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A Table in the Presence: The Dramatic Account of How a U.S. Marine Battalion Experienced God's Presence Amidst the Chaos of the War in Iraq

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On April 10th, 2003, the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, faced with the task of seizing the presidential palace in downtown Baghdad, ran headlong into what Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North called, "the worst day of fighting for U.S. Marines." Hiding in buildings and mosques, wearing civilian clothes, and spread out for over a mile, Saddam Hussein's militants rained down On April 10th, 2003, the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, faced with the task of seizing the presidential palace in downtown Baghdad, ran headlong into what Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North called, "the worst day of fighting for U.S. Marines." Hiding in buildings and mosques, wearing civilian clothes, and spread out for over a mile, Saddam Hussein's militants rained down bullets and rocket propelled grenades on the 1st Battalion. But when the smoke of the eight-hour battle cleared, only one Marine had lost his life. Some said the 1st Battalion was incredibly lucky. But in the hearts and minds of the Marines who were there, there was no question. God had brought them miraculously through that battle. As the 1st Battalion's chaplain, Lieutenant Carey Cash had the unique privilege of seeing firsthand, from the beginning of the war to the end, how God miraculously delivered, and even transformed, the lives of the men of the 1st Battalion. Their regiment, the most highly decorated regiment in the history of the Marines, was the first ground force to cross the border into Iraq, the first to see one of their own killed in battle, and they were the unit to fight what most believe to have been the decisive battle of the war-April 10th in downtown Baghdad. Through it all, Carey Cash says, the presence of God was undeniable. Cash even had the privilege of baptizing fifty-seven new Christians-Marines and Sailors-during the war in Iraq. The men of the 1st Battalion came to discover what King David had discovered long ago--that God's presence could be richly experienced even in the presence of enemies. Here is the amazing story of their experience.


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On April 10th, 2003, the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, faced with the task of seizing the presidential palace in downtown Baghdad, ran headlong into what Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North called, "the worst day of fighting for U.S. Marines." Hiding in buildings and mosques, wearing civilian clothes, and spread out for over a mile, Saddam Hussein's militants rained down On April 10th, 2003, the 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, faced with the task of seizing the presidential palace in downtown Baghdad, ran headlong into what Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North called, "the worst day of fighting for U.S. Marines." Hiding in buildings and mosques, wearing civilian clothes, and spread out for over a mile, Saddam Hussein's militants rained down bullets and rocket propelled grenades on the 1st Battalion. But when the smoke of the eight-hour battle cleared, only one Marine had lost his life. Some said the 1st Battalion was incredibly lucky. But in the hearts and minds of the Marines who were there, there was no question. God had brought them miraculously through that battle. As the 1st Battalion's chaplain, Lieutenant Carey Cash had the unique privilege of seeing firsthand, from the beginning of the war to the end, how God miraculously delivered, and even transformed, the lives of the men of the 1st Battalion. Their regiment, the most highly decorated regiment in the history of the Marines, was the first ground force to cross the border into Iraq, the first to see one of their own killed in battle, and they were the unit to fight what most believe to have been the decisive battle of the war-April 10th in downtown Baghdad. Through it all, Carey Cash says, the presence of God was undeniable. Cash even had the privilege of baptizing fifty-seven new Christians-Marines and Sailors-during the war in Iraq. The men of the 1st Battalion came to discover what King David had discovered long ago--that God's presence could be richly experienced even in the presence of enemies. Here is the amazing story of their experience.

30 review for A Table in the Presence: The Dramatic Account of How a U.S. Marine Battalion Experienced God's Presence Amidst the Chaos of the War in Iraq

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    I have a close friend who has a son (Josh) who recommended this book to me. Josh took 2 tours in Iraq and told me that this book depicts the war in Iraq very accurately. Wow! What a great book. It is amazing what God did in spite of the horrors of war.. A table in His presence.. A blessing to read. Thank you to all those who protect our freedom. Thank you for all you who protect my freedom. May God bless you and your families!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Reni Karimpineth

    Amazing book! I picked it up after I heard news of my close friend being called into Iraq. I worried for him, seeing all the horror in the news with the war. This book encouraged me and really showed mr that no matter what God is always in control. I'm blessed to have my friend come home from Iraq, knowing God kept him!

