense of direction–and no debt. You’ll discover: • the one thing preventing your student from blasting forward • why Advanced Placement isn’t so advanced • why international programs fail to provide a truly global education • the most critical time for your student to study abroad • the best exchange program in the world ($3,000 or less per year) • the strategic way to fast-forward through high school • how to maximize a family sabbatical • how to live the life of your dreams abroad–and save thousands for college Packed with myth-busting facts, laughable loopholes, insider insights, astonishing success stories, and poignant tales from the Frost daughters themselves, this inspiring romp is guaranteed to get you cheering.


Compare

Good-bye, Old School. Hello, Bold School! In 2005, Maya Frost and her husband sold everything and left their suburban American lifestyle behind in order to have an adventure abroad. The tricky part: they had to shepherd their four teenage daughters through high school and into college. This hilarious and conspiratorial how-to handbook describes the affordable, accessible, a Good-bye, Old School. Hello, Bold School! In 2005, Maya Frost and her husband sold everything and left their suburban American lifestyle behind in order to have an adventure abroad. The tricky part: they had to shepherd their four teenage daughters through high school and into college. This hilarious and conspiratorial how-to handbook describes the affordable, accessible, and stunningly advantageous options they stumbled upon that any American student can leverage to get an outrageously relevant global education. Ready to ditch the drama of the traditional hypercompetitive SAT/AP/GPA path? Meet the bold American students who are catapulting into the global economy at twenty with a red-hot college diploma, sizzling 21st-century skills, a blazing sense of direction–and no debt. You’ll discover: • the one thing preventing your student from blasting forward • why Advanced Placement isn’t so advanced • why international programs fail to provide a truly global education • the most critical time for your student to study abroad • the best exchange program in the world ($3,000 or less per year) • the strategic way to fast-forward through high school • how to maximize a family sabbatical • how to live the life of your dreams abroad–and save thousands for college Packed with myth-busting facts, laughable loopholes, insider insights, astonishing success stories, and poignant tales from the Frost daughters themselves, this inspiring romp is guaranteed to get you cheering.

