counter create hit The Courts of Love - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Courts of Love

Availability: Ready to download

When I look back over my long and tempestuous life, I can see that much of what happened to me - my triumphs and most of my misfortunes - was due to my passionate relationships with men. I was a woman who considered herself their equal—and in many ways their superior—but it seemed that I depended on them, while seeking to be the dominant partner—an attitude which could har When I look back over my long and tempestuous life, I can see that much of what happened to me - my triumphs and most of my misfortunes - was due to my passionate relationships with men. I was a woman who considered herself their equal—and in many ways their superior—but it seemed that I depended on them, while seeking to be the dominant partner—an attitude which could hardly be expected to bring about a harmonious existence. Eleanor of Aquitaine was revered for her superior intellect, extraordinary courage, and fierce loyalty. She was equally famous for her turbulent relationships, which included marriages to the kings of both France and England. As a child, Eleanor reveled in her beloved grandfather’s Courts of Love, where troubadours sang of romantic devotion and passion filled the air. In 1137, at the age of fifteen, Eleanor became Duchess of Aquitaine, the richest province in Europe. A union with Louis VII allowed her to ascend the French throne, yet he was a tepid and possessive man and no match for a young woman raised in the Courts of Love. When Eleanor met the magnetic Henry II, the first Plantagenet King of England, their stormy pairing set great change in motion—and produced many sons and daughters, two of whom would one day reign in their own right. In this majestic and sweeping story, set against a backdrop of medieval politics, intrigue, and strife, Jean Plaidy weaves a tapestry of love, passion, betrayal, and heartbreak—and reveals the life of a most remarkable woman whose iron will and political savvy enabled her to hold her own against the most powerful men of her time.


Compare

When I look back over my long and tempestuous life, I can see that much of what happened to me - my triumphs and most of my misfortunes - was due to my passionate relationships with men. I was a woman who considered herself their equal—and in many ways their superior—but it seemed that I depended on them, while seeking to be the dominant partner—an attitude which could har When I look back over my long and tempestuous life, I can see that much of what happened to me - my triumphs and most of my misfortunes - was due to my passionate relationships with men. I was a woman who considered herself their equal—and in many ways their superior—but it seemed that I depended on them, while seeking to be the dominant partner—an attitude which could hardly be expected to bring about a harmonious existence. Eleanor of Aquitaine was revered for her superior intellect, extraordinary courage, and fierce loyalty. She was equally famous for her turbulent relationships, which included marriages to the kings of both France and England. As a child, Eleanor reveled in her beloved grandfather’s Courts of Love, where troubadours sang of romantic devotion and passion filled the air. In 1137, at the age of fifteen, Eleanor became Duchess of Aquitaine, the richest province in Europe. A union with Louis VII allowed her to ascend the French throne, yet he was a tepid and possessive man and no match for a young woman raised in the Courts of Love. When Eleanor met the magnetic Henry II, the first Plantagenet King of England, their stormy pairing set great change in motion—and produced many sons and daughters, two of whom would one day reign in their own right. In this majestic and sweeping story, set against a backdrop of medieval politics, intrigue, and strife, Jean Plaidy weaves a tapestry of love, passion, betrayal, and heartbreak—and reveals the life of a most remarkable woman whose iron will and political savvy enabled her to hold her own against the most powerful men of her time.

30 review for The Courts of Love

  1. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    I kind of liked this, but not enough. This was different than I thought. It's not a romance, which is a good thing. This was more historical fiction which I liked too. However, a lot of it is war and politics, I expected that, but it got boring at times. This book is about Eleanor of Aquitaine which sparked my interest thanks to Robin Hood. I enjoy learning about that family, but finding not in in fiction. Rather read non-fiction about them. For a well researched book that cites it's sources at t I kind of liked this, but not enough. This was different than I thought. It's not a romance, which is a good thing. This was more historical fiction which I liked too. However, a lot of it is war and politics, I expected that, but it got boring at times. This book is about Eleanor of Aquitaine which sparked my interest thanks to Robin Hood. I enjoy learning about that family, but finding not in in fiction. Rather read non-fiction about them. For a well researched book that cites it's sources at the end, they seemed to romanticize parts. At least Plaidy isn't a bad writer. I might read her other books, but not a fan.