  3. 5 out of 5

    JD

    Great book written by a Navy chaplain serving with the 1/5th Marine Regiment in the days leading up to the US-led Invasion of Iraq to the capturing of Baghdad. This is a very spiritual book of young men giving themselves over to the power of God as witnessed by Carey Cash and the witnessing of His love and power through miracles they see everyday on the frontlines of the battles they fought. The book is also kind of a combat chronicle of the 1/5 Marines in this timeline as there are some vivid d Great book written by a Navy chaplain serving with the 1/5th Marine Regiment in the days leading up to the US-led Invasion of Iraq to the capturing of Baghdad. This is a very spiritual book of young men giving themselves over to the power of God as witnessed by Carey Cash and the witnessing of His love and power through miracles they see everyday on the frontlines of the battles they fought. The book is also kind of a combat chronicle of the 1/5 Marines in this timeline as there are some vivid descriptions of the combat these brave young men went through. Highly recommended to Christians.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peregrine 12

    It was okay, but not great. As a reader, I would've liked to read more story and less eulogy, less religion. The miracle the men experienced was truly incredible; I wish it, and the discussion of the vagaries of war, had been more center-stage in the book rather than a conclusion to 200 pp of other stuff. The book is written to describe a group of Marines who passed through explosions, etc, that easily should have killed everyone, yet no one was seriously injured. Once arriving at this part, I fe It was okay, but not great. As a reader, I would've liked to read more story and less eulogy, less religion. The miracle the men experienced was truly incredible; I wish it, and the discussion of the vagaries of war, had been more center-stage in the book rather than a conclusion to 200 pp of other stuff. The book is written to describe a group of Marines who passed through explosions, etc, that easily should have killed everyone, yet no one was seriously injured. Once arriving at this part, I felt it wasn't handled with the strength and focus that it should have been, especially considering it was the point of the book in the first place. The writing wasn't as tight as it needed to be - too many of the author's digressions, I thought, interfered with the flow of his story. The chronology was jumbled. There was a heavy emphasis on the love of God/Jesus/etc (maybe 40% of the text); while important to the story and the chaplain's work, this only caused the book to drag when the book should be picking up speed. In fact, one can skip over most of it without losing any of the storyline. Also, I had to read some combat scenes two or three times to understand what the author was trying to describe. One thing I did particularly appreciate, and will remember, is the author's description of the oppression of women in Iraq and his religion's (Christian, Baptist) belief in the equality of the sexes. That part was movingly written and well done. The author's discussion on jihad as a tool in the Muslim world was also something to think about - regarding violence in the name of a religion, "these things don't come out of thin air," the author writes. I must agree.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Scott Cramer

    This book does an excellent job of telling the tale of one groups experiences during Operation Freedom in Iraq. It doesn't glorify war or minimize the loss, pain, and suffering experienced. It shared how faith in God was found and nurtured during such a difficult time.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Joy Rojas