30 review for The New Global Student: Skip the SAT, Save Thousands on Tuition, and Get a Truly International Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    As an avid and frequent traveler, and one who has set out on many independent research adventures abroad, I felt The New Global Student was a must read. While the writing style and layout was highly distracting, this book is filled with some worthwhile content and advice. Here are my assessments of the general strengths and weaknesses of the book, as well as my final takeaways. Strengths: As a fellow traveler, I admire Frost and her bold move to take her four teenage daughters abroad to give them As an avid and frequent traveler, and one who has set out on many independent research adventures abroad, I felt The New Global Student was a must read. While the writing style and layout was highly distracting, this book is filled with some worthwhile content and advice. Here are my assessments of the general strengths and weaknesses of the book, as well as my final takeaways. Strengths: As a fellow traveler, I admire Frost and her bold move to take her four teenage daughters abroad to give them unique experiences that ultimately led to positive outcomes. I love this family travel model, and I also appreciate her focus on learning and not just achievement, which is a problem I see in the traditional education system. I agree with her when she says we should be “helping our kids learn to deal with uncertainty” instead of “sheltering” them (7). This move towards self-directed learning is positive and something I would like to see more of, both in traditional classrooms and in study abroad programs, because I believe student engagement is at the heart of lasting and meaningful learning. Travel can be a catalyst in this process. Another point I agree with in this book is the importance of learning a language, which is not emphasized enough in traditional education. Frost says often schools teach language “in the name of “global education” (24), but these courses do not adequately prepare students to actually speak the language. They can even become meaningless, because often employers seek people who learned outside of the classroom (33). Immersing students in a host culture is a great way to help students authentically learn a language in a way they can use it in their futures. Chapter seven, “How to Save Thousands on College Study Abroad,” seemed most relevant to me and my experiences. I’m all for ditching the expensive “packaged study abroad programs” (24) promoted by universities in place of independent field studies or direct enrollments which allow students to bypass the middle man. By skipping out on this “cruise mentality” (181), students are able to absorb more of the culture, do more of the heavy lifting, engage in their learning, and reflect more deeply. It also helps when there are not dozens of other college students with them, sheltering their experience as they walk around in a giant comfort bubble. This sort of travel does not stand out to future employers or drastically change a student’s trajectory. As Frost put it, “Indie” students “know that they can duplicate the services included in most study abroad packages for a fraction of the cost” (207). Plus, we should be involving students in their own education if we want them to get excited about it (119). I agree, and I wish everyone knew one doesn’t have to fork up thousands of dollars to study internationally in college. Unique travel experiences, I have found, do equip students with useful tools, “critical skills” (89), and set them apart from other applicants. Frost backs this up with plenty of case studies of global students. As one of Frost’s exemplar students says, “studying abroad was more than experiencing a new culture. It helped me learn about my own capabilities and strengths” (128). For me, my independent travel experiences and directed readings courses in college gave me leadership and research qualifications that few of my friends who did traditional study abroad programs enjoyed. I feel it was my travel experiences in college that landed me a job right out of college with Teach For America and a free Master’s Degree from a reputable university. Some people mistakenly assume travel is a waste of time or a sign of an uncommitted mind, but I found it helped me launch ahead in my career, similar to Frost’s daughters. In addition to more self-directed learning, I am all for inquiry-based programs. Frost dropped lots of practical options for individuals from IB, CSA, Rotary, and various online organizations which provide resources for students looking to transition abroad. These lists are one of the greatest assets to the book. Weakness and Wonderings: One aspect about the book that I did not agree with was an assumption that students are dropping out of high school because they are just bored or freaked out by college. I have worked in urban schools and I can assure you that the reasons the majority of kids are dropping out of school has little to do with Frost’s thesis. There are many people who are not privileged enough to quit everything and live abroad the way the Frost family did because they lack the opportunities and resources. Encouraging kids to drop out, with the assumption that they all have the skills necessary to succeed in a community college, is not a stance I agree with. I still believe schools are tasked with ensuring students have the basic skills they need to be successful in college, and skipping this step should not be taken lightly. Not everyone has “an enormous amount of freedom to choose from a tantalizing smorgasbord of education options” (19). Also not every student can study abroad instead of “getting some pathetic summer job” (214), because many people actually need that job to get by. Another concern I find with Frost’s premise is found on the very first pages of the book. She states that there will be “no