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Frostmourne. It was caught in a hovering, jagged chunk of ice, the runes that ran the length of its blade glowing a cool blue. Below it was a dais of some sort, standing on a large gently raised mound that was covered in a dusting of snow. A soft light, coming from somewhere high above where the cavern was open to daylight, shone down on the runeblade. The icy prison hid s Frostmourne. It was caught in a hovering, jagged chunk of ice, the runes that ran the length of its blade glowing a cool blue. Below it was a dais of some sort, standing on a large gently raised mound that was covered in a dusting of snow. A soft light, coming from somewhere high above where the cavern was open to daylight, shone down on the runeblade. The icy prison hid some details of the sword's shape and form, exaggerated others. It was revealed and concealed at the same time, and all the more tempting, like a new lover imperfectly glimpsed through a gauzy curtain. Arthas knew the blade -- it was the selfsame sword he had seen in his dream when he first arrived. The sword that had not killed Invincible, but that had brought him back healed and healthy. He'd thought it a good omen then, but now he knew it was a true sign. This was what he had come to find. This sword would change everything. Arthas stared raptly at it, his hands almost physically aching to grasp it, his fingers to wrap themselves around the hilt, his arms to feel the weapon swinging smoothly in the blow that would end Mal'Ganis, end the torment he had visited upon the people of Lordaeron, end this lust for revenge. Drawn, he stepped forward. The uncanny elemental spirit drew its icy sword. "Turn away, before it is too late," it intoned. * * * His evil is legend. Lord of the undead Scourge, wielder of the runeblade Frostmourne, and enemy of the free peoples of Azeroth. The Lich King is an entity of incalculable power and unparalleled malice -- his icy soul utterly consumed by his plans to destroy all life on the World of Warcraft. But it was not always so. Long before his soul was fused with that of the orc shaman Ner'zhul, the Lich King was Arthas Menethil, crown prince of Lordaeron and faithful paladin of the Silver Hand. When a plague of undeath threatened all that he loved, Arthas was driven to pursue an ill-fated quest for a runeblade powerful enough to save his homeland. Yet the object of his search would exact a heavy price from its new master, beginning a horrifying descent into damnation. Arthas's path would lead him through the arctic northern wastes toward the Frozen Throne, where he would face, at long last, the darkest of destinies.


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Frostmourne. It was caught in a hovering, jagged chunk of ice, the runes that ran the length of its blade glowing a cool blue. Below it was a dais of some sort, standing on a large gently raised mound that was covered in a dusting of snow. A soft light, coming from somewhere high above where the cavern was open to daylight, shone down on the runeblade. The icy prison hid s Frostmourne. It was caught in a hovering, jagged chunk of ice, the runes that ran the length of its blade glowing a cool blue. Below it was a dais of some sort, standing on a large gently raised mound that was covered in a dusting of snow. A soft light, coming from somewhere high above where the cavern was open to daylight, shone down on the runeblade. The icy prison hid some details of the sword's shape and form, exaggerated others. It was revealed and concealed at the same time, and all the more tempting, like a new lover imperfectly glimpsed through a gauzy curtain. Arthas knew the blade -- it was the selfsame sword he had seen in his dream when he first arrived. The sword that had not killed Invincible, but that had brought him back healed and healthy. He'd thought it a good omen then, but now he knew it was a true sign. This was what he had come to find. This sword would change everything. Arthas stared raptly at it, his hands almost physically aching to grasp it, his fingers to wrap themselves around the hilt, his arms to feel the weapon swinging smoothly in the blow that would end Mal'Ganis, end the torment he had visited upon the people of Lordaeron, end this lust for revenge. Drawn, he stepped forward. The uncanny elemental spirit drew its icy sword. "Turn away, before it is too late," it intoned. * * * His evil is legend. Lord of the undead Scourge, wielder of the runeblade Frostmourne, and enemy of the free peoples of Azeroth. The Lich King is an entity of incalculable power and unparalleled malice -- his icy soul utterly consumed by his plans to destroy all life on the World of Warcraft. But it was not always so. Long before his soul was fused with that of the orc shaman Ner'zhul, the Lich King was Arthas Menethil, crown prince of Lordaeron and faithful paladin of the Silver Hand. When a plague of undeath threatened all that he loved, Arthas was driven to pursue an ill-fated quest for a runeblade powerful enough to save his homeland. Yet the object of his search would exact a heavy price from its new master, beginning a horrifying descent into damnation. Arthas's path would lead him through the arctic northern wastes toward the Frozen Throne, where he would face, at long last, the darkest of destinies.

