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Everyone knows Scott Adams, the creator of Dilbert, as the king of workplace humor. His insights into the crazy world of business have long been on display in his hugely popular comic strip and bestselling books like The Dilbert Principle. But there's much more to life than work, and it turns out that the man behind Dogbert and the Pointy-Haired Boss has an equally outrage Everyone knows Scott Adams, the creator of Dilbert, as the king of workplace humor. His insights into the crazy world of business have long been on display in his hugely popular comic strip and bestselling books like The Dilbert Principle. But there's much more to life than work, and it turns out that the man behind Dogbert and the Pointy-Haired Boss has an equally outrageous take on life outside the cubicle. Adams ventures into uncharted territory in this collection of more than 150 short pieces on everything from lunar real estate to serial killers, not to mention politics, religion, dating, underwear, alien life, and the menace of car singing. He isn't afraid to confront the most pressing questions of our day, such as the pros and cons of toothpaste smuggling, why kangaroos don't drive cars, and whether Jesus would approve of your second iPod.


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Everyone knows Scott Adams, the creator of Dilbert, as the king of workplace humor. His insights into the crazy world of business have long been on display in his hugely popular comic strip and bestselling books like The Dilbert Principle. But there's much more to life than work, and it turns out that the man behind Dogbert and the Pointy-Haired Boss has an equally outrage Everyone knows Scott Adams, the creator of Dilbert, as the king of workplace humor. His insights into the crazy world of business have long been on display in his hugely popular comic strip and bestselling books like The Dilbert Principle. But there's much more to life than work, and it turns out that the man behind Dogbert and the Pointy-Haired Boss has an equally outrageous take on life outside the cubicle. Adams ventures into uncharted territory in this collection of more than 150 short pieces on everything from lunar real estate to serial killers, not to mention politics, religion, dating, underwear, alien life, and the menace of car singing. He isn't afraid to confront the most pressing questions of our day, such as the pros and cons of toothpaste smuggling, why kangaroos don't drive cars, and whether Jesus would approve of your second iPod.

30 review for Stick to Drawing Comics, Monkey Brain!

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Library Biography # 30 This book was a compilation of Scott Adams' blog posts. I loved pretty much every single one. They were witty and amusing. The one thing that could have been improved is if there were dates from when they were originally published. While I enjoyed this book, I also felt that book kinda of dragged on, it was pretty long for a book of this nature. Nice book to fit in with more serious books when I needed a brain break!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Todd Stockslager

    The problem with blogs is that very few of the things people have to say are interesting to anyone other than themselves or their mothers (and then only vaguely as "something my child produced", without any awareness of or commitment to the quality of the product). Adams demonstrates this principle in his book, which is nothing more than a printout of his blog. I'm sure his mother is proud of him for writing it, even if she's never read any of it. That said, Adams's "interesting" rate certainly e The problem with blogs is that very few of the things people have to say are interesting to anyone other than themselves or their mothers (and then only vaguely as "something my child produced", without any awareness of or commitment to the quality of the product). Adams demonstrates this principle in his book, which is nothing more than a printout of his blog. I'm sure his mother is proud of him for writing it, even if she's never read any of it. That said, Adams's "interesting" rate certainly exceeds that of your average blogger, and maybe one third of the entries are amusing or profound enough to make a quick skim of the book a pleasant diversion. The rest of the entries are just the typical banality that people who enjoy their own writing think is funny or profound. Obviously, Adams applies more thought and editing to Dilbert cartoons, which have a higher success rate than this "book"--I can't call a printed blog a book without the quotation mark, especially when Adams (or the publisher) has the nerve to write on the flap: "Much of the content in this book (actually most . . . OK, fine, 98 percent) was first published on Scott Adams's blog (dilbertblog.typepad.com). But please note that his blog archive has been disabled, so don't even think about printing out all the content for free." This kind of misdirected money grab expresses disdain for the audience that has made Adams wealthy in the first place. In point of fact, one thing that I find most disagreeable about this book is Adams's offhanded arrogance, sometimes passed off as humor, but mostly received in my mind as unpleasant disrespect for everyone not Scott Adams. I am somewhat conflicted by this, since as most office-dwellers in the information age I have found Dilbert almost universally funny and accurately concise in his lampooning of corporate management. I suppose the principle here is that words and attitudes that are funny coming from a perennially downtrodden cartoon character are not so much coming from the very successful and very wealthy man who created said character.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Eva