  2. 5 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    This is a pretty nice and thick book, a histfic autobiography told from the view of Eleanor of Aquitaine. This is my first novel from this author, and I'm always a little wary of fictional autobiographies of real-life people, but Plaidy does weave an entertaining story that is backed by plenty of historical research. This is a pretty nice and thick book, a histfic autobiography told from the view of Eleanor of Aquitaine. This is my first novel from this author, and I'm always a little wary of fictional autobiographies of real-life people, but Plaidy does weave an entertaining story that is backed by plenty of historical research.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessie

    If you're looking for an easy read, and some historical fiction that's predominately fiction, than this is the book for you. But I appreciate a lot more historical accuracy in my books, so I was sadly disappointed. I've already read a few books about Eleanor and the early Plantagenet kings, which I'm sure skewed my impression of this book compared to readers who are coming to the tale for the first time. First off, I absolutely loathed Plaidy's use of the first-person narration - a sort of reminis If you're looking for an easy read, and some historical fiction that's predominately fiction, than this is the book for you. But I appreciate a lot more historical accuracy in my books, so I was sadly disappointed. I've already read a few books about Eleanor and the early Plantagenet kings, which I'm sure skewed my impression of this book compared to readers who are coming to the tale for the first time. First off, I absolutely loathed Plaidy's use of the first-person narration - a sort of reminiscing inner dialogue from an older Eleanor's point of view. Historical fiction always takes some liberties with the day-to-day events and dialogues of the story, but by adding Eleanor's thoughts, feelings, and emotions - as if we were in her own mind - really seemed to misrepresent the actual woman. The personal narration is very simple and juvenile, which makes sense in the early chapters while Eleanor was still young, but it never matures as the woman herself would have. There's a significant amount of banal repetition, particularly in the later half of the book - for instance, Eleanor's reiteration of what her children were like and how much they loved her over Henry. And finally, Plaidy noticeably skews this inner monologue of a medieval royal woman with far too much modern feminism and perspective. Secondly, Plaidy plays fast and loose with a LOT of the aspects of this historical record. I think good historical fiction needs to "stick to the facts" and then fill in the spaces with plausible day-to-day moments. But Plaidy doesn't just introduce generally disproved historical "facts," she overdevelops and overemphasizes them. Eleanor's supposed affair with Raymond (generally not accepted by modern historians) is given a back story, plus half a chapter of sordid details, plus repeated remembrances - used to explain some of Eleanor's future thoughts and actions. All completely fictitious. Same with putting the bastard Geoffrey's birth after Henry & Eleanor's marriage when it really was BEFORE their marriage. And even little things like mis-titling William Marshal as Earl of Pembroke on his first introduction when at that time he was still a landless knight. Or weaving so much intrigue into Richard's homosexual (or bisexual) inclinations or activities when that's based on incredibly flimsy evidence. It was a light, well-paced read. I can see why many people have enjoyed it. But it just wasn't something that I could recommend to others.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth(The Book Whisperer)

    Amazing, epic and beautiful. Eleanor of Aquitaine is one of my favorite historical figures and this book did not disappoint in bringing her story to life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mimi

    Jean Plaidy, and all of Hibbert's iterations, have been a touchstone author for me. One that I will return to often, picked up throughout my reading life, and have always enjoyed. I love Eleanor and remember reading this one in my early marriage, but it has been a long time. Always enjoyable and this was the perfect snow day (week, year...) read. Jean Plaidy, and all of Hibbert's iterations, have been a touchstone author for me. One that I will return to often, picked up throughout my reading life, and have always enjoyed. I love Eleanor and remember reading this one in my early marriage, but it has been a long time. Always enjoyable and this was the perfect snow day (week, year...) read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brittni

