counter create hit Silver Blaze - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Silver Blaze

Availability: Ready to download

One of the most popular Sherlock Holmes short stories, "Silver Blaze" focuses on the disappearance of the titular race horse (a famous winner) on the eve of an important race and on the apparent murder of its trainer. The tale is distinguished by its atmospheric Dartmoor setting and late-Victorian sporting milieu. It also features some of Conan Doyle's most effective plott One of the most popular Sherlock Holmes short stories, "Silver Blaze" focuses on the disappearance of the titular race horse (a famous winner) on the eve of an important race and on the apparent murder of its trainer. The tale is distinguished by its atmospheric Dartmoor setting and late-Victorian sporting milieu. It also features some of Conan Doyle's most effective plotting, hinging on the "curious incident of the dog in the night-time".


Compare
Ads Banner

One of the most popular Sherlock Holmes short stories, "Silver Blaze" focuses on the disappearance of the titular race horse (a famous winner) on the eve of an important race and on the apparent murder of its trainer. The tale is distinguished by its atmospheric Dartmoor setting and late-Victorian sporting milieu. It also features some of Conan Doyle's most effective plott One of the most popular Sherlock Holmes short stories, "Silver Blaze" focuses on the disappearance of the titular race horse (a famous winner) on the eve of an important race and on the apparent murder of its trainer. The tale is distinguished by its atmospheric Dartmoor setting and late-Victorian sporting milieu. It also features some of Conan Doyle's most effective plotting, hinging on the "curious incident of the dog in the night-time".

30 review for Silver Blaze

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mir

    This is the first Sherlock Holmes story I don't recall reading as a child. Not sure if that means I didn't read them all or I forgot this one because it was kind of boring. I don't think Doyle is very interested in horses. The plot was less far-fetched than many of these stories, however.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    Silver Blaze is set in the world of horse racing, and one which Dick Francis would have been proud of, yet it is very much a Sherlock Holmes story. The very elements of what make Holmes a great detective are on display in this tale; as although Inspector Gregory of Scotland Yard has made an arrest in the case, Holmes doesn’t think that the obvious suspect is the right one. The police have looked at the available evidence and jumped to conclusions; Holmes looks at the evidence and sees what is miss Silver Blaze is set in the world of horse racing, and one which Dick Francis would have been proud of, yet it is very much a Sherlock Holmes story. The very elements of what make Holmes a great detective are on display in this tale; as although Inspector Gregory of Scotland Yard has made an arrest in the case, Holmes doesn’t think that the obvious suspect is the right one. The police have looked at the available evidence and jumped to conclusions; Holmes looks at the evidence and sees what is missing. Holmes is then able to deduce missing details, and finds the evidence to back up his deductions. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle also ensures that the solution is delivered by Holmes with the showmanship that the detective was prone to indulge in. Over the years, Silver Blaze has proved to be one of the most popular Sherlock Holmes stories, and one of the most memorable.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    4.5 stars. A unique and intriguing Sherlock Holmes mystery about a valuable missing racehorse and a dead man. This one came close to making Arthur Conan Doyle’s list of his top 12 Sherlock Holmes stories, but he couldn’t quite forgive it for some errors he’d made regarding the rules of the horse racing world. But I think maybe it does make my own list of the top dozen Sherlock stories, because of the unusual plot and the fact that Doyle actually gives readers enough clues to solve the mystery fo 4.5 stars. A unique and intriguing Sherlock Holmes mystery about a valuable missing racehorse and a dead man. This one came close to making Arthur Conan Doyle’s list of his top 12 Sherlock Holmes stories, but he couldn’t quite forgive it for some errors he’d made regarding the rules of the horse racing world. But I think maybe it does make my own list of the top dozen Sherlock stories, because of the unusual plot and the fact that Doyle actually gives readers enough clues to solve the mystery for themselves.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cora Tea Party Princess

    5 Words: Perfetc length for a cuppa.

  5. 5 out of 5

    RM Subramanian

    Best of Sherlock Holmes and enjoyed it to the core. Explanation of his techniques were path breaking.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jaksen

    Greatly atmospheric tale and it involves a horse! Silver Blaze, the fastest horse in the upcoming Wessox Cup is missing. More so, his trainer is dead. So Holmes and Watson head to Dartmoor to investigate. The solution is simple, the trail leading there not so much, and though I thought I'd figured it out, I didn't. The famous quote, 'see the value of imagination,' is in this one, which is at odds to how Holmes usually operates, or thinks. (Logic is Holmes' usual mantra.) Plus the even more famous Greatly atmospheric tale and it involves a horse! Silver Blaze, the fastest horse in the upcoming Wessox Cup is missing. More so, his trainer is dead. So Holmes and Watson head to Dartmoor to investigate. The solution is simple, the trail leading there not so much, and though I thought I'd figured it out, I didn't. The famous quote, 'see the value of imagination,' is in this one, which is at odds to how Holmes usually operates, or thinks. (Logic is Holmes' usual mantra.) Plus the even more famous one: 'the curious incident of the dog in the night-time,' which, of course, means the dog was silent, didn't bark, when it should have. (Thus, the 'curious incident.') Anyhow, a quick and fascinating read, and so far one of my top #5 Holmes stories.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Oscar Despard

    'Silver Blaze' is a thoroughly enjoyable story featuring Sherlock Holmes at his finest. The story had some humorous parts, which is welcome, considering the one fault of Conan Doyle's work is often that it is too dry compared to some more modern writings from the 'Golden Age,' such as Christie's Poirot. However, 'Silver Blaze' does not have this flaw, and is gripping and witty read throughout. The final solution is supremely simple, yet elegant. Overall, I t's another excellent short story from 'Silver Blaze' is a thoroughly enjoyable story featuring Sherlock Holmes at his finest. The story had some humorous parts, which is welcome, considering the one fault of Conan Doyle's work is often that it is too dry compared to some more modern writings from the 'Golden Age,' such as Christie's Poirot. However, 'Silver Blaze' does not have this flaw, and is gripping and witty read throughout. The final solution is supremely simple, yet elegant. Overall, I t's another excellent short story from the Sherlock Holmes collection.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Roberto Mattos

    In my opinion, one of the best short stories featuring Sherlock Holmes. The plot is simple, yet superb: Sherlock Holmes and his friend Dr. Watson travel by train to Dartmoor, summoned to investigate a crime that has convulsed the newspapers: the disappearance of the great race horse Silver Blaze and the murder of the horse's trainer, John Straker. Inspector Gregory has already arrested a man in connection with John Straker's murder by the time Holmes and Watson arrive at King's Pyland, the Dartm In my opinion, one of the best short stories featuring Sherlock Holmes. The plot is simple, yet superb: Sherlock Holmes and his friend Dr. Watson travel by train to Dartmoor, summoned to investigate a crime that has convulsed the newspapers: the disappearance of the great race horse Silver Blaze and the murder of the horse's trainer, John Straker. Inspector Gregory has already arrested a man in connection with John Straker's murder by the time Holmes and Watson arrive at King's Pyland, the Dartmoor stable owned by Colonel Ross, from which Silver Blaze is missing. The suspect is Fitzroy Simpson, a London bookmaker who has come to Dartmoor (and specifically to King's Pyland) to gather information relating to his professional activities (which include wagers placed on favourites for the Wessex Cup, the race in which Silver Blaze is to run). However, to Holmes, from the outset, there seem to be a number of facts that do not fit the inspector's case against Simpson, damning as it looks. It seems odd, for instance, that he would lead the horse out on to the moor simply to injure or kill him. That could be done right in his stall. He could not have stolen the animal. What good would such a famous thoroughbred be to him? Why has an exhaustive search of the neighbourhood not turned up Silver Blaze? What has Simpson done with him? Sherlock Holmes soon tracks down Silver Blaze, literally: his tracks (along with a man's) are clearly visible in the soil, albeit intermittently. Holmes also deduces why the police could not find the horse, despite having looked right at him. Holmes ensures Silver Blaze's safety, and turns his mind to other aspects of the case. John Straker, Silver Blaze's late trainer, has been killed by a blow to the skull, presumably administered by Simpson with his "Penang lawyer", a clublike walking stick. Simpson's cravat is also found in Straker's hand, and the latter's coat is found draped over a furze bush. A knife is found at the crime scene—a peculiarly delicate-looking one, with a small blade. Dr. Watson, from his medical experience, identifies it as a cataract knife (used for the most delicate surgery). It is marked Weiss & Co., London. Useful as it is for that purpose, it would be unsuitable as a weapon; in addition, Straker also seems to have stabbed himself in the hip with it. One of the stable lads, Ned Hunter, was on guard duty the night of the crime, but he proves to have been drugged with powdered opium placed in his supper. No one else who ate the curried mutton made at the Strakers' house that evening suffered any ill effects, but Hunter was in a profound stupor well into the next day.[3] Straker's pockets contained two interesting items: a tallow candle and a milliner's bill for (among other things) a 22-guinea dress, made out to one William Derbyshire. There is the curious incident with the dog, and a problem with the sheep kept at the stable: a shepherd tells Holmes that three of his animals have recently become suddenly lame. Holmes's powers unravel the mystery, and lay bare what villainies there are to be exposed. He visits the milliner's shop in London and determines, using Straker's photograph, that Straker posed as Derbyshire. This establishes his motive: he had a mistress with expensive tastes, and tried to influence the race's outcome to earn himself a large sum of money. The curried mutton was a clue, also; only such a spicy dish could have masked the taste of powdered opium, and it was impossible for Simpson to arrange a highly seasoned meal that evening for his purposes. Therefore, someone in the household must have conceived the idea—namely, Straker himself. The "curious incident of the dog in the night-time" is easily explained: the dog made no noise, because no stranger was there. As Holmes explains: “I had grasped the significance of the silence of the dog, for one true inference invariably suggests others....Obviously the midnight visitor was someone whom the dog knew well. It was Straker who removed Silver Blaze from his stall and led him out on to the moor." Straker's purpose in doing this was to use the cataract knife to inflict a slight injury upon one of the horse's legs. He had thought to use Simpson's cravat (which the latter dropped when he was expelled from King's Pyland) as a sling to hold the horse's leg to cut it. But instead, Straker was killed when the horse, sensing that something was wrong, panicked and kicked the trainer in the head. The lame sheep had been used by Straker for practice. Colonel Ross's main concern, of course, is getting his horse back safely. Holmes chooses not to tell Ross where his horse has been (although he has known all along) until after the Wessex Cup, which is won by Silver Blaze. At first the Colonel does not recognize his own horse, since the animal's distinguishing white markings have been covered with dye. The horse had been looked after by one of the Colonel's neighbours, Silas Brown, who had found him wandering the moor and hidden him in his barn. Holmes then explains the details of the case step-by-step to the satisfaction of the Colonel, Watson, and Inspector Gregory. Gregory is one of the more competent police detectives Holmes works with in the course of his career. He conducts a thorough investigation of the crime before Holmes's arrival, and gathers all the evidence Holmes needs to solve the case. Holmes notes that Gregory is "an extremely good officer," and observes that the only quality he lacks is imagination—the ability to imagine what might have happened on a given occasion, and act on this intuition. I recommend this book to the permanent library of any reader who appreciates a well written mystery.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Paolina

    Clever and probably one of the more realistic Holmes mysteries.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mary Pagones

    Holmes, horses, the curious dog. One of my all-time favorites of the canon.

  11. 5 out of 5

    al

    read for class.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jason Donoghue

    To be honest the story did not capture my attention. I found it boring and at times tiresome to read. So far my least favourite story of Sherlock Holmes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Janine Zachariae

    First of all: I'm kind of obsessed with Sherlock. Even I didn't read much at all but he is just genius. And of cause I love Benedict Cumberbatch. But this is, obviously, not about the BBC show but the story. Silver Blaze. A story about a horse. Where is Silver Blaze? Who killed ...? I love the dialogues between John Watson and Sherlock Holmes. They are always so lively, so full of ironie and sarcasm. But it is also totally nice, friendly and respective. Their "relationship" is one of my favorites. First of all: I'm kind of obsessed with Sherlock. Even I didn't read much at all but he is just genius. And of cause I love Benedict Cumberbatch. But this is, obviously, not about the BBC show but the story. Silver Blaze. A story about a horse. Where is Silver Blaze? Who killed ...? I love the dialogues between John Watson and Sherlock Holmes. They are always so lively, so full of ironie and sarcasm. But it is also totally nice, friendly and respective. Their "relationship" is one of my favorites. I can't believe that I just started to read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle so late in my age (with the end of my 20 many month ago) The story is as fast as most of them. I love how Sherlock finds out everything. How he deduces the whole stuff.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rob Thompson

    Holmes investigates the disappearance of a champion racehorse and the murder of its trainer. All taking place in the atmospheric setting of Dartmoor. The tale is not overly complicated with baffling clues and as such it's one of the better Holmes stories. Little by little Holmes puts together pieces of what might have happened by questioning servants and stable boys. Then dealing with the owner of a nearby estate who knows something about the whole episode. It also features some of Conan Doyle's Holmes investigates the disappearance of a champion racehorse and the murder of its trainer. All taking place in the atmospheric setting of Dartmoor. The tale is not overly complicated with baffling clues and as such it's one of the better Holmes stories. Little by little Holmes puts together pieces of what might have happened by questioning servants and stable boys. Then dealing with the owner of a nearby estate who knows something about the whole episode. It also features some of Conan Doyle's most effective plotting, hinging on the "curious incident of the dog in the night-time:"

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rajat Dubey

    He's an extraordinary detective 😲😲

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Silver Blaze is a short story of another mysterious crime that Mr Sherlock Holmes is asked to help solve. As usual Mr Sherlock Holmes doesn't walk away from a challenge, so he sets to work as to trying to solve how the thoroughbred favourite racehorse was stolen from his stables two nights before he was due to take part in a big race and to solve the additional murder of his trainer that happened the same night. The police were called in immediately and failed to solve how the horse was stolen a Silver Blaze is a short story of another mysterious crime that Mr Sherlock Holmes is asked to help solve. As usual Mr Sherlock Holmes doesn't walk away from a challenge, so he sets to work as to trying to solve how the thoroughbred favourite racehorse was stolen from his stables two nights before he was due to take part in a big race and to solve the additional murder of his trainer that happened the same night. The police were called in immediately and failed to solve how the horse was stolen and how the man was murdered at the same time, thereby then calling upon Mr Holmes to come and assess how it was achieved and who was responsible. The police have a suspect and have arrested a man, the man they have is a Mr Fitzroy Simpson but Holmes is not convinced that they have the right man as not all the fact link the suspect to the murder. Sherlock Holmes follows a number of leads that make him easily able to discover what happened to the stolen thoroughbred and the horses trainer, he deducts that Straker, the horse's trainer, was killed by a blow to the skull but the cataract knife found beside him held no intention of being used to kill someone but for a more detailed task, the task of maiming the thoroughbred that he led out of the stables and into the dark so he couldn't run in the big race. The contents of Straker's pockets gave he clue as to why he wanted to make sure the thoroughbred didn't race was because he had bet against it winning and he needed the money so he could buy us lady the dress she had ordered, the receipt was found in his pocket. Holmes unravels the mystery as he usually does with a sense of certainty and his usual strong confidence in his own ability. Although this was one of his older pieces of work, the language and context was modern and still easy to understand for me, which isn't always he case. Dr Watson as usual is trying to piece things together in the hopes of outwitting his friend and finding the answer before him but alas he fails again as his mentor seems to find clues before they're even shown to us the readers. Read a story like this of Holmes was one of his more obvious story's and no wonder he solved it without problems although it was obvious I can safely say I still don't have the analytical mind that Holmes does and I didn't solve it until he pointed out every clue and linked them together for me, I'm amazed by his out of the box thinking, the excitement these books draw out from you. I love reading the Sherlock Holmes mystery just as much as I enjoy Poirot or Agatha Christie mysteries because Holmes is where this world began.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Al Basosi

    I've taken a few weeks break between completing 'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes' and starting 'The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes', and this was mainly so that I could read a few other books (by a few I mean six). Coming back to Arthur Conan Doyle's writing is a breath of fresh air. I immediately noticed the creative way in which he worded the dialogues (and the repetitive use of the word 'singular'); the clever way Holmes built (and eventually rebuilt) his hypothesis with the observation of new I've taken a few weeks break between completing 'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes' and starting 'The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes', and this was mainly so that I could read a few other books (by a few I mean six). Coming back to Arthur Conan Doyle's writing is a breath of fresh air. I immediately noticed the creative way in which he worded the dialogues (and the repetitive use of the word 'singular'); the clever way Holmes built (and eventually rebuilt) his hypothesis with the observation of new pieces of evidence. Another thing I noticed was its pace. Of course, having come from reading six novels in the space of two weeks, going back to short stories meant accustoming myself to a faster pace. That was not a bad thing though. The pace was enjoyably fast. He (in the words of William Strunk Jr.) omitted needless words, and that gave his stories coherence, making it flow superfluously. The only drawback was a break midway through that made me want to stop reading. I can't explain it, but there was one point where I wanted to put the book down and read something else; a point where it became slightly boring. After that break, however, it continued to thrill me and because of that, to this short story I give four well-earned stars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Crime Addict Sifat

    Sherlock Holmes and his companion Dr. Watson venture out via prepare to Dartmoor, summoned to examine a wrongdoing that has shook the daily papers: the vanishing of the considerable race horse Silver Blaze and the murder of the stallion's coach, John Straker. Assessor Gregory has just captured a man regarding John Straker's murder when Holmes and Watson touch base at King's Pyland, the Dartmoor stable claimed by Colonel Ross, from which Silver Blaze is absent. The suspect is Fitzroy Simpson, a L Sherlock Holmes and his companion Dr. Watson venture out via prepare to Dartmoor, summoned to examine a wrongdoing that has shook the daily papers: the vanishing of the considerable race horse Silver Blaze and the murder of the stallion's coach, John Straker. Assessor Gregory has just captured a man regarding John Straker's murder when Holmes and Watson touch base at King's Pyland, the Dartmoor stable claimed by Colonel Ross, from which Silver Blaze is absent. The suspect is Fitzroy Simpson, a London bookmaker who has come to Dartmoor (and particularly to King's Pyland) to assemble data identifying with his expert exercises (which incorporate bets set on top choices for the Wessex Cup, the race in which Silver Blaze is to run). In any case, to Holmes, from the beginning, there appear to be various realities that don't fit the examiner's body of evidence against Simpson, cursing as it looks. It appears to be odd, for example, that he would lead the steed out on to the field just to harm or murder him. That should be possible appropriate in his slow down. He couldn't have stolen the creature. What great would such an acclaimed pure breed be to him? Why has a comprehensive pursuit of the area not turned up Silver Blaze? What has Simpson finished with him?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nina Jon

    I confess – this is the first Sherlock Holmes I remember reading. It's a short story, it took me less than two hours to read, but I thoroughly enjoyed it. It contains the memorable line – the curious incident of the dog in the night-time – and a curious incident it is. The story concerns a thoroughbred racehorse stolen from his stables a night or so before a big race and the murder of his owner that same night. Naturally the police have tried but failed to solve the crime, and Holmes is called u I confess – this is the first Sherlock Holmes I remember reading. It's a short story, it took me less than two hours to read, but I thoroughly enjoyed it. It contains the memorable line – the curious incident of the dog in the night-time – and a curious incident it is. The story concerns a thoroughbred racehorse stolen from his stables a night or so before a big race and the murder of his owner that same night. Naturally the police have tried but failed to solve the crime, and Holmes is called upon. The style is very similar to Agatha Christie, with numerous clever clues, conundrums, and curious incidents, quite impossible to unravel (unless you're Sherlock Holmes of course!). Holmes must be a lot cleverer than me, because he worked it out pretty quickly. A very clever and surprising end. I shan't say anymore than (as always) it was the least likely suspect what done it. If you haven't read any Sherlock Holmes, or would like to return to him, I'd recommend this read. I'd also recommended to those who enjoy pitting their wits against the cleverest of detectives.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Yoak

    I think this is my favorite yet, re-reading the original Holmes stories in order. My ongoing complaint is that the stories don't provide the sort of deductive puzzle that I had remembered of them. Usually the puzzle itself is either trivial or the critical elements Holmes needs to reach a solution are concealed from the reader. Silver Blaze is an exception. All of the facts were in front of the reader and I found myself actually delighting at having put all aspects of the thing together. I found I think this is my favorite yet, re-reading the original Holmes stories in order. My ongoing complaint is that the stories don't provide the sort of deductive puzzle that I had remembered of them. Usually the puzzle itself is either trivial or the critical elements Holmes needs to reach a solution are concealed from the reader. Silver Blaze is an exception. All of the facts were in front of the reader and I found myself actually delighting at having put all aspects of the thing together. I found myself walking alongside Holmes in having a partial solution, exciting in itself, before all facts were reveals and when he had enough to put it together, so did I, and it was fun. This is what I remember of Holmes. Also, it was cool to encounter the story that gave rise to one of my favorite Holmes comments, when he mentions "the curious incident with the dog in the nighttime."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    One (rich) man and his (race) horse. In fairness, there's not a lot more to say about this story. Aside from remembering, of course, that the curious incident of the dog in the night time, is that the dog did not bark - the absence of any sound or indication, is that very curious incident.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie Gleckler Clark

    I am and always have been a Sir Arthur Conan Doyle fan...Sherlock Holmes and his power of deduction never cease to amaze me. This, the first story in "The Memoires of Sherlock Homes" is an excellent example of Doyle's Sleuth and his methods. In this short story, a magnificent race horse has been taken and the horses trainer is found murdered. Silver Blaze is scheduled to run in a major race in a week, and Colonel Ross doesn't know what will happen. As always, Holmes solves the crime.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Eye of Sauron

    This is one of the best stories in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, and probably the one that's been adapted the most frequently. It's an interesting setting, and the horse aspect is a break from the usual. The only thing I could think about while reading this was that Psych episode about the horse races. This is one of the best stories in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, and probably the one that's been adapted the most frequently. It's an interesting setting, and the horse aspect is a break from the usual. The only thing I could think about while reading this was that Psych episode about the horse races.

  24. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    This is a great Sherlock Holmes mystery as he delves step by step into a mystery that will leave the reader baffled and confused until the very end, and then you realize that all the clues and answers were right in front of you the entire time. This is my favorite type of mystery, and fans of the genre should love this story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dan Wilson

    Silver Blaze is a decent whodunnit and is, I believe, the best example so far of Holmes toying with his (de facto) client by prolonging the time between solution and exposition. Don't get on Holmes' bad side.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Wendi

    Where "the curious incident of the dog in the night-time" comes from!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kat Ioannides

    "Curious incident of the dog in the nighttime"- I love stumbling across allusions I've heard countless times unexpectedly :)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    "The curious incident of the dog in the night-time" Love it!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    Sherlock Holmes shows off his skills as a horse detective.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Romik Danial

    based on the legend of Parsifal and his search for the Grail, using Jungian psychological concepts

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.