    I was never a Dilbert fan, so I didn't realize how wonderfully clever Scott Adams is. Two thumbs way up. Kindle quotes: Maybe it’s the way I was raised, but I find that I get mad about all the wrong things. For example, when I hear a news report about some serial killer who buried forty-three victims in an underground bunker that he constructed beneath his shed, my first reaction is Wow, he built an underground bunker under a shed! I find myself admiring his industriousness and passion in the pur I was never a Dilbert fan, so I didn't realize how wonderfully clever Scott Adams is. Two thumbs way up. Kindle quotes: Maybe it’s the way I was raised, but I find that I get mad about all the wrong things. For example, when I hear a news report about some serial killer who buried forty-three victims in an underground bunker that he constructed beneath his shed, my first reaction is Wow, he built an underground bunker under a shed! I find myself admiring his industriousness and passion in the pursuit of his dreams. That’s clearly wrong. - 446 A potato-shaped woman with unfashionable glasses herded me into the “severe search” line. Someone told me to stand in a high-tech phone booth sort-o-thing that blew air on me, analyzed it, and informed the technician whether I had been in contact with explosives lately. I passed the test, but I spent the whole time wondering how I could get some. - 490 Did you see the story about the convicted murderer who escaped prison by using a fake ID and a set of civilian clothes? The guards just opened the door and let him out. The authorities described the escapee as narcissistic. That’s the fancy way of saying he thinks he’s better than other people. I have to admit, if I made a fake ID using nothing but a pack of Marlboros and a spoon, and made a set of civilian clothes out of pillowcases, then walked out of jail, I’d be feeling pretty good about myself, too. - 557 Narcissistic Murderer Update Police caught the escaped narcissistic murderer. Apparently they found him standing outside a liquor store, drunk, making no effort to hide his identity. This has caused some observers to conclude that he wasn’t so smart after all. But you aren’t thinking like a narcissistic criminal mastermind. My theory is that he left something in his cell, say a pair of good sunglasses or a pack of cigarettes, and he wanted to go back and get them. He knows he can escape anytime he wants. But this time, just for the extra challenge, he wants to do it while drunk. On some level, I admire his attitude. - 570 One of the most common questions I get is “Do you ever get writer’s block?” The thing I love about that question is that it reveals a wonderful optimism in the person who is asking. I suspect that the people who ask this question believe they possess deep wells of creativity and talent that are inexplicably blocked. All they need is the secret unblocking spell from a cartoonist and then a geyser of bestselling books will spray forth. - 578 I don’t want to say that I prefer the technology to my natural body parts, but it’s worth noting that only my liver complains if I drink too much. - 654 Today I am whacked out on pain killers because yesterday I had surgery to correct my deviated septum. I didn’t ask a lot of questions about the procedure, but I can deduce most of the details based on the way I feel today. - 665 Today my wallet was stolen for the four hundredth time, and frankly I’m sick of it. I don’t know what bothers me more—the crime or the fact that the thief always sneaks back into my home an hour later and puts the wallet back in a hard-to-find place such as the top of my dresser. There’s never anything missing from the wallet, so I know the thief isn’t especially good at his job. It might be the same idiot who keeps stealing my car every time I park it at the airport. - 758 You’ve probably noticed that opinion pollsters go out of their way to include as many morons as possible in surveys. That’s called a representative sample. And what it means is that the opinion of Einstein, for example, counts as much as the opinion of the guy who thinks The Family Circus comic is sending him secret messages via Little Billy. I think it’s dangerous to inform morons about what their fellow morons are thinking. It only reinforces their opinions. And the one thing worse than a moron with an opinion is lots of them. - 777 I knew that my fiancée’s job of shopping for me wouldn’t be so easy. I have the deadly combination of not caring much about material possessions plus a high disposable income. - 824 Unfortunately, gifts are too easy to buy these days. Nothing takes long enough to showcase my diligent thought and hard work. My fallback plan is to create a spreadsheet where I can log the time I spend “thinking about” her gift. I’ll have a column for comments, in case she audits it later. The comments will be things such as “Thought about how much she likes eating crab. Didn’t think of any good crab-related gifts.” Here again, as is often the case with me, I am penalized for being a fast thinker. I’ll have to have a footnote that says I round everything up to the nearest fifteen-minute increment. - 835 Adopting a baby seems like a lot of work, especially when you consider the “flying to another country” part. I want to be nice, but in a way that involves fewer flies. - 981 If you have ever had a severe back sprain, you can answer the following with no problem. Which activity is most likely to result in the worst back pain of your life? Skiing to outrace an avalanche Lifting a car to save a baby Kickboxing competition Bending over to pick up a piece of Pringles you spit out while laughing at your own joke The last thing your back wants is for you to have an excellent story to mitigate some of your discomfort. - 1102 This morning at about dawn, I was sipping some green tea and looking for more whales from the comfort of my condo. Suddenly I spotted a whale down on the beach. It appeared to be dead. This excited me because I’ve always wanted to see a dead whale up close. I couldn’t wait to finish my tea, grab my flip-flops, and take a better look. But in time, the light of day informed me that it was only a large rock. The bottom line is that I spent a good thirty minutes being entertained by a rock impersonating a dead whale. - 1282 The biggest relationship mistake you can make is to assume that because you have some special training or knowledge on a topic, that your opinion should be extra important. - 1288 Instead, I offer you the only solution: the WCM Method. WCM stands for Who Cares Most. If you want your relationship to have a chance, defer all decisions and interpretations of fact to the person who cares the most. In practice, this will mean that women will make 98 percent of all the decisions and be “right” 98 percent of the time. - 1294 It makes me wish I were one of those people who can’t read faces—I think they’re called engineers. - 1355 The public announcement system just told me to report any people who “look suspicious.” This is a big category. I need clearer guidance. I just saw an incredibly hot woman traveling with an ugly guy. That looks suspicious. And a maintenance guy just walked by wearing one glove. What’s he up to? Am I to believe it’s only cold on one side? - 1464 I feel some inner need to keep the budget under control without appearing cheap. My current strategy is to frame all wedding decisions in terms of how many African villagers could be saved from starvation with the equivalent amount of money. For example: FIANCÉE: Do you think we should have a big cake or a little one? SCOTT: Well, the difference in price seems to be…about twelve Rwandans. It’s up to you, honey. - 1479 Now all I had to do was convince my doctor(s) that I wasn’t nuts and that I had a very rare condition. As you might imagine, when you tell a doctor that you think you have a very rare condition, that doctor will tell you that it’s very unlikely. Your first impulse might be to point out that “very rare” is a lot like “very unlikely,” but you don’t do that, because doctors have wide latitude in deciding which of your orifices they will use for various medical apparati. - 1512 I keep hearing the argument that some things are constitutional while other things are not. The idea is that we should be in favor of all the things that were decided over two hundred years ago by a bunch of slave-owning cross-dressers who pooped in holes. - 1549 People assumed that because I want to label the majority opinion “right” and the minority opinion “wrong” that I would also favor mob rule. No way. I still favor the traditional system where rich people run the country and convince the morons who live here that the voters are really the ones in charge. It’s not a perfect system, but no one has come up with a better one. And it’s fair in the sense that anyone could become rich and abuse the poor. - 1564 For those of you who have never taken a dance class, it goes something like this. First, the instructor demonstrates some footwork a bit too fast for you to have any frickin’ idea what he did. Then he repeats the demonstration several times, each time differently as far as you can tell. - 1714 also wonder if showing respect for all beliefs is causing more problems than it is avoiding. The only thing that prevents most people from acting on their absurd beliefs is the fear that other people will treat them like frickin’ morons. Mockery is an important social tool for squelching stupidity. At least that’s what I tell people after I mock them. Or to put it another way, I’ve never seen anyone change his mind because of the power of a superior argument or the acquisition of new facts. But I’ve seen plenty of people change behavior to avoid being mocked. - 1793 I keep hearing pundits whining about the growing gap between the rich and the poor. I have difficulty empathizing with that viewpoint for two reasons: (1) Poor people can vote, and (2) There are more poor people than rich people. - 1806 My fiancée, Shelly, and I are in the process of picking “favors” for our wedding. Allow me to explain the