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Sibley's New Mexico Campaign

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Telling the story of the Texas invasion of New Mexico during the American Civil War, this edition also includes a map. It shows how in early 1862, Confederate General Henry Hopkins Sibley marched thirty-four hundred coarse Texas farmboys, cowhands, and frontiersmen into New Mexico. However, the Union volunteers defeated Sibley's Confederates. Telling the story of the Texas invasion of New Mexico during the American Civil War, this edition also includes a map. It shows how in early 1862, Confederate General Henry Hopkins Sibley marched thirty-four hundred coarse Texas farmboys, cowhands, and frontiersmen into New Mexico. However, the Union volunteers defeated Sibley's Confederates.


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Telling the story of the Texas invasion of New Mexico during the American Civil War, this edition also includes a map. It shows how in early 1862, Confederate General Henry Hopkins Sibley marched thirty-four hundred coarse Texas farmboys, cowhands, and frontiersmen into New Mexico. However, the Union volunteers defeated Sibley's Confederates. Telling the story of the Texas invasion of New Mexico during the American Civil War, this edition also includes a map. It shows how in early 1862, Confederate General Henry Hopkins Sibley marched thirty-four hundred coarse Texas farmboys, cowhands, and frontiersmen into New Mexico. However, the Union volunteers defeated Sibley's Confederates.

30 review for Sibley's New Mexico Campaign

  1. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    OfIn the first few sentences of this sad little book about a sad little chapter in the American Civil War, the author refers to that conflict as "The War for Southern Independence." That's probably to be expected for a piece of scholarship on the Confederacy's brief, comically unsuccessful attempt to conquer New Mexico-- for who else would invest the necessary hours of research but someone already convinced of the glory and righteousness of the southern cause? Martin Hall's prose is as sluggish a OfIn the first few sentences of this sad little book about a sad little chapter in the American Civil War, the author refers to that conflict as "The War for Southern Independence." That's probably to be expected for a piece of scholarship on the Confederacy's brief, comically unsuccessful attempt to conquer New Mexico-- for who else would invest the necessary hours of research but someone already convinced of the glory and righteousness of the southern cause? Martin Hall's prose is as sluggish and ineffective as General Sibley's under- equipped, underfed army. It's a pale member of that genre of pro-Southern civil war narrative exemplified by Shelby Foote. And yet, the facts (notwithstanding a couple of errors) are all there, and at the end of the day, Hall's analysis is balanced. While he could probably be more critical of Sibley's lackluster leadership, he's fairly complimentary of the competence of Sibley's opponent, Colonel Canby of the United States. There's not a ton of scholarship on the civil war fight for New Mexico and Arizona. It was after all a minor jag in a conflict that had some important, compelling drama further east. It was also over by the summer of 1862, early in the war. Hall's is probably the most rigorous of the scant literature on the subject, and, at that, is functional enough

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Hall's Sibley's New Mexico Campaign, since published in 1960, has been regarded as the best book on said campaign. This book is a second edition, which corrects some minor errors of spelling and confusion over names. This volume has definitely held up to the test of time! Hall's writing is concise, informative, and easy to read. He gives almost equal attention to the two sides (slightly more to the Confederates), and gives insightful analysis of the performance of the respective commanders in the Hall's Sibley's New Mexico Campaign, since published in 1960, has been regarded as the best book on said campaign. This book is a second edition, which corrects some minor errors of spelling and confusion over names. This volume has definitely held up to the test of time! Hall's writing is concise, informative, and easy to read. He gives almost equal attention to the two sides (slightly more to the Confederates), and gives insightful analysis of the performance of the respective commanders in the campaign. While not bashing Sibley, or giving in to citing rumors of his being drunk, Hill doesn't spare the general where he thinks he went wrong. Sibley's unrealistic planning and absence from the major battles of the campaign are two major examples. Sibley's counterpart, Edward R. S. Canby, is shown as almost his complete opposite. Canby was prudent, patient, and capable. These traits don't make for flashy stories of battlefield glory, but they did help save New Mexico for the Union. Overall, I'd say you can't beat this book for coverage of this little-known Civil War campaign. The coverage of the armies and their leaders is well thought out and balanced, and the narrative is concise and easy to follow. My only complaint is that the book could have used some more maps.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Very pleased to find this good account of a very obscure theater in the Civil War. I remember seeing the Glorieta Pass battlefield site back when I was working in Santa Fe in 1996-1998, but I never really knew the timeframe or background, historical figures involved, etc. It was fascinating to read that this was really for all effective purposes just a second invasion of New Mexico by Texas adventurers, albeit this time in Confederate uniforms and in 1862, 20 years after the Republic of Texas "f Very pleased to find this good account of a very obscure theater in the Civil War. I remember seeing the Glorieta Pass battlefield site back when I was working in Santa Fe in 1996-1998, but I never really knew the timeframe or background, historical figures involved, etc. It was fascinating to read that this was really for all effective purposes just a second invasion of New Mexico by Texas adventurers, albeit this time in Confederate uniforms and in 1862, 20 years after the Republic of Texas "filibuster" invasion in 1841. It had the same effect as the original invasion: the hostile landscape, challenge of the logistics and simple length of the invasion route, and lack of secured supply lines defeated the effort more so than the military challenges. It's very strange how very little discussion this campaign merits in discussions of Texas History. Can't say I even recall a mention of it in the Bob Bullock state museum, where the battles of Galveston have first billing, but I'll look more carefully next time due to this book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    A campaign was launched during the American Civil War to capture New Mexico and possibly the American Southwest all the way to the Pacific Ocean. It started in San Antonio, Texas.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  6. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dan

  8. 4 out of 5

    William

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rich

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Bohnhoff

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lance Weller

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ray Nowell

  14. 4 out of 5

    Erik Charles

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rocky Farr

  16. 5 out of 5

    David Morales

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gary

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kalerney

  19. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gary

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Sabetta

  22. 5 out of 5

    Peter

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vince

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  25. 5 out of 5

    John Cross

  26. 4 out of 5

    Igrowastreesgrow

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stanislav

  28. 5 out of 5

    Henry Davis IV

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joel Michael Podlaski

  30. 5 out of 5

    Noah

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