angst about competing with others” (xv) under this new approach, but I disagree. I think at the heart of her argument is the assumption that her model is superior. I recognize Frost has to sell her parent audience on the benefits of her international educational model, but I get the sense that Frost does feel her approach is wildly better than what the rest of people are doing. Skipping the SAT is a low bar for measuring whether or not students are competing for college and the future job market. It’s unavoidable, which is a main reason why Frost gave her daughters this unique opportunity—to make them competitive applicants. I also challenge Frost when she says that “the advantages of sending kids abroad during college pale in comparison to the advantages of sending kids abroad at a younger and more malleable age” (171). While this is her personal experience, I feel there is far too much emphasis on high school travel over the college ages, when students are more qualified and (hopefully) more mature later. I do not see any significant benefit to making this transition before college as opposed to later and appreciate the value of both. Even if I put my concerns about students not developing academic skills aside, I think many students may be better off in high school given their age and cognitive development. Frost continually brings up “missing prom” as the only real reason to regret not attending traditional high school, ignoring the value of the traditional model. Developmentally, not all high school students may be ready to jump into a foreign country or start college. I’m also put off by Frost’s disdain for AP classes. At their core, AP classes are more rigorous courses for students to prepare for college, even if universities no longer accept them for credit. Frost seems hyper concerned about credits at the expense of important content. Final Thoughts: I think Frost is onto something, despite the questions I have about some of her arguments. I firmly believe meaningful travel experiences prepare students for the future in ways a typical classroom cannot. We cannot look to the traditional education model to solve our problems or prepare us for life after college the way we could have decades ago. We must also look outside. However, travel is not a substitute for a foundational education, nor do I think it replaces the importance of content often learned in a classroom. By all means, do what you can to engage students through learner-owned education and self-directed learning because they will ultimately take the wheel and run with it, but at the same time do not assume you can drop any struggling student in Kenya and expect her to come back ready to enter college at the age of 15. With all that said, I am grateful for another needed voice about the tangible benefits of pursuing an international education. For me it has been the most transformative education I’ve ever received.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    This book is well worth reading if you have children to educate or if you are a high school or college student ready for an international experience. The author is a great advocate for sending your kids abroad to study during high school or college, but she didn't need to convince me. I have sent both my children abroad multiple times, and we have hosted many exchange students. There are a lot of different inexpensive and scholarship-paid ways for students to do this and the author gives good re This book is well worth reading if you have children to educate or if you are a high school or college student ready for an international experience. The author is a great advocate for sending your kids abroad to study during high school or college, but she didn't need to convince me. I have sent both my children abroad multiple times, and we have hosted many exchange students. There are a lot of different inexpensive and scholarship-paid ways for students to do this and the author gives good resources. Her advice is to go early, "go solo, go long, and go deep." I totally agree that students should be immersed and navigating on their own without the typical American study abroad program which is no better than an expensive vacation and excuse to party internationally with other American students. The author describes them as "the high-end cruise option designed for those who value comfort, structured activities, and simple choices." She gives a lot of advice on how to create personalized study-abroad experiences to save money and ensure an authentic experience. I believe even the family vacation can be planned in this vain as well. The author also makes a case for study abroad programs being just the thing to motivate unengaged, quasi-motivated high schoolers who perhaps have not felt challenged in their high school setting. She has seen cases of the international experience lighting a fire for them and changing their whole outlook on life. She also makes the case for how inexpensive going to college internationally can be if you arrange it yourself and arrange for transfer credit. She provides lots of internet tips for making local connections before arriving which can help with housing, orienting, and making friends. Lastly, I appreciated her encouraging adults and families, especially those with small children to consider international sabbaticals or moves. Her own family found they could live much, much cheaper in Mexico and Argentina than in the US, which allowed them to save for college and enjoy a more simple, family-centered lifestyle. So, if you have a job that could possibly be done remotely and you have the adventure bug for yourself or your children, this book can convince you it is possible. She undervalues an ivy league education which I obviously disagree with, but her anti-establishment approach will be refreshing and more importantly, affordable, to many.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tamara York