term favors to those of you who are foreigners, hillbillies, ignoramuses, or me one week ago. - 1877 “Favor” is one of those great ironic names. To my way of thinking, you’re not doing a guy a favor by giving him something he doesn’t want and can’t throw away. That’s more like a penalty. In fact, I could imagine exactly this sort of penalty for minor crimes. JUDGE: You urinated in public. Your sentence is that you must keep this functionless knickknack somewhere in your home for the rest of your life. URINATOR: Noooooo!!!! - 1881 No one wants to buy a winning lottery ticket for someone else. You’d bang your head on the wall for the rest of your life, yelling, “Why oh why didn’t I keep that one??? Whaaawhaaaawhaaaa!!!” That’s bad for the wall. My brother solved that problem by buying for himself two additional lottery tickets with the same numbers as the one he got for me. He explained that in case my ticket won, he wanted to be twice as rich. It’s the thought that counts. - 2058 Here’s the quandary, as I see it. There are three qualities I want to have: (1) success, (2) honesty, (3) humility. At most, logically, I can only have two of the three. - 2123 I owe my current understanding of this phenomenon to my ex-friend Amy who taught me that no one likes an honest successful person. She taught me this lesson by not liking me after success “changed me.” And by changed I mean I acted exactly the same as I always did, but that honesty seemed grotesque when things started going my way. - 2134 I believe that willpower is an illusion. Overweight people simply get more enjoyment from food than thin people do, at least relative to their other pleasure options. If I liked food more than I like playing tennis, I’d be the size of a house. Willpower never enters into it. You can see my theory play out with kids. Kids have no willpower, yet many of them are skinny. The skinny ones get so little pleasure from noncandy food that they prefer starving and playing with a friend to eating. - 2344 I’m sitting at the Oakland airport. The airline claims my flight will be delayed one hour, but I know that’s only the opening bid. - 2364 I’m suspicious of round numbers. If they said the flight was going to be forty-seven minutes late, I’d think they had a good handle on things. But one hour is the same as saying, “Honestly, we don’t even know how those big metal things stay in the air.” - 2366 happy are the guys who sell illegal steroids? You can’t buy that kind of advertisement. And it sure makes it harder for the just-say-no people. “Kids, don’t do steroids. If you do, you might become the fastest man in the world and have so much poontang and money that…I forget my point.” - 2665 I read in the news that the Chinese police are cracking down on the practice of hiring strippers for funerals. Seriously. Strippers for funerals. Villagers believe that the more people who attend the funeral, the more honored the dead person is. And naked women bring in the crowds. - 2694 I didn’t see in the news report why the Chinese police were suddenly cracking down on the strippers at funerals, but I have a theory. I think I speak for all men when I say that at the age of fourteen, I would have been willing to kill a cousin to look at a stripper. And remember that those small villages in China don’t have cable TV and high speed Internet. You pretty much have to choke someone to death just to generate any entertainment that doesn’t involve dragon costumes and tambourines. - 2705 By now the little pillow I keep between my knees has fallen on the floor and I can’t decide if it’s worth picking it up. Has it become mandatory or is it just nice? Can I sleep with my knees touching? There’s no such thing as an easy question when you’re tired. - 2763 As a writer, I’m always searching for those thoughts that everyone has but no one has yet expressed. It’s dangerous territory because there’s always a good chance that you’re the only freak in the world with that thought or that problem. - 2852 Every time I reach for something in my car that’s hard to get, I hurt myself. Sometimes I use a tool, such as a box of tissues, to paw at the distant object, as if that will help. When it comes to grabbing power, a smooth, square box is low on the list, but you have to work with what you have. So I end up bludgeoning the object of my desire with the cardboard - 2864 a one-way ticket to California. I never saw another snowflake, at least not up close. My thinking is that the good reasons for dying do not include “went outside,” as in “Where’s Scott?” “Oh, he went outside without a coat and died.” - 2928 Cold is just a fancy marketing word for a particularly unpleasant form of pain. We should just call it what it is: pain. What’s the temperature in Chicago? Painful. - 2932 Yesterday, for the sixth time in the past year, a refrigerator repairman tried, and failed, to fix my ice dispenser. Four different repair guys from the company that manufactured the fridge have had a go at it. They diagnose the problem. They order parts. They install the parts. The ice dispenser does not dispense ice. I’m thinking of changing its name from “ice dispenser” to “the thing that gives me false hope of ice.” - 3042 I think the worst super power you could have would be X-ray vision. Take a look around you right now and ask yourself how many people would look better without clothes. Not many. And if you could see inside them, that would be even uglier, but not in every case. You’ve heard the saying “She’s beautiful on the inside.” I think what that means is that her appendix is more attractive than her face. The best part about X-ray vision is that you would no longer have to ask pregnant women if they know the genders of their babies. You could just look right into the womb with your X-ray eyes and, in all likelihood, mutate the baby’s genetic code. Good times. - 3108 Every time there’s a military conflict, someone points out that many of the victims were not adult men. The theory is that a tragedy is way more tragic if anyone other than adult men get killed. If you throw a woman or a minor or a puppy into the mix then we all have a reason to be sadder and madder. - 3154 I think the main reason there are so many wars is that most of the soldiers are adult males. If all wars had to be fought exclusively by second graders or contestants from the Special Olympics, no one would ever start a war because the results would be too tragic. - 3163 The most disturbing part of this “husband did it” phenomenon is that there’s always a motive. I’m still in the newlywed phase, but it’s disconcerting to know that it’s only a matter of time before every casual onlooker assumes that if one of us disappears, the other one had a perfectly good reason to commit murder. It’s not much of an endorsement of marriage. - 3275 Now don’t get me wrong—there’s a 100 percent chance that the voting machines will get hacked and all future elections will be rigged. But that doesn’t mean we’ll get a worse government. It probably means that the choice of the next American president will be taken out of the hands of deep-pocket, autofellating, corporate shitbags and put into the hands of some teenager in Finland. How is that not an improvement? - 3390 The important thing with democracy, and this has always been the case, is that the citizens (a) believe the election result is based on the common sense and voting rights of the citizens, and (b) have enough handguns to wax any politicians who get too seriously out of line (also known as a “check and balance”). - 3397 I remember one day in sixth grade, our teacher asked us to go to the blackboard, one at a time, and write down something we would be willing to die for. The first few kids wrote down answers such as “cancer” and “hit by car.” Our teacher informed us that this was not what he was looking for. - 3420 Those of you who travel a lot know that if you ask a driver about his life, you never get a story that sounds like this: “Well, I was a drifter and a hobo for a while, but then I got this job driving you around. It’s the highlight of my life.” Instead you usually get something more like this: “After I won the Nobel Prize I became a dissident in my country and had to flee. - 3453 I love the feeling of doing something right, no matter how inconsequential, such as guessing the exact right time it will take to warm a yam in the microwave. It makes me feel in control of my life. - 3611 Comedian Larry Miller once described America’s war strategy in Iraq as “Driving around until people shoot at us.” - 3660 Last night we were having some quality time alone at home and I made the mistake of writing myself a note while Shelly was still talking. She asked me what the note was about. I proudly told her it was about Vladimir Putin, and how two of his critics were recently poisoned. I said I thought it would make a great topic to write about. I was quite pleased with myself, until Shelly asked, “Is that what you were thinking about while I was talking?” - 3845 parents let children ride bicycles. But parents do not ever allow children to hear vulgar words if they can help it. Therefore, we can deduce that cursing is more dangerous than maybe being hit by a car. - 3986 Why aren’t more humans tapping more chimps? Your first thought might be that chimps are not human. But neither are inflatable women and other sex toys. If you think a drunken guy in his twenties would be dissuaded by the fact that his sex partner isn’t a human being, you might be a woman. - 4505 Humor explains why God would bother creating people. He needs us for the laughs. Everyone knows you can’t tickle yourself. Maybe God can’t either, at least not directly. - 4657 Hypothetically, in the future, if a sex doll robot was indistinguishable from a human woman, and you weren’t in a relationship with a human, would you tap the robot? I asked that question in my blog and about 95 percent of the hetero guys said they would. The other 5 percent expressed a strong preference for lying. - 4709 “Dance like it hurts. Love like you need money. Work like people are watching.”—Dogbert - 4827

