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"What is an Indigo Child? The Indigo Child is a child who displays a new and unusual set of psychological attributes that reveal a pattern of behavior generally undocumented before. This pattern has common yet unique factors that demand that parents and teachers change their treatment and upbringing of them in order to achieve balance. To ignore these new patterns is to po "What is an Indigo Child? The Indigo Child is a child who displays a new and unusual set of psychological attributes that reveal a pattern of behavior generally undocumented before. This pattern has common yet unique factors that demand that parents and teachers change their treatment and upbringing of them in order to achieve balance. To ignore these new patterns is to potentially create great frustration in the minds of these precious new lives. Can we really be seeing human evolution in the kids today? Are they smarter? Why do so many of our children today seem to be "system busters"? Why are they committing suicide and killing each other? Why are so many of our best children being diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder( ADD)? Are all of them really ADD kids...in need of being drugged, or is there more to this story? Join international authors and lecturers Lee Carroll and Jan Tober as they bring together some very fine minds to discuss and expose this exciting premise. Many alternate methods of treating ADD are presented, and you won't believe some of the spiritual aspects of this study! These children are very different, and represent a great percentage of all the children being born today...worldwide. They come in "knowing" who they are, and must be recognized and celebrated with the correct guidance. This book is a must for parents!"


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"What is an Indigo Child? The Indigo Child is a child who displays a new and unusual set of psychological attributes that reveal a pattern of behavior generally undocumented before. This pattern has common yet unique factors that demand that parents and teachers change their treatment and upbringing of them in order to achieve balance. To ignore these new patterns is to po "What is an Indigo Child? The Indigo Child is a child who displays a new and unusual set of psychological attributes that reveal a pattern of behavior generally undocumented before. This pattern has common yet unique factors that demand that parents and teachers change their treatment and upbringing of them in order to achieve balance. To ignore these new patterns is to potentially create great frustration in the minds of these precious new lives. Can we really be seeing human evolution in the kids today? Are they smarter? Why do so many of our children today seem to be "system busters"? Why are they committing suicide and killing each other? Why are so many of our best children being diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder( ADD)? Are all of them really ADD kids...in need of being drugged, or is there more to this story? Join international authors and lecturers Lee Carroll and Jan Tober as they bring together some very fine minds to discuss and expose this exciting premise. Many alternate methods of treating ADD are presented, and you won't believe some of the spiritual aspects of this study! These children are very different, and represent a great percentage of all the children being born today...worldwide. They come in "knowing" who they are, and must be recognized and celebrated with the correct guidance. This book is a must for parents!"

30 review for Indigo Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Summer

    So have you ever met anyone who comes up with long-winded explanations of how a particular room has magickal energies and auras and you can feel the warmth of togetherness and family in it or something, where a better explanation for the feeling of warmth would be a particularly large south-facing window? That's pretty much what this whole "indigo children" thing is about. For example, here is a list of traits of the Indigo Child (from here: http://skepdic.com/indigo.html ) * They come into the So have you ever met anyone who comes up with long-winded explanations of how a particular room has magickal energies and auras and you can feel the warmth of togetherness and family in it or something, where a better explanation for the feeling of warmth would be a particularly large south-facing window? That's pretty much what this whole "indigo children" thing is about. For example, here is a list of traits of the Indigo Child (from here: http://skepdic.com/indigo.html ) * They come into the world with a feeling of royalty (and often act like it) * They have a feeling of "deserving to be here," and are surprised when others don't share that. * Self-worth is not a big issue. They often tell the parents "who they are." * They have difficulty with absolute authority (authority without explanation or choice). * They simply will not do certain things; for example, waiting in line is difficult for them. * They get frustrated with systems that are ritually oriented and don't require creative thought. * They often see better ways of doing things, both at home and in school, which makes them seem like "system busters" (nonconforming to any system). * They seem antisocial unless they are with their own kind. If there are no others of like consciousness around them, they often turn inward, feeling like no other human understands them. School is often extremely difficult for them socially. * They will not respond to "guilt" discipline ("Wait till your father gets home and finds out what you did"). * They are not shy in letting you know what they need. Congratulations, that describes EVERY CHILD EVER BORN. Your kid is not some special reincarnated angel snowflake from another planet, it's just a little person who sometimes gets frustrated, or silly, or creative, or cranky. Once again, if you persist in labeling your child as "indigo", you are robbing them of normal human development.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    In 2001-2002 I worked at a Montessori school in Southern Califorina. I was a Teacher's Aide & I was in charge of the afternoon daycare from 3-6 (or when ever the parents picked their children up). I had never heard of the Indigo Children. These children were not like I was when I was in grade school! I showed respect for my teachers & authority figures (whether they deserved it or not) because I was a child & that was what was expected of me. When I was told to do something, I did it. It was ver In 2001-2002 I worked at a Montessori school in Southern Califorina. I was a Teacher's Aide & I was in charge of the afternoon daycare from 3-6 (or when ever the parents picked their children up). I had never heard of the Indigo Children. These children were not like I was when I was in grade school! I showed respect for my teachers & authority figures (whether they deserved it or not) because I was a child & that was what was expected of me. When I was told to do something, I did it. It was very difficult for me, but I was afraid of getting in trouble. The children in my class & out at recess had no fear of getting in trouble. These (Indigo) children had a very difficult time standing in line, one little boy kept running up the slide after I told him not to & explained about getting hurt. Others would question every thing I said, still others found it almost impossible to stay in their seats during lesson time (or anytime for that matter) I had another boy who would go & hide when he got upset. I would explain things until I was blue in the face, TRY & give time outs, I was becoming frazzled beyond words! Fortunately for me, one of the Mothers brought me this book about the Indigo Children! She gave me a quick synopsis of the book & recommended I read it. I did. This book is a guide to help parents & teachers understand these amazing, beautiful children! Not everyone is going to agree with everything in this book. Take from it what you agree with & will benefit your child/children & dismiss what won't. There are no perfect parenting manuals, but if you're looking for a book that's got information & ideas, as well as nutrition suggestions, this is worth the read. Some things will apply to your situation, others won't. I found it very helpful when I was at my wits end. Good Luck : )

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sherrie

    OK i approached this book oin the recommendation of a friend, who is very much into new age philosophy, as am i.However this book is the biggest piece of garbage i ever spent money on. The whole philosophy of this book is that kids now are different than prior generations, which i tend to agree with.Their pproach to raising such kids is to basically put the control into their hands. One such idea was to "sell" a child time with something they enjoy, like TV or video games.They even thought it ma OK i approached this book oin the recommendation of a friend, who is very much into new age philosophy, as am i.However this book is the biggest piece of garbage i ever spent money on. The whole philosophy of this book is that kids now are different than prior generations, which i tend to agree with.Their pproach to raising such kids is to basically put the control into their hands. One such idea was to "sell" a child time with something they enjoy, like TV or video games.They even thought it marvelous when one child began to ask every time he was told to do something, "how much time will i get on my Nintendo?" This is dangerous thinking.In such a situation the control no longer belongs to the parent, but to the child. If the parent said "none" would the child be allowed to decline the request? Not in my house, let me tell you! Further the authors encourage parents to explain every detail of why they are doing everything to their kids, right down to telling a baby why they are changing their diaper! This kind of thinking only leads to children who think only of themselves and how everything affects them. I'm not suggesting that children should be seen and not heard, however kids are not adults and should not be treated as such, no matter what some new age guru (who freely admits that she never had any kids of her own) may say. This book is the self help version of snake oil in my opinion. Sounds great at first but after closer examination, its really nothing but a sham.

