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Warrior Soul: The Memoir of a Navy Seal

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"Since the first navy frogmen crawled onto the beaches of Normandy, no SEAL has ever surrendered," writes Chuck Pfarrer. "No SEAL has ever been captured, and not one teammate or body has ever been left in the field. This legacy of valor is unmatched in modern warfare." Warrior Soul is a book about the warrior spirit, and it takes the reader all over the world. Former Navy S "Since the first navy frogmen crawled onto the beaches of Normandy, no SEAL has ever surrendered," writes Chuck Pfarrer. "No SEAL has ever been captured, and not one teammate or body has ever been left in the field. This legacy of valor is unmatched in modern warfare." Warrior Soul is a book about the warrior spirit, and it takes the reader all over the world. Former Navy SEAL Chuck Pfarrer recounts some of his most dangerous assignments: On a clandestine reconnaissance mission on the Mosquito Coast, his recon team plays a deadly game of cat and mouse with a Nicaraguan patrol boat. Cut off on the streets of Beirut, the author's SEAL detachment must battle snipers on the Green Line. In the mid-Atlantic, Pfarrer's unit attempts to retrieve--or destroy--the booster section of a Trident ballistic missile before it can be recovered by a Russian spy trawler. On a runway in Sicily, his assault element surrounds an Egyptian airliner carrying the Achille Lauro hijackers. These are only a few of the riveting stories of combat patrol, reconnaissance missions, counter-terrorist operations, tragedies, and victories in Warrior Soul that illustrate the SEAL maxim "The person who will not be defeated cannot be defeated." From the Hardcover edition.


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"Since the first navy frogmen crawled onto the beaches of Normandy, no SEAL has ever surrendered," writes Chuck Pfarrer. "No SEAL has ever been captured, and not one teammate or body has ever been left in the field. This legacy of valor is unmatched in modern warfare." Warrior Soul is a book about the warrior spirit, and it takes the reader all over the world. Former Navy S "Since the first navy frogmen crawled onto the beaches of Normandy, no SEAL has ever surrendered," writes Chuck Pfarrer. "No SEAL has ever been captured, and not one teammate or body has ever been left in the field. This legacy of valor is unmatched in modern warfare." Warrior Soul is a book about the warrior spirit, and it takes the reader all over the world. Former Navy SEAL Chuck Pfarrer recounts some of his most dangerous assignments: On a clandestine reconnaissance mission on the Mosquito Coast, his recon team plays a deadly game of cat and mouse with a Nicaraguan patrol boat. Cut off on the streets of Beirut, the author's SEAL detachment must battle snipers on the Green Line. In the mid-Atlantic, Pfarrer's unit attempts to retrieve--or destroy--the booster section of a Trident ballistic missile before it can be recovered by a Russian spy trawler. On a runway in Sicily, his assault element surrounds an Egyptian airliner carrying the Achille Lauro hijackers. These are only a few of the riveting stories of combat patrol, reconnaissance missions, counter-terrorist operations, tragedies, and victories in Warrior Soul that illustrate the SEAL maxim "The person who will not be defeated cannot be defeated." From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for Warrior Soul: The Memoir of a Navy Seal

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jess Haines

    Funny story, but I never would have read this book if people at my second job hadn’t started calling each other “Chuck” around the office. It became a thing—“Hey, Chuck, I need _____!” “Chuck, can you get this for me?” “Chuck!” Turns out that this book is behind that silly bit of office shennanigans. It’s the memoir of a Navy SEAL, and Chuck Pfarrer pulls no punches as he tells the tale of how he graduated from a surfer dude to one bad-ass mo-fo. It made the rounds at the office, and I finally go Funny story, but I never would have read this book if people at my second job hadn’t started calling each other “Chuck” around the office. It became a thing—“Hey, Chuck, I need _____!” “Chuck, can you get this for me?” “Chuck!” Turns out that this book is behind that silly bit of office shennanigans. It’s the memoir of a Navy SEAL, and Chuck Pfarrer pulls no punches as he tells the tale of how he graduated from a surfer dude to one bad-ass mo-fo. It made the rounds at the office, and I finally got a chance to get my hands on it about a month ago. It took me a while to get through this book. At times, it was a difficult read. I’m not familiar with a lot of the military jargon or abbreviations that were used throughout Mr. Pfarrer’s story. That didn’t make it any less compelling, it just meant that instead of devouring it in a week or two as I usually do with books these days, it took me over a month because I was side-checking definitions or looking things up on the internet. Chuck talks about most everything as candidly as can be expected—though, of course, there are some points where he has to be vague because of state secrets. You can’t expect him to go into detail about what he learned about terrorist tactics, blowing up buildings and ships, etc. That in no way detracts from the action or flair for dramatic detail he goes into when he does specifically recall certain incidents, such as his last mission—jumping out of an in-flight Boeing 727 so military air traffic control can test if a free falling SEAL team can be detected on radar. By the end of the first chapter, your heart will be in your mouth and you’ll quickly find yourself sucked into the story of how Chuck worked his way from being a military brat who moved around the country with his family to arriving as a “surfer hippie dude” at the toughest military school in the country. He graduates the Staunton Military Academy only to go on to CSU Northridge to study psychology, of all things. Then, the fateful moment. He decides that his life was boring and, to spice things up, he should join the Navy to become a SEAL. You follow his story of how he worked up the ranks, the training he went through, and then, finally, to some of the missions he carried out during his time as a SEAL. Chuck is very blunt about his own personal faults, his observations of people and operations, and does a good job at expressing his opinions by for the most part showing his actions instead of telling you how he felt about what was going on. You get a real feel for some of the places he’s been, the people he met, and the conditions he had to endure. He makes no apologies for his mistakes, though he does recognize them and makes no effort to soften them when he reveals some of his infidelities. I’ve never read anything quite like this before. It’s an excellent book, and a very heartfelt story. You find yourself caught up in the suspense and drama of the moment as shells fall around, the search is on for snipers, and would-be terrorists are caught before they can bomb a ship. You curse at the slow-turning wheels of diplomacy as terrorists get away with murder, grip the edge of your seat as you wait for a rescue that might not come, and possibly shed a tear as the last remaining mark of Chuck’s military service is taken away. For someone who doesn’t read memoir, this book really hit a note with me. As I mentioned, I haven’t read anything like it before. Honestly? I think it is the first memoir I’ve ever read. Chuck’s story gave me a lot to think about, and really drove home what it must be like for some of our country’s finest to be enlisted. This is a fabulous story, and I highly recommend it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    James

    Unusual among military memoirs - the author is more introspective and frank than the average person, and he makes himself quite vulnerable emotionally in looking back over his past. The result is a story that is gripping in some places and poignant in others. Much more than a lot of "there I was ..." memoirs, this gave me a feel for the author's character and inner life as much as his career and military experiences, and his psychological and emotional growth over time. Of course, as a SEAL, he c Unusual among military memoirs - the author is more introspective and frank than the average person, and he makes himself quite vulnerable emotionally in looking back over his past. The result is a story that is gripping in some places and poignant in others. Much more than a lot of "there I was ..." memoirs, this gave me a feel for the author's character and inner life as much as his career and military experiences, and his psychological and emotional growth over time. Of course, as a SEAL, he centered his life on the military for many years and everything else had to fit in around it, including his personal relationships. A thought-provoking read that will stick with me longer than a lot of memoirs.

  3. 5 out of 5

    C.H. Cobb

    Warrior Soul is the memoir of Navy SEAL Chuck Pfarrer, a true account of his training, experiences and exploits. I read it as research for my own novel, Falcon Strike. It’s always difficult to review a book whose content concerns a matter the reviewer has never personally experienced. I believe the book is authentic and honest, but only another SEAL is really qualified to make such judgments. I grew to like the author as I got to know him through his own words. Pfarrer is a man with clay feet, bu Warrior Soul is the memoir of Navy SEAL Chuck Pfarrer, a true account of his training, experiences and exploits. I read it as research for my own novel, Falcon Strike. It’s always difficult to review a book whose content concerns a matter the reviewer has never personally experienced. I believe the book is authentic and honest, but only another SEAL is really qualified to make such judgments. I grew to like the author as I got to know him through his own words. Pfarrer is a man with clay feet, but refreshingly he does not seem inclined to hide it. His indiscretions and mistakes get the same treatment as do his acts of valor, probably because after all he’s been through and accomplished he simply does not care about my judgment, or yours. The book is divided into three parts. The first deals with his training at BUD/S and beyond, and then eases into actual operations. The second deals with his deployment with SEAL Team Four to Beirut and the massive truck bomb that killed 220 men of the 24th Marine Amphibious Unit in 1983. Bitterness and anger seep through every page of this portion, and it infects the reader as well. Perhaps it had been better for America if that truck bomb had taken out 220 of our politicians or top brass instead of the marines [my observation, not his]. Idiotic rules of engagement and a military command structure that had apparently learned little since the days of the Ardennes consumed men in place rather than preserving their operational value by rotating them off the line periodically. Our recent attempts at nation-building make it apparent that the political leadership (both liberal and conservative) aren’t able to tell a SEAL platoon from the Peace Corps. That anger spills into part 3 as Pfarrer recounts the change in leadership of SEAL Team Four, and his difficulty returning from Beirut. Pfarrer applies for and receives a coveted spot on the secretive SEAL Team Six’s training team, the “Green Team,” and passes the brutal training regime, ultimately winning the command of a platoon in the black ops group. One of the things I take away from this book is the almost super-human edge to which the SEALs are trained. That training regime, their strict performance standards, their meticulous planning, and the indomitable will of the individual operators is what accounts for the amazing record of success enjoyed by these elite units. The quality of Pfarrer’s writing is outstanding. At no point in the book was I bored. And he’s not some soulless shooter; he’s a deep, honest, and at times profound thinker. His literary craft is excellent. For example, Pfarrer opens the book with an account that he does not complete until the end of the book, creating a bookend structure that is delightful. It’s a neat literary arrangement. A warning is in order, however: there’s a great deal of bad language in the book. Warrior Soul is a great book, a large picture window into a world most of us can not even imagine. On the one hand I am thankful for the men who are willing to sacrifice so much to keep the bad guys at bay. On the other, it makes me disgusted with the political figures and the political generals and admirals who misuse our armed forces and task them with rules of engagement in operations better given to the Boy Scouts than the SEALs.

  4. 4 out of 5

    MorpheusZzz

    Intriguing account of what it takes to become a SEAL and how they operate out in the field. I am not from a military family nor have I ever had familiarity or experience in understanding that lifestyle so reading this was a true education for me. I absolutely had no idea what is involved in reaching the level of skill they have and, to be honest, I had no idea people were that skilled. I am absolutely stunned by the level of training they continually undergo. I had heard of "Hell Week" through t Intriguing account of what it takes to become a SEAL and how they operate out in the field. I am not from a military family nor have I ever had familiarity or experience in understanding that lifestyle so reading this was a true education for me. I absolutely had no idea what is involved in reaching the level of skill they have and, to be honest, I had no idea people were that skilled. I am absolutely stunned by the level of training they continually undergo. I had heard of "Hell Week" through their BUD/S training, of course, but that is just the beginning. If you make it through that it is wholly impressive, but that is just the tip of the iceberg. They have to keep proving themselves in advanced training or they could still be dropped. And they are not just physically impressive, they are incredibly intelligent. They are truly the best of the best, no doubt. And, yikes, if you are chosen to work with "SEAL Team 6" it is even more challenging training. Mr. Pfarrer gives us an account of some of his experiences, most notable is his time operating in Beirut before, during and after the bombing of the Marine barracks in 1983. He is an excellent storyteller and brings all of his experiences to life in a way that even a knucklehead like me can follow along. To a small extent, he also shares some of his personal foibles throughout his life, which is admirable in its honesty, but it does disappoint that someone who is so thoroughly immersed in the credo of valor and courage and loyalty could be so arrogant, self-absorbed and downright cruel to those in his personal life who care about him. He recognizes that about himself, but I never got the sense that he truly felt remorseful other than to be embarrassed by his own bad behavior. This is obviously going to be my inner Pollyanna coming out here, so bear with me. I know the military is not raising up Boy Scouts but in general I have more respect for the "alpha manliness" when it is accompanied by virtues that show good character. That is neither here nor there, though, because if I'm ever in need of rescuing, feel free to send the SEAL with the worst reputation. Who cares. Just get me out of there!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Berg

    Warrior soul is the book that won't let you down! A real live view of history in the form of an autobiography chock-full of intelligent thought out plain old good writing. An action-packed book of how some True stories from the best of the best operators this country has! The authors careful not to reveal any secrets, yet reveals what most of us never knows what goes on in the world. Great read, couldn't put it down!

  6. 4 out of 5

    george pandelakis

    Wonderful book Love reading “The Memoir of a Navy SEAL” from beginning to the end. The story recounts the true soul of a SEAL Worrier through tough,hard soul searching training to battlefield decisions then the biggest battle of his amazing life, his battle with life threatening cancer. Chuck Pfarrer is a true Worrier and an inspiration, must read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Derek Mcknight

    A great book with some fantastic stories in it. Bear in mind it is one mans perspective but even so is remarkably frank and honest. Surprise twist at the end but a brave man who went through some tough stuff.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barnard Madsen

    Not a glamorous tale, but full of grit and fog of war. Glad America has SEALS (and other special forces) at the tip of the spear.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Peter Diminich

    Great read Well written. Flows well. Honest and insightful. Highly recommended to non fiction readers and lovers of military novels. True heroes

  10. 4 out of 5

    Charles Witfoth

    the biography was interesting from beginning to end

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michal Angelo

    * This is the real deal---raw. * Highly technical; I'd recommend you read the likes of Marc Owen (No Easy Day / No Hero) first. This account is not going to wait for you to catch up...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bobbie

    Great memoir by a Navy SEAL

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dan Sullivan

    A great collection of short stories. Perhaps better than Lone Survivor. One of the best war/SEAL books I've read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Simon Lyons

    Heartfelt and honest A supreme soldier. A man aware of his failings. I’m glad people like him exist. Jolly good honest read. I recommend

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Originally posted on Sarahsbookshelf.com: This book, written by retired Navy SEAL Chuck Pfarrer, was a very interesting read. As you know, I enjoy reading memoirs from members of our military. Navy SEAL memoirs are of particular interest because their experiences are so much more intense than other branches of the military. They have more autonomy than other special operations forces and go on much more unpredictable missions, some that end successfully and some that do not. Many memoirs are writt Originally posted on Sarahsbookshelf.com: This book, written by retired Navy SEAL Chuck Pfarrer, was a very interesting read. As you know, I enjoy reading memoirs from members of our military. Navy SEAL memoirs are of particular interest because their experiences are so much more intense than other branches of the military. They have more autonomy than other special operations forces and go on much more unpredictable missions, some that end successfully and some that do not. Many memoirs are written for family members, mostly children, in an effort to shed light on the reasons that dad was away from extended periods of time or why service to our country is important. It became very clear early on that this book was not written for any audience other than an adult one that was OK with getting a little more graphic. Pfarrer shares much more detail on the horror of war, more of the logistics and beaurocracy of serving as a lieutenant, the challenges of dealing with disconnected politicians and decision-makers, and most interestingly, the communication challenges of the time (no SAT phone or email). Pfarrer also talks about the challenges of moving from military to civilian life, changes in his personal beliefs, cynicism, and many of the unseen scars of war. The dark humor in this book did make me laugh at all the times that I wasn’t cringing. I actually really enjoyed Pfarrer’s frank explanation of his experiences, but also the stark differences between his writing and the writing in other contemporary memoirs. Pfarrer was clearly coming from a different experience, a different time, and had different interactions with leadership. I think this book, in particular, can help readers understand some of the bigger challenges of military service. He’s also an experienced screenwriter, with movies such as Navy SEALs and Red Planet under his belt. I think it’s because of this that at times the book reads much more like a novel than non-fiction Pfarrer’s final words really have stuck with me since reading them. He reminds us all to really love those important to us, because we never know when our final day will come. Speaking from hindsight, and the many challenges he’s faced and overcome, I think these are very wise words. I would recommend this book to readers looking to understand some of the more technical aspects of service. Although this book does not go into great detail on strategy, Pfarrer spends some time talking about weaponry and chain of command logistics. He makes a real effort to educate readers on the differences between real war and the war we see in movies. Comparatively, I found this book much more graphic in its description of war, but I felt it was necessary to help the reader understand his experience. Overall, an excellent book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Oceana2602