  4. 5 out of 5

    thewestchestarian

    I recently finished the new book by Scott Adams, creator of the Dilbert cartoon series and short-lived TV show. I believe the book is just a compilation of Adams’ blog as it is largely constituted by dozens of very short essays without any consistency of topic. The essays are, generally, as funny as the title of the book suggests and mirror none of the day-to-day irony and insight of the cartoon series. Apparently, what Adams Adams’ finds entertaining in ink is leagues funnier than what he consi I recently finished the new book by Scott Adams, creator of the Dilbert cartoon series and short-lived TV show. I believe the book is just a compilation of Adams’ blog as it is largely constituted by dozens of very short essays without any consistency of topic. The essays are, generally, as funny as the title of the book suggests and mirror none of the day-to-day irony and insight of the cartoon series. Apparently, what Adams Adams’ finds entertaining in ink is leagues funnier than what he considers interesting in print. For example, he believes the juxtaposition of the salutation “Hi, Jean” and the word “hygiene” hilarious. He spends some time describing stains he found in a cheap motel he once stayed in (they were symmetrical – isn’t that fascinating). There is also a short vignette full covering (and them some) the use of the silent “H” as in doughnut. However, when writing about producing the Dilbert cartoon, things pick up considerably. In one section he lists his experiments in trying to publish cartoons that feature butts. Showing Wally’s plumber’s crack was rejected yet a profile view of a naked rear-end was accepted. A marketing consultant with an ass instead of a head was only allowed if he had underwear as a hat. In another section he recounts accusations of African-American racial stereotyping upon the introduction of the Asok character despite Asok being Indian. He also recounts a phone call from a belligerent individual accusing him of plagiarism to which he diplomatically applies: “why would I steal crap?” Adams’ random thoughts never rise toward memorable; however, the insights he allows into his life are interesting. After a bout with allergies that produced laryngitis, his normal speaking voice failed to return, yet he could still give speeches to large crowds. A procession of specialists yielded a plethora of treatments but no relief. Dejected, he typed his symptoms into an internet search which revealed that he had an exceedingly rare condition known as spasmodic dysphonia treatable by botox injections into his larynx. After two years of treatment he discovered he could speak in rhyming verse and later was able to reclaim his voice by using the same synaptic networks that allowed for the rhyming in normal speech. I would have thought he was just nuts had I not previously read Oliver Sacks’ “Musicophilia” which covers this and related conditions in detail. Adams breaks the last biographical taboo left and talks about being very, very wealthy. He claims to have turned down $100,000 for a single, hour-long speech because of prior commitments but that he is routinely paid sums nearing this for his frequent corporate speeches. The two restaurants he bought are discussed frequently and he laments the difficultly in responding to people who ask what he would like for his birthday because if he wanted something, he would just buy it. Also interesting is Adams recurring false modesty. He describes himself as dumb and then details his graduation at the top of his classes. He talks about being unable to draw and then notes how many papers Dilbert runs in. He laughs about is shallowness and then writes essays about the nature of being. In this way, he is like Jennifer “Jenny from the Block” Lopez who talks simultaneous about being down-to-earth and yet having the funds to buy swaths of it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I couldn't finish. I just couldn't. It started out promisingly enough - the introduction began as a cheeky recalling of Adams's various attempts to do things outside the bounds of his "day job" or what he knew he was good at, and how well they went. Unfortunately, it quickly progressed into bragging about having coined a mysterious political catchphrase that could've "changed the world," and his other forays into random success. He tempers the bragging by telling us that 9 out of every 10 things I couldn't finish. I just couldn't. It started out promisingly enough - the introduction began as a cheeky recalling of Adams's various attempts to do things outside the bounds of his "day job" or what he knew he was good at, and how well they went. Unfortunately, it quickly progressed into bragging about having coined a mysterious political catchphrase that could've "changed the world," and his other forays into random success. He tempers the bragging by telling us that 9 out of every 10 things he does is a miserable failure, but it still sets the tone up as quite self-indulgent. The very very short entries in this book were, apparently, mostly written as blog entries originally. As blog entries, taken in tiny soundbites and with time in between them, I suspect they'd be clever and fun. Strung together - 150+ of them, in a thick hardcover - there are a few moments of interest and a few clever or downright hilarious bits of wordplay or description (the idea of a wolverine attempting to claw into one's brain to correct a deviated septum is not gonna leave me any time soon), but mostly it's just tedious. There's little to no sense of pacing, coherency, or transition, and I had no interest whatsoever in continuing after reading a fourth micro-rant about seatmates on a plane. Stick to blogging, monkey brain.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bev

    Scott Adams is the cartoonist who creates Dilbert. This is a book of over 150 pieces, I think from his Blog. Reviews on the back cover compare him to Dave Barry and say he is almost as funny. I have read Dave Barry and he's OK, but I've never found him laugh out loud funny, which I did with Adams' book, many times in the 150+ pieces, on everything from lunar real estate to serial killers, not to mention politics, religion, dating, underwear, alien life, and the menace of car singing. The chapter Scott Adams is the cartoonist who creates Dilbert. This is a book of over 150 pieces, I think from his Blog. Reviews on the back cover compare him to Dave Barry and say he is almost as funny. I have read Dave Barry and he's OK, but I've never found him laugh out loud funny, which I did with Adams' book, many times in the 150+ pieces, on everything from lunar real estate to serial killers, not to mention politics, religion, dating, underwear, alien life, and the menace of car singing. The chapter on "My History Learning" is very funny, talking about Jesus turds. And his take on the presidential election is perfect, if depressing: "We're judging how a candidate will handle a nuclear crisis by how well his staff creates campaign ads.  It's a completely nonsensical process."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Darth

    I am not a huge Scott Adams fan, but I have glanced at the Dilbert comics now and again, and even chuckled at a friends set of the animated series on DVD, so I figured I would give this book a shot. I was pleasantly surprised to find it witty, engaging, and as well thought out as something so COMPLETELY random could possibly claim to be. I may not rush out and find everything ever put to paper by the author, but I have to say this was good stuff

  8. 4 out of 5

    rabbitprincess

    An entertaining collection of blog posts from The Dilbert Blog. Scott has a very sharp sense of humour and a way with words, and the sheer variety of topics he discusses is pretty impressive. I also like his ability to sniff out a good news story and provide an interesting take on it. If you are a Dilbert fan this book is worth checking out.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kerry