    I've read two other Jean Plaidy novels before and decided my next one, and the rest from then on, should be read in historical order. She's written so many books and some are in print in one country but not in another, or are by different titles, so most Jean Plaidy lists compiled by historical order are a little muddled. This is the one I found to be first historically. I didn't enjoy this nearly as much as the other two I've read so far. At times the narrative seemed choppy. Some of this might I've read two other Jean Plaidy novels before and decided my next one, and the rest from then on, should be read in historical order. She's written so many books and some are in print in one country but not in another, or are by different titles, so most Jean Plaidy lists compiled by historical order are a little muddled. This is the one I found to be first historically. I didn't enjoy this nearly as much as the other two I've read so far. At times the narrative seemed choppy. Some of this might be attributed to it being written in Eleanor's point of view, not as the events happen, but in looking back. Some of the events which happened to others in her life were ones she wasn't actually present at, but they had to be recounted in the book so as not to leave out important points. So there's many instances where we have Eleanor saying "I imagine this must've been what he said and how he reacted". The telling of events becomes more complicated when the narrator herself is imprisoned for six years, so all important events occur without Eleanor herself. This book seems to cut from one instance to as though just throwing out facts instead of making a story with them. To me, Eleanor herself wasn't a very likeable personality in the book. Though her strength is certainly admirable, and her understanding of politics, she's also brash and shallow. Pleasure is her sole interest in life, whether through sex or fine clothing. She wants self-gratification and isn't concerned with morals...which though somewhat a nice surprise (since we all tend to just wrongly assume people were uptight in older days), she throws herself into what she wants without a concern for how it'd affect others. Mostly am just talking about when she cheats on her first husband, first with her married uncle and then with Henry. Her husband was faithful to marriage, meanwhile. Granted, she wasn't getting what she wanted out of the marriage and from the way other marriages were spoken of in this book, it seemed that most of the people weren't monogamous, probably because they didn't have their choice of spouses to begin with. So while I understand that, I don't find it an excuse to break the sanctity of marriage for the sake of having a better bed partner. Beyond that, I didn't get an overall feel of her personality. I gleaned her characteristics, but it seemed like something was incongruous about it, because it's like what makes her personality interesting near the beginning falls away once she marries Henry. The book stops being about her and becomes about the events of the people in her life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

    English history intrigues me so I greatly injoyed this book about Eleanor of Acquitaine, who lived in the 12 century during a fascinating period - when the Church was even more powerful than kings and when going off on crusades to save the Holy Land was considered the height of glory. Eleanor was a gutsy lady - way ahead of her time - who sounds like she would have done very well living in the 21st century instead of the 12th. But nevertheless she managed to make quite a mark for herself as it w English history intrigues me so I greatly injoyed this book about Eleanor of Acquitaine, who lived in the 12 century during a fascinating period - when the Church was even more powerful than kings and when going off on crusades to save the Holy Land was considered the height of glory. Eleanor was a gutsy lady - way ahead of her time - who sounds like she would have done very well living in the 21st century instead of the 12th. But nevertheless she managed to make quite a mark for herself as it was - married to two kings (Louis VII of France and Henry II of England) and mother of two more (Richard the Lion-hearted and John.) She had nine children and had most of them taken away while they were very young to be raised elsewhere because their betrothals -and in some cases their weddings -took place purely for political reasons. Although this book was a novel, it was carefully researched (The bibliography alone took up two full pages)and appeared to stick pretty closely to the facts without a lot of embellishment. Which makes sense. The period itself was colorful enough and so was Eleanor's life. No need to make up plots and invent details when what really happened was so fascinating.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    This was the first book by this author that I read and I loved it! There is very little in the way of historical fiction that deals with the reigns of early Kings of England, except King Arthur. This focuses on the wife of Henry I, Eleanor of Aquitaine. It follows her life from her first marriage to the King of France through her extremely tumultuous marriage to Henry II, also showing her relationships with her children, including Richard I (the Lionheart). I really, really enjoyed this book bec This was the first book by this author that I read and I loved it! There is very little in the way of historical fiction that deals with the reigns of early Kings of England, except King Arthur. This focuses on the wife of Henry I, Eleanor of Aquitaine. It follows her life from her first marriage to the King of France through her extremely tumultuous marriage to Henry II, also showing her relationships with her children, including Richard I (the Lionheart). I really, really enjoyed this book because it dealt with a period of English history that I am extremely interested in but hadn't read that much about.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mandy Moody

