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At the Origin of the Christian Claim

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Giussani argues that if we accept the hypothesis that the mystery entered the realm of human existence and spoke in human terms, the relationship between the individual and God is no longer based on a moral, imaginative, or aesthetic human effort but instead on coming upon an event in one's life. Thus the religious method is overturned by Christ: in Christianity it is no l Giussani argues that if we accept the hypothesis that the mystery entered the realm of human existence and spoke in human terms, the relationship between the individual and God is no longer based on a moral, imaginative, or aesthetic human effort but instead on coming upon an event in one's life. Thus the religious method is overturned by Christ: in Christianity it is no longer the person who seeks to know the mystery but the mystery that makes himself known by entering history. At the Origin of the Christian Claim presents an intriguing argument supported with ample documentation from the gospels and other theological writings.


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Giussani argues that if we accept the hypothesis that the mystery entered the realm of human existence and spoke in human terms, the relationship between the individual and God is no longer based on a moral, imaginative, or aesthetic human effort but instead on coming upon an event in one's life. Thus the religious method is overturned by Christ: in Christianity it is no l Giussani argues that if we accept the hypothesis that the mystery entered the realm of human existence and spoke in human terms, the relationship between the individual and God is no longer based on a moral, imaginative, or aesthetic human effort but instead on coming upon an event in one's life. Thus the religious method is overturned by Christ: in Christianity it is no longer the person who seeks to know the mystery but the mystery that makes himself known by entering history. At the Origin of the Christian Claim presents an intriguing argument supported with ample documentation from the gospels and other theological writings.

30 review for At the Origin of the Christian Claim

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jack Maguire

    This was a fine as an explication of the claim of Christianity, but it lacked a central thesis. I also found it fairly uninspiring.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Fr. Peter Mottola

    Following upon Giussani's groundbreaking "The Religious Sense," the method of that book is applied to Christianity with provocative results. "Every man should follow the religion of his own tradition," syas Giussani. "Perhaps an encounter in life will draw attention to a doctrine, a morality, an emotion more suited to our reason or to our heart. In that case, we could well 'convert.' (Cardinal John Henry Newman noted that 'conversion' is nothing other than the deeper, more authentic discovery of Following upon Giussani's groundbreaking "The Religious Sense," the method of that book is applied to Christianity with provocative results. "Every man should follow the religion of his own tradition," syas Giussani. "Perhaps an encounter in life will draw attention to a doctrine, a morality, an emotion more suited to our reason or to our heart. In that case, we could well 'convert.' (Cardinal John Henry Newman noted that 'conversion' is nothing other than the deeper, more authentic discovery of what we have always adhered to)." "A religion may commit only one crime: to say 'I am the religion, the one and only way.' And this is precisely what Christianity claims. This constitutes a crime, the moral imposition of its own expression on others. So there is nothing wrong in feeling repelled by such an affirmation: what would be wrong would be to leave unquestioned such an affirmation, the reason for this great claim."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mari

    Finally. Life not as rules and obligations, but as an invitation to pay attention to the wishes of our hearts so we can seize the beauty and the happiness we long for.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Christopher McCaffery

    The Barthian in me is furious [Nein!], but there's a lot to like too. I'll re-review once I read it for class this fall. The Barthian in me is furious [Nein!], but there's a lot to like too. I'll re-review once I read it for class this fall.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Valentini

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Mollerus

  7. 5 out of 5

    sara

  8. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adela Lawless

  12. 5 out of 5

    Frederick

  13. 5 out of 5

    Toby D'Anna

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robert Cowlishaw

  15. 5 out of 5

    Molly

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rute

  17. 5 out of 5

    Philip

  18. 4 out of 5

    Adele Elizabeth

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jorge Jiménez-Alfaro

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

  21. 5 out of 5

    Beth Jones

  22. 4 out of 5

    Franco

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tierney

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tim O'Malley

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stefano Cayre

  26. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cactiviste

  28. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gerard S

  30. 5 out of 5

    Martina

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