    A collection of the Dilbert creator's blog. Quite simply, if you like the blog, you'll like the book. I was enjoying it until about 40 pages from the end, where I ran into blog posts I'd already read - weird to have deja vu at the end of a book. A collection of the Dilbert creator's blog. Quite simply, if you like the blog, you'll like the book. I was enjoying it until about 40 pages from the end, where I ran into blog posts I'd already read - weird to have deja vu at the end of a book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Themistocles

    It's no Dilbert, but still good fun. Perfect for reading on a beach :)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Clem

    Scott Adams is best known as the creator of the “Dilbert” comic strip. Never has anyone captured the essence of what a ‘real’ work environment looks and feels like. What makes his comic strips so wonderful is the fact that as crass and hopeless as the situations are that his imaginary characters face, most would argue that they’re scarily spot on when compared to real life. My guess is that the majority of workplace cubicles all over the world have cutouts of their favorite strips that illustrat Scott Adams is best known as the creator of the “Dilbert” comic strip. Never has anyone captured the essence of what a ‘real’ work environment looks and feels like. What makes his comic strips so wonderful is the fact that as crass and hopeless as the situations are that his imaginary characters face, most would argue that they’re scarily spot on when compared to real life. My guess is that the majority of workplace cubicles all over the world have cutouts of their favorite strips that illustrate the idiocy of our drawn out day-to-day obligatory comings and goings that are necessary to obtain a regular paycheck. In addition to his brilliant comics, Adams has written several ‘workplace’ books that are just as hilarious as his daily comics. These books are a sarcastic antidote to the bazillions of “inspirational touchy-feely” business books out there that so many leaders think that their whole staff should read in order to be more ‘productive’ and or ‘profitable’. Scott Adams’ books are a must for everyone who has worked any amount of significant time in the corporate workspace and knows how the ‘real’ world of work actually works. Which leads me to this book. Sadly, this book doesn’t compare to the author’s comics nor his madcap reflections of the idiocy of the workplace. This book seems as though it is merely excuse for writing something – anything – to replicate the author’s success in other areas. From what I can tell, this book seems to be some sort of journal, or series of blog entries where the author simply wakes up, picks some random topic that’s on his mind and jots down a page or so of his reflections. To be fair, sometimes Adams can be VERY funny, and there are many anecdotes here that made me laugh out loud. Unfortunately, though, most of what is here is simply mundane and/or irrelevant. Topics like cleaning out a cat’s litterbox, having to reach over in the back seat of your car, and the city of Pittsburgh aren’t really funny nor necessary. I suppose this is true with most artists when it comes to creating. They can’t be funny all the time. I challenge you to read a collection of ANY of your favorite comic strips, and you’ll discover that as much as the comic strip makes you laugh at times, there are probably just as many entries that leave you unmoved at best or confused at worst. Most of these daily reflections simply aren’t very funny. Another interesting tidbit: after reading other reviews of this book, it seems as though the fragmented entries in this book WERE in fact, at one time, placed on the author’s website for all to read for free. It seems that many of the devoted were highly upset to find these musings pulled so they could be published in a standalone book that people had to, you know, pay money to read. Of course, most of what’s here, I really wouldn’t want to read for free anyway. It simply isn’t worth the time. So I would skip this one, yet highly recommend the author’s ‘business books’. Specifically: “The Joy of Work” and “The Way of the Weasel”. What’s quite strange is I wonder if the author actually pondered the irony of the title he used for this group of rather uninspired musings.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katsuro Ricksand

    In later years, Scott Adams has become a polarizing figure with political views that people like me don't approve of at all. But quality is quality, and so I can still recommend this book of essays, written long before that happened. The essays used to be blog entries, which sometimes is obvious--like when he discusses events that were recent at the time of writing--and sometimes it's not. Almost all of them are short, humorous observations about the world and the people inhabiting it. Some of t In later years, Scott Adams has become a polarizing figure with political views that people like me don't approve of at all. But quality is quality, and so I can still recommend this book of essays, written long before that happened. The essays used to be blog entries, which sometimes is obvious--like when he discusses events that were recent at the time of writing--and sometimes it's not. Almost all of them are short, humorous observations about the world and the people inhabiting it. Some of them aren't short, others are more serious. One thing I particularly appreciate is his philosophical opinions. I agree completely with his views about human irrationality. He points out that there's not much reason to believe that free will exists, and that we usually aren't willing to change our opinions about things just because we see evidence that we're wrong. This book doesn't really have a theme as such. But if you enjoy short little thoughts, anecdotes and reflections, then you'll probably like it. I do have one complaint. At the end, there's a pages-long list of funny quotes by Adams. A good idea in itself, but many of them are verbatim quotes from this book. That just seems like unnecessary padding. It's as if Shakespeare would quote himself all the time. Apart from that, I can recommend this essay collection unreservedly.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Trudy

    Stick to Drawing Comics, Monkey Brain! is a collection of hilarious stream-of-consciousness reflections on life by Scott Adams. His style in not unlike Jerry Seinfeld, but I find him even funnier. Although I read this book straight through, I would really recommend taking it a few pages at a time. It's a laugh-out-loud fest...you'll find yourself having to explain your outbursts.

  14. 5 out of 5

    John Kastner

    Crazy collection of ramblings by the creator of Dilbert. Some items thought provoking, some disturbing, some lame, some wildly funny. Lots of quotables. Several unpublished Dilbert cartoons along with the reasons they were “edited.”

