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Water from the Sun and Discovering Japan

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In June, 2006, Picador launch Picador Shots, a new series of pocket-sized books priced at 1. The Shots aim to promote the short story as well as the work of some Picador's greatest authors. They will be contemporarily packaged but ultimately disposable books that are the ideal literary alternative to a magazine. Bret Easton Ellis' two short stories chronicle the lives of a In June, 2006, Picador launch Picador Shots, a new series of pocket-sized books priced at 1. The Shots aim to promote the short story as well as the work of some Picador's greatest authors. They will be contemporarily packaged but ultimately disposable books that are the ideal literary alternative to a magazine. Bret Easton Ellis' two short stories chronicle the lives of a group of Los Angele's residents all of them suffering from nothing less that death of the soul. Ellis has immense gift for dialogue, off-the-wall humour, merciless description and exotic bleakness. In 'Water from the Sun', Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage to William has broken down, she has moved in with a young boy half her age who is more interested in other young boys that in her and she keeps not turning up at work, the one area of her life that seems to be in good working order. To keep afloat she drinks, she shops and she takes pills. Would meeting up with William, something she has been avoiding like everything else in her life, give her what she needs anyway? In 'Discovering Japan', Bryan, is on tour. His manager, Roger, has taken him to Tokyo to promote his record and do a few gigs. But to get Roger out of hotel room, off the drink, drugs and women is going to be a tall enough feet itself for Bryan. Written with spare and hypnotic prose, this is a story about a man hell-bent on distruction by a writer deeply concerned with the moral decline of our society.


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In June, 2006, Picador launch Picador Shots, a new series of pocket-sized books priced at 1. The Shots aim to promote the short story as well as the work of some Picador's greatest authors. They will be contemporarily packaged but ultimately disposable books that are the ideal literary alternative to a magazine. Bret Easton Ellis' two short stories chronicle the lives of a In June, 2006, Picador launch Picador Shots, a new series of pocket-sized books priced at 1. The Shots aim to promote the short story as well as the work of some Picador's greatest authors. They will be contemporarily packaged but ultimately disposable books that are the ideal literary alternative to a magazine. Bret Easton Ellis' two short stories chronicle the lives of a group of Los Angele's residents all of them suffering from nothing less that death of the soul. Ellis has immense gift for dialogue, off-the-wall humour, merciless description and exotic bleakness. In 'Water from the Sun', Cheryl Lane is going under. Her marriage to William has broken down, she has moved in with a young boy half her age who is more interested in other young boys that in her and she keeps not turning up at work, the one area of her life that seems to be in good working order. To keep afloat she drinks, she shops and she takes pills. Would meeting up with William, something she has been avoiding like everything else in her life, give her what she needs anyway? In 'Discovering Japan', Bryan, is on tour. His manager, Roger, has taken him to Tokyo to promote his record and do a few gigs. But to get Roger out of hotel room, off the drink, drugs and women is going to be a tall enough feet itself for Bryan. Written with spare and hypnotic prose, this is a story about a man hell-bent on distruction by a writer deeply concerned with the moral decline of our society.

30 review for Water from the Sun and Discovering Japan

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    “Water from the Sun” and “Discovering Japan” are both excellent stories of burned out people abusing substances while slowly reaching the end of their tether and are great reads. However, both of these stories are included in Bret Easton Ellis’ short story collection “The Informers” which is far better value for money as you get an entire book’s worth of other fantastic stories as well.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Louise Atkin

    Not read any of his short stories before but they were good. I definitely preferred the first one but I recommend this if you're interested in trying out his prose style.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Redfox5

    I can't say this book did much for me. Didn't take very long to read, it passed the time while I was waiting for my boyfriend to get ready. The stories were okay but I didn't like one more than the other and I didn't feel very attached to them and I failed to connect with any of the characters.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Eben

    It was great to revisit these short stories which I originally read in The Informers (a short story collection by Bret Easton Ellis) Both stories consist of heavy portrayals of substance abuse, sexual misconduct, and relationship alienation, and somehow Ellis manages to make these issues seem inconsequential. Both protagonists should know better, and maybe they do, but they choose escapism and apathy as a buffer between them and "real world", yet you can't blame them because the portrayal of the It was great to revisit these short stories which I originally read in The Informers (a short story collection by Bret Easton Ellis) Both stories consist of heavy portrayals of substance abuse, sexual misconduct, and relationship alienation, and somehow Ellis manages to make these issues seem inconsequential. Both protagonists should know better, and maybe they do, but they choose escapism and apathy as a buffer between them and "real world", yet you can't blame them because the portrayal of the "real world" is so fucked up and out of touch with any moral code or compass that you eventually, genuinely, feel sorry for them. Some people might find that frustrating and demand characters who are smart enough to form some sort of reconciliation. Don't get me wrong, the characters do try, but the world won't allow them that peace of mind. They're surround by self-centered people who have become so jaded, so narcissistic, that the story beckons the question: what came first? The inconsolable protagonist or the disconsolate characters and world. A fitting exploration of nature vs. nurture.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Roberta De leo