30 review for Arthas: Rise of the Lich King

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Arthas: Rise of the Lich King (World of Warcraft #6), Christie Golden The story starts off with Arthas at age nine, in the period between the First and Second Wars, with Anduin Lothar and Varian Wrynn first arriving in Capital City bearing news of the fall of Stormwind. Arthas and Varian play together, though while Varian was trained to fight since childhood, Arthas was shielded from such teachings by his father. However, with Muradin Bronzebeard coming across Arthas fighting imaginary orcs while Arthas: Rise of the Lich King (World of Warcraft #6), Christie Golden The story starts off with Arthas at age nine, in the period between the First and Second Wars, with Anduin Lothar and Varian Wrynn first arriving in Capital City bearing news of the fall of Stormwind. Arthas and Varian play together, though while Varian was trained to fight since childhood, Arthas was shielded from such teachings by his father. However, with Muradin Bronzebeard coming across Arthas fighting imaginary orcs while Alliance forces battle against the Horde on Draenor, Muradin volunteers to train him. Later, Arthas is caught up in Daval Prestor's attempt to marry Calia Menethil. The love triangle between Arthas, Jaina Proudmoore and Kael'thas Sunstrider is developed through the plot, Arthas and Jaina partaking in the festivities of Noblegarden, the Midsummer Fire Festival, Hallow's End and the Feast of Winter Veil together. Later, as Arthas starts taking on the responsibilities of a prince, he visits Durnholde Keep, seeing Thrall fight other adversaries in the gladiator arena. Quel'Thalas is visited and high Elven culture depicted. Eventually, he is inducted as a Knight of the Silver Hand in the Cathedral of Light. Eventually, the Third War begins. The story covers Arthas and Jaina meeting Kel'Thuzad, Arthas calling Uther a traitor and dismissing him and the Knights of the Silver Hand from service for their refusal to aid in the Culling of Stratholme. In time, Arthas' search for vengeance leads him to Frostmourne, the (apparent) demise of Mal'Ganis and the moments leading to and after the murder of King Terenas. The storyline continues beyond this point, to Jaina and Aegwynn in Theramore. Numerous scenes from Wrath of the Lich King are included along with cameos of Tuskarr and Taunka. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز هجدهم ماه دسامبر سال 2017 میلادی عنوان: آرتاس: ظهور لیچ کینگ؛ نویسنده: کریستی گلدن؛ مترجم: افشین اردشیری؛ ویراستار: آهو مدیحی؛ تهران، ویدا، چاپ دوم 1395؛ در 440 ص؛ فروست: وارکرافت کتاب 6؛ شابک: 9786002911537؛ چاپ سوم و چهارم 1396؛ عنوان دیگر: ظهور لیچ کینگ؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان ایالات متحده آمریکا - سده 21 م لیچ کینگ؛ توانایی بیمانندی در شرارت دارد. روحش یخ زده، برای نقشه های پلید و شوم، که هر دم برای نابودی زندگی، در جهان وارکرفت کشیده، روحش خالی از احساس شده است. اما همیشه اینگونه نبوده، پیش از آنکه روحش، چنین از شرارت لبریز شود، او جانشین بر حق «لردارون»، و پهلوان افسانه ای «سیلور هند» بوده است. زمانیکه مرگی نابهنگام، تمام داشته هایش را میرباید، او راهی سفری میشود، تا بتواند با به دست آوردن یک توانایی، سرزمین خود را نجات دهد، سفری که او را با سرنوشتی تاریک روبرو میسازد. و...؛ داستانی از کشمکش میان «خیر و شر»، «نیکی و پلیدی»، و «اهریمن و روشنایی» است، «آرتاس» اگرچه در جهانی خیالی، سرنوشت خویش را، بازی میکند، اما در حقیقت، یکی از انسانی ترین شخصیتهای «وارکرفت»، با سرنوشتی غریب، و شاید تراژیک باشد؛ داستان زندگی او، شاید همانند داستان زندگی تک تک ما، در چیزی خلاصه میشود، که شخصیت و سرنوشت هر کدام از ما نیز، بدان وابسته است؛ برگزیدن گزینشهایی، که هر یک از ما بر سر دو راهیهای بیشمار زندگی، برمیگزینیم، تا شخصیت و سرنوشت خود را، بسازیم، و بی شک بهای گزینشهای خویش را نیز میپردازیم.؛ «آرتاس»، در سرنوشت غریب خود، با گزینش میان «قدرت و عشق»، «روشنایی و تاریکی»، و «مرگ و زندگی»، حماسه ای حیرت انگیز، با پایانی ناباورانه رقم میزند.؛ نقل نمونه متن: «بلاکمور خندید، و با کنار رفتن ریش بزی‌ اش، دندان‌های تمیز و مرتبش نمایان شد.؛ قرار نبود امروز مبارزه کند، اما به خاطر اعلی‌حضرت، قوی‌ترین جنگجویان را پیدا می‌کنم، تا در برابرش مبارزه کنند.؛ دو ساعت بعد، بازدید آرتاس تموم شده بود، و او در حال صرف غذای خوشمزه‌ ای همراه با بلاکمور، و مرد جوانی به‌ نام لرد کارمین لانگستون بود، که بلاکمور خود را قیم او معرفی کرده بود.؛ آرتاس احساس کرد از لانگستون خوشش نیامده است.»؛ پایان نقل تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 10/05/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Markus

    "This kingdom shall fall," he promised his beloved steed as he threw his cloak over its bony back and mounted. "And from the ashes shall arise a new order that will shake the very foundation of the world!" This book tells the story of Arthas Menethil and his Darth Vader-ish path from being a little prince of Lordaeron to becoming a catalyst and master of unspeakable evil. Rise of the Lich King is mostly just a novelisation of Warcraft 3, putting the escapades of Arthas and Jaina, and the encounter "This kingdom shall fall," he promised his beloved steed as he threw his cloak over its bony back and mounted. "And from the ashes shall arise a new order that will shake the very foundation of the world!" This book tells the story of Arthas Menethil and his Darth Vader-ish path from being a little prince of Lordaeron to becoming a catalyst and master of unspeakable evil. Rise of the Lich King is mostly just a novelisation of Warcraft 3, putting the escapades of Arthas and Jaina, and the encounters with everything from demon lords to powerful wizards, down on paper. Even many of the lines are copied directly from the game, but I thought that gave a nice touch to it. Christie Golden is the best of the Warcraft writers, but Arthas is no longer the best of the Warcraft characters. I realised while reading that he's much weaker and more shallow than I had expected. He's still an intriguing character, but there's little depth to him compared to some of the people he meets (who also happen to be my favourite characters), namely Illidan Stormrage and Sylvanas Windrunner. Overall, though, it was totally worth an hour or two of my time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Heart1lly