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Good

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bruno Oliveira

    Absolutely hilarious.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Akshay

    For anyone who's been completely oblivious to certain aspects of pop-culture these past couple of decades, Scott Adams is the tweaked, odd and very clever mind behind the Dilbert comic strip that has become the epitome of satire on corporate culture. In addition he wrote the best-selling (and quite hilarious!) THe Dilbert Principle too. But! Those achievements aside, I came across this book by sheer chance while visiting a favourite second-hand book shop that often has little treasures that are h For anyone who's been completely oblivious to certain aspects of pop-culture these past couple of decades, Scott Adams is the tweaked, odd and very clever mind behind the Dilbert comic strip that has become the epitome of satire on corporate culture. In addition he wrote the best-selling (and quite hilarious!) THe Dilbert Principle too. But! Those achievements aside, I came across this book by sheer chance while visiting a favourite second-hand book shop that often has little treasures that are hard to find or buy anymore. What intrigued me the most was that this is not a business/work/corporate based book in any fashion and in fact is as far removed from that as possible as he muses on most anything and everything. Containing a veritable slew of short(ish) essays (blog post style) on a multitude of topics ranging from globale politics and conspiracy to the menace of car singing to blouse monsters (yeah, that last one kind of stuck in my brains humour section!) and more, Adams brings a truly unique and refreshing take on things. What is it that makes him different to others? It's not just that he's talking about many things that others don't between these covers, it's HOW he does it. Bringing an irreverant twang to almost everything with a hint of shamelessness here and there, each and every essay is a border-line laugh riot at the least, if not a full-blown one! What I love most I think is that unlike a lot of writers who tend to be more one than the other, Adams has what one would call a hopefully-cynical streak to his writing. This is something that I've been told I possess and I think I relate to someone bringing that to such a diverse range of topics and really making you think about them from a whole other point of view. Too often we look at cynics and see only the worst of them, whereas Adams here demonstrates masterfully what a difference a touch of cynicism can make in an otherwise all too serious life and perspective. I've always been one who believes that one should always be able to laugh, even at the worst of times, and Adams here shows how you can do exactly that while never losing sight of what it is you are concerned about. Some things are just absurd and need to be laughed and moved on from, others need some more thought and have more "real" consequence, but we should be able to laugh at them all the same. Of course his own somewhat neurotic nature can at times seem a little insane, reading him find the lighter side of it and other personal shortcomings adds a more relatable quality to whatever he writes. And being a series of blog posts that he's collected into a book gives us bits from his life that make it more so and a far more enjoyable book (for me anyway) than even the brilliant Dilbert Principle. Life's too short to take it too seriously and I'd advise anyone with a healthy sense of humour and desire to flex and grow those muscles to give this book a read. You may not agree with all his viewpoints (I know there were a few I didn't), but by and large it's a general enough and diverse range of topics that it rarely ever digs too deep.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    That was my favorite Scott Adams book, it's funnier than the comic strip. He's best in small doses, it took me a few months reading a couple pages at a time. It's a series of rants, irreverent observations, essays - it would make a good bathroom reader for a household with no kids, as several essays are adult. Here are a few quotes: Maybe it’s the way I was raised, but I find that I get mad about all the wrong things. For example, when I hear a news report about some serial killer who buried fort That was my favorite Scott Adams book, it's funnier than the comic strip. He's best in small doses, it took me a few months reading a couple pages at a time. It's a series of rants, irreverent observations, essays - it would make a good bathroom reader for a household with no kids, as several essays are adult. Here are a few quotes: Maybe it’s the way I was raised, but I find that I get mad about all the wrong things. For example, when I hear a news report about some serial killer who buried forty-three victims in an underground bunker that he constructed beneath his shed, my first reaction is "Wow, he built an underground bunker under a shed!" I find myself admiring his industriousness and passion in the pursuit of his dreams. That’s clearly wrong. If you have ever had a severe back sprain, you can answer the following with no problem. Which activity is most likely to result in the worst back pain of your life? Skiing to outrace an avalanche, Lifting a car to save a baby, Kickboxing competition, Bending over to pick up a piece of Pringles you spit out while laughing at your own joke. The last thing your back wants is for you to have an excellent story to mitigate some of your discomfort. I’m sitting at the Oakland airport. The airline claims my flight will be delayed one hour, but I know that’s only the opening bid. The public announcement system just told me to report any people who “look suspicious.” This is a big category. I need clearer guidance. I just saw an incredibly hot woman traveling with an ugly guy. That looks suspicious. And a maintenance guy just walked by wearing one glove. What’s he up to? Am I to believe it’s only cold on one side? I love the feeling of doing something right, no matter how inconsequential, such as guessing the exact right time it will take to warm a yam in the microwave. It makes me feel in control of my life. For those of you who have never taken a dance class, it goes something like this. First, the instructor demonstrates some footwork a bit too fast for you to have any frickin’ idea what he did. Then he repeats the demonstration several times, each time differently as far as you can tell. Here’s the quandary, as I see it. There are three qualities I want to have: (1) success, (2) honesty, (3) humility. At most, logically, I can only have two of the three. I owe my current understanding of this phenomenon to my ex-friend Amy who taught me that no one likes an honest successful person. She taught me this lesson by not liking me after success “changed me.” And by changed I mean I acted exactly the same as I always did, but that honesty seemed grotesque when things started going my way.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mart Roben

    Scott Adams is intelligent enough to be a scientist or a politician. He could change the world! Instead he's drawing comics. But, in his own words, "intelligence has much less practical application than you'd think." So he's using his to make an art form out of trolling. The result is hilarious and thought-provoking. And if someone can make people laugh and at the same time think: "You know... he's kind of right!" he is in fact changing the world. Maybe that's the way truly intelligent people go Scott Adams is intelligent enough to be a scientist or a politician. He could change the world! Instead he's drawing comics. But, in his own words, "intelligence has much less practical application than you'd think." So he's using his to make an art form out of trolling. The result is hilarious and thought-provoking. And if someone can make people laugh and at the same time think: "You know... he's kind of right!" he is in fact changing the world. Maybe that's the way truly intelligent people go about it (instead of getting elected). Or maybe it's just a massive practical joke. I feel like this book taught me more about politics, religion and psychology than a decade of reading newspapers could. Then again, the ideas are suspiciously simple and funny. The truth is usually not like that... Anyhow. If nothing else, it's a great exercise in discovering how many more logical-sounding ways there are to think about things which you thought you already knew everything about. Here are a few selected quotes: "My favourite conspiracy theory is that the world is being run by a handful of ultra-rich capitalists, and that our elected governments are mere puppets. I sure hope it's true. Otherwise my survival depends on hordes of clueless goobers electing competent leaders. That's about as likely as a three-legged dog with the shakes pissing the Mona Lisa into a snowbank. In the summer." "I've never seen anyone change his mind because of a superior argument. But I've seen plenty of people change behaviour to avoid being mocked." "Just once maybe there should be a story about an athlete who did steroids and didn't set a world record, and didn't hump his way through the entire Victoria Secrets model list. Otherwise you have what I call a mixed message." "A day without sunshine is like a day without melanoma." "I once got an e-mail from a guy named Richard Head. I wonder what his friends call him." "And then he voted." - Scott Adams's response to almost any irrational argument.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    I freely admit that though I can see the humour in the Dilbert strip, I only laugh at 5-10% of them. But when I do laugh, I laugh hard - and that's worth something to me. It was in this spirit that I read this book; I knew that I likely wouldn't love every essay, but I'd read a couple of Adams' blogs and found them amusing and (usually) insightful. I had hoped the same for his book. So...I made it past page 100 (my normal limit before I decide whether to put a book down without finishing it): I m I freely admit that though I can see the humour in the Dilbert strip, I only laugh at 5-10% of them. But when I do laugh, I laugh hard - and that's worth something to me. It was in this spirit that I read this book; I knew that I likely wouldn't love every essay, but I'd read a couple of Adams' blogs and found them amusing and (usually) insightful. I had hoped the same for his book. So...I made it past page 100 (my normal limit before I decide whether to put a book down without finishing it): I made it to 200 (roughly halfway). At that point, I gave up. I got tired of the author congratulating himself on all of his success, talking about his mountains of disposable income, bragging about all of his speaking engagements. Oh, he apologized for this, saying that he was sure that some would take it the wrong way, but how can he possibly be expected to ignore this major part of his life experience? He's blaming the reader for our thoughts, so that he can try to make us feel badly for our opinions. Feels like a teenager using a little bit of psych 101 on their parents, and thinking that they've outsmarted us again! So, Scott Adams, full marks for getting me to pick up your book. But I'm on to you. You're not as funny, pithy, or interesting as I thought you'd be, and I take comfort in the fact that you (as you say) get so much mail, so much commentary on your books and strips, so many opinions - that you won't care about this, and would dismiss it right away if you were to deign to read it. But, on the off chance that this gets to you...don't condescend to your readers. Don't assume that everybody else's life is boring and empty. And never bite the hand that feeds. You can't always be the smartest in the room. And even if you are, it's best not to point it out.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tucker