  4. 4 out of 5

    bellatuscana bellatuscana

    Give your kids the freedom without a world of medicine! Teach them real life lessons they have to learn to face the real world! Give your kids time and patience when it comes to their attention. The world of ADHD is a lot more far fetched then we would like to believe and medicine such as Ritalin is keeping our kids from growing up, only mellowing them out. If you grew up without medicine and your spouse grew up without medicine, do you really think your child needs medicine too? Whether the Ind Give your kids the freedom without a world of medicine! Teach them real life lessons they have to learn to face the real world! Give your kids time and patience when it comes to their attention. The world of ADHD is a lot more far fetched then we would like to believe and medicine such as Ritalin is keeping our kids from growing up, only mellowing them out. If you grew up without medicine and your spouse grew up without medicine, do you really think your child needs medicine too? Whether the Indigo's are real or not, we need to give our children the freedom to grow up into what they want rather than limit them in a world of medicine. And if they have a purpose, wanting to change the world for the better, we should nurture that! Don't let your kids rule the roost, but let them continue to want to make a difference. By the way, I am an indigo child. I can admit to having had some psychic experiences but I'm sure all of us have as well, indigo or not.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeannine

    I found this book fascinating and I'm interested in reading more information that has been published since this book came out. I'm not sure I buy into it completely, but the suggestions for working with indigo children really make sense when I look at the students I work with. I also had never heard of chronic reversed polarity which also has links to fibromyalgia. Again, I'm not sure what I think, but I found the theory fascinating.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carolina

    I loved this book. Even though I don't really agree with everything and not sure if my son would really be considered "indigo", I found the advise very useful and it makes a lot of sense. As a friend said, take what you need from them and forget the rest.

  7. 5 out of 5

    K AKUA GRAY

    The Indigo Children have been legends for a long time. As a primary school educator for more than two decades I personally witnessed the evolution of the kind of children that entered my classroom year after year. However, only after reading The Indigo Children by Lee Carroll and Jan Tober do I now fully understand that what I was seeing in the different types of children was a spiritual shift in consciousness. I like the approach these two authors take in writing this book. They are not trying t The Indigo Children have been legends for a long time. As a primary school educator for more than two decades I personally witnessed the evolution of the kind of children that entered my classroom year after year. However, only after reading The Indigo Children by Lee Carroll and Jan Tober do I now fully understand that what I was seeing in the different types of children was a spiritual shift in consciousness. I like the approach these two authors take in writing this book. They are not trying to convince you that special children have come into this world, instead they skillfully provided the testimony and research findings of expert educators, and counselors who have worked many years with children. They also provided the stories of parents and children to give first hand accounts that is clear evidence of their points. What is a indigo child? "...it is a child who displays a new and unusual set of psychological attributes... Read More http://drakuabookreviews.blogspot.com...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ginny

    Reading this book was like being trapped at the worst cocktail party ever, ears bent by crackpots with anecdotes about how "this generation" of children is "different" and "special" (one should understand of course that this is due to the evolved thinking of their grandparents and parents). I read it thinking that I might glean wisdom in odd places, but ended up thinking that some literary cul-de-sacs do not need exploration. At some point one of the "experts" said that Indigo children are brill Reading this book was like being trapped at the worst cocktail party ever, ears bent by crackpots with anecdotes about how "this generation" of children is "different" and "special" (one should understand of course that this is due to the evolved thinking of their grandparents and parents). I read it thinking that I might glean wisdom in odd places, but ended up thinking that some literary cul-de-sacs do not need exploration. At some point one of the "experts" said that Indigo children are brilliant but prone to violence in certain conditions. Reading her piece, I thought I understood how violence might be provoked. To add insult to injury, this book was also badly written. This may not be the worst book I have ever encountered, but none others actively spring to mind.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Brinkerhoff

    A very fascinating book the helps explain kids/adults that display traits and behaviors that may seem non-mainstream these days. I found that this book helped me identify and understand Indigos more clearly - which allows us to realize their thought process and to also help with the environment that they live in, the diet/nutrition that may "set them off", and just understanding their gifts that they have to offer. The book proposes that kids with ADD/ADHD may not necessarily have a "disorder", A very fascinating book the helps explain kids/adults that display traits and behaviors that may seem non-mainstream these days. I found that this book helped me identify and understand Indigos more clearly - which allows us to realize their thought process and to also help with the environment that they live in, the diet/nutrition that may "set them off", and just understanding their gifts that they have to offer. The book proposes that kids with ADD/ADHD may not necessarily have a "disorder", but infact may just need to be addressed differently than mainstream or traditional methods. Case studies included help to describe the changes that are possible.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sevda

    Every parent should read this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    very informative and intriguing. Going to pick up "Understanding your life through color" now. :)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karin Mitchell

    This was such utter and complete garbage that I couldn't even more than skim some chapters. Zero scientific basis for this. Just total gobbledygook. I can't even figure out what shelves to put this on because it's certainly not non-fiction and I can't say it's paranormal either. Just don't bother.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    The whole concept intrigues me. I've ordered the Color book . . .

  14. 4 out of 5

    Iona Stewart

    Indigo children are a new kind of children who have been coming into the world in recent years. They are termed Indigos because their auras have been found to be indigo in colour. I’ve been somewhat disappointed by this book due to the fact that Lee Carroll did not seem to want to let us know about his role as channeller of Kryon, as though this was too “weird”. Also, the role and function of Doreen Virtue, a main contributor to the book, as an angel expert I felt was extremely underplayed, as th Indigo children are a new kind of children who have been coming into the world in recent years. They are termed Indigos because their auras have been found to be indigo in colour. I’ve been somewhat disappointed by this book due to the fact that Lee Carroll did not seem to want to let us know about his role as channeller of Kryon, as though this was too “weird”. Also, the role and function of Doreen Virtue, a main contributor to the book, as an angel expert I felt was extremely underplayed, as though this too was weird. Also, there were so many different contributors to the book that I was somewhat confused as regards who was the author of whatever section I was reading. However, all in all I found it to be a useful book providing much valuable information about Indigos. I most appreciated the listing of the most common traits of Indigo children: 1) They come into the world with a feeling of royalty. 2) They have a feeling of deserving to be here. 3) Self-worth is not an issue. They often tell the parents who they are. 4) They have difficulties with absolute authority (without explanation or choice). 5) They simply will not do certain things, for example stand in a queue. 6) They get frustrated with systems that are ritual-oriented and don’t require creative thought. 7) They often see better ways of doing things and thus seem like “system-busters”. 8) They seem anti-social unless they are with their own kind. School is often extremely difficult for them socially. 9) They will not respond to “guilt” discipline” such as “Just wait until your father comes home!” 10) They are not shy in letting you know what they need. Many of these children have been diagnosed with ADHD and ADD, since they have excessive amounts of energy, bore easily, have a short attention span and cannot sit still unless absorbed in something of their own interest. Many will be labelled as hyperactive trouble-makers who won’t listen. “Indigos came to serve the planet, their parents, and their friends as emissaries from Heaven – bearers of wisdom, if listened to.” They appear to stay happy, are very spiritual, and have their own agenda. They demand much attention and can’t figure out why others operate in anything other than love. The advice given is to treat Indigos with respect, help them create their own disciplinary solutions and give them choices about everything. “ … if you give them authoritative, dictatorial orders without good, solid reasons, these kids will take you apart:” Indigos are open and honest – this is their greatest strength. There are sections written by various persons who themselves are parents of Indigo children and have thus special insight into them. We are advised not to medicate these children with Ritalin since it is obviously harmful, in that it causes biochemical imbalances. Instead, we could give the children a dietary supplement called Smart Start, which contains chelated minerals, antioxidant vitamins and “botanicals” (whatever these are, presumably something derived from plants). Many parents have found that this supplement helps tremendously. Other useful supplements are also recommended, particularly blue-green algae from Klamath Lake (before reading this book I had actually just ordered this supplement for myself to help me with detoxing). To sum up, I found this to be an important book in the understanding of these Indigo children, particularly since I have a grandchild who seems to be one. It provides helpful information and advice on how best to tackle them, and I would recommend it both to those with children with ADHD or ADD symptoms, or those who suspect their kids to be Indigos. (However, it is pointed out that all Indigos do not have ADHD or ADD, and all those with these symptoms are not Indigos.)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nastja