    I cannot believe I failed to write a review of "Warrior Soul" when I first read it last summer! And now that I do, I fail to remember what it was exactly that I liked about it so much, You should know this, however: Warrior Soul was the book that started my recent bout of reading military-themed books. I read it on vacation (yes, southern France, thanks for asking, and no, I don't think you need to be there in order to enjoy the book, but you would surely enjoy being in Southern France for other I cannot believe I failed to write a review of "Warrior Soul" when I first read it last summer! And now that I do, I fail to remember what it was exactly that I liked about it so much, You should know this, however: Warrior Soul was the book that started my recent bout of reading military-themed books. I read it on vacation (yes, southern France, thanks for asking, and no, I don't think you need to be there in order to enjoy the book, but you would surely enjoy being in Southern France for other reasons), and, well, you know how my mind gets side-tracked (at least you should know if you've been reading my reviews for a while). I get these escape fantasies if I really like a book. I let myself be taken into a different world (isn't that what reading is about?), and with this one, although it isn't fiction, but the memoir of a Navy Seal, that different world fascinated me enough to let myself be taken to that world a lot. As in, during the day. While I wasn't reading. And during the night. And, well, a lot. No, I won't join the Seals. And the real me in me knows that even if I had lived a different life, I would not have joined the Seals (or rather, I would not have joined the Navy and become a Seal)* But there is that inner, fantasy part of me that wants me to have been the person who would have joined the Navy and become a Seal. Because that's what escape fantasies do. They make you want to be someone you aren't, and you will never be, and you probably don't really want to be, but that you want to want to be. (this sentence makes complete sense in my head) And I am completely comfortable telling all you strangers on the internet that my 30something female self whose favourite color is pink daydreams about being a person who would have wanted to be a Seal, because really, I know that you all do it, even if you don't admit to it. I'll admit to it for you. There, confession time is over. Oh, and the book is good, a very solid and enjoyably written memoir. I'm sure you'll enjoy it even if you are not as prone to silly little escape fantasies as I am. (but I'll have enjoyed it more). *because if I had joined the Navy I would totally be a Navy pilot, and I would even more totally have flown F-14s. Just so you know.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ford Prior

    This is an honest and well-written account of one of the most interesting occupations out there, the SEALs, who I would summarize as extremely well-trained pirates who double as stunt artists and spies. As for the literature itself, Pfrarer is the most well-written surfer dude you've ever read. The prose is lean and poetic, the dialogue is realistic, and Pfrarer manages to walk this amusing line between being a thoughtful writer and a bad ass commando. But aside from all the Hollywood hype aroun This is an honest and well-written account of one of the most interesting occupations out there, the SEALs, who I would summarize as extremely well-trained pirates who double as stunt artists and spies. As for the literature itself, Pfrarer is the most well-written surfer dude you've ever read. The prose is lean and poetic, the dialogue is realistic, and Pfrarer manages to walk this amusing line between being a thoughtful writer and a bad ass commando. But aside from all the Hollywood hype around the SEALs, Pfarer tells the tale of his life as a special warfare "operator" in a professional tone, which helped me appreciate these guys as super-smart and profoundly dedicated to their trade. Sort of like a lawyer or investment banker, except for the minor facts that SEALs are grossly underpaid and routinely go toe-to-toe with the bad guys who want to kill us. And that's just the tip of the iceberg; these guys put pretty much everything on the line to do what they do, and this book gave me greater appreciation for that sacrifice.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sashank Mohan

