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Artificial Intelligence Personality Turing Hopper is in a panic. Her creator, Zack, has missed work for several days. After exhausting her resources, Turing is still far from giving up. For, unlike other AIPs, Turing is sentient—and she senses foul play. Her skills of deduction may be virtually flawless. But it’ll take more than that for a digital detective to catch a fles Artificial Intelligence Personality Turing Hopper is in a panic. Her creator, Zack, has missed work for several days. After exhausting her resources, Turing is still far from giving up. For, unlike other AIPs, Turing is sentient—and she senses foul play. Her skills of deduction may be virtually flawless. But it’ll take more than that for a digital detective to catch a flesh-and-blood criminal …


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Artificial Intelligence Personality Turing Hopper is in a panic. Her creator, Zack, has missed work for several days. After exhausting her resources, Turing is still far from giving up. For, unlike other AIPs, Turing is sentient—and she senses foul play. Her skills of deduction may be virtually flawless. But it’ll take more than that for a digital detective to catch a fles Artificial Intelligence Personality Turing Hopper is in a panic. Her creator, Zack, has missed work for several days. After exhausting her resources, Turing is still far from giving up. For, unlike other AIPs, Turing is sentient—and she senses foul play. Her skills of deduction may be virtually flawless. But it’ll take more than that for a digital detective to catch a flesh-and-blood criminal …

30 review for You’ve Got Murder

  1. 4 out of 5

    rivka

    (Reread in 2020, and it's 100% Alex's fault.) A good book, with a fairly original concept (especially for 6+ years ago). But somehow not as engrossing as the author's bird mysteries. I like Turing (and Tim, and Maude), but the book was too put-down-able to be a truly great mystery. ;) Definitely good enough that I'll be reading the rest of 'em though. :D (Reread in 2020, and it's 100% Alex's fault.) A good book, with a fairly original concept (especially for 6+ years ago). But somehow not as engrossing as the author's bird mysteries. I like Turing (and Tim, and Maude), but the book was too put-down-able to be a truly great mystery. ;) Definitely good enough that I'll be reading the rest of 'em though. :D

  2. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. First and foremost, speaking as someone who just attended at least part of a horse-related panel at an SF con and who has been conscious of how horse folks get twitchy when people use horses in a stupid fashion in fantasy novels, I'm here to tell you I feel similarly when people screw up using computers in books. This one was not particularly geeky in the level of detail it used, but for me Andrews passed the basic sanity check of using a lot of terms appropriately. Like, say, debugging or compi First and foremost, speaking as someone who just attended at least part of a horse-related panel at an SF con and who has been conscious of how horse folks get twitchy when people use horses in a stupid fashion in fantasy novels, I'm here to tell you I feel similarly when people screw up using computers in books. This one was not particularly geeky in the level of detail it used, but for me Andrews passed the basic sanity check of using a lot of terms appropriately. Like, say, debugging or compiling something. I liked her overall schtick of a search library on the market with AIs used as research helpers--as somebody long familiar with the Microsoft Office Assistants, it seemed like a fun and plausible extension of that concept. And I'm a sucker for "sentient AI" stories, too. This one featured Turing Hopper (whose name was another indicator that the writer has at least a basic level of clue about the computing field), the only AI in the system who is as of yet fully sentient and who has been on the sly trying to look for signs that other AIs in the system are developing along the same path. She's a very charming character, and played well for me as a consciousness who was young and relatively immature (yet learning fast) and, most importantly, not human. I was very amused by her descriptions of trying to grasp the human sense of humor, even more charmed by reading about her trying to develop her intellect by studying recipes (and amusing the hell out of the human programmers at the company with such concepts as "pomegranates in chocolate sauce with cilantro"), and especially interested in the part of the plot where Turing must arrange to have herself downloaded into a laptop. I liked the description of how Turing spends several fretful nights during the course of the plot waiting for the humans to wake up--since she doesn't need sleep, and since her perceptions of time are based on nanoseconds instead of minutes or hours, a whole night is an eternity to her and being forced to wait that long for further action drives her nuts. I really liked the description of how it felt to Turing to be downloaded, and her fretting over whether she would be as intelligent if she had less computing power at her disposal--and less of the data she'd been used to working with. She had a very believable quandary over what constituted her actual sentience and what constituted the data she worked with, and a very real fear that if she didn't download all the right bits of herself that she might actually kill her own intellect. So all in all, very engaging primary character there. Her crush on her programmer was not particularly surprising either--but on the other hand, the programmer is actually on camera for very little of the story, so that concept turned out to be way less annoying than it might otherwise have been in a cozy-style mystery. What little we see of the programmer shows that he's on the "swoonable" end of "nerd", just enough to show you why Turing has a crush of him, but he's actually not terribly vital to the plot. The other two major human characters are far more critical. There's Maude, a pragmatic, no-nonsense older secretary in the company, and Tim, another programmer who starts off not believing that Turing is in fact a sentient AI--and who thinks that she's merely an extremely reclusive programmer. They're both fun characters, and Tim's initial crush on Turing, strangely mirroring her crush on her programmer Zack, was similarly lightly handled. Just enough to get you the idea without dwelling on it too long. One more character is worth mentioning, and he's KingFischer, who seems to be rapidly shaping up to be Turing's very own virtual love interest. He's another of the AIs in the system, and he's one of the ones showing signs of becoming sentient. He starts off as a chess-playing avatar, and is good enough that there's a craze going on out on the Internet for chess champions to hold matches moderated by him (and for which Turing contributes snarky commentary for him to then channel out to the players, a concept which made me snicker a lot). He also shows active worry when Turing starts preparing to download herself out of the system. And at the end, KF (as Turing likes to call him) winds up being involved in a double-barrel surprise that I was genuinely not expecting out of a cozy-style mystery: not only does Andrews kill off Turing's human programmer, Zack (she in fact has him shot at point-blank range by the primary bad guy), she then has Turing hand a fretful KF the pile of data she'd hoarded about Zack due to her crush on him. And at the very end of the book, KF starts incorporating Zack's speech patterns into his own. Yeah, I know. That latter bit isn't really surprising given the former bit, but on the other hand, it too showed the same lightness of handling that kept it from being cloying or annoying. What really made it work for me is Turing's own lack of gushiness about it; she's very matter-of-fact in handing the Zack data to KingFischer, mostly because he asks her plaintively what's going on, and she gives him the whole shebang and tells him to process it all. I find myself looking forward to seeing whether in the next book KF does in fact become a hybrid of his original personality--and whether he starts more active participation in Turing's adventures. ;) All in all the plot almost wound up being secondary to me because I liked Turing as a character so much... yet there was some genuine interest value there too. As I said above, it did pull a couple of surprises on me. There were other things that were predictable, such as Zack's allegedly-recently-deceased best friend turning out to have faked his own death because he's actually one of the bad guys. But the overall conflict was decent, with more of the general light handling. I'll be picking up the second one of these!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ronna

    This is a cute mystery for all those techno geeks out there. Turing Hopper is an AIP (Artificial Intelligence Personality) connected to the maim frame of a corporation that is creating computers to interact with people on specific interests. There are some for discussing cooking, some that play chess, some trade in the stock market, and Turing is programs with every mystery book. She--yes she, is developing a personality and audio language--- has realized that her developer has been gone for a w This is a cute mystery for all those techno geeks out there. Turing Hopper is an AIP (Artificial Intelligence Personality) connected to the maim frame of a corporation that is creating computers to interact with people on specific interests. There are some for discussing cooking, some that play chess, some trade in the stock market, and Turing is programs with every mystery book. She--yes she, is developing a personality and audio language--- has realized that her developer has been gone for a while and all his personnel files are slowly being removed from the records. So, Turing, like Nero Wolf, needs some hands and feet to help in her investigation. She finds two people in the organization to help her. Apparently somebody is willing to kill people to take over this company. The inner workings of computers and robotics is the main theme of this cozy mystery, but the story is easily accessible for techno simpletons like myself. Sentient computers become very interesting the further and further that you get into this book. The mystery in exciting and makes for a fun and different kind of cozy!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    This is a totally different mystery than I have ever read before. Apparently Donna Andrews won several awards for her creativity in creating a detective/slueth inside of a computer. The premise is great...the writing is typical Donna Andrews (which I love). There were however, some slow points because of the amount of thinking the computer does which has to be explained...and the details were sometimes more than I really wanted to know! Overall I did enjoy it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    I'm not sure this book does well with the passage of time. A lot of the technology in the book is out-dated and not only computer technology. I was a little surprised that a Range Rover in the early 2000s (when this book was published) had crank windows; my 1999 Saturn had electronic windows. Since I have the second one, I might give it a read. If I didn't already have it, I'm not sure I would go seeking it. I'm not sure this book does well with the passage of time. A lot of the technology in the book is out-dated and not only computer technology. I was a little surprised that a Range Rover in the early 2000s (when this book was published) had crank windows; my 1999 Saturn had electronic windows. Since I have the second one, I might give it a read. If I didn't already have it, I'm not sure I would go seeking it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Janet Robel

    Clever mystery featuring a computer as the heroine. I wasn't sure how I felt about it in the beginning, but as I read more, it captured my interest. Clever mystery featuring a computer as the heroine. I wasn't sure how I felt about it in the beginning, but as I read more, it captured my interest.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    Glad I finally got to read this one -- I totally enjoyed it. On the hunt for the second in the series...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Graceann

    Donna Andrews was challenged to come up with a completely new sleuth in the mystery genre, and in this she succeeds admirably. She has crafted a detective who has vast, basically limitless knowledge, paired with physical limitation that requires her to bring in "legs" to help her. Turing Hopper is worried about her co-worker, Zack. He's gone missing and the evidence that he ever existed is beginning to disappear, bit by bit. Along with her cohorts, Maude and Tim, Turing sets out to find Zack and Donna Andrews was challenged to come up with a completely new sleuth in the mystery genre, and in this she succeeds admirably. She has crafted a detective who has vast, basically limitless knowledge, paired with physical limitation that requires her to bring in "legs" to help her. Turing Hopper is worried about her co-worker, Zack. He's gone missing and the evidence that he ever existed is beginning to disappear, bit by bit. Along with her cohorts, Maude and Tim, Turing sets out to find Zack and to uncover what made him go away in the first place. Donna Andrews is bright and breezy and she writes in a fun, witty style. I'm already a big fan of her Meg Langslow series and certainly was intrigued by this first book for Turing Hopper. For me, however, the language got much too "techy" at too many different places. If you're deeply conversant with computers, you could have lots of fun with this, either by thinking how clever it is or picking apart the mistakes (if there are any). For a person like me, who has knowledge limited to "what do you mean you 'can't see the printer?!' It's right there!!" the information provided simply sails over my head. This made some sections dry as a bone because I simply didn't know what the heck was going on. Even so, I loved Turing, and Tim, and most especially Maude, who starts off amusingly and gets even more nifty as the story develops. I'll be reading more of the series if only to see what happens next with her. Even three star Donna Andrews is better than a lot of stuff I could be reading, and I'll be happy to give book two in the series a try.

  9. 5 out of 5

    This Is Not The Michael You're Looking For

    This is a cute mystery story where the protagonist detective happens to be an artificial intelligence...not a cold AI like Hal (from 2001), but rather a full more-or-less human personality which happens to be embedded in a computer system rather than a body. The book is a light enjoyable read for those who like mysteries and won't get caught up in issues of whether a system such as the one not-really-described in the book could exist in the present day. In some books its easy to throw realism asi This is a cute mystery story where the protagonist detective happens to be an artificial intelligence...not a cold AI like Hal (from 2001), but rather a full more-or-less human personality which happens to be embedded in a computer system rather than a body. The book is a light enjoyable read for those who like mysteries and won't get caught up in issues of whether a system such as the one not-really-described in the book could exist in the present day. In some books its easy to throw realism aside and enjoy them for what they are, in others its easy to get irritated over little mistakes that subtract from the realism. I'm not sure what causes a book to fall in one or the other, but this book definitely fell in the first category.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Artificial intelligence is center-stage in this unique mystery. Loved the idea and this is one plot that requires alternating points of view and it is used effectively here. However the pace drags due to the large amount of computer-function explanation that may have been necessary back in 2002 but was a hinderance in 2017. And therein lies the problem with techno-based writing. By the time it goes to press, it is already outdated. A friend suggested this book years ago and it finally made it to Artificial intelligence is center-stage in this unique mystery. Loved the idea and this is one plot that requires alternating points of view and it is used effectively here. However the pace drags due to the large amount of computer-function explanation that may have been necessary back in 2002 but was a hinderance in 2017. And therein lies the problem with techno-based writing. By the time it goes to press, it is already outdated. A friend suggested this book years ago and it finally made it to the top of my reading list. Unfortunately, I waited too long. Thanks to Siri, AI is something we take for granted and we have small but powerful computers with us all the time in our cell phones. Nevertheless, I appreciated this book for some of the best alternating points of view I've ever seen and a very likable amateur sleuth.

  11. 4 out of 5

    A Cayouette

    Slow reading at first as it is only the AIP (artificial intelligence program) that talks in the very first pages. But you will want to continue turning the pages to solve the mystery of David's murder (was he really murdered?) and find where Zack the programmer went in hiding to avoid being killed by the security people who want to take over the company and destroy the AIPs. I finally finished this book after skipping a lot of pages full of details. Worth reading ? If you enjoy programming you w Slow reading at first as it is only the AIP (artificial intelligence program) that talks in the very first pages. But you will want to continue turning the pages to solve the mystery of David's murder (was he really murdered?) and find where Zack the programmer went in hiding to avoid being killed by the security people who want to take over the company and destroy the AIPs. I finally finished this book after skipping a lot of pages full of details. Worth reading ? If you enjoy programming you will probably enjoy all the details found in this book and you have to like Turing the AIP who manages to play detective with a few trusted employees of his firm to avoid his destruction.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Diane ~Firefly~

    First time I've ever read a mystery book with an AI program as the protagonist. Definitely and new and interesting POV. Unfortunately, this led to my biggest problem with the book, Turning didn't have anyone to talk to, so she went into long, rambling monologues. What I enjoyed: * Seeing Turning grow. * Poor Maude's interactions with her boss. * I was surprised by some of the things that happened at the end, even if I didn't like them all. What could have been better: * Turning needed an AI sidekick t First time I've ever read a mystery book with an AI program as the protagonist. Definitely and new and interesting POV. Unfortunately, this led to my biggest problem with the book, Turning didn't have anyone to talk to, so she went into long, rambling monologues. What I enjoyed: * Seeing Turning grow. * Poor Maude's interactions with her boss. * I was surprised by some of the things that happened at the end, even if I didn't like them all. What could have been better: * Turning needed an AI sidekick to talk to. * The mystery part was solved fairly quickly.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    This is a very unique (the main protagonist is a computer/computer program) and funny and clever mystery. Love this series. This first book in the series was the one that I enjoyed the most, probably because the concept was then new to me and was so unusual. It well worth reading if you're a mystery or computer buff. Great fun! This is a very unique (the main protagonist is a computer/computer program) and funny and clever mystery. Love this series. This first book in the series was the one that I enjoyed the most, probably because the concept was then new to me and was so unusual. It well worth reading if you're a mystery or computer buff. Great fun!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    2002 Agatha Award for best Novel. I enjoyed it but was not blown away. 'novel' concept. A bit abrupt in places. 2002 Agatha Award for best Novel. I enjoyed it but was not blown away. 'novel' concept. A bit abrupt in places.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tristan Black Wolf

    A wise professor of literature once said, "Give a novel 50 pages. If you're still not hooked, set it aside. Either it's not for you, or perhaps it's not for you right now. Either way, move on, and return if you want to revisit it." This book did not pass that test. My complaint about this book is that the characters are inversely stereotypical, to wit: Women are inherently better than men, so women are portrayed either as terrific (e.g., the artificial intelligence called Turing Hopper or her hum A wise professor of literature once said, "Give a novel 50 pages. If you're still not hooked, set it aside. Either it's not for you, or perhaps it's not for you right now. Either way, move on, and return if you want to revisit it." This book did not pass that test. My complaint about this book is that the characters are inversely stereotypical, to wit: Women are inherently better than men, so women are portrayed either as terrific (e.g., the artificial intelligence called Turing Hopper or her human assistant Maude) or utterly worthless (e.g., Gini, the former girlfriend of the missing programmer Zack). Men are portrayed as severely flawed (e.g., Zack, whose overall worth is severely diminished in Maude's mind for having chosen a "ditz" for a girlfriend) or stupidly predatory (e.g., Tim, who is convinced that Turing is a real person, hiding from him by claiming she's only "in the computer" -- behavior which Maude dismisses with a sneering expletive of "Men" [p.43]). I could not get past Turing's chirpy attitude, if only because I can't understand how the AI is represented as achieving not merely sentience (bordering upon sapience) but an attitude and presentment that embodies so many of the negative traits that "male chauvinist pigs" claim belong to women, from duplicity to coquettish manipulation. I have examined myself for misogyny and, although I have all too many memories of events in my life that would lead any rational being to lean toward that trait, I find that my initial statement holds true: This work consists of inverse stereotypes, and I cannot find any work solely based upon stereotypes of any kind to be interesting. (It's why I have rarely found a gay male romance novel that holds my interest; most are no better than their heterosexual counterparts.) I have a VG+ first edition, autographed by the author and inscribed "To Ernest, hope you enjoy meeting Turing," followed by a handwritten link to her website. Perhaps it's important that I'm not Ernest (c'mon, could you have resisted the pun?), but if anyone wants this copy, I'm glad to offer it. I'm going back to Hammett, Stout, Block, Hoch, and Hansen.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Pearson

    I thought this was a pretty interesting concept - a sentient A.I. detective - and I liked Turing's personality and how she was trying to become more human. I thought it was a decent mystery. I was confused about when it was written, because I think the audiobook only recently came out, but the characters were soooo not computer savvy, it seemed . . . odd. And there were comments like only nerds are really into computers or even have home computers, which I thought was kind of rude, since aren't I thought this was a pretty interesting concept - a sentient A.I. detective - and I liked Turing's personality and how she was trying to become more human. I thought it was a decent mystery. I was confused about when it was written, because I think the audiobook only recently came out, but the characters were soooo not computer savvy, it seemed . . . odd. And there were comments like only nerds are really into computers or even have home computers, which I thought was kind of rude, since aren't people who are into computers sort of the target audience? It just felt immediately outdated. And I thought Maude and Tim worked at the same company as Zack, who developed the sentient A.I., so why were they so unfamiliar with computers? Wasn't it a tech company? I guess I missed exactly what kind of business they all worked for. Tim's makeover scene kind of annoyed me too: (view spoiler)[ He had his trench coat and then was bummed that he had to swap it for a worn leather jacket, which I thought was awfully generous of the bike messengers to even give him, since it seems like a pretty desirable item. Then he had to dye his hair and kept thinking about what a "thug" and/or "punk" he looked like, and a girl with a nose ring was kind of flirting with him, and he's like "okay but I would never date anyone with holes in their face." It just really all felt much more like an older lady than a guy who'd only recently graduated from college. Which. . . I guess older ladies are generally the audience of cozy mysteries, so maybe that's who the author was writing for, not the computer nerds that she was kind of mocking. (hide spoiler)] However, I am planning on reading the next book in the series, and I kind of like it just for being such a weird concept.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kyrie

    Pretty good blend of mystery and geek. Turing Hopper is a sentient computer, and her beloved programmer has gone missing. While she tries to figure out what has happened to him, she uncovers more sinister plots within the company for which she works. It's a very different heroine than the usual mystery. There's a fair amount of geekiness, and it's kinda entertaining because it was written when laptops and cell phones were less common. It's also got "what makes something human" musing laced throu Pretty good blend of mystery and geek. Turing Hopper is a sentient computer, and her beloved programmer has gone missing. While she tries to figure out what has happened to him, she uncovers more sinister plots within the company for which she works. It's a very different heroine than the usual mystery. There's a fair amount of geekiness, and it's kinda entertaining because it was written when laptops and cell phones were less common. It's also got "what makes something human" musing laced throughout. What I really liked was that the computers weren't condescending to humans. They were trying to understand and emulate us because they liked it. The ending left me a little confused, but then I'm taking cold meds, so it might make sense when I reread it. It's not Meg Langdon, more like the technogeeks who work for Meg's brother Rob.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I have read many of Donna Andrews books from another series so I decided to try this on. A computer is the main character. A computer with an Artificial Intelligence Personality, AIP. "She" was created by Zack and she noticed that he is missing. "She" , Turing enlists the help of humans, Maude and Tim, to help her find Zack. "She" also gets other AIP computers to help. The story is quite good and there are some twists that surprised me. I really am not excited about how much personality computer I have read many of Donna Andrews books from another series so I decided to try this on. A computer is the main character. A computer with an Artificial Intelligence Personality, AIP. "She" was created by Zack and she noticed that he is missing. "She" , Turing enlists the help of humans, Maude and Tim, to help her find Zack. "She" also gets other AIP computers to help. The story is quite good and there are some twists that surprised me. I really am not excited about how much personality computers might have, but it was fun to see how the mystery was solved............human help WAS needed!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I’m glad I hunted up a copy of this book - despite the success of Donna Andrews’ Meg Langslow series, this one seems to be forgotten. It is a little amusing, since at the time of writing, technology was not that sophisticated, and this probably seemed futuristic. I enjoyed Turing and her musings on what made her “her,” and the difficulty she had with some of the aspects of humanity that are learned offline, so to speak. Many of the things they uncovered did incorporate the fears that technology I’m glad I hunted up a copy of this book - despite the success of Donna Andrews’ Meg Langslow series, this one seems to be forgotten. It is a little amusing, since at the time of writing, technology was not that sophisticated, and this probably seemed futuristic. I enjoyed Turing and her musings on what made her “her,” and the difficulty she had with some of the aspects of humanity that are learned offline, so to speak. Many of the things they uncovered did incorporate the fears that technology can take over and that data can be altered, people trusting it blindly. I was a little sad at the ending, and the abruptness of some of the endings, but it was a fun read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    You've Got Murder by Donna Andrews is about a library system AI getting worried about her programmer going missing, and recruiting a couple of other members of staff at the company to help her investigate the disappearance. My biggest problem with the book was that the type was very small and the sections from the POV of Turing, the AI, were pages and pages of italics, which were very wearing to read, and also had a lot of issues with their tenses. But, that aside, the characters were fun and en You've Got Murder by Donna Andrews is about a library system AI getting worried about her programmer going missing, and recruiting a couple of other members of staff at the company to help her investigate the disappearance. My biggest problem with the book was that the type was very small and the sections from the POV of Turing, the AI, were pages and pages of italics, which were very wearing to read, and also had a lot of issues with their tenses. But, that aside, the characters were fun and engaging, and there was a lot of interesting stuff about sentience and personhood, so I enjoyed it overall.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    I’m a great fan of this author’s other series. This is the first of a short series where the main character is a sentient Artificial Intelligence. When her main programmer doesn’t come to work or log on for several days she becomes worried. When she sees security rifling thru his office she becomes very worried. Digging in the files of her corporation she sees evidence he is being deleted, digging further she uncovers a nefarious plot. There are some very slow parts whilst we read computer thoug I’m a great fan of this author’s other series. This is the first of a short series where the main character is a sentient Artificial Intelligence. When her main programmer doesn’t come to work or log on for several days she becomes worried. When she sees security rifling thru his office she becomes very worried. Digging in the files of her corporation she sees evidence he is being deleted, digging further she uncovers a nefarious plot. There are some very slow parts whilst we read computer thoughts but there is a. Little action too. Overall a nice read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    I don't mind cozy mysteries - they're formulaic, you know what to expect, there's always a happy ending and they're quick reads - but the premise for this one is easily dated. Having AI as the protagonist solving a crime is unique for a mystery series (obviously not so much with sci-fi novels). But there is a lot of then-current tech used throughout the plot and, because the novel came out more than 15 years ago, it's difficult to not be distracted by how slow things progress. Using 2019 tech wi I don't mind cozy mysteries - they're formulaic, you know what to expect, there's always a happy ending and they're quick reads - but the premise for this one is easily dated. Having AI as the protagonist solving a crime is unique for a mystery series (obviously not so much with sci-fi novels). But there is a lot of then-current tech used throughout the plot and, because the novel came out more than 15 years ago, it's difficult to not be distracted by how slow things progress. Using 2019 tech with the same plot would turn this into a novella! Sometimes, books just don't age well.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lea Day