    I'm actually surprised by all the good reviews for this book. To each their own, though Christie Golden has done much better with other novels. This one felt very rushed, and forced, as though she didn't really have any enthusiasm for writing this one. If you've played Warcraft III along with the Frozen Throne, there isn't much need to read this. I was also greatly bothered by the injection of the horse - Invincible - into the plot. After Arthas turns to the - ahem - dark side, it seems as though I'm actually surprised by all the good reviews for this book. To each their own, though Christie Golden has done much better with other novels. This one felt very rushed, and forced, as though she didn't really have any enthusiasm for writing this one. If you've played Warcraft III along with the Frozen Throne, there isn't much need to read this. I was also greatly bothered by the injection of the horse - Invincible - into the plot. After Arthas turns to the - ahem - dark side, it seems as though he's constantly thinking about this damn horse. When I still played World of Warcraft, my guild mates and I used to joke around about how Jaina Proudmoore wasn't his true love. That spot was reserved for his damn horse. I was disappointed by the Kael'thas plot line, because it was actually the only spot in the book that I thought Ms. Golden's talent truly shined. I was disappointed because these moments in the book didn't last long, and they were really interesting. If you're really into World of Warcraft, and really love this book or want to read it, perhaps you'd be interested in buying my signed copy? :D

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ernie Jr.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I have been an avid gamer since PC's came on the market. I'm also a sometimes video game level designer (Feverpitch/Warthog-Tx/Gizmondo and Sony Online). I have played all the Diablos, both Starcrafts, and all of the Warcraft series including WoW. It is important to note that I play games for their storylines and graphics (especially 'cut scenes') more than any other reason. I have loved Blizzard's humor, depth, and creativity in their storylines. However, when I played Warcraft III and the expa I have been an avid gamer since PC's came on the market. I'm also a sometimes video game level designer (Feverpitch/Warthog-Tx/Gizmondo and Sony Online). I have played all the Diablos, both Starcrafts, and all of the Warcraft series including WoW. It is important to note that I play games for their storylines and graphics (especially 'cut scenes') more than any other reason. I have loved Blizzard's humor, depth, and creativity in their storylines. However, when I played Warcraft III and the expansion, I had trouble suspending disbelief on the fall of a new young paladin-prince so rapidly to become the Lich King. Years later I read Christie Golden's book adaptation of the game storyline. She helped me grasp who Arthas was and how he could become one of the most powerfully evil characters in the Warcraft universe. The best review I have to offer is a heartfelt thank you. Thank you for bringing me back to the rich world, the in depth story line, and most of all thank you for helping me understand the Arthas part of the story so much better.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leeanna

    World of Warcraft: Arthas: Rise of the Lich King, by Christie Golden "Arthas: Rise of the Lich King" feels like it should be the best of all the Warcraft books published so far. Golden has a lot to work with: the previous Warcraft books, all the Warcraft games and expansions, and the multitude of lore and history that exists. But there's a feeling I'm always left with after finishing this book - a feeling that *something* is missing. The novel is the story of Arthas Menethil, heir to the throne of World of Warcraft: Arthas: Rise of the Lich King, by Christie Golden "Arthas: Rise of the Lich King" feels like it should be the best of all the Warcraft books published so far. Golden has a lot to work with: the previous Warcraft books, all the Warcraft games and expansions, and the multitude of lore and history that exists. But there's a feeling I'm always left with after finishing this book - a feeling that *something* is missing. The novel is the story of Arthas Menethil, heir to the throne of Lordaeron; a bright boy with a promising future. But instead of becoming a wise king and faithful paladin, Arthas will fall into the dark and icy deep and rise as the Lich King. The book starts out well enough, with Golden tying many of the scenes into other published Warcraft novels and game history. Arthas is established as a boy desperate to do the right thing, eager for his father's approval, and to be his own person. He makes a misguided vow to do whatever necessary to protect his people, one that he holds to at all costs. Golden is good at writing misguided characters, ones that start with noble intentions that disintegrate - it seems to be her forte; she's done this in the other Warcraft books she's authored. But I feel something is missing from "Arthas: Rise of the Lich King." For me, Arthas' fall is too fast. There isn't enough believability in his fall from grace - while all Warcraft players know that he becomes evil, Golden doesn't do a good enough job of making it a realistic journey. The third section of the book also glosses greatly over many important events; barely mentioning some and forgetting others all together. The end comes far too quickly. In my opinion the third section is very lacking; it could have used more detail, length, and coverage of important Warcraft events. Fans of the game will appreciate the little touches Golden puts in, such as Arthas' anger being described often as righteous fury, a spell paladins have. Or the smell of peacebloom, a common herb in the game. "Arthas: Rise of the Lich King" also features Jaina Proudmoore, Kael'thas Sunstrider, and Sylvanas Windrunner, all legendary figures in their own right. "Arthas: Rise of the Lich King" was the first Warcraft book to be published in hardcover, and while I did splurge and purchase it in hardcover, I feel $25 is a bit much for this book. Only buy it if you have a good coupon, or wait for the paperback. It's too short for my tastes, and isn't long enough to be worth that much, frankly. I was very excited when this book was published, and I couldn't wait to read it, and I do enjoy rereading it, but I just wish there was more too it. I always feel a bit blah at the end, and I wish I didn't feel that way. 3/5.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katyana