    A 30 anni adoravo questo autore, cominciando dalla lettura folgorante di Meno di Zero. Dopo 20 anni posso dire che Ellis mi disgusta nella maniera più assoluta. Strano...eppure è così.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nayibe Castillo

    Tesoro encontrado en un pulguero por Central Park!!!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stamatios

    The two short stories in the book are an excellent introduction to Ellis's work and not having the stomach to read a full-length novel of his, I decided to give them a shot. It was exactly what I expected. Amoral, vacuous characters, unable to feel the tiniest sting of emotion, lost in a maze they can never exit, living forever in the same moment again and again, unable to break the vicious circle of addiction and pain. Ellis writes in long repeating sentences that take you on a roller-coaster ri The two short stories in the book are an excellent introduction to Ellis's work and not having the stomach to read a full-length novel of his, I decided to give them a shot. It was exactly what I expected. Amoral, vacuous characters, unable to feel the tiniest sting of emotion, lost in a maze they can never exit, living forever in the same moment again and again, unable to break the vicious circle of addiction and pain. Ellis writes in long repeating sentences that take you on a roller-coaster ride you want to get off from. The narrative that jumb-cuts from one scene to the next evokes the fragmented memories of a heavy drinker or a junkie. The words are dirty. The world stinks. The story lingers in your mind long after you've put the book down. There's no doubt Ellis is a master writer. The problem is that it's all taken to such extreme that his technique jumps out of the page and stares you in the face. The characters are not believable. They are just mannequins for Ellis's obsessions. The plot and the settings never become believable, they don't draw you into them. And for me, I guess the biggest turn-off was that I just couldn't get into this nihilist frame of mind. Ironically, I ended up thinking: what was the point of all this? Was it supposed to be a commentary on our hyper-consumerist society? Reality is way more different than that. Was I supposed to feel sorry for the main characters? Fuck them. They brought it all upon themselves, and hurt others in the process. Every review contains a mix of objective and subjective opinion. Was it a good book and did I enjoy it? Bret Easton Ellis may mark high scores as one of the greatest authors of our time, but I'm sorry to report that he is not my cup of tea. Will you find this review helpful? Probably not.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gavin Smith

    Honestly, there isn't much going on in either of these two stories that you won't find in an improved and more comprehensive form in any of Bret Easton Ellis' longer works. Thematically and narratively, this is very much the same drug-fueled world of self-involved nihilists that you can find throughout his writing. Surely though, Ellis must have a claim to be one of the most consistent literary writers of his time. His style always has the same propulsive rhythm and deadpan conclusion, like a po Honestly, there isn't much going on in either of these two stories that you won't find in an improved and more comprehensive form in any of Bret Easton Ellis' longer works. Thematically and narratively, this is very much the same drug-fueled world of self-involved nihilists that you can find throughout his writing. Surely though, Ellis must have a claim to be one of the most consistent literary writers of his time. His style always has the same propulsive rhythm and deadpan conclusion, like a pop song that can't be bothered to quite finish its own hook. If that sounds negative, it isn't supposed to. I love the beat of Ellis' writing. It's deceptively simple but so many other nineties writers have tried to do the same thing and failed. It is prose that just seems to scream (but followed by a shrug) to be read aloud.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jason Bosworthick

    These two short stories introduce the talent evident in Ellis (of American Psycho fame). The two stories explore similar themes of substance abuse and fame. What makes these works stand out for me is the natural dialogue within the stories. I admit that both tales aren't exactly filled with excitement but there is such natural, free-flowing speech that it reaches the reader...even should they be the most devoutly "clean" person going...on a familiar level. Worth a read for sure and for those, like These two short stories introduce the talent evident in Ellis (of American Psycho fame). The two stories explore similar themes of substance abuse and fame. What makes these works stand out for me is the natural dialogue within the stories. I admit that both tales aren't exactly filled with excitement but there is such natural, free-flowing speech that it reaches the reader...even should they be the most devoutly "clean" person going...on a familiar level. Worth a read for sure and for those, like myself, that haven't yet gotten round to works like American Psycho it certainly makes me want to sink my teeth into them sooner rather than later.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Richard Evans

    I'd say this is one for Bret Easton Ellis fans. I'd probably give Water from the Sun, which has the better title, 2 stars and Discovering Japan, which bears more similarity to Glamorama and Less than Zero 4 stars.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Duncan

    Was pretty disappointed with this book. It felt to me like a tired re-hash of the very similar ideas to those communicated much more powerfully in American Psycho.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Peter C

    Hadn't read these so glad available on Kindle. A bit of a curiosity more than anything, but perfectly enjoyable read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sediqa

    Brilliant. Naturally. Allows the reader to feel like a participant in the events that occur rather than an observer.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Short, but typically Easton-Ellis: dazed and confused characters, 1980s context, affluent types, not really likeable

  15. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    2 short stories by Ellis, both a bit blah.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lu Silva

  17. 5 out of 5

    Daria Tyuneva

  18. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

  19. 5 out of 5

    BushAll&APeck

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mark Quinn

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kate Cubitt

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vale 75

  24. 5 out of 5

    Grace

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amyfaerie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hilda

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Farmer

  29. 4 out of 5

    Athena

  30. 4 out of 5

    Deniz Aydemir

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