    A fantastic practical book for families interested in international travel. It details how to do year long foreign exchange in high school, study abroad for less in college, and move abroad as a family. This book has me planning a family sabbatical to Greece. Highly recommend for wanderlust families.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marcie

    The writing was okay and the book could have used a better editor (the layout was really distracting) but I liked the subject matter and felt the author had a lot of good ideas on how to get a college education and live abroad on a budget.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    I don't even remember exactly how I first happened upon one of Maya Frost's websites, but when I did I immediately took note of her name because I had taken a couple classes with 2 of her daughters when I studied abroad in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 2007 and remembered Tara talking a little about her mom's work (this was when most of the family was living in Buenos Aires). I am so glad to have met Tara and Teal and learned of Maya's work because it is wonderful. I cannot recommend this book highl I don't even remember exactly how I first happened upon one of Maya Frost's websites, but when I did I immediately took note of her name because I had taken a couple classes with 2 of her daughters when I studied abroad in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 2007 and remembered Tara talking a little about her mom's work (this was when most of the family was living in Buenos Aires). I am so glad to have met Tara and Teal and learned of Maya's work because it is wonderful. I cannot recommend this book highly enough for pretty much anyone--but especially for parents of children not yet in high school and middle or high school students. I wish every parent and high school guidance counselor were required to read this book. Maya does a fantastic job of presenting a holistic persuasion for getting a cheaper, enriching, and incomparable global education. She tackles several common and significant concerns with honest transparency (anecdotes from her family's own experiences) and a wonderful sprinkling of humor amid her conversational tone that makes it feel as though you are simply discussing the matters with her over coffee. But she also provides plenty of evidence, support, and references to help get someone started along the path to an exciting and rewarding "alternative" future education. Having experienced a small taste of education abroad and seeing a unique attitude toward life and education in 2 of her daughters with whom I took those classes, I am convinced that Maya has not only written well about these topics but has done so because she has been there and witnessed first-hand the benefits of immersion and education abroad. She is well-qualified to speak to this increasingly-crucial topic, and I am very glad she has.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I'm having a hard time articulating why I liked this book so much. I think it's partly because Maya Frost brings a winsome, hopeful authorial "voice" to the topic of alternatives in education. She presents her ideas in a way that is accessible to someone who's never really considered alternatives to the contemporary high school "rat race" to do well on the SAT and get into a good college, and she does it in a way that allays fears. Yet her ideas are substantial enough to give a veteran "alternat I'm having a hard time articulating why I liked this book so much. I think it's partly because Maya Frost brings a winsome, hopeful authorial "voice" to the topic of alternatives in education. She presents her ideas in a way that is accessible to someone who's never really considered alternatives to the contemporary high school "rat race" to do well on the SAT and get into a good college, and she does it in a way that allays fears. Yet her ideas are substantial enough to give a veteran "alternative schooler" food for thought. And I really like her winning "Old School vs. Bold School" framing of the whole issue. Her emphasis is on authentic, not-outrageously-expensive global experiences for teens, but she doesn't lose sight of the fact that everyone will have different needs. Her audience is definitely middle-class to upper-middle-class parents, and some might criticize her for that, but she makes the point that you don't necessarily have to have a bunch of money in order to have global experiences. I enjoy her personal ancedotes based on her own family's experience, but she does a good job of incorporating other voices so that it isn't just a memoir.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This was an interesting book. It probably could have been a very good website instead, which reminds me, I need to google it and see if it exists. This really didn't need to be a book, but whatever. It was how your kid could have a really good international education and life without breaking the bank. She bragged about her own kids a littttttle too much for my liking. But otherwise, there were some very good tips out there, tips I wish knew existed when I was a kid because maybe I would have ta This was an interesting book. It probably could have been a very good website instead, which reminds me, I need to google it and see if it exists. This really didn't need to be a book, but whatever. It was how your kid could have a really good international education and life without breaking the bank. She bragged about her own kids a littttttle too much for my liking. But otherwise, there were some very good tips out there, tips I wish knew existed when I was a kid because maybe I would have taken advantage of them instead of slumming it out in my own hell. Or I would have done what I ended up doing, which was nothing. Who knows! All I have to say, is it takes a really really special kid to do what is written about in this book. Though the parts on studying abroad in college where really interesting and just so so true. It's a business. Avoid the business and do it cheap. More work, but well worth it. Some things I agreed with and some I didn't, but that is life! Definitely for parents of smart, motivated (or not) kids. Different is good!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    A well written, informative, and above all encouraging book on how to prepare your (American) teenager to be successful as a young adult in a multicultural world, with lots of useful insights and tips into how to get around the rat race of preparing for an American university education, save money, and gain useful experience and practical skills. The advice in this book is definitely not for everybody, but I can see how for the right kid the author's suggestions could really turn out well. I wou A well written, informative, and above all encouraging book on how to prepare your (American) teenager to be successful as a young adult in a multicultural world, with lots of useful insights and tips into how to get around the rat race of preparing for an American university education, save money, and gain useful experience and practical skills. The advice in this book is definitely not for everybody, but I can see how for the right kid the author's suggestions could really turn out well. I would have given 4 stars, except that the book is getting a little old (published about a decade ago), and therefore deserves an update-- that said, I doubt that many of the trends in college prep or the typical American high school experience have changed much, so the overall advice is still well worth considering, even if it would probably be wise to double check some of the data presented to see if they have changed.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Katya Ivanenko

    This book was extremely helpful because as a high school student looking to go abroad, I wasn't sure whether that was what I really wanted. This ended up being a very informative book, and even though the writing was a bit dry, I now feel as if there is a different path I can take. I though Maya Frost provided a very strong argument, and I think that anyone who has doubts on going abroad should read this. This book was extremely helpful because as a high school student looking to go abroad, I wasn't sure whether that was what I really wanted. This ended up being a very informative book, and even though the writing was a bit dry, I now feel as if there is a different path I can take. I though Maya Frost provided a very strong argument, and I think that anyone who has doubts on going abroad should read this.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Several good and interesting ideas in this book. Overall, I thought there was too much cheerleading and admonition for why a family would consider a more global education. Most people reading this book will already be convinced of the "why" and are looking for more resources and ideas about how. Several good and interesting ideas in this book. Overall, I thought there was too much cheerleading and admonition for why a family would consider a more global education. Most people reading this book will already be convinced of the "why" and are looking for more resources and ideas about how.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Ellingson

    Great info - would love to see an update since this was published in 2009. Maya Frost used to live in the area here in Washington County. I remember attending a mindfulness meditation series she taught at Hawthorne Farm Athletic club before her family made the move overseas.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nathalia Rojas.

    It contains some helpful tidbits but it’s contained within a lot of rambling. THe author could be more organized and succinct. The book also needs updating. Main thing I got out of it: Create your own study abroad program. To volunteer abroad, just ask organizations there instead of paying $1000+

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kris Irvin

    In the beginning, I was enthused to read this book. My son is only 6, so I have a while till I really need to get "concerned" about PSATS and AP classes and all that jazz. So I was reading this to kind of get a head-start. Make a plan in advance and all that jazz. While this book does have a lot of useful information, much of it has been outdated since it was published. While 7 years ago it was uncommon for high schoolers to get on the fast-track to college, now, at least in my state, it's much In the beginning, I was enthused to read this book. My son is only 6, so I have a while till I really need to get "concerned" about PSATS and AP classes and all that jazz. So I was reading this to kind of get a head-start. Make a plan in advance and all that jazz. While this book does have a lot of useful information, much of it has been outdated since it was published. While 7 years ago it was uncommon for high schoolers to get on the fast-track to college, now, at least in my state, it's much more feasible. I graduated with my Associate's degree when I was 17. I used a combination of AP classes, concurrent enrollment (taking college classes and getting high school credit for them) and distance learning (taking college classes through the Internet while physically at my high school.) My most impressive claim to fame? I did two years of college in my senior year of high school. I kicked ass, and I am proud of it. that said, DANG do I wish this book had been around when I was a teenager. I would have killed to study abroad, but my parents wouldn't let me do foreign exchange for fear it would mess up my ... life? Okay. Now there's that. The problem I had with this book is not that the information is becoming outdated. No no. The problem is that I got tired of the tone of the writing. Over and over again it insinuated that doing high school the traditional way is stupid. Let's get something clear. Doing high school the traditional way? Not stupid. Not, perhaps, impressive. But in no way is it something that will fail you in your life. When I think back on high school, I wish I had been able to get the normal experience sometimes. It would have been nice to enter college as a real freshman, rather than a 17 year old junior who had no idea what she wanted to do with her life (I subsequently dropped out and am only now able to finish my degree at the age of 27, with a husband and a child in tow.) So props for those who do it traditionally. I think I would have liked this book if it just hadn't been for the consistently snide tone. The reality is, things are going to change so much in the few years I have until my son enters high school that this book was almost no help to me whatsoever (apart from showing me how freaking cool it would have been if my parents would have sent me abroad!) That said, there was a chapter at the end about how to go abroad as an adult, with kids. It was mostly talking about taking sabbaticals abroad, which don't apply to me, but there were some incredibly useful paragraphs for those who may be seeking a Master's degree. I had no idea it was possibly to get one from an accredited university - IN ENGLISH - while living in a non-English speaking country. So there you have it. Read this book, but don't expect it to be SUPER helpful. It may be a little helpful. It may not. Meanwhile, I'll be over here applying like crazy for Master's degree programs in Spanish speaking countries. Adios!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eva Thieme

    I've lived as an expat and sent my kids to a school abroad, so I could relate very well to Maya Frost's message. But I consider it a good read for anyone with children approaching college age, or really anyone with children at all. The New Global Student's message is that we should strive to raise our kids to "surge ahead with flaming enthusiasm and red-hot qualifications for life (and work) in the global economy." That a typical high school education in the U.S.and the inevitable college prep r I've lived as an expat and sent my kids to a school abroad, so I could relate very well to Maya Frost's message. But I consider it a good read for anyone with children approaching college age, or really anyone with children at all. The New Global Student's message is that we should strive to raise our kids to "surge ahead with flaming enthusiasm and red-hot qualifications for life (and work) in the global economy." That a typical high school education in the U.S.and the inevitable college prep rat race that goes with it is not only insufficient but also not really necessary. That we as parents can avoid the stress of the "traditional hypercompetitive path to that golden university diploma" as well as save a lot of money in the process. That what we need today is "bold school," not "old school." The New Global Student is a fast and at times very entertaining read, due to Maya Frost's cheerful prose and frequent admonishments. It can come across a bit preachy and might leave you feeling totally inadequate for not packing up and moving your children to a local school in the Peruvian Andes, or perhaps circumnavigating the globe on a sailboat, but if you're able to get past that, you'll come away with some valuable new thoughts on education and whether your family really wants to or needs to join what Frost calls the "rat-race of SAT prep courses." I would have given it five stars but I think it mostly applies to American readers due to the heavy focus on the American education system and alternative ways of navigating it. A European or Asian reader might not find it as useful. Nevertheless, it is more than a book just on education. It goes to the core of parenting and what it is we raise our kids for. Read more...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Afton