    ***3.5*** Having played this game for ... well, longer than I care to admit... I always meant to check out the books, but never did. Well, I finally picked up the book for the backstory on one of my favorite expansions. TBH, I had a really hard time keeping my attention on it. Maybe this is because the story is familiar to me, from the game. Or maybe it was because ... well, Arthas' petulant man-baby inner monologue reads particularly poorly in today's crappy world of incels and bros. *shrug* ***3.5*** Having played this game for ... well, longer than I care to admit... I always meant to check out the books, but never did. Well, I finally picked up the book for the backstory on one of my favorite expansions. TBH, I had a really hard time keeping my attention on it. Maybe this is because the story is familiar to me, from the game. Or maybe it was because ... well, Arthas' petulant man-baby inner monologue reads particularly poorly in today's crappy world of incels and bros. *shrug*

  7. 4 out of 5

    belle ✨

    I really enjoyed this book and so far, I think it's the best Warcraft book I've read. The WoW lore regarding Arthas and his descent into evil is some of my favorite, and this book was so fun to read! It was such a good novelization of Warcraft III events, even using some of the exact in-game and cut scene dialogue, but even if you're not a WoW player you could still enjoy this book. It was a good solid fantasy tale all on its own! I really enjoyed this book and so far, I think it's the best Warcraft book I've read. The WoW lore regarding Arthas and his descent into evil is some of my favorite, and this book was so fun to read! It was such a good novelization of Warcraft III events, even using some of the exact in-game and cut scene dialogue, but even if you're not a WoW player you could still enjoy this book. It was a good solid fantasy tale all on its own!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ramón S.

    This book is a proof of how boooring are pure evil characters . The book is divided in two clear parts: 1-Arthas human and 2- Arthas embracing willingly and without any resistance the evil path. The last part of the book is a almost a description of a video game . A book destined to be forgotten. Only the character of Jaina can be saved

  9. 5 out of 5

    Grimm

    This book was incredibly fun to read but if you've never played world of Warcraft, I'm not sure if you would enjoy it that much. I will say I learned a lot about the lore of the lich king. It made me feel more attached to the world. This book was incredibly fun to read but if you've never played world of Warcraft, I'm not sure if you would enjoy it that much. I will say I learned a lot about the lore of the lich king. It made me feel more attached to the world.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    If you play WoW in any of its formats, you'll love this book. If you enjoy solid fantasy novels, you'll enjoy this book, but you'll know you're missing some of the background. Golden does an excellent job of weaving Warcraft lore, World of Warcraft game points and even quotes into this foundation story of one of Warcraft's major antagonists, and current expansion focus, Arthas - the Lich King. The key moment of the book is Arthas' massacre of Stratholme - his kingdom's second city. He decides he If you play WoW in any of its formats, you'll love this book. If you enjoy solid fantasy novels, you'll enjoy this book, but you'll know you're missing some of the background. Golden does an excellent job of weaving Warcraft lore, World of Warcraft game points and even quotes into this foundation story of one of Warcraft's major antagonists, and current expansion focus, Arthas - the Lich King. The key moment of the book is Arthas' massacre of Stratholme - his kingdom's second city. He decides he must kill everyone in the city before the plague that kills its victims and then reanimates them as undead soldiers for a demonic army. When he arrives at the city, he learns he's too late and the grain containing the plague has already been distributed. Killing thousands of men, women, and children - people who loved you as their prince and future king, can't be an easy thing. But I won't say I don't understand his decision. I can say I could never make it myself. But if Stratholme was allowed to fall completely to the plague, then the resulting army might well have been unstoppable. They were nearly unstoppable in any event and it turns out an extra 10-15000 undead soldiers would not have mattered. But Arthas didn't know that. He felt he had to do what he could to save his people. Jaina Proudmoore - his companion and former lover tried to talk him out of his decision by saying they might find a cure, there's always hope. Again, it turned out there was. With hindsight, both neither decision was correct - Arthas didn't save his people, and in fact, the Culling of Stratholme directly led to Lordaeron's fall at the hands of Arthas. But Jainia's alternative wasn't viable either. All it had to offer was a clean conscious. But in the end, sometimes that's all you can hope for.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pippa DaCosta

    I'm not sure what happened here. It was a good read but lots of events took place off-page, especially near the end when plot points are built up and then swept away in an explanatory paragraph. Arthas is a dick. From the moment he gives Jaina the "let's be friends" talk after screwing around with her for months, it's clear, he's an a-hole. I'm not sure what I expected—something with a bit more emotional connection, perhaps. The tone is dry, especially after coming from Christine's excellent Bef I'm not sure what happened here. It was a good read but lots of events took place off-page, especially near the end when plot points are built up and then swept away in an explanatory paragraph. Arthas is a dick. From the moment he gives Jaina the "let's be friends" talk after screwing around with her for months, it's clear, he's an a-hole. I'm not sure what I expected—something with a bit more emotional connection, perhaps. The tone is dry, especially after coming from Christine's excellent Before the Storm. I would have liked to have seen more of a connection to the characters, more reason for me to beg Arthas not to be a fool, but he's just a special snowflake with power issues and that never really changes. Kael was interesting and had a lot more potential. And Sylvanus stole Arthas' thunder. Both had more emotion and motivations, than Arthas. Still, adapting game-play to novelizations is no easy thing to do, and I think the author probably did the best she could with the framework she was given. Worth a read, but it left me disappointed.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I went into this book thinking that it was going to be a lot like the lore sheets that are online. No real story, just fact in a oddly structured format. I've never read the other lore books and I was told this was the one to read so I grabbed it. It was strange to find that their was an actual progression of character in Arthas and you can spot the points where he begins to fall from the Light. Golden does an awesome job at making the story understandable even if the reader hasn't played any of I went into this book thinking that it was going to be a lot like the lore sheets that are online. No real story, just fact in a oddly structured format. I've never read the other lore books and I was told this was the one to read so I grabbed it. It was strange to find that their was an actual progression of character in Arthas and you can spot the points where he begins to fall from the Light. Golden does an awesome job at making the story understandable even if the reader hasn't played any of the Warcraft games. I think people that haven't played at least World of Warcraft will have a bit of a time with visualizing each place and character. I found that even though I hadn't played Warcraft III, I was still able to grasp these things being as I play WoW. So in short, this is definitely a gamer's book, but a face value I took it as doom and gloom but its not. There's romance and determination, cunning and deceitfulness. It definitely made me want to pick up Golden's other lore books. In case you're curious, I play Mornaria - 80 blood elf Holy Paladin on the Turalyon server. :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    David Octavian