    This is such a great book!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    My husband so enjoyed this book that afterwards he decided to give it to his dad, who seldom reads but occasionally does enjoy an exciting book. I was curious what made this book so good that my husband thought his dad would enjoy it, so it is out of my usual reading genres – war stories. Lt. Carey Cash, a Navy chaplain’s autobiography about the war with Iraq. I chose to read it on a flight because it takes an exciting book to distract me from the mechanics of flying, and this book worked fine fo My husband so enjoyed this book that afterwards he decided to give it to his dad, who seldom reads but occasionally does enjoy an exciting book. I was curious what made this book so good that my husband thought his dad would enjoy it, so it is out of my usual reading genres – war stories. Lt. Carey Cash, a Navy chaplain’s autobiography about the war with Iraq. I chose to read it on a flight because it takes an exciting book to distract me from the mechanics of flying, and this book worked fine for that purpose. It was gripping and well-told. I'd recommend it to others, which is why I'm rating it a 4. I probably wouldn't reread it, however, which is why it's not a 5. It seemed funny to me that while I was flying, something I hate to do, the book kept talking about courage. I do know that these men’s courage far surpassed my own, so much so that there isn’t any comparison. I realize that there are differing opinions on the war with Iraq, and whether or not it was warranted. Lt. Cash just briefly told what they knew at the time, and the reasons for the war. I did have a Muslim friend tell me that it unnecessarily antagonized the Muslims of the world. Lt. Cash did consider it a justified war. Lt. Cash wrote about both those soldiers who died and those who received unexplainable answer to prayer and lived. He didn’t try to explain (much) why some lived and some died, except to treat both with honor, and to say that God loves both those who lived and those who died, and to say that both outcomes brought attention to God in different ways. Lt. Cash talked about working with clergy from other Christian denominations, and I realize he was only talking about his own experiences. But I wondered where the clergy were, if any, for the Islamic people, or Buddhists, or Hindus, or Jews, etc. In particular, I wondered about the perspective of the American Islamic leaders during this war on Iraq, and how they would’ve comforted and encouraged their American troops. Certainly, there would have been more grief. I used to talk over such things with a Muslim friend of mine, until I moved out of state. I would also have been curious to see whether any of these American troops of other faiths had also experienced the unexplainable protection in battle. It’s not that I am skeptical of miracles – I think I may have witnessed a couple myself – but I am probably more analytical and reserved about them than most. I do believe that God has the power to work miracles; I think that most events that people call miracles are not. I would not be surprised to learn that God did, indeed, miraculously protect His people. The flashbacks were confusing, but I think I followed it. I would have preferred the story to be in chronological order, with Lt. Cash’s brain tumor coming first rather than during his remembrances on the battlefield. I especially liked Cash’s comments, “It occurred to me that anybody who said, ‘The perfect will of God is the safest place to be’ had never crossed the border into Iraq. God’s will may be the best place to be, but it isn’t necessarily the safest. Following Him sometimes means that we are led into the shadow of death, where valiant and faithful men will give their all.” I think those kinds of thoughts frequently about various popular “Christian” sayings. Taking the statement to an extreme, martyrs may indeed be in the ‘perfect will of God’ and still die horrifying deaths. (I am not commenting on whether these soldiers were in the ‘perfect will of God’ or not. I didn’t know them, and sometimes I know the ‘perfect will of God’ even less.) If the statement is not true for the extreme case of martyrdom, it’s probably not always true for other risks, either. I suppose one could say that although the ‘perfect will of God’ may not be the safest place to be in this life, it is the safest place to be for the next, but that’s not usually what people mean when they say it. My biggest problem with the scenario is that sometimes the American troops fired first, before any provocation. I realized that this happened long after attempts at diplomacy with Iraqi leaders had failed, but so many of the Iraqi troops had surrendered, that I would have always wondered. I do know that some of the American lives probably depended on them taking the advantage of striking first. As for me, personally, I would have preferred to die rather than to commit murder, particularly if it’s unknown whether the individuals would be violent. I am not a complete pacifist, but I am too much of a pacifist to sign away my right to conscience to anyone, particularly a government. However, I do appreciate and respect those protectors who think otherwise, who are willing to fight, to protect, to put themselves in harm’s way for another. They have my full respect. I did have some minor quibbles with the theology in this, but nothing really worth mentioning. It didn’t detract from the story. Sometimes various people took Biblical promises made to other, specific people in the Bible and applied these promises to themselves in the Iraq war. But those particular promises were not always written for them. God’s character and loving nature does not change, however, and it is appropriate to ASK Him to extend those promises to us as well, but not to presume that they are ours. The topic reminded me of other assaults on freedom of religion for military chaplains, where they are prohibited from sharing their faith, and where some don't want them to be able to pray in uniform. But it seems to me that it would be impossible to share hope without sharing your faith. That doesn't even make sense, never mind that Christians are called to do precisely that - share their faith. Those in the military deserve to be able to find hope in their hard situations. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/n... https://aclj.org/religious-liberty/pr... Favorite quotes: “They were desperate. And desperate men do not hunger for trivialities. They hunger for someone to point them to the One who is the Way, the Truth, and the Life. They long for a relationship with God.” “Through it all, she [his wife] has been the nurturer to the kids, staple of sanity for the home, and chaplain to the chaplain.” “It occurred to me that those people who prayed needed to know how God had resoundingly answered their prayers on the battlefield. This book therefore, is also a loving testimony to God’s power in answer to prayer.” “Help me to faithfully offer to these men the same strength and courage that You have given to me so many times before.” “I remembered how many letters I had received in Kuwait from churches and schools across the United States, telling me that people everywhere were praying specifically for God to grant our men faith and courage as we crossed the border into harm’s way.” “It was a story not of death and tragedy, but of a sovereign God who, knowing the trials we will face, providentially prepares us to face them.” “Sometimes our greatest ministry to others is simply to speak the Word of God into a situation where it has not been spoken before and without frantically explaining and expounding, to allow God, in His own way, to meet those deep and often imperceptible needs that lie in the inner reaches of every human heart.” “White knew the issues of politics, not merely for popular reasons, but insofar as they touched the moral pillars of his life and faith. I think that’s what made him such an anomaly to his friends. He came across as very cool, very smooth, and yet there was far more to him than met the eye.” “Evidence to them of man being made in the image of God – God, who is the source of all heroism, the bulwark of all courage, the foundation of all sacrifice.” “Semper Fidelis. Perhaps the most closely related word in all of Scripture is the Hebrew word hesed. Nearly untranslatable in English, it is a word used to describe the unending faithfulness that God has for His people; a faithfulness that, even when rejected, remains true; even when snubbed, He is not offended; even when forgotten, does not forget. Hesed describes God’s undying commitment never to cease pursing our hearts, never to cease desiring our best, never to cease employing whatever means necessary to gain our loving companionship so He can grant us indescribable blessings of abundant and eternal life.” Beautifully said, and yet, there is a time when God does let us go, if we are still rejecting Him when we die.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark Weaver