    My barber gave me a pile of used books coated in talcum powder. The one about Pope John Paul II got donated to the library pretty quickly, but I am taking a look at all the others. The first great thing I noticed about this book of short, humorous essays by the Dilbert cartoonist is that it contained $10 in folded singles under the hardcover front. I wondered if I had to return it to my barber immediately, or if I could wait until it was convenient for me; if it had to be those exact bills, or i My barber gave me a pile of used books coated in talcum powder. The one about Pope John Paul II got donated to the library pretty quickly, but I am taking a look at all the others. The first great thing I noticed about this book of short, humorous essays by the Dilbert cartoonist is that it contained $10 in folded singles under the hardcover front. I wondered if I had to return it to my barber immediately, or if I could wait until it was convenient for me; if it had to be those exact bills, or if any $10 would do; if I could forget about it and still tell myself that I had somehow paid him back, given that he's going to cut my hair again and I'll tip him some arbitrary amount anyway; or if I just plain got lucky and deserve to buy myself a few donuts. On page 56 of this book, Scott Adams asks in his one-page "Billionaire's Money Question" essay: "Suppose you found a thousand dollars in cash that you knew had been lost by a billionaire...Would you give it back?" He observes that: "Based on my limited sampling of this question, people who need a new TV are not as generous as those who already have one." Also, some people believe "that if God wanted the billionaire to have it, he never would have let him lose it in the first place." It does appear that, when my barber gave up his John Paul II book (which he referred to as "pope shit"), he lost the aura of protection on his $10 in Stick to Drawing Comics, Monkey Brain! I shall not make it to page 356, but this was a worthwhile exercise. How often does anyone actually get free lost money when they're asked the party question about whether they would keep free lost money?

  22. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    It makes a good bathroom reader - as long as you don't go to the bathroom too frequently. It is a bit hard to describe this as a book - since it doesn't tell a story of any sort. A collection of Scott Adams' blog posts is the best way to describe it. However, it is an indiscriminate collection - it seems Adams simply printed out his blog posts, without any additional post-editing and had it published. The result is an inconsistent and meandering romp through his thoughts as he wrote them down. Some It makes a good bathroom reader - as long as you don't go to the bathroom too frequently. It is a bit hard to describe this as a book - since it doesn't tell a story of any sort. A collection of Scott Adams' blog posts is the best way to describe it. However, it is an indiscriminate collection - it seems Adams simply printed out his blog posts, without any additional post-editing and had it published. The result is an inconsistent and meandering romp through his thoughts as he wrote them down. Some pieces are interesting in their insights or questions they ask. But the majority are simply mundane minutiae that nobody really cares about, but Adams tries to bring some oddball humour to it. Adams is intelligent, literate, definitely thinks outside the box, but (perhaps it's because I read the book over a short span) he comes across as a rather smug, arrogant narcissist. On the other hand, if you think everything Adams says is pure gold, then you will find the book absolutely brilliant. Some quotes from inside: "Have you ever marveled at how many things you believe without evidence? It turns out to be most things." "I am appalled at the low quality of spam lately. If someone is trying to scam me, I expect him to put some effort into it." "Recently we had a heat wave in California. My air conditioner broke because, I assume, it is not designed to operate in hot weather."

  23. 4 out of 5

    Todd Martin

    A non-Dilbert book by that Dilbert guy? Yep. The book is basically a collection of observations and thoughts culled from his blog. Not all his entries are interesting, but there are many humorous and unique insights to be found. Here are a few I liked: My goal in life is to be slightly less miserable than the people that hate me. I call that winning. There’s really no point in listening to other people; they’re either going to be agreeing with you, or saying stupid stuff. There’s nothing more dange A non-Dilbert book by that Dilbert guy? Yep. The book is basically a collection of observations and thoughts culled from his blog. Not all his entries are interesting, but there are many humorous and unique insights to be found. Here are a few I liked: My goal in life is to be slightly less miserable than the people that hate me. I call that winning. There’s really no point in listening to other people; they’re either going to be agreeing with you, or saying stupid stuff. There’s nothing more dangerous than a resourceful idiot. Engineers believe that if it ain’t broke, it doesn’t have enough features. Sure the government has a few lucky successes like building highways, and schools, and dams, and reducing pollution, and eradicating polio, and encouraging the internet, and winning World Wars I and II, but a broken clock is right twice a day too. Maybe we should start educating the morons of tomorrow so they’ll stop believing the leaders of tomorrow. I’ve never seen anyone change his mind because of the power of a superior argument or the acquisition of new facts but I’ve seen plenty of people change their behavior to avoid being mocked. I can’t bring myself to believe in a god with a personality like my own. I base that on the paucity of lightening attacks on people who deserve it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    David Caldwell

    This is not a Dilbert book nor a business book. It is more of a blog in book form or as people from my era would say, a diary.It is not a book to read from cover to cover. Pick it up and read a section or two when you are waiting in the doctor's office or more truthfully in the bathroom. Considering it is 356 pages, it could take quite a few bathroom trips to finish. Finally finished it. Let me start by saying I bought this book at the Dollar Tree Store (yes I paid $1 for it. I am wondering if I This is not a Dilbert book nor a business book. It is more of a blog in book form or as people from my era would say, a diary.It is not a book to read from cover to cover. Pick it up and read a section or two when you are waiting in the doctor's office or more truthfully in the bathroom. Considering it is 356 pages, it could take quite a few bathroom trips to finish. Finally finished it. Let me start by saying I bought this book at the Dollar Tree Store (yes I paid $1 for it. I am wondering if I spent too much on it. Basically it can be summed up as Scott Adams sees himself as an optimistic genius. If the rest of us morons would just believe like he does and follow his lead , then the world would be a much better place.These beliefs include all religions are wrong,the government is hopeless (mainly because nobody has enough knowledge to make an informed decision when voting), and while we need to work on the big problems you shouldn't worry about them. You may be asking why I rated this book ok(2 stars).There are 2 reasons.1-I did laugh at times while reading it.2-I would hate to admit that I read a 300+ page book, made up of short blogs,that I didn't like and could put away at any time just to help reach my reading challenge for goodreads.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marsha

