counter create hit King Arthur's Bones - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

King Arthur's Bones

Availability: Ready to download

During excavation work at Glastonbury Abbey in the year 1191, an ancient leaden cross is discovered buried several feet below the ground. Inscribed on it are the words Hic iacet sepultus inclitus rex arturius: Here lies buried the renowned King Arthur. Beneath the cross are two skeletons. Could these really be the remains of the legendary King Arthur and his queen, Guineve During excavation work at Glastonbury Abbey in the year 1191, an ancient leaden cross is discovered buried several feet below the ground. Inscribed on it are the words Hic iacet sepultus inclitus rex arturius: Here lies buried the renowned King Arthur. Beneath the cross are two skeletons. Could these really be the remains of the legendary King Arthur and his queen, Guinevere? As the monks debate the implications of this extraordinary discovery, the bones are spirited away by the mysterious Guardians, a group determined to keep King Arthur's remains safe until the legend is fulfilled and he returns to protect his country in the hour of its greatest need. As the secret of the bones' hiding place is passed from generation to generation, those entrusted to safeguard the king's remains must withstand treachery, theft, blackmail, and murder in order to keep the legend intact.


Compare

During excavation work at Glastonbury Abbey in the year 1191, an ancient leaden cross is discovered buried several feet below the ground. Inscribed on it are the words Hic iacet sepultus inclitus rex arturius: Here lies buried the renowned King Arthur. Beneath the cross are two skeletons. Could these really be the remains of the legendary King Arthur and his queen, Guineve During excavation work at Glastonbury Abbey in the year 1191, an ancient leaden cross is discovered buried several feet below the ground. Inscribed on it are the words Hic iacet sepultus inclitus rex arturius: Here lies buried the renowned King Arthur. Beneath the cross are two skeletons. Could these really be the remains of the legendary King Arthur and his queen, Guinevere? As the monks debate the implications of this extraordinary discovery, the bones are spirited away by the mysterious Guardians, a group determined to keep King Arthur's remains safe until the legend is fulfilled and he returns to protect his country in the hour of its greatest need. As the secret of the bones' hiding place is passed from generation to generation, those entrusted to safeguard the king's remains must withstand treachery, theft, blackmail, and murder in order to keep the legend intact.

30 review for King Arthur's Bones

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ice Bear

    This book wanders through a tale of bones, whose bones is never really discovered. Connections aplenty to previous books and characters as well as within the short stories. However the ends to some of the narratives was like a jumpy flickering film reel, and bits like the bones seemed to be missing. As they say in a school report - could do better.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jane Walker

    It's brave of writers to contribute to a book like this where their work is directly comparable to that of others. And one writer in this group of 5 is clearly inferior to the others. But although the idea for the book was good, the finished product is disappointing, and I gave up on the last chapter out of boredom. It's brave of writers to contribute to a book like this where their work is directly comparable to that of others. And one writer in this group of 5 is clearly inferior to the others. But although the idea for the book was good, the finished product is disappointing, and I gave up on the last chapter out of boredom.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    King Arthur's Bones is one of a series of collaborative novels by this group of writers. Some of them are better than others. There's some decent research going on, particularly in the first couple of pieces, and some of the historical notes are interesting. They peter out, though, which is kind of disappointing. I'd hoped for something well-researched the whole way through, with enough references that if one followed up, the interpretation of events might fit the facts. As stories, whether accur King Arthur's Bones is one of a series of collaborative novels by this group of writers. Some of them are better than others. There's some decent research going on, particularly in the first couple of pieces, and some of the historical notes are interesting. They peter out, though, which is kind of disappointing. I'd hoped for something well-researched the whole way through, with enough references that if one followed up, the interpretation of events might fit the facts. As stories, whether accurate or not, they're okay. 'Act One' bothered me, starting as it did in one POV for a tiny section and then skipping on to a different one for the rest of it. It could easily have been framed entirely in that POV, and it felt clunky. There were similar other things that just displayed lazy or bad writing, and the lack of a good editor.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jane Irish Nelson

    Probably closer to 3.5 stars. Very clever concept — five authors, who all write medieval mysteries, have combined together under the collective name of The Medieval Murderers to write this collection of linked novellas. The stories begin with the discovery of a large skeleton at Glastonbury Abbey — could it be King Arthur's Bones? But if it is, that means he died, like an ordinary man, and is not just sleeping to rise again when his country needs him. The stories that follow follow the travels o Probably closer to 3.5 stars. Very clever concept — five authors, who all write medieval mysteries, have combined together under the collective name of The Medieval Murderers to write this collection of linked novellas. The stories begin with the discovery of a large skeleton at Glastonbury Abbey — could it be King Arthur's Bones? But if it is, that means he died, like an ordinary man, and is not just sleeping to rise again when his country needs him. The stories that follow follow the travels of this skeleton through history. Some of the authors's stories feature their series' protagonists. Very enjoyable. I will be reading other collections by these collective authors.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    I am familiar with only one of the authors, Michael Jecks, but I do like stories about King Arthur, and felt that Jecks' collaboration with the Medieval Murderers meant this was a well-written story. I was not wrong. I loved it! I liked the familiarity of Baldwin and Simon, but I also loved how the corpse was taken through the centuries, the characters met along the way, how the corpse was hidden and discovered. This collaboration works and works well. I did not realize there were a series writt I am familiar with only one of the authors, Michael Jecks, but I do like stories about King Arthur, and felt that Jecks' collaboration with the Medieval Murderers meant this was a well-written story. I was not wrong. I loved it! I liked the familiarity of Baldwin and Simon, but I also loved how the corpse was taken through the centuries, the characters met along the way, how the corpse was hidden and discovered. This collaboration works and works well. I did not realize there were a series written by this group, but I will definitely be looking for the others.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Toria

    2.5 stars. It was an clever idea to have multiple authors write a book the outcome could have been great, I've seen it done before. But sadly I didn't think it was done great. It was just an alright book 2.5 stars. It was an clever idea to have multiple authors write a book the outcome could have been great, I've seen it done before. But sadly I didn't think it was done great. It was just an alright book

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kally Sheng

    This collaboration is not working! The stories were flat, uