counter create hit Armageddon, Oil, and the Middle East Crisis: What the Bible Says about the Future of the Middle East and the End of Western Civilization - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Armageddon, Oil, and the Middle East Crisis: What the Bible Says about the Future of the Middle East and the End of Western Civilization

Availability: Ready to download

What the Bible Says About the Future of the Middle East and the End of Western Civilization.


Compare
Ads Banner

What the Bible Says About the Future of the Middle East and the End of Western Civilization.

30 review for Armageddon, Oil, and the Middle East Crisis: What the Bible Says about the Future of the Middle East and the End of Western Civilization

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I give this book zero stars not because of the topic or because it's obviously outdated now, but because it, like most books of this type, is poorly written. It is also full of lies, omissions, and opinions that masquerade as truth. The author first off assumes you know quite a bit about biblical prophesy. There is no summary or introduction to the topic at the beginning and no summary or broad conclusion at the end. He does include several "timelines" but each has different predicted events on i I give this book zero stars not because of the topic or because it's obviously outdated now, but because it, like most books of this type, is poorly written. It is also full of lies, omissions, and opinions that masquerade as truth. The author first off assumes you know quite a bit about biblical prophesy. There is no summary or introduction to the topic at the beginning and no summary or broad conclusion at the end. He does include several "timelines" but each has different predicted events on it with only some of those overlapping. In this case, a picture is worth minus 1,000 words. However, in spite of assuming you know about prophesy, he also ironically assumes that you believe and interpret biblical passages the same way he does. The reason I say ironically is because if you know much about interpretations of prophesy, then you also know that THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO AGREEMENT about those interpretations. Even people of the same denomination in the same church have different beliefs/interpretations. That is the largest failing of this book - he does not address any of his would-be critics, he does not even mention that there are different opinions (one exception, see later). First rule of writing about a controversial subject: you have to address the controversy! Going hand in hand with that large omission, the author NEVER ONCE tells you how he chose the interpretations he did or even which Christian sect or path he follows. That's basically the same as not citing sources. If I can't pinpoint where you got your "facts" or how you reached your conclusion, then it's misleading and should not be considered worthy of publication even by a Christian press. If your God can't stand up to scrutiny, then maybe you serve the wrong God. As just one example of many, the author talks about Russia invading Israel during the time of tribulation. Now, if you know the bible, then you know that there is no word "Russia" in it. The author has interpreted "Magog" to be Russia (p. 144). But that's it! There's no discussion! It's just assumed that you know why he interpreted it that way (just so you know - yes, I do know why some people use that interpretation). The author only uses a few bible verses as "sources" for interpretation, but he never tells you why he chose the ones he did. Some, like those in Revelation, may be obvious. But others, like those in Psalms?, are not. I'm convinced that even I found a couple of bible verses that the author took completely out of context just to support his interpretation. The one exception to not discussing controversy was the topic of when the rapture would occur (p. 210). However, even this was not supported properly, and he again contradicts himself. First the author quotes Paul who said that "we shall all be changed." But then he makes a complicated argument about how, because of how he has timed Christ's return, some people wouldn't be changed, they would still have regular human bodies. It was quite confusing, even for me, who knew the point he was trying to argue. Like other political and religious books, this one also had a tendency to rewrite history to suit its story. I'm not a history buff, but even I found places where the author completely contradicted himself. For instance, he talked about Israeli-Arab War, and first he said that Israel was unprepared and people were killed in the synagogues while on holiday and they had to call up their reserves unexpectedly. Then he said on the next page that Israel waited for the Arabs to attack first (as if they were expecting it), just so they could prove to the world that they didn't start the war this time (p. 41-42). Reallly??? How can it be both ways? As a second instance, there are numerous passages that talk about Hussein and generally he is painted as a "bad guy" since it's his invasion of Kuwait that apparently set off the whole path to Armageddon (p. 47 and others). The author even mentions at one point the previous war between Iraq and Iran, but he never ONCE mentions that it is the US's support of Hussein in the Iraq-Iran war that gave him enough power to invade Kuwait! The author also assumes that all media have a liberal bias and all supported Lebanon over Israel (p. 45). And this is from back in the 70s! Dear conservatives, not all media are liberal and never have been (some are, yes; but some are also conservative, which nulifies your argument).

  2. 4 out of 5

    George

    I read a variety of these kinds of books when I was in Bible College; even then I found them rather poorly written and with dubious connections to Scripture. This was one of them. Re-reading this now, twenty years after I started to explore the subject, I note that they are still appropriate only to the degree that they are the most general. They are very good at taking past events and pullint them into their world view: as is any theology, any group, any philosophy. What they are bad at is any I read a variety of these kinds of books when I was in Bible College; even then I found them rather poorly written and with dubious connections to Scripture. This was one of them. Re-reading this now, twenty years after I started to explore the subject, I note that they are still appropriate only to the degree that they are the most general. They are very good at taking past events and pullint them into their world view: as is any theology, any group, any philosophy. What they are bad at is any kind of predictive power. The author does not claim to be a prophet (well, not explicitly), but neither is he able to step beyond his own philosphy to see the large picture of the world around him. That is, in fact, part of the reason the world is in its current international crisis of trust.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pepper

    Fascinating read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brian Pate

    I read this book in high school. I remember enjoying it at the time, but would probably have a very different opinion today.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brent Voight

    I have been enthralled with the End Times over the past year and have really dived into studying them becuase I want to understand them and I really feel we are living in the End Times right now--how long it will last I am not sure. Mr. Walvoord does an excellent job laying out how current events fit biblical prophecy. This has been the best book for making sense of biblical prophecy that's been filled, current events as the birth pangs of the end and biblical prophecy that is yet to be filled a I have been enthralled with the End Times over the past year and have really dived into studying them becuase I want to understand them and I really feel we are living in the End Times right now--how long it will last I am not sure. Mr. Walvoord does an excellent job laying out how current events fit biblical prophecy. This has been the best book for making sense of biblical prophecy that's been filled, current events as the birth pangs of the end and biblical prophecy that is yet to be filled and how it will be filled. The title does not do justice for how good a book this is on describing in practical terms how the end times will be played out based on biblical prophecy.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steve cutting

    Reading this before going to sleep at night of all things! This book is one of those that is hard to put down at any point. So far, it reads like a Hal Lindsy book, lots of prophesy that could or could not come true. It relates to how the Mideast crisis affect the world supply of oil and what will the crisis do to the alignment of nations in the Middle East. Also, will Israel survive the Arab attempts to push it from the Holy Land and do current events point to the final global war, Armageddon?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Arlee Bird

    Though released in 1974 this book is still a pretty contemporary read. It's well written and organized. However the premise is a bit misleading. There are interesting insights offered as to potential scenarios regarding Israel in the future, but mostly it's standard interpretations that can be found elsewhere. The majority of the book is typical Bible prophecy and the author's analysis of those prophecies. It's a topic that I don't tire of reading and this book presents the material in a fine ma Though released in 1974 this book is still a pretty contemporary read. It's well written and organized. However the premise is a bit misleading. There are interesting insights offered as to potential scenarios regarding Israel in the future, but mostly it's standard interpretations that can be found elsewhere. The majority of the book is typical Bible prophecy and the author's analysis of those prophecies. It's a topic that I don't tire of reading and this book presents the material in a fine manner.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    Only 2 stars - It was okay - because I couldn't say I "really liked" it because of the topic itself. Prophesy or no, it is still sad to think mankind is destined for this (self)destruction. For those who like a good Stephen King scare I'd say this topic gives the scare plus the "chill-pill" so read it - it's a lot shorter, too.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    The predictions are not very specific, but the history of the middle east is explained well. You have to believe the interpretation of the bible as the author does to draw the same conclusions about the future. Luckily, we do not have to guess right, the future will be a surprise to us all. John 3:16. No ambiguity there.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Beverly Locker

    Although not a bible scholar, I'm an avid reader of the Bible and a Christian. This book helped me understand the oil and Middle East crisis, along with how they relate to the end times. Much has happened since the writing of this book. It was an interesting read and easy to understand.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anneliese Johns

    Spells out the way many Americans like me were raised to believe how it all came about and how its all going to go. Evolution is a wonderful substance!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Larry Wegman

    The Dallas Seminary president's 1990 look at current events related to Biblical prophecy about the end times. It hold up so-so.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nick Woodall

    Every Christian needs to understand the Middle East, and Walvoord is an excellent author to help you understand it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jane Sadek

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nelu Nista

  16. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jessy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carlodelarosa

  19. 5 out of 5

    Audrey Caldwell

  20. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marco Kaluma

  22. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rossy

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andrew William

  24. 5 out of 5

    Adam Calvert

  25. 4 out of 5

    Daniel W.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paula Obermeier McCarty

  27. 4 out of 5

    Breck Brigham

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rose

  29. 5 out of 5

    Claire

  30. 5 out of 5

    Helen P

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.