    Mr. Adams brings his beady-eyed viewpoint to explain why he’s a skeptical optimist, a casual disbeliever in God, a fan of constant trial and error and a vegetarian. Well, actually, he doesn’t proselytize about the latter but he’s got plenty to say about what he thinks is askew in the system and what isn’t. Whether he’s defending the two-party system (it’s bad but not as bad as what else is out there) or stating why discussing major religions is pointless (it’s a choice of believing that one guy Mr. Adams brings his beady-eyed viewpoint to explain why he’s a skeptical optimist, a casual disbeliever in God, a fan of constant trial and error and a vegetarian. Well, actually, he doesn’t proselytize about the latter but he’s got plenty to say about what he thinks is askew in the system and what isn’t. Whether he’s defending the two-party system (it’s bad but not as bad as what else is out there) or stating why discussing major religions is pointless (it’s a choice of believing that one guy walked on water or in a flying horse), Mr. Adams on-point humor is irreverent, delightfully askew and occasionally rather ribald. He understands censorship and, rather than railing against it, has cleverly danced around it. He’s being paid to amuse people and sees no reason to bite the hand that feeds him. Whether you’re a fan of Dilbert or simply devoted to his wry nose-thumbing at the rest of humanity, Stick to Drawing Comics, Monkey Brain! is a wonderful, slightly manic romp through the mind of a man who doesn’t even realize he’s drawn a penis until one of his fans shows him. Ha!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Dilbert creator Scott Adams' latest book of prose is an example of a recent publishing trend: the blog book, in which a writer keeps a daily-ish blog, the collects the best entries and assembles them into a collection printed on dead trees. As former blog entries, all of the chapters are short, which makes this book perfect for bathroom reading. That's a not a slam on the book, just an observation of what type of book it is.[return][return]A few of the pieces relate to creation of the Dilbert st Dilbert creator Scott Adams' latest book of prose is an example of a recent publishing trend: the blog book, in which a writer keeps a daily-ish blog, the collects the best entries and assembles them into a collection printed on dead trees. As former blog entries, all of the chapters are short, which makes this book perfect for bathroom reading. That's a not a slam on the book, just an observation of what type of book it is.[return][return]A few of the pieces relate to creation of the Dilbert strip--mostly encounters with censors--but most of the book is filled with Adams' observations of his daily life or world events. Adams can be a funny writer, so if you're a fan of Dilbert you'll probably find many chuckles inside. Sometimes though he gets a bit pedantic, and his occasional anti-religion swipes seem a bit unthinking. Still, overall a pleasant way to pass the time.[return][return]Rating: 3 (of 5)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    People with strange thinkings fascinate me. I like to consider ideas that are both rational and strange, studying them as if they will reveal new and wondrous powers to me. Really, they do, because every new thought, when mixed into the fertile soil of my own mental garden, has the possibility of creating delicious fruits… or nutritious vegetables… or rank weeds. You never really know what you’re gonna get, so it’s a lot like thought roulette. This book is full of thought roulette possibilities. People with strange thinkings fascinate me. I like to consider ideas that are both rational and strange, studying them as if they will reveal new and wondrous powers to me. Really, they do, because every new thought, when mixed into the fertile soil of my own mental garden, has the possibility of creating delicious fruits… or nutritious vegetables… or rank weeds. You never really know what you’re gonna get, so it’s a lot like thought roulette. This book is full of thought roulette possibilities. So many clever essays from all over the though landscape. I wish I could swap brains with Scott Adams for a while, but since that is illegal surgery in nearly every civilized nation (even if he agreed to the swap, my research shows), this is the next best thing. I wish this book were ten times as longer so I could keep reading and thinking. I don't think reading it nine more time works out the same.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    I'm not a Dilbert fan, so I don't know what made me decide I'd like this book - I guess the back cover copy caught me. As a series of short essays that mostly began as blog posts, it was a nice easy read; some of the pieces were very funny, and the one on gratitude made me smile in an entirely different way - I'm thankful to have read that one. However, the amount of time Adams spends discussing his intelligence in some form (including how and why he joined Mensa), just made this book seem like a I'm not a Dilbert fan, so I don't know what made me decide I'd like this book - I guess the back cover copy caught me. As a series of short essays that mostly began as blog posts, it was a nice easy read; some of the pieces were very funny, and the one on gratitude made me smile in an entirely different way - I'm thankful to have read that one. However, the amount of time Adams spends discussing his intelligence in some form (including how and why he joined Mensa), just made this book seem like a bit of a brag fest. The final straw was reading the disclaimer that followed the author bio at the back of the book. It admitted most of the book was blog posts, which didn't bother me, but the comment that he had deactivated his blog archives so that people couldn't go and print the posts just made me roll my eyes and think "get over yourself."

  29. 4 out of 5

    David C

    This book, (I'm not going to write the whole name) is a humor book by Scott Adams, the writer of Dilbert. Surprisingly, though, it's not a book of comics. The book is basically a collection of all of the thoughts he had during the process of writing the book. Most of them are pretty funny, but sometimes the author just goes on and on expanding on a joke that wasn't very funny in the first place. One of the things I liked about this book is that each segment wasn't very long, and you don't really This book, (I'm not going to write the whole name) is a humor book by Scott Adams, the writer of Dilbert. Surprisingly, though, it's not a book of comics. The book is basically a collection of all of the thoughts he had during the process of writing the book. Most of them are pretty funny, but sometimes the author just goes on and on expanding on a joke that wasn't very funny in the first place. One of the things I liked about this book is that each segment wasn't very long, and you don't really need to read them in any particular order. So it's really convenient when you don't have much time to read it. If you enjoy the type of humor you find in Dilbert, you'll most likely enjoy this book of light humor for those with a busy schedule.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    This was good. A lot about the value of failure and optimism (they obviously pair well together ;-)... He has that Seinfeld quality to be able to find some common experience we often have and bring it to our attention. For example the ambiguous queue. I learn't from this that good restaurants don't succeed on good food or service. Long after you have forgotten these it is the ambience that brings the x factor. Also some good ideas on how politics should be run. Plus if you are guy and want to da This was good. A lot about the value of failure and optimism (they obviously pair well together ;-)... He has that Seinfeld quality to be able to find some common experience we often have and bring it to our attention. For example the ambiguous queue. I learn't from this that good restaurants don't succeed on good food or service. Long after you have forgotten these it is the ambience that brings the x factor. Also some good ideas on how politics should be run. Plus if you are guy and want to dance better it better to increase the movement in your hips. This was supported by a recent study I read on the topic of mens dancing. He also would like a consensus of well informed geniuses informing public debate on issues. Would be far better than the current decision / opinion makers.

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