    4.25/5 The book started really well, but the last 40% felt rushed - unfortunately the story had to accommodate the game, thus the last 30% part seemingly forgot some of the characters and focused strictly on plot and the ultra-fast pace. The book should've been at least 20% longer with the world and characters it had. The ending was just superb. 4.25/5 The book started really well, but the last 40% felt rushed - unfortunately the story had to accommodate the game, thus the last 30% part seemingly forgot some of the characters and focused strictly on plot and the ultra-fast pace. The book should've been at least 20% longer with the world and characters it had. The ending was just superb.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Akila

    As a work of meaningful fiction, Golden's writing is mediocre at best. I just skimmed through the second half of the book grabbing just the gist of it. Her characters lack depth, her descriptions lackluster and vocabulary extremely limited. I read it because I cared about this game I spent a lot of my time playing and I wanted to see what had happened for the expansions I just skipped through. If the story is already out there in the form of a game, I think it should take a little more work to m As a work of meaningful fiction, Golden's writing is mediocre at best. I just skimmed through the second half of the book grabbing just the gist of it. Her characters lack depth, her descriptions lackluster and vocabulary extremely limited. I read it because I cared about this game I spent a lot of my time playing and I wanted to see what had happened for the expansions I just skipped through. If the story is already out there in the form of a game, I think it should take a little more work to make it a beautiful one instead of keeping it so light and almost trashy. Even the protagonist, whose name is the title of the book, has such shallow character description that I wonder what kind of target audience Golden was writing for. I am not even prone to writing scathing reviews and here I am so annoyed by the substance, or lack thereof, in this book. Well, for all the excitement I had for finding this book at my library, I felt deeply disappointed at 3 a.m when I reached the end. I loved Arthas, this good guy that turned bad in the game I played and after reading this book I don't. Honestly, I am supposed to have understood why he did the things that he did but I don't think Golden succeeded in explaining that at all, therefore defeating the whole purpose of writing the story. I don't even recommend this one to Warcraft players. If you really care about the lore, simply questing in Northrend will give you a better outlook on Arthas than this book will.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rich Tijerina

    Better writing than the quests so it gets 3 stars. Stand alone, it deserved a measly star. Why a woman shouldn't have written this: -------------SPOILER----------------------------------------------------------------- The weakness of Arthas was manipulated by Christie to fit in her wanna-be romantic tragedy. Here is how the story really went: The first time Arthas was alone with Varian- the king to be crowned- Arthas told Varian that he was fortunate to have come to rule so early. This was the begin Better writing than the quests so it gets 3 stars. Stand alone, it deserved a measly star. Why a woman shouldn't have written this: -------------SPOILER----------------------------------------------------------------- The weakness of Arthas was manipulated by Christie to fit in her wanna-be romantic tragedy. Here is how the story really went: The first time Arthas was alone with Varian- the king to be crowned- Arthas told Varian that he was fortunate to have come to rule so early. This was the beginning of the hate he brewed against the good health of his father. King Terenas saw this hate and therefore kept Arthas from training. Arthas sexually assaulted the maid while on his trip to see Thrall. Arthas was ashamed of Jaina, because her lineage wasn't royal that is why he banged her in private. King Terenas approved of her and forced the affair to be legit, because he respected Admiral Proudmore. Arthas was like F-that, I'm out. Arthas knew that the people of the town would be easier annihilated pre-zombification. straight up. You don't just wake up and become Dickhead Arthas, sorry hack writer Golden.

  16. 5 out of 5

    S.M. Johnson

    Actually pretty good. My favorite part is that it's basically just a novelization of much of Warcraft III and The Frozen Throne, even right down to verbatim unit quotes on occasion. Warcraft III is awesome, ergo this book is awesome. It also "interfaces" nicely with other books in the Warcraft universe - it recounts events that have already been detailed in other novels but from a different point of view. Overall it's just good stuff for Warcraft fans. Actually pretty good. My favorite part is that it's basically just a novelization of much of Warcraft III and The Frozen Throne, even right down to verbatim unit quotes on occasion. Warcraft III is awesome, ergo this book is awesome. It also "interfaces" nicely with other books in the Warcraft universe - it recounts events that have already been detailed in other novels but from a different point of view. Overall it's just good stuff for Warcraft fans.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Monika