    More or less DNF'ed at 55%. I skimmed the second half of the book, but I couldn't bring myself to read it. There were so many things that bothered me, even though I'm open-minded about the topic itself. I didn't like phrases that went something like this: "The doctors said that the child had ADHD, but when we tested him at my office, it turned out he was extremely intelligent instead!" Like whoever has said that ADHD and intelligence are not compatible? This is a very strange interpretation from More or less DNF'ed at 55%. I skimmed the second half of the book, but I couldn't bring myself to read it. There were so many things that bothered me, even though I'm open-minded about the topic itself. I didn't like phrases that went something like this: "The doctors said that the child had ADHD, but when we tested him at my office, it turned out he was extremely intelligent instead!" Like whoever has said that ADHD and intelligence are not compatible? This is a very strange interpretation from the authors of the book. I also got really tired while reading multiple personal stories from the authors and co-authors and clients and random people who wanted to share their "special story". Why on Earth would I care for tens and tens of stories from random people, who are all basically saying the same thing - my child is special and talented and misunderstood? Some points the authors described as important in raising a child are just very basic things a parent should know, doesn't matter if their child is "indigo" or not. Like, respect your child, listen to your child, treat them as an equal. No shit, I didn't need the word "indigo" slapped on the cover of the book to find this piece of advice particularly great or topical. I'm just really sad that similar topics to this one are so often handled in a wrong way, going too deep into esoterics and being strongly against scientific findings. Why can't we talk about alternative topics without keeping anything "mainstream" in disregard? I still think there might be a small grain of truth to the "indigo children" phenomenon, I'm just not sure about the way the topic is handled, the "I talked to angels" and "my visions told me that" and "there was a special light around his head" stuff. Let's compromise a bit more, please. I truly do believe that we cannot explain every single thing scientifically and that there is more to life than just dry facts and proven findings. I believe in the spiritual, the hidden and the unresearchable (at least in the traditional scientific way). But I also believe in science, facts, experiments, and a rational, materialistic world. Integration is key. Radical spiritualism and radical rationalism are not.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Fox

    I had a difficult time getting through this book. I would like to rate it higher than I did, but I can't do that due to the slow start that this book offered. The last 100, 150 pages or so were good and engaging, but up to that point it was hard for me to read. The basic premise and lack of scientific credibility within the text made it a huge turn off to me. Previous reviewers have stated that the book is primarily crap due to the fact that the traits "Indigo Children" exhibit are the traits exhi I had a difficult time getting through this book. I would like to rate it higher than I did, but I can't do that due to the slow start that this book offered. The last 100, 150 pages or so were good and engaging, but up to that point it was hard for me to read. The basic premise and lack of scientific credibility within the text made it a huge turn off to me. Previous reviewers have stated that the book is primarily crap due to the fact that the traits "Indigo Children" exhibit are the traits exhibited by all children - not just those who are Indigo or suffering AD(H)D. I agree with that point, and furthermore, figure the statistic that now 90% of all children born are Indigo is a rather lame attempt to cover up such an obvious flaw in the argument. As the book went on I found myself able to relate to a lot of what the Indigo kids (16+) were describing as their own life experiences. I enjoyed the book due to my ability to relate to certain experiences and the overall soundness in the arguments presented for parenting and education reform. A certain amount of the techniques advocated I did not find very wise, or just thought were sycophantic. (i.e. not using the words "no" or "don't", etc.) An influx of positivity in the way that the book described just felt forced to me. All the same, the basic ideas presented were good and I found it for the most part an entertaining read if nothing else. Just stay away from the crazies.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I had heard about this book for years before I finally got my hands on a copy. What I heard about the book was great. I totally agree that the children being born now are different than previous children. I know even with my own children, the younger ones who are 12-14 years younger are very different children. I recognize qualities of an "Indigo" child in my sister's grand-children and anticipate these same qualities in my future grand-children. I also agree with the ideas in the book regarding I had heard about this book for years before I finally got my hands on a copy. What I heard about the book was great. I totally agree that the children being born now are different than previous children. I know even with my own children, the younger ones who are 12-14 years younger are very different children. I recognize qualities of an "Indigo" child in my sister's grand-children and anticipate these same qualities in my future grand-children. I also agree with the ideas in the book regarding education. Schools need to be better prepared for these children that are coming. Where an "Indigo" child was a minority before, I think the "Indigo" child will be the norm very soon. I think the book was a little too "New Age" to be widely accepted by the general population. I also agree with the alternate medicine ideas presented in this book. I skimmed the section about "re-incarnation" a little too out there for me. Change that to "pre-existance" I'm good with that.