    Wow. This book was one of the most exciting and intriguing that I’ve read. It made me doubt, consider, fear, hope, dream, and shout for joy! I can’t believe how inspired I am to send my kids off to a foreign country as exchange students, and possibly to pick up and move my whole family abroad. Maya Frost is so down to earth, openly honest, understanding, and hilarious. She gives every parent a “heart-shaped permission slip to do things differently.” (Frost, p. 298) Isn’t that wonderful? I think th Wow. This book was one of the most exciting and intriguing that I’ve read. It made me doubt, consider, fear, hope, dream, and shout for joy! I can’t believe how inspired I am to send my kids off to a foreign country as exchange students, and possibly to pick up and move my whole family abroad. Maya Frost is so down to earth, openly honest, understanding, and hilarious. She gives every parent a “heart-shaped permission slip to do things differently.” (Frost, p. 298) Isn’t that wonderful? I think that’s one reason I loved it so much. My new thing has been to do things differently. I’ve been way inspired by people who do things differently and who find so much joy and fulfillment in breaking from the norm, ceasing to let societal expectations rule their life, and discovering and pursuing their true passions. “The New Global Student” shares tons of personal stories from students who have studied abroad through Foreign Youth Exchange and through independent study abroad. The stories are fascinating and incredible, though not unrealistic or exceptional. Maya’s experiences living abroad with her four daughters are insightful and humorous and they present the real challenges that her family faced, as well as the real successes. I’m inspired. I wish everyone with or without children would read this book: it opens your eyes to a whole new possibility that is liberating and fascinating.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Gillespie

    Maya Frost calls foul on our cultural tendency to helicopter parent, and presents a counter-cultural view on high school and college-aged kids in her intriguing book The New Global Student. Frost challenges myths about what teenagers are capable of, what really gets kids into college, and what the point of education is anyway. I found myself simultaneously saying, “Preach it, sister!” and “Whoa, I never thought of that.” In other words, it’s the best sort of book–thoughtful, insightful, and convi Maya Frost calls foul on our cultural tendency to helicopter parent, and presents a counter-cultural view on high school and college-aged kids in her intriguing book The New Global Student. Frost challenges myths about what teenagers are capable of, what really gets kids into college, and what the point of education is anyway. I found myself simultaneously saying, “Preach it, sister!” and “Whoa, I never thought of that.” In other words, it’s the best sort of book–thoughtful, insightful, and convicting. While I don’t think that all of Frost’s ideas are applicable to our family, many of them bear serious consideration and I find myself thinking through options in a different light thanks to reading The New Global Student. Whether you homeschool or send your kids to public or private school, this book will give you a lot to think about as you head into teenage years and I highly recommend it for all parents. {Read my full review at A Spirited Mind}

  17. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Highly recommended for teens who want to go abroad and need to persuade reluctant parents, or parents who are wondering about the benefits to their children of having international experiences. However, if you already studied and lived abroad during or shortly after high school or college, you may not find enough substance in this to warrant purchasing it. In the end I found a few websites I want to explore, but the bulk of the book was devoted to allaying people's fears about the supposedly dir Highly recommended for teens who want to go abroad and need to persuade reluctant parents, or parents who are wondering about the benefits to their children of having international experiences. However, if you already studied and lived abroad during or shortly after high school or college, you may not find enough substance in this to warrant purchasing it. In the end I found a few websites I want to explore, but the bulk of the book was devoted to allaying people's fears about the supposedly dire consequences of interrupting a traditional US education to go overseas, as well as relaying anecdotes of successful young people who went abroad. I felt those arguments could have been condensed into the first chapter or two, leaving the rest of the book for more concrete details about specific organizations, etc. Still, it would be an excellent book to hand to xenophobic skeptics.