    So far this is the best World of Warcraft book I have ever read

  18. 4 out of 5

    ⚜️Trea

    It has been years since I read this story, but I was very glad that I revisited it! It focuses on Arthas' actions prior to becoming The Lich King, and paints a very clear picture of him as a child and a man both. The writing did an excellent job of capturing the areas and events of the game, as it was easy for me to picture them! I wish the book had ended differently, as it seemed to be on a bit of a cliffhanger, but I understood the reasoning for doing so. Definitely worth the time in reading i It has been years since I read this story, but I was very glad that I revisited it! It focuses on Arthas' actions prior to becoming The Lich King, and paints a very clear picture of him as a child and a man both. The writing did an excellent job of capturing the areas and events of the game, as it was easy for me to picture them! I wish the book had ended differently, as it seemed to be on a bit of a cliffhanger, but I understood the reasoning for doing so. Definitely worth the time in reading it!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Zarkseven

    I never played any of the Warcraft PC games, but I’ve played World of Warcraft since November 2004. I own all of the Warcraft novels, but have only gotten around to reading one of them (Warcraft: Day of the Dragon by Richard A. Knaak). I was excited to read that Dick Hill had recorded 3 of the Warcraft books as audiobooks, only to be disappointed when their release was delayed indefinitely. So when I saw that World of Warcraft: Arthas – Rise of the Lich King was coming out, I thought it might be I never played any of the Warcraft PC games, but I’ve played World of Warcraft since November 2004. I own all of the Warcraft novels, but have only gotten around to reading one of them (Warcraft: Day of the Dragon by Richard A. Knaak). I was excited to read that Dick Hill had recorded 3 of the Warcraft books as audiobooks, only to be disappointed when their release was delayed indefinitely. So when I saw that World of Warcraft: Arthas – Rise of the Lich King was coming out, I thought it might be a good opportunity to read one that was highly related to the World of Warcraft: Wrath of the Lich King expansion, without being tied to a three book series. Downloaded it to my Kindle and gave it a whirl. LIKED True to the Lore. I have read articles by people who played Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos and Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne are very faithfully represented in the book, sometimes word for word. After really getting into World of Warcraft, I regretted that I never played either of those games, though real time strategy games are not my forte. Many World of Warcraft References. There were many World of Warcraft related references in the story. It’s obvious that Golden is very familiar with the MMO. Jaina igniting the Wicker Man for the Hallow’s Eve festival, as well as other festivals. Appearances by Tuskarr and Taunka in Northrend. The ghostly Matthias Lehner (anagram of Arthas Menethil). NOT SO MUCH To The Point. I’m probably conditioned by reading a lot of Stephen King and Robert Jordan lately, but I thought as I was reading the book that it could have gone into much more detail about the characters and what was going on. Because it spans so many events, it seems like you are lead from one event to the next with no read character or story development in-between. In the wowwiki post about the book, it references that “The story is set over an extensive period, and has many duplicate scenes from other works, including Tides of Darkness, Beyond the Dark Portal, Day of the Dragon, Reign of Chaos, The Frozen Throne and Wrath of the Lich King. However, while the scenes themselves remain the same, they are experienced from alternate viewpoints.” I think this worked to the detriment of the book, which probably could have been twice as long to fully do justice to the story. Motivations. This ties in with the previous statement, but I don’t think that the characterization of Arthas was strong enough to make his descent into darkness believable. Perhaps it’s just that so much happens to fast that there just isn’t the depth. RECOMMEND? If you are a World of Warcraft fan, this book fleshes out the lore very well. It will give you a new appreciation of the world of the game. For non-fans, it is a very accessible fantasy novel, so it might appeal to some who might not otherwise read the genre. For those who are strictly fantasy story fans and not WoW players, there are plenty of other works that you would probably appreciate much more.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rhys

    In the book World of Warcraft: Arthas: Rise of the Lich King is about a prince named Arthas who is loved by every one in his kingdom. He was thought to be a paladin and use the light to his advantage. He was one day sent out on a mission to look for these orc who they thought were using demonic energy. When they got to the sight were the orcs were so posed to be, only to find undead men coming out of houses. They killed them all and went in to the main town where they saw more undead and 5 men In the book World of Warcraft: Arthas: Rise of the Lich King is about a prince named Arthas who is loved by every one in his kingdom. He was thought to be a paladin and use the light to his advantage. He was one day sent out on a mission to look for these orc who they thought were using demonic energy. When they got to the sight were the orcs were so posed to be, only to find undead men coming out of houses. They killed them all and went in to the main town where they saw more undead and 5 men in black robes looking like they were controlling the undead. when they saw arthas they ran through a portal and left there undead minions to die. Arthas chased them for months in to an iceland. Arthas had heard tails of this place where a secret sword called frostmorn was so so posed to be. He looked for many days for it and finally found it. He wanted it so he could kill the undead scourge completely. He then started to hear voices in his head of a man telling him to find him to give Arthas even more power then he already had. So Arthas looked for him when he got to the place where the voice was coming form he saw Illadan and his army of men. Illadan and Arthas had a grueling battle that was won by Arthas. Arthas then went to clam the lich king for him self. Arthas took control of the Armor and turned in to the Lich King. He then raised an undead army to help take over the world. Text to self In the book I learned more about Arthas and what his life was like but in this game I played I learned how and why he wanted to turn in to the lich king and How he did it. I also learned that he killed his father and left his sister in charge of the kingdom. Last I learned in the book that he fell in love with a girl who was also in the game named Jania Prowdmorn. I would give this book 5 stares because I loved this book because it had so much detail and had so much action. I would recommend this book to any one who likes action books/ thriller books / mystery books because this book kind of touches on all of those subjects. I would also recommend this book to people who like the game Warcraft or World of Warcraft because in the game you learn little bit about them but this book says more about it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Saugat