    Our God is good, great book to renew your faith in God.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Garyandlenora Anderson

    Miracle after Miracle. An amazing story. I highly recommend it. Gave many copies away as gifts.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lee Murray

    This book was amazing. Having two sons who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, this book was more than simple entertainment or casual reading. I like the way Lt. Cash didn’t sugarcoat or minimize the Marine pros experience or the dangers, stresses, and horrors of war. At the same time, he presented a witness to a living and powerful God who is just as active today as He was then. The chapter on the prayers for the troops by stateside people was a truly poignant chapter for a person who spent many hou This book was amazing. Having two sons who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, this book was more than simple entertainment or casual reading. I like the way Lt. Cash didn’t sugarcoat or minimize the Marine pros experience or the dangers, stresses, and horrors of war. At the same time, he presented a witness to a living and powerful God who is just as active today as He was then. The chapter on the prayers for the troops by stateside people was a truly poignant chapter for a person who spent many hours praying for two sons and sometimes wondering if they had any effect. Seeing the effects on he troops and the hand of God in action confirmed for me the fact that no prayer goes unheard. A truly inspiring and amazing book. I highly recommend it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cody

    Really enjoyed reading this book. I thought Lt. Cash did an excellent job laying the foundation in the beginning and giving us a good understanding of the men that he speaks about along the way. Being a Marine myself I could relate to a lot along the way. I think the best part of the book was the last few chapters. No spoilers here but I think people will really enjoy reading the stories of these men in a distant land and how God protected them along the way.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    A book about modern day miracles. Will increase your faith! Several times I had to stop and wipe away tears so I could see what I was reading! A little confusing at the start because the author jumps around in time, and the last 3 chapters are the best.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Blaine

    A great read from start to finish. Easy too! This first-hand account is gripping with every turn. As a Christian reader, it only strengthens a belief that God is with us and for us no matter what.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    A great book that illustrates the power of God during the horrific times of war. Must read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Library Queen

    Simply one of the best non-fiction books I've ever read. I recommend this to everyone.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Don't miss the last 2 pages of the epilogue.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    4 1/2 stars. Excellent read about faith and adversity. I loved it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chris Jarvis

    I’m so grateful for our amazing military. Thank you all.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    I read this book because it was recommended to me by a dear friend and the person who baptized me, the author's father-in-law. I saw a great deal of influence of his saintly father-in-law in these pages. This book tells the true story of the first Marine Battalion in Iraq, and their spiritual as well as military struggle there. LT. Cash, who is currently the President's chaplain at Camp David, is a man of true Christian faith, expressed as a Baptist Navy chaplain, but open to the ideas of a litur I read this book because it was recommended to me by a dear friend and the person who baptized me, the author's father-in-law. I saw a great deal of influence of his saintly father-in-law in these pages. This book tells the true story of the first Marine Battalion in Iraq, and their spiritual as well as military struggle there. LT. Cash, who is currently the President's chaplain at Camp David, is a man of true Christian faith, expressed as a Baptist Navy chaplain, but open to the ideas of a liturgical and sacramental faith such as is found in the Catholic form of worship. As a Catholic, I found it reinforced my beliefs on the true presence of Christ in the Eucharist, the benefits of confession to a priest, the healing power of sacramentals, and the intercessory power of prayer. In fact, I was astounded as I read time after time of Chaplain Cash's account of God's providence in Iraq, how closely it aligned with my Catholic faith. For example, Chaplain Cash explained how, as a Baptist minister, he was trained to explain the scriptures in order that worshippers could apply it to their daily lives. But he found the men going into battle didn't have the time or the inclination to listen to fine sermons. They primarily desired two things: confession (with absolution) and holy communion. As a Protestant, Cash could hear confessions and advise the penitent of their saviour's forgiveness, but he couldn't offer sacramental absolution. Also, I believe Chaplain Cash understood the men's need for holy communion as something greater than words. Despite the fact that the communion wafer was merely a symbol of Christ's body, the men desired mystical union with Christ before they went off into battle. Chaplain Cash also spoke about seeing angels protecting them and the power of intercessory prayer and how much it meant to the men to know that people back home were praying for them. Just as his father-in-law, Chaplain Larry Ellis, told me I would, I loved it. If President Obama and his family spend more time at Evergreen chapel at Camp David, as Time magazine suggests, Chaplain Cash may have the opportunity to share his tremendous faith with our chief executive. I know, the White House "denies" these rumors. But perhaps the Obamas will find the spiritual solace they need at Camp David. I can't help but think that is a good thing.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tricia

    Carey Cash gave a humble and honest account of his Marine unit's experiences in taking Saddam Hussein's palace in Saddam City at the beginning of the Iraq War. Humble in that he admitted to the apprehension and uneasy feelings of soldiers going into battle. Yet despite fear the bravery of our American soldiers, the heart for a down trodden people, showed how very honorable they were. But even more God's miraculous protection and victory was seen by those who embraced Him and those who had not ye Carey Cash gave a humble and honest account of his Marine unit's experiences in taking Saddam Hussein's palace in Saddam City at the beginning of the Iraq War. Humble in that he admitted to the apprehension and uneasy feelings of soldiers going into battle. Yet despite fear the bravery of our American soldiers, the heart for a down trodden people, showed how very honorable they were. But even more God's miraculous protection and victory was seen by those who embraced Him and those who had not yet given their lives to Jesus. This was a just war, and God was there leading and protecting in inexplicable ways. As the chaplain of his unit, the author shows how powerfully God's love, strength and purpose changed these courageous men into men of God and men of valor. Inspiring, heart wrenching and heart warming.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Aafje

    I thought this book was okay overall. While it is truly amazing to hear how powerful prayer is as Chaplain Cash recounts his experience this book wasn't written very well. In my humble opinion I think this book would have had a much bigger impact if it was written better. For example, Cash, tends to flip flop back and forth between war stories and who was praying for him back home and how some of his men came to Jesus. While I enjoyed hearing some of the testimony I found myself zoning out and f I thought this book was okay overall. While it is truly amazing to hear how powerful prayer is as Chaplain Cash recounts his experience this book wasn't written very well. In my humble opinion I think this book would have had a much bigger impact if it was written better. For example, Cash, tends to flip flop back and forth between war stories and who was praying for him back home and how some of his men came to Jesus. While I enjoyed hearing some of the testimony I found myself zoning out and finding it hard to keep my focus with everything going back and forth. This book had potential to show other people that God truly is everywhere but I feel that because of how it was written for a reader like myself it took away from that main concept a little bit.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Fantastic account of the men who serve our country and one in particular that God used to bring the gospel to soldiers in the middle of a war. The clear teaching of scripture is that God uses circumstances for His own ends and glory; sometimes God chooses to save men from the worst that a fallen world can throw at us, and sometimes God saves us through the worst that can come our way. This book gives a very real account of war that brought both hardship and miraculous deliverance, which is just Fantastic account of the men who serve our country and one in particular that God used to bring the gospel to soldiers in the middle of a war. The clear teaching of scripture is that God uses circumstances for His own ends and glory; sometimes God chooses to save men from the worst that a fallen world can throw at us, and sometimes God saves us through the worst that can come our way. This book gives a very real account of war that brought both hardship and miraculous deliverance, which is just the way God does things. This is a serious read for the lover of the true Gospel, no health and wealth in this account, thank God.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Robin Thomas