  18. 4 out of 5

    William Lawrence

    Adventurous with positive results, though the conclusion of this book is yet to be written (the effects on her children and their children). Lots of great information on the alternatives. Still I see too radical sides fighting over American education. One side is saying tests, tests, and more tests need to be administered to improve students. The other side is saying tests, or even knowledge and memory for that matter, won't do a thing to improve education. Frost falls into the latter group. As Adventurous with positive results, though the conclusion of this book is yet to be written (the effects on her children and their children). Lots of great information on the alternatives. Still I see too radical sides fighting over American education. One side is saying tests, tests, and more tests need to be administered to improve students. The other side is saying tests, or even knowledge and memory for that matter, won't do a thing to improve education. Frost falls into the latter group. As much as I agree with her on the dangers (and corruption) of testing, I can't say her alternative is the answer. The best part of this book, other than her family accomplishments, is the investigative research into the College Board and ETS. This is what saves the book for me. Frost should consider another book just focusing in on the research that disputes these standardized tests.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susannah Skyer Gupta

    Reading this book synched up with my honors student son (age 13) announcing that he had "always" wanted to attend our local university, one which I heretofore thought of as fairly lackluster. Despite the title, the book encompasses more than just study abroad -- it challenges parents to look at many different paths through high school and college, including GED, community college, dual enrollment, the local (versus "name brand") university, and of course, study abroad. This strikes me as an espe Reading this book synched up with my honors student son (age 13) announcing that he had "always" wanted to attend our local university, one which I heretofore thought of as fairly lackluster. Despite the title, the book encompasses more than just study abroad -- it challenges parents to look at many different paths through high school and college, including GED, community college, dual enrollment, the local (versus "name brand") university, and of course, study abroad. This strikes me as an especially timely book against the current, chilling, backdrop of financial collapse in public education. New Mexicans, that lottery scholarship sure is looking good. Wonder if it will be around in four years?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cameo

    If you have the travel bug and want to get out of the U.S. and experience life abroad, and if you want this for your children as well, then this is the book for you. It is a great book full of really good ideas and tips on how to help your kids get a good education and skip over the meaningless hoops and hurdles that are often in the way. The author is definitely biased towards living overseas and makes it very clear that she thinks the way she has done things for herself and her kids is the bes If you have the travel bug and want to get out of the U.S. and experience life abroad, and if you want this for your children as well, then this is the book for you. It is a great book full of really good ideas and tips on how to help your kids get a good education and skip over the meaningless hoops and hurdles that are often in the way. The author is definitely biased towards living overseas and makes it very clear that she thinks the way she has done things for herself and her kids is the best way of doing things and any other attempts are inferior. That was probably the one thing I didn't like about the book, but other than that there are definitely some tips and ideas that I will take from the book and incorporate.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

    While I can't claim to have read every word in this book I did skim through the first portion. It doesn't apply exactly to me or my younger children yet so I focused on chapters 8 and 9. We educate our four children at home and I am very eager to help develop their minds beyond just the American experience. I hope to share my passion for all people and for traveling with my family. This book was encouraging and insightful. The author was honest about living abroad not always being easy but I mig While I can't claim to have read every word in this book I did skim through the first portion. It doesn't apply exactly to me or my younger children yet so I focused on chapters 8 and 9. We educate our four children at home and I am very eager to help develop their minds beyond just the American experience. I hope to share my passion for all people and for traveling with my family. This book was encouraging and insightful. The author was honest about living abroad not always being easy but I might add neither would staying "home". Life has its challenges whether you live in your native country or not! There are many benefits to engaging with others and new cultures.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Maya Frost is a wise, witty guide with innovative ideas for global education. She explains her "Bold School" approach: WHY a substantial, immersive international experience before age 20 transforms students' brains as it creates global citizens. And she provides many ideas about HOW to create such an opportunity, safely and inexpensively. While practical tips abound, this is a guide about living with passion and without fear as much as it is about education and travel. [Read my complete review:] Maya Frost is a wise, witty guide with innovative ideas for global education. She explains her "Bold School" approach: WHY a substantial, immersive international experience before age 20 transforms students' brains as it creates global citizens. And she provides many ideas about HOW to create such an opportunity, safely and inexpensively. While practical tips abound, this is a guide about living with passion and without fear as much as it is about education and travel. [Read my complete review:]