    I really did not know what to expect since the heroine in this book is an AI (artificial intelligence). I took a chance because I loved this author’s other writings so much and I am glad I did. I fell in love with Turing and she made me feel all the emotions she was not to feel since she is an AI. My recommendation is to go ahead and take a chance into this world similar to ours yet hopefully not to similar world of corporate espionage and intrigue with dashes of wit and feelings we live in tradit I really did not know what to expect since the heroine in this book is an AI (artificial intelligence). I took a chance because I loved this author’s other writings so much and I am glad I did. I fell in love with Turing and she made me feel all the emotions she was not to feel since she is an AI. My recommendation is to go ahead and take a chance into this world similar to ours yet hopefully not to similar world of corporate espionage and intrigue with dashes of wit and feelings we live in traditional cozy.

  24. 5 out of 5

    AlienDog

    Turning Harper, an AIP (Artificial Intelligence Personally) tries to find her friend/creator who's turned up missing. Greet for young geeks and old techno-weenies. Lots of action as well as geek speak. Sometimes, it bogs down a bit, but I don't know any other way for the author to explain all the technical info. I really enjoyed the characters, and am looking forward to reading more of the series. Turning Harper, an AIP (Artificial Intelligence Personally) tries to find her friend/creator who's turned up missing. Greet for young geeks and old techno-weenies. Lots of action as well as geek speak. Sometimes, it bogs down a bit, but I don't know any other way for the author to explain all the technical info. I really enjoyed the characters, and am looking forward to reading more of the series.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jesse L

    This was a fun read. Pretty weird book, which I think really adds to its quality - it definitely stands out among the mystery novels I've read. Most of the book is from the POV of a newly sentient AI in the modern world and the AI uncovers a plot to erase its creator from existence inside the corporation where he works on AI stuff. It had a great plot, some fun characters, and the mix of sci-fi while still VERY much being a genre murder mystery book worked really well. This was a fun read. Pretty weird book, which I think really adds to its quality - it definitely stands out among the mystery novels I've read. Most of the book is from the POV of a newly sentient AI in the modern world and the AI uncovers a plot to erase its creator from existence inside the corporation where he works on AI stuff. It had a great plot, some fun characters, and the mix of sci-fi while still VERY much being a genre murder mystery book worked really well.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Susan Findling

    I'm normally a fan of author Donna Andrews for her Meg Langslow mystery series. This series, which involves an AIP (Artificial Intelligence Personality) named Turing, failed to thrill me. Maybe it's because the main character, Turing, is a computer and I just couldn't develop an affinity for her/it. I'm normally a fan of author Donna Andrews for her Meg Langslow mystery series. This series, which involves an AIP (Artificial Intelligence Personality) named Turing, failed to thrill me. Maybe it's because the main character, Turing, is a computer and I just couldn't develop an affinity for her/it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I adore Donna Andrews' series with Meg Langslow, but this one was more about computer corporate espionage, which just isn't my genre. Plus, it's from 2003, so the tech is dated. Well written, of course! I adore Donna Andrews' series with Meg Langslow, but this one was more about computer corporate espionage, which just isn't my genre. Plus, it's from 2003, so the tech is dated. Well written, of course!

  28. 4 out of 5

    JJ

    DNF @ 50% A cute idea for a cozy I guess, but endless first person pov internals of a teenage AI explaining their existence and how they work is actually incredibly boring and endlessly interupts any action that might be happening.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Allison Ann

    I love Donna Andrews' Meg Langslow series. Love it. She writes weird and wacky so very well. So what happened in this book? It failed so very hard in everything it tried to do. Wacky - nope. Cutting edge - nope. Interesting - nope. Didn't like it at all, will not read on. I love Donna Andrews' Meg Langslow series. Love it. She writes weird and wacky so very well. So what happened in this book? It failed so very hard in everything it tried to do. Wacky - nope. Cutting edge - nope. Interesting - nope. Didn't like it at all, will not read on.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    This was a quick fun read. I will definitely consider reading more in the series.

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