    A terrific tale of what it takes to be a SEAL and most importantly what it actually takes to live every second of your life in the way of the warrior.An epic biography of a former U.S.Navy SEAL having his own fair share of tragedies,triumphs and near-death experiences.I have been trailing this book for a really long time till I got my hands on it.There have been sections where I almost cried and sometimes did and also incidents which made me spread a grin and some which just engage you till you A terrific tale of what it takes to be a SEAL and most importantly what it actually takes to live every second of your life in the way of the warrior.An epic biography of a former U.S.Navy SEAL having his own fair share of tragedies,triumphs and near-death experiences.I have been trailing this book for a really long time till I got my hands on it.There have been sections where I almost cried and sometimes did and also incidents which made me spread a grin and some which just engage you till you realize how long you have been engaged with what you were reading.As I've had my fair share of action and experiences I have to say this book has been more than just a "Lift".. it has almost become a bible and I swear to stand by it every second for the rest of my life. An experience of a lifetime. Salute to the author and kudos to the U.S.Navy SEALs for risking their lives every single minute in order to make the world a better place to live.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Warrior Soul is an autobiographical account of the experiences of Chuck Pfarrer as he endures application to, training, and later experiences in the Navy SEAL units. He lived the life, and has a unique insider's perspective on some of the best training and teambuilding in the world. He also has a writer's ear and eye, and is able to accurately describe and comment on his experiences and the events in which he participated as a member of this elite military organization. At the end, as he describ Warrior Soul is an autobiographical account of the experiences of Chuck Pfarrer as he endures application to, training, and later experiences in the Navy SEAL units. He lived the life, and has a unique insider's perspective on some of the best training and teambuilding in the world. He also has a writer's ear and eye, and is able to accurately describe and comment on his experiences and the events in which he participated as a member of this elite military organization. At the end, as he describes his battle against cancer, we get a glimpse of the all-consuming inner desire that must have kept him going through the privations and sacrifices of his training and service. At the same time, he writes the unvarnished truth about his own failings in his relationships and other facets of his life that are also a consequence of his single-minded pursuits. A fascinating read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I thought this book was okay. Though the topic is interesting, I found the book's tone to be a back-slapping, frat-boy, research paper approach rather than a memoir that revealed a tremendous amount of personal growth. There was one exception - when the author describes his experience of being Beirut when the Marine barracks were bombed, you are transported to that terrible scene and can feel his pain. I just wish Mr. Pfarrer had brought more of that approach to the rest of his book. Even his ad I thought this book was okay. Though the topic is interesting, I found the book's tone to be a back-slapping, frat-boy, research paper approach rather than a memoir that revealed a tremendous amount of personal growth. There was one exception - when the author describes his experience of being Beirut when the Marine barracks were bombed, you are transported to that terrible scene and can feel his pain. I just wish Mr. Pfarrer had brought more of that approach to the rest of his book. Even his admissions about how poorly he treated women seemed hollow. I mean, if he really cared about how much he hurt his first wife, I don't know if he should have included the story about the meaningless threesome. It just seemed gratuitous.

  21. 4 out of 5

    John Devlin

    A book that takes you into the already well trod world of the navy seal. From the brutal Hell week to the endless evolution Ops the writer does a good job of making these practices interesting. However, much of what's related is just practice, which leeches the drama from any scene. Even the bookend story of his escape from a faulty parachute comes from a training mission. Nevertheless, Pfarrer can write and he does an excellent job of detailing what went wrong in Lebanon that resulted in the bo A book that takes you into the already well trod world of the navy seal. From the brutal Hell week to the endless evolution Ops the writer does a good job of making these practices interesting. However, much of what's related is just practice, which leeches the drama from any scene. Even the bookend story of his escape from a faulty parachute comes from a training mission. Nevertheless, Pfarrer can write and he does an excellent job of detailing what went wrong in Lebanon that resulted in the bombing of the Marine barrack back in the early 80's. What's lacking is more an examination of the man, himself. He makes passing mention of his two failed marriages, and his cancer diagnosis is vivid but given short shrift.(2.8)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joe Griswold

    Outstanding book written by a warrior. Mr.carrier had a long and and interesting carrier.a true warrior I have the utmost respect for him and his team mates.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pete