    I read The Courts of Love immediately after reading Eleanor the Queen (by Norah Lofts). The two books portray Eleanor in very different ways, and because of that I had a hard time with this book at the begining. Plaidy's book is quite a bit more detailed, and takes us into parts of Eleanor's life that Lofts doesn't visit. She does an excellent job bringing Eleanor to life and making her a relatable character. Though it was dry at times, I really enjoyed this one, and appreciated the historical acc I read The Courts of Love immediately after reading Eleanor the Queen (by Norah Lofts). The two books portray Eleanor in very different ways, and because of that I had a hard time with this book at the begining. Plaidy's book is quite a bit more detailed, and takes us into parts of Eleanor's life that Lofts doesn't visit. She does an excellent job bringing Eleanor to life and making her a relatable character. Though it was dry at times, I really enjoyed this one, and appreciated the historical accuracy.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jamilah

    This is historical fiction, but the author seems to stay relatively true to history, just occasionally taking historical rumor and treating it as truth. She tells the story as a "memoir" by Eleanor of Aquitaine. It is slightly dry reading sometimes, although not nearly as dry as a history textbook would be! This is historical fiction, but the author seems to stay relatively true to history, just occasionally taking historical rumor and treating it as truth. She tells the story as a "memoir" by Eleanor of Aquitaine. It is slightly dry reading sometimes, although not nearly as dry as a history textbook would be!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gordon

    An illuminating book from a master of the genre. Watch the movie The Lion in Winter, then read this book for the whole story. Eleanor of Aquitaine was a fascinating person and Jean Plaidy brings her to life.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nenda

    2019 Reading Challenge Novel Based on A True Story Bit boring, should have been edited better

  13. 4 out of 5

    MaryKate

    3.5 stars. Plaidy is an excellent storyteller and it is a joy to read a historically accurate HF novel. I don't know much about Eleanor of Aquitaine and her family, but I am now desperate to read and learn more! She was an extraordinary woman and Plaidy takes you from her young childhood in Aquitaine up to her death at an old age. You feel her sorrow, joy, hate, and love for her husbands and children and you don't want to let the story go at the end. There were a few aspects of Plaidy's writing 3.5 stars. Plaidy is an excellent storyteller and it is a joy to read a historically accurate HF novel. I don't know much about Eleanor of Aquitaine and her family, but I am now desperate to read and learn more! She was an extraordinary woman and Plaidy takes you from her young childhood in Aquitaine up to her death at an old age. You feel her sorrow, joy, hate, and love for her husbands and children and you don't want to let the story go at the end. There were a few aspects of Plaidy's writing that started to irritate me by the end, namely her repetition. Sometimes I'd read three pages in which I felt she explained the same event or emotion over and over. Other times, she'd skim over important events in a paragraph. I was irritated and in love with all of the characters throughout the story, though, and I think that is one of the most important things a story should be able to do--engage you.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    Better overall character development than Nora Loft's novel on Eleanor of Aquitaine (the only other Eleanor novel I've read so far so I'll compare the two). One of the things I love about Plaidy is her assessments of the relationships between the characters and this does not disappoint. At the same time, it also details the political and worldly events better. But I felt like Loft handled Eleanor's period of captivity better, it was actually the strongest part of the book whereas Plaidy brushes Better overall character development than Nora Loft's novel on Eleanor of Aquitaine (the only other Eleanor novel I've read so far so I'll compare the two). One of the things I love about Plaidy is her assessments of the relationships between the characters and this does not disappoint. At the same time, it also details the political and worldly events better. But I felt like Loft handled Eleanor's period of captivity better, it was actually the strongest part of the book whereas Plaidy brushes over it as an inconvenience to Eleanor.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This was my first book by Plaidy as well. This book was also the first book I had ever read on Eleanor of Aquitaine, and it inspired a bit of a love-affair with the "Grandmother of Europe" as she is known. I do agree that Plaidy can be a bit dry at times, however I feel if you stick through you can find that underneath is a fantastic historical fiction about a fascinating woman. I'm not a huge fan of some of her other works, but this is one I have re-read a couple times. If you have the time (and This was my first book by Plaidy as well. This book was also the first book I had ever read on Eleanor of Aquitaine, and it inspired a bit of a love-affair with the "Grandmother of Europe" as she is known. I do agree that Plaidy can be a bit dry at times, however I feel if you stick through you can find that underneath is a fantastic historical fiction about a fascinating woman. I'm not a huge fan of some of her other works, but this is one I have re-read a couple times. If you have the time (and to be fair a bit of patience) I think you may enjoy it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Tillery

    Elenor of Aquitaine became the duchess of the richest provence on Europe at the age 15. She married Louis VII of France and became the Queen. But, when she met Henry II of England she fell in love. The story follows her struggle to be with the one she really loves and the betryal she faces because of it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    April

    This was such a good book! This was the first book I read by Jean Plaidy and it will not be the last! I loved reading about Eleanor of Aquitaine, Louis VII, and Henry II. It made me want to continue to read everything I could find on them. I could relate to Eleanor's strong personality. This was an exciting book that I would recommend to anyone! This was such a good book! This was the first book I read by Jean Plaidy and it will not be the last! I loved reading about Eleanor of Aquitaine, Louis VII, and Henry II. It made me want to continue to read everything I could find on them. I could relate to Eleanor's strong personality. This was an exciting book that I would recommend to anyone!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gene Rios

    So, once I got past a certain dialogue part, the book regained its rhythm. I could definitely pick up on the rising action as Eleanor aged, and I enjoyed it considerably. I especially found it interesting to read about the blatant homosexuality in Richard the Lion-Hearted, a man with Norse beauty and British militance. All in all, The Courts of Love was a good read!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ella Dohlman

    If you love historical fiction, especially early English history, this book is for you. The author does an excellent job in making the main character human and believable. The reader gets lost during the time of early England and the hardships of that time period. I plan to read all books by this author

  20. 5 out of 5

    Traci

    I really liked this one--Eleanor of Aquitaine is absolutely fascinating! This fictionalized story of her life (according to my research on her) was as historically accurate as it could be, and I loved Plaidy's presentation. I really liked this one--Eleanor of Aquitaine is absolutely fascinating! This fictionalized story of her life (according to my research on her) was as historically accurate as it could be, and I loved Plaidy's presentation.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    TL;DR: All the quality of research and insight into character I've come to expect from Plaidy, but nothing more than that. Struggled to read it a second time. Plaidy does have my respect for producing something of this quality so prolifically. Why I picked it up: I was craving some historical fiction and I've enjoyed Plaidy's books in the past. What I liked: When I consider how many books Plaidy wrote under 3 pen names, I'm astonished at the level of historical research in her books. She paints a TL;DR: All the quality of research and insight into character I've come to expect from Plaidy, but nothing more than that. Struggled to read it a second time. Plaidy does have my respect for producing something of this quality so prolifically. Why I picked it up: I was craving some historical fiction and I've enjoyed Plaidy's books in the past. What I liked: When I consider how many books Plaidy wrote under 3 pen names, I'm astonished at the level of historical research in her books. She paints a very convincing Eleanor: passionate yet practical throughout her life. Also, she went there, twice, and did it well. This Eleanor has an affair with her uncle, and it's done so well as to neither be titillating nor (very much) ugly. It just makes sense for the character. Also, Richard the Lionheart is gay! Eleanor's reaction isn't terribly progressive, but it fits her character and the time and place. I realize more modern historians have largely disagreed with both rumors, but they certainly made for interesting reading. What I didn't like: It's taken me a few retellings of her life, but I don't think I like Eleanor of Aquitaine. At least not the Eleanor that modern authors try to bring to life. Also, because of the massive time-scope of the novel, everything reads like a lengthy summary, with a few small interactions here and there. The ideas are good, but the prose isn't electrifying like, say, Wolf Hall. I got bored. Verdict: No disrespect, but it's headed to a Little Free Library as soon as the rain lets up.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nicole-Rose