    “My son, when you were born, the very forest of Lordaron whispered a name to me. Arthas.” This is such a chilling story about the lich king. I knew the lores of the warcraft before but, even then it was such a good book to read. It created a picture of Arthas that I never imagined before. It showed the human side of him. The story I think follows the trend of Anakin Skywalker from the star wars; a great warrior turns evil for the power it promises. In both stories they begin as Champions of ligh “My son, when you were born, the very forest of Lordaron whispered a name to me. Arthas.” This is such a chilling story about the lich king. I knew the lores of the warcraft before but, even then it was such a good book to read. It created a picture of Arthas that I never imagined before. It showed the human side of him. The story I think follows the trend of Anakin Skywalker from the star wars; a great warrior turns evil for the power it promises. In both stories they begin as Champions of light but, their need to protect the things they hold dear makes them turn to darkness. It felt like the stories were too similar like the Battle of Stratholme after which Arthas killed Uther was like when Anakin fought Obi Wan. The final product of both stories, the Lich King and Darth Vader were also very similar. This really made me question the originality of the story. Nevertheless, it’s a great book to read for any WOW fan. Reading the lore really ties the story together and lots of the quests in the Icecrown Citadel and Northrend makes more sense because of it. You also understand some the instances like Culling of Strathlome, Ahn'kahet: the Old Kingdom etc. Understanding the stories behind them really makes them funner. Plus there are many little stories that are helpful to know like the story behind the mount Invincible that you can only get in 25 man ICC heroics. Or maybe it gives you more fuel and anger to crit 10k on the Lich King as you think about all the horrible things he did. Either way it’s a great read for those who love wow lores.

  22. 4 out of 5

    John

    Arthas, the central, defining bad guy in the World of Warcraft on line roleplaying game, and the good guy gone bad from Warcraft III is one of the strongest characters ever introduced in a computer game. He sets out to save his family, protect his lover, and serve his people as their prince. He ends up destroying everything he touches or is touched by. This novel of his life is about as good as you could get and stick to the very convoluted script already set down in the game, and memorized by th Arthas, the central, defining bad guy in the World of Warcraft on line roleplaying game, and the good guy gone bad from Warcraft III is one of the strongest characters ever introduced in a computer game. He sets out to save his family, protect his lover, and serve his people as their prince. He ends up destroying everything he touches or is touched by. This novel of his life is about as good as you could get and stick to the very convoluted script already set down in the game, and memorized by the gamers. As a straight fantasy novel, there are too many characters, too many details that divert from the story, and little to no tension. However, the central story is a great one, and Christie Golden does a great job of putting the reader in Arthas's head. Arthas is the main point of view character, but there are some scenes in other PoVs, such is Jaina Proudmore's. If you have played either of the games, it's great to live though the life of one of video games best loved and loathed anti-hero. If you play WoW, read this book. It's a quick read, and loads of fun. If you are a parent thinking about this book for your child, the Arthas / Jaina love story is very PG, and all the fun stuff happens off camera. The readability level is in the Y/A zone, albeit with a lot of (game driven) minutia. But your kid probably knows that minutia already. If you just want a good fantasy novel, there are many better ones.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shanelle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I finally got to really see what was going on in Prince Arthas' head as he turned from a Paladin: Wielder of the Light to the nefarious Lich King. The storyline flows seamlessly with the campaigns of Warcraft III. As many scenes happened in the novel, I found my mind pulling up the cinematics from the game. If you've played the campaign enough times, it's impossible not to do this. It was nice to see some back-story of Prince Arthas' upbringing. I saw how profoundly certain events affected him I finally got to really see what was going on in Prince Arthas' head as he turned from a Paladin: Wielder of the Light to the nefarious Lich King. The storyline flows seamlessly with the campaigns of Warcraft III. As many scenes happened in the novel, I found my mind pulling up the cinematics from the game. If you've played the campaign enough times, it's impossible not to do this. It was nice to see some back-story of Prince Arthas' upbringing. I saw how profoundly certain events affected him and it became easier to understand his seemingly hasty descent into darkness. The depth of the relationship between Jaina Proudmoore and Arthas was more than I surmised, which added another previously non-existent dimension to the entire story. I became much more acquainted with both of their characters. The lines that begin the Ravages of the Plague campaign now have much more meaning. There were other relationships that were equally important in Arthas' life that this book shed some light on. Most prominently with Uther, Muradin, and his horse Invincible. Having also read Lord of the Clans, I was pleased to see how the two stories encountered each other in this book. Christie Golden once again has done a fantastic job tying in all the new information to the story already entrenched in the game, and adds incredible realism to the legendary characters of Azeroth.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nic

    With the release of their top MMO's second expansion, Blizzard Entertainment begins to tell more about their expansion's main antagonist. Arthas: Rise of the Lich King expands on the existing story with deeper emotions from the characters to show why each does what they do in World of Warcraft. Arthas, the main character of the book, begins his life as the Prince of Lordaeron. He dredges through his studies and prayer sessions as he's molded into a paladin of the Light and king of Lordaeron. All With the release of their top MMO's second expansion, Blizzard Entertainment begins to tell more about their expansion's main antagonist. Arthas: Rise of the Lich King expands on the existing story with deeper emotions from the characters to show why each does what they do in World of Warcraft. Arthas, the main character of the book, begins his life as the Prince of Lordaeron. He dredges through his studies and prayer sessions as he's molded into a paladin of the Light and king of Lordaeron. All the events of the original games happen during Arthas' childhood. Arthas meets Jiana Proudmoore during her journey to study at Dalaran. Later in their life, the two fall in love with Arthas destroying the relationship only to further destroy it during the events at Stratholme. Arthas: Rise of the Lich King shows the reasoning behind Jiana's wanting to purify Arthas to the way he was as a paladin of the Light. Arthas: Rise of the Lich King broadens the emotional ties of the lore in Warcraft. I recommend this book for anyone who plays the Warcraft games and takes an interest in the story of the game. 308 pages

  25. 5 out of 5

    Belinda

    OKAY FINE. This is me admitting to have read a book ABOUT A FREAKING VIDEO GAME. Sue me. As far as the craft of writing and storytelling go, these are all pretty much horrible, horrible novels. Really bad. I mean, really not well done at all. The ONLY reason to read one of the WoW novels is if you are geeked out enough in the game to want to fill in some of the lore you may possibly have missed out on during the course of regular gameplay, and on that score, this one filled the bill for me. Most OKAY FINE. This is me admitting to have read a book ABOUT A FREAKING VIDEO GAME. Sue me. As far as the craft of writing and storytelling go, these are all pretty much horrible, horrible novels. Really bad. I mean, really not well done at all. The ONLY reason to read one of the WoW novels is if you are geeked out enough in the game to want to fill in some of the lore you may possibly have missed out on during the course of regular gameplay, and on that score, this one filled the bill for me. Mostly because now I feel sorry for poor scorned Kael'Thas, even while I repeatedly kill him hoping he'll drop that darn mount. Admittedly, the authors of these things are pretty much gimped from the start by having to force their narratives into a fairly rigid and often inconsistent (and sometimes downright contradictory) lore canon set forth in the game itself, so it can't be an easy task. But geez. As they might say in Trade Chat in the game, "WTB EDITOR. MUST KNOW SENTENCE STRUCTURE."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mitch

    What a great little book. This is like what the Star Wars prequels should've been about; a focused story of the rise and fall of an ambitious, gifted man. Despite some of the imagery/symbolism being a bit heavy-handed, a strong dramatic irony pervades the 1st third of the book, thereby setting up the delicious tragedy of Arthas' descent into becoming the one and only Lich King. A special mention of his one-time lover, Jaina, as her parts of the book provide us with the devoted sympathy needed for What a great little book. This is like what the Star Wars prequels should've been about; a focused story of the rise and fall of an ambitious, gifted man. Despite some of the imagery/symbolism being a bit heavy-handed, a strong dramatic irony pervades the 1st third of the book, thereby setting up the delicious tragedy of Arthas' descent into becoming the one and only Lich King. A special mention of his one-time lover, Jaina, as her parts of the book provide us with the devoted sympathy needed for us to truly care about Arthas and his corruption/self-actualization. Plus she's a badass. Check this book out if you're into WoW, Castle Fight, absolute power stories, or any sort of fantasy stuff. Quick & thoroughly enjoyable read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    If you've ever played the video game Warcraft III, or the MMORPG World of Warcraft, the story presented isn't a new one. It traces the path of Arthas Menethil, from Prince of Lorederon to his fall from grace, and inheriting the mantle of the Lich King. The characters are well plotted. The story moves at a good pace for the first two thirds of the book, and then it seems as though the author was late for her deadline, and rushed the manuscript. If you've never played any incarnation of the game, it If you've ever played the video game Warcraft III, or the MMORPG World of Warcraft, the story presented isn't a new one. It traces the path of Arthas Menethil, from Prince of Lorederon to his fall from grace, and inheriting the mantle of the Lich King. The characters are well plotted. The story moves at a good pace for the first two thirds of the book, and then it seems as though the author was late for her deadline, and rushed the manuscript. If you've never played any incarnation of the game, it holds up as a fantasy story, and as a story of good turning evil.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Valentina Morgana la fata

    All my friends told me that I would have loved Arthas as a character, and so it is. I love how he changed during the book, how he had to lose pieces after pieces of his soul in order to achieve what I thought was right in his mind. He did what he did, at least at the beginning, trying to save his people, then power started to take him over, he desired more and more, till he became the rightful Lich King. But, that's the point, in some ways Arthas is far too good for me to truly like him, that's why All my friends told me that I would have loved Arthas as a character, and so it is. I love how he changed during the book, how he had to lose pieces after pieces of his soul in order to achieve what I thought was right in his mind. He did what he did, at least at the beginning, trying to save his people, then power started to take him over, he desired more and more, till he became the rightful Lich King. But, that's the point, in some ways Arthas is far too good for me to truly like him, that's why I gave the book only three stars. That and Jaina, I really hate her!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Volodymyr Gerasimov

    If you are a huge fan of Warcraft 3 and Arthas, I would recommend you to read only first 25% and a final chapter, rest of it is a total waste of your time, if you played the original game. First 25% were outstanding, I really enjoyed reading about relationship of Arthas and Jaina, but afterwards - total disappointment. Description of original campaign was poor and short. 3/5 - I really think that author could have done better if she had more time and freedom

  30. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Hoke

    I just read this book, it's about a guy becoming a king of the dead (Lich King). It's related to a game called World Of Warcraft, in the game the sword frostmoure is a really strong weapon and it is hard to get. I just read this book, it's about a guy becoming a king of the dead (Lich King). It's related to a game called World Of Warcraft, in the game the sword frostmoure is a really strong weapon and it is hard to get.

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