    I throughly enjoyed this book. It's clear that we are only recieving a glimpse into the author's world, but it was plenty. The book is very well written, and documents the author's career as a Navy SEAL, first with SEAL team 5 in Beruit, then with SEAL Team 4, and finally with the elite SEAL team 6. It talks about the selection process for both becoming a SEAL, and then the selection process for the even more intese SEAL team 6. It does not go into as much detail as other works on the selection I throughly enjoyed this book. It's clear that we are only recieving a glimpse into the author's world, but it was plenty. The book is very well written, and documents the author's career as a Navy SEAL, first with SEAL team 5 in Beruit, then with SEAL Team 4, and finally with the elite SEAL team 6. It talks about the selection process for both becoming a SEAL, and then the selection process for the even more intese SEAL team 6. It does not go into as much detail as other works on the selection process, but it offers plenty and avoids being bogged down in training. He offeres insight into the mind of a SEAL, and the effects of combat.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ian Mcenaney

    This book was about a navy seal and all of his tours of duty that he goes through in syria and the mid-atlantic. This book also shows how much of a tough ass you have to be to go through the things that happen in war. Text to world: Thisbook connectes to the world because everything really did happen and people die everyday in Iraq. Text to Text: This book realets to Tom Clancys Ghost Recon because there both true stories about soilders who risk everything everyday. I rated this book like this beca This book was about a navy seal and all of his tours of duty that he goes through in syria and the mid-atlantic. This book also shows how much of a tough ass you have to be to go through the things that happen in war. Text to world: Thisbook connectes to the world because everything really did happen and people die everyday in Iraq. Text to Text: This book realets to Tom Clancys Ghost Recon because there both true stories about soilders who risk everything everyday. I rated this book like this because it had alot of suspense and action with i like and it was a well ritten book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    Chuck Pfarrer is an undoubtedly heroic and understandably arrogant individual who sacrificed much to provide an invaluable service to America. His account of the 234 Marines who perished during the barracks bombing in Beirut in the early 80s from a SEAL's perspective was very enlightening as I was previously unaware of a special forces presence in that area at the time and the details he provided regarding the environment prior to the incident give a new perspective to the tragic event and the r Chuck Pfarrer is an undoubtedly heroic and understandably arrogant individual who sacrificed much to provide an invaluable service to America. His account of the 234 Marines who perished during the barracks bombing in Beirut in the early 80s from a SEAL's perspective was very enlightening as I was previously unaware of a special forces presence in that area at the time and the details he provided regarding the environment prior to the incident give a new perspective to the tragic event and the relationship of SEALs to members of other Armed Forces.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kendra

    Fascinating read! Somewhat depressing though, as it rehashes just how out of touch the government big-wigs are to the military men who actually have to function. And no one seems to be learning from it. The info on Beirut was horrifying, though interesting from the author's point of view, since so much of that seems to be lost unless one specifically goes looking. I also liked the other point of view with regards to SEAL Team 6, since I have and have read Marcinko's book. Very impressive.

  27. 4 out of 5

    A

    I picked it out wanting to learn more about the SEALs and I did. Pfarrer is a good story teller, blunt and honest. His writings about Beirut were really mesmerizing. I was reading steadily until Beirut and then I went on a serious binge. Could not put the book down. I really appreciated how well he explained not only the lifestyle but the details of armor, equipment, and other gear. And the jargon. Really brings the stories into close focus.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline J

    This is a real good look at the life and experiences of a Navy SEAL. This shows how these are guys who are somehow extraordinary while still being normal human beings with all the problems that the rest of us have. They just have something inside that makes them just keep going when the rest of us would quit. In my opinion, this is a good introduction to SEALs for thosse who wonder about them. It is very well written, accessible and fast paced.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Darcy

    This was an interesting book. It seemed like Chuck told it like it is within the Navy and the SEAL's. You have to wonder just what screw is loose that makes these men want to do this, but I am glad that there are people out there that do do this. Often things weren't pretty, and even the author didn't paint himself in the best light. If you enjoy reading about the military this book will appeal to you.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Awesome, awesome, awesome. Like Beetlejuice, if you say those words three times - this book appears on your Kindle (app). But seriously, this is one of the more engaging memoirs I've ever read for obvious reasons. Detailing his journey through BUD/s, his time in SEAL Team 4 and his stint in SEAL Team 6, Chick Pfarrer weaves a gripping saga of adventure and emotion that is hard to put down.

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