  18. 4 out of 5

    The Cute Little Brown-haired girl

    While I believe in the concept of "some" children being especially gifted with knowledge and wisdom far beyond their years and with the inate ability to want to "save the planet"...I think that honestly, that all children have this ability and are intrinsically wanting to save that which adults have destroyed. I gave it a three star rating because it is a little too "woo-woo" for me, but the concept is a good one. I just wish the language of the book were a little more digestible for someone who While I believe in the concept of "some" children being especially gifted with knowledge and wisdom far beyond their years and with the inate ability to want to "save the planet"...I think that honestly, that all children have this ability and are intrinsically wanting to save that which adults have destroyed. I gave it a three star rating because it is a little too "woo-woo" for me, but the concept is a good one. I just wish the language of the book were a little more digestible for someone who is not a total granola earth muffin tree hugger with unshaved legs and dreads...if you catch my drift, man.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    Not reading it because I want to, reading it because it was "recommended" and I'll leave it at that so as not to incrimidate anyone. Nevermind!!! I won't even finish it because of the sheer stupidity of it all! Sorry but I don't believe children are born with the self-entitlement issues that are described. If perhaps parents spent time parenting instead of treating their princess or prince like a princess or prince we wouldn’t be having these issues and the need to explain away behaviors.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sammy Sutton

    Indigo Children by Lee Carroll, is well written and informative for a general audience of readers. It provides a blanket explanation for a reader interested in researching a new era of gifted children. Lee has my praise for staying away from claims that are too fantastical. However, if you have a gifted child that possesses skills you wish to research or learn about, I would suggest finding books or materials, which could provide a little more depth and substance.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    I think this was when I read it. I read this book to figure out the new children being born and how to work with them. The end of the book gives ideas how to tell the difference between ADDH and Indigo and foods, nutrients that they may need due to the high energy that they consume. For anyone with kids under the age of 25

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    I'm about half way through and I would agree with the authors that anyone who has children, or is around them should read this book! Our daughter of 9monts fits the bill. You can see she already knows her purpose. Interesting info on ADHD/ADD and how our school systems need to give up the old ways of teaching to better nuture and mentor our children.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Fiona Robson

    Read this after a couple of people referred to Nathanael as being an indigo. I agreed with those sentiments after reading this and began to recognise indigo traits in myself, too. However, I couldn't really see any basis for this theory and it was all a bit new agey for me to take too seriously.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hope

    If I could give zero stars, I would. I didn't even read it. I skimmed through looking to find something wonderful and was left feeling like it focused on the negative. Too bad. It's a fun topic, but this book just seemed yucky. I prefer books and things in life in general, that see things from a positive standpoint. This simply wasn't what I was looking for.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Meh. Little too New Age for me, and that is saying something. Too much "Show them respect, treat them as you would an adult, punishments don't work, logical consequences" immediately followed by suggestions for forced isolation, behavior reward charts (not chore, actual behavior), and using screen time as bargaining chips.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Heather Peck

    As the parent of an Indigo, this book helped me understand and relate to my Indigo child. That said, it was written in a sort of tacky manner and was rather annoying at times. It seemed every sentence ended in an exclamation point trying to convince the reader that the writers were THE BEST

  27. 4 out of 5

    Catalina Poiana

    A book about us, the ones aged between 10 and 28 y.o. It's a psychological book, which brings in the attention of the adults how to raise these "new children". Try it, and you will find a path to understanding yourselves:)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Maire

    I found this book annoying, badly written and so hard to read. I started it because I had been told about it several times and recommended it. So glad I didn't buy it. It's not often I don't finish a book but I just couldn't put myself through any more of it

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    This book was recommended to me by a friend. It definitely gets a little out there at times. I think it has some good info for parents and anyone who felt like an outsider as a child. Check it out, you just might learn something.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Richard Henerlau

    Excellent book on indigo children ADHD or autism diagnosis? Not so fast! Read this book to see what is really going on. Excellent read for anyone dealing with add or autism or anything like that.

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