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jane Dugger

    Where was this book when I was in high school? (Don't forget hindsight is 20/20.) Wow - what a great concept for students who are bored in high school: take classes at the community college for dual credit, do a study abroad while in high school, finish up your core requirements online or at the CC THEN transfer in to a university. Read this if you have kids. Read this if you are curious about alternate options other than traditional high school. Read this if you thought the SAT & ACT are/were a j Where was this book when I was in high school? (Don't forget hindsight is 20/20.) Wow - what a great concept for students who are bored in high school: take classes at the community college for dual credit, do a study abroad while in high school, finish up your core requirements online or at the CC THEN transfer in to a university. Read this if you have kids. Read this if you are curious about alternate options other than traditional high school. Read this if you thought the SAT & ACT are/were a joke. Read this if you want to broaden your thinking about education options.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cat Chiappa

    This is an incredibly thought provoking book and one that all parents should read. While I don't agree with everything the author has to say, she does make some very insightful and interesting points about how to raise a well-informed global student and there are a lots of great resources to check out for futher reading and reaseach. Not everything in the book will be for everyone or every child, but I think that all children and citizens of this country could benefit from some time abroad in so This is an incredibly thought provoking book and one that all parents should read. While I don't agree with everything the author has to say, she does make some very insightful and interesting points about how to raise a well-informed global student and there are a lots of great resources to check out for futher reading and reaseach. Not everything in the book will be for everyone or every child, but I think that all children and citizens of this country could benefit from some time abroad in some form whether it be as a precocious child, an angsty teen, or an adult of any age.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    This book is awesome. I'm thankful to have read it now while my kids are young. There are so many options for our children that I want to look into. I'm really interested in exchange programs and the author has put together thorough and helpful resources. Anyone interested in education options and who are looking for ways to support their child's development as they get older should consider this book. This book is awesome. I'm thankful to have read it now while my kids are young. There are so many options for our children that I want to look into. I'm really interested in exchange programs and the author has put together thorough and helpful resources. Anyone interested in education options and who are looking for ways to support their child's development as they get older should consider this book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ac

    Poor writing, I felt it read like an advertisement. But the content was interesting enough for me to keep reading. There was quite a bit of useful information in there, but I don't feel I could lend it to a friend or recommend it because it is too "rah rah." So it's great for people who are already convinced of her ideas, but I feel it would be overwhelming or threatening to someone who has a more traditional outlook--the kind of person who really needs to hear what the author has to say. Poor writing, I felt it read like an advertisement. But the content was interesting enough for me to keep reading. There was quite a bit of useful information in there, but I don't feel I could lend it to a friend or recommend it because it is too "rah rah." So it's great for people who are already convinced of her ideas, but I feel it would be overwhelming or threatening to someone who has a more traditional outlook--the kind of person who really needs to hear what the author has to say.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jmtm35

    Wow! So speaks to me - and Jon! Alternative education and global - I devoured this book in basically one evening - then started crunching numbers! Geared towards junior and high school students but still relevant - thinking ahead. I have already forwarned my toddler and first grader that we are doing things a little different... they giggled. :)

  28. 5 out of 5

    The Hofs

    LOVED this book. A unique perspective to the schooling vs. education dilemma that is always battling in my mind. Not written from a Christian or homeschooling perspective but not contrary to it at all. Full of resources and tips for those willing to take the leap of faith. Im totally game! I would write more but I need to start packing up the contents of my house!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    What an inspiring book. It is the ideas behind books like this that steered us towards homeschooling. The specifics of how we can experience the world with our children at many ages supported my sense of all that homeschooling could be for our family.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Denice

    Admittedly, I am not a high school student, nor do I have children, but I am interested in alternative education and international education, so it was interesting to hear some of the stories of the benefits and how it could be done.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.