    Remarks: A very enjoyable read. With all of Plaidy's novels (so far), I do enjoy how she portrays the characters. And to me that's one of the most important aspects of historical fiction. I really do like how Plaidy portrays Eleanor, particularly as a mother. It might seem a little heartless to a 21st-century mother like me that Eleanor left her daughters for years right after Alix's birth, that Eleanor felt very little love for John, or that she sometimes viewed her children as mildly dispensab Remarks: A very enjoyable read. With all of Plaidy's novels (so far), I do enjoy how she portrays the characters. And to me that's one of the most important aspects of historical fiction. I really do like how Plaidy portrays Eleanor, particularly as a mother. It might seem a little heartless to a 21st-century mother like me that Eleanor left her daughters for years right after Alix's birth, that Eleanor felt very little love for John, or that she sometimes viewed her children as mildly dispensable, but we do need to consider the times. Rarely did queens in medieval Christendom actually raise their children and I imagine that would certainly affect the connection they were able to make with them. I really enjoyed Henry (Sr.)'s character too. He was presented a lot more gruffly than any other depictions I've read and I could see him very plainly in my head. I always love when I can do that. However, just like several other of Plaidy's novels, this really shouldn't have been written in first-person. I'm getting really tired of reading page-after-page of conversations being retold verbatim to Eleanor just so the author can relay important events to the reader for which Eleanor was not present. Not to say it's impossible for someone to remember the exact words of an entire conversation that happened several months earlier, but it's highly unlikely and fairly lazy writing to be honest. That being said, I really did enjoy reading this novel. Though it would have to be dreadfully horrible for me to dislike a novel about Eleanor and her kiddos.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    This one sort of left me cold. I really really want to love Eleanor of Aquitaine and this book made me really dislike her at quite a few points. It’s hard for me to critique the “history” here too deeply as a) there are significant gaps in the existing documentation about Eleanor as even women who ruled important French holdings were not deemed worthy of much ink in this time period and b) It’s Jean Plaidy and if you came for hardcore history, you must be lost. This one was an okay read and I di This one sort of left me cold. I really really want to love Eleanor of Aquitaine and this book made me really dislike her at quite a few points. It’s hard for me to critique the “history” here too deeply as a) there are significant gaps in the existing documentation about Eleanor as even women who ruled important French holdings were not deemed worthy of much ink in this time period and b) It’s Jean Plaidy and if you came for hardcore history, you must be lost. This one was an okay read and I did make it all the way through, but it felt like work too much of the time. I did learn one new thing though…for some reason I had never connected that Eleanor’s son’s included the English Kings Richard and John that I first was introduced to in a certain animated film with talking foxes and lions. Yes, I somehow missed that her sons were Richard the Lionhearted and King John ala Robin Hood. So that was cool.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    This book was ok. Eleanor of Aquitaine had a very interesting life, holding the titles of both Queen of France and Queen of England. How she came to acquire those titles is interesting, but there was a lot of filler in this book that was unnecessary, especially in the middle. When new characters came in to the picture, for some reason their entire history was told. A briefer background would have trimmed some of the waste in this book that slowed down the narrative. Instead of these figures' bac This book was ok. Eleanor of Aquitaine had a very interesting life, holding the titles of both Queen of France and Queen of England. How she came to acquire those titles is interesting, but there was a lot of filler in this book that was unnecessary, especially in the middle. When new characters came in to the picture, for some reason their entire history was told. A briefer background would have trimmed some of the waste in this book that slowed down the narrative. Instead of these figures' background, I would have liked to learn more about Eleanors' children since so many of them went on to be King, even for a short period of time. I haven't read much about the British monarchy from this early so this was new for me and I liked it but it was a bit dry.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Star Yang