    Semper Fidelis … Always Faithful. This book is written by one of the chaplains serving with a battalion of marines during Operation Iraqi Freedom. It describes the already existing faith of some of the marines as well as marines that were baptized "on the road" so to speak. They experienced many encounters where many, many of them should have been killed. Yet they only lost 2 people and suffered some casualties. The instances really do sound like miracles. Direct hits on a vehicle, yet no deaths Semper Fidelis … Always Faithful. This book is written by one of the chaplains serving with a battalion of marines during Operation Iraqi Freedom. It describes the already existing faith of some of the marines as well as marines that were baptized "on the road" so to speak. They experienced many encounters where many, many of them should have been killed. Yet they only lost 2 people and suffered some casualties. The instances really do sound like miracles. Direct hits on a vehicle, yet no deaths. Overpowering machine gun fire, and again no deaths. They believe that God was there fighting for them and protecting them.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    I'll make this review simple. A book written by a military chaplain heavy on religion. He uses religion and the belief to explain why soldiers avoided harm during some specific military engagements. Personally, having religion when placed in situations where ones life is on the line is a good thing. Chance or general good luck was never an option presented. I wanted this book to be great but overall just average. The author was never present during the operations and presented after the fact rec I'll make this review simple. A book written by a military chaplain heavy on religion. He uses religion and the belief to explain why soldiers avoided harm during some specific military engagements. Personally, having religion when placed in situations where ones life is on the line is a good thing. Chance or general good luck was never an option presented. I wanted this book to be great but overall just average. The author was never present during the operations and presented after the fact recaps. A lot of preaching in the book and I have no doubt these soldiers were protected but it was boring to read. Three stars might be generous.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This book was WAY to Christian for my taste - it really annoys me when evangelical Christians think they have the corner on spirituality. I did enjoy the broad idea, though, that spirituality can be found, and is helpful, in life-threatening situations. Mostly, though, the value that I found in this book was simply in learning more about what it's actually like--or, at least what it was like for one battalion--to be combat in Iraq. For that reason, I highly recommended this to other VA staff and This book was WAY to Christian for my taste - it really annoys me when evangelical Christians think they have the corner on spirituality. I did enjoy the broad idea, though, that spirituality can be found, and is helpful, in life-threatening situations. Mostly, though, the value that I found in this book was simply in learning more about what it's actually like--or, at least what it was like for one battalion--to be combat in Iraq. For that reason, I highly recommended this to other VA staff and any others who are interested in gaining an inside picture of the war.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jerome

    Some amazing stories of how a Marine Battalion experienced God's presence during the war in Iraq, and some interesting insights on being a chaplain in the Marines. Unfortunately, Cash doesn't seem to know much about war and dumbs down lots of the military strategy, tactics,jargon, and weapons systems for the reader, which I see as evidence that today's Christians are a little too comfortable in their isolationist mentality and don't bother to inform themselves about that kind of stuff. Probably t Some amazing stories of how a Marine Battalion experienced God's presence during the war in Iraq, and some interesting insights on being a chaplain in the Marines. Unfortunately, Cash doesn't seem to know much about war and dumbs down lots of the military strategy, tactics,jargon, and weapons systems for the reader, which I see as evidence that today's Christians are a little too comfortable in their isolationist mentality and don't bother to inform themselves about that kind of stuff. Probably the only thing the church remembers about the war is stuff from the news...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    A truly moving book. The book starts its descriptions as the Marines are in Kuwait, soon to get the word to move into Iraq. It paints a portrait of the life of a soldier as they go into combat--the worries, what was faced in battle, etc. All throughout the author tells how prayers were answered in astounding ways. The last two chapters had me in tears--first, because surviving that last push seemed impossible, second, because God gave them His protection in such amazing ways.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    A very honest, insightful, first hand account of the emotional rollercoaster of war through the eyes and heart of an army chaplain. It so delicately reveals the difficult task that a service chaplain has ministering to our service personnel during such difficult situations, all the while struggling with his own emotions. Lt. Cash breathes freshair to the reader's soul describing how God entered and re-entered non-believers' and believers' lives through these tough times.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    I enjoyed this book because it showed the realities of spirituality in the midst of war. If you enjoy military history this book will be for you. However, if you do not normally read military history it can seem dry and repetative at times. The author really enjoyed the use of foreshaddowing and, in my opinion, overused it. I would recommend this book because it addresses a unique topic, but it may not be the most engaging book you read this year.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    Quoting from the back of the book, "Serving as a chaplain to the U.S. Marines, Lieutenant Carey Cash had witnessed the miracles that began in the desert of northern Kuwait and found their culmination in one of the fiercest battles of Operation Iraqi Freedom. With vivid detail and gripping emotion, Lt. Cash gives a firsthand account of this amazing story -- how the men of an entire battalion found God in the presence of their enemies." Truly amazing stories we don't hear on the news.

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