    I loved this book from Jean Plaidy. I have to admit. It took me 100 pages to get into the book because Jean Plaidy's writing style is not super... dramatic and filled with romance. She is historically accurate and letting you learn about all the important things. With that being said, I loved Elenaor's personality. She is my kind of woman. She is in fact a woman ahead of her time. A lot of people don't like her and a lot of people do. I would say her life has been more sad than anything but thro I loved this book from Jean Plaidy. I have to admit. It took me 100 pages to get into the book because Jean Plaidy's writing style is not super... dramatic and filled with romance. She is historically accurate and letting you learn about all the important things. With that being said, I loved Elenaor's personality. She is my kind of woman. She is in fact a woman ahead of her time. A lot of people don't like her and a lot of people do. I would say her life has been more sad than anything but through it all she tries to preserve. I had the hardest time reading the last 50 pages.. not because the characters were not great, but because I know what will happen and that was the part I was dreading. I would definitely reread this book later in my life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Arianna Vargas

    I think I've found my new obsession in Jean Plaidy. I'm a sucker for anything with Eleanor of Aquitaine anyway, so when I saw this at the PTA, snapped it right up. She has a very plain, but really personal writing style. It felt like I was sitting next to Eleanor herself and she was just reciting her life story to a willing audience. I loved this book! I was so excited to see there was a whole "Queens of England" series, then dug a little deeper and discovered she has written like somewhere near I think I've found my new obsession in Jean Plaidy. I'm a sucker for anything with Eleanor of Aquitaine anyway, so when I saw this at the PTA, snapped it right up. She has a very plain, but really personal writing style. It felt like I was sitting next to Eleanor herself and she was just reciting her life story to a willing audience. I loved this book! I was so excited to see there was a whole "Queens of England" series, then dug a little deeper and discovered she has written like somewhere near 100 books or more. I'm sure I'm super late on the train and plenty of other people have figured that out already, but I've discovered a new favorite author- definitely recommend!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emalia Tillotson

    Oh dear...this one interested me at the beginning but about 1/3 the way through I realized this was going to be a long...long...really long read. It covers her entire life as well highlights about most people around her. It just started to drag on and on and I lost interest but was determined to finish it! I also didn't care for the main character...she became rather annoyingly arrogant and self conceited. Oh dear...this one interested me at the beginning but about 1/3 the way through I realized this was going to be a long...long...really long read. It covers her entire life as well highlights about most people around her. It just started to drag on and on and I lost interest but was determined to finish it! I also didn't care for the main character...she became rather annoyingly arrogant and self conceited.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    This was a great history of Eleanor of Aquitaine-from her childhood in the court of her grandfather to the early reign of her least favorite son, John. I felt I really got the sense of Eleanor's personality-strong, enduring and intelligent. All of the events are told from her perspective- from the crusade with her first husband King Louis to her son Richard's imprisonment. Definitely one of the best Plaidy novels I have read so far. This was a great history of Eleanor of Aquitaine-from her childhood in the court of her grandfather to the early reign of her least favorite son, John. I felt I really got the sense of Eleanor's personality-strong, enduring and intelligent. All of the events are told from her perspective- from the crusade with her first husband King Louis to her son Richard's imprisonment. Definitely one of the best Plaidy novels I have read so far.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    Very Interesting Eleanor of Aquitaine was definitely a fascinating and strong woman who had a hand in shaping multiple kingdoms through her marriages, lovers and her progeny. As always, Jean Plaidy brings this historical figure to life in such a masterful way as to leave the readers wanting more.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Lots of interesting history mixed into Eleanor of Aquitaine's love life. So many babies... I was surprised to hear a little of the story of Richard the Lionheart and his brother Prince John. I had no idea she was their mother! Lots of interesting history mixed into Eleanor of Aquitaine's love life. So many babies... I was surprised to hear a little of the story of Richard the Lionheart and his brother Prince John. I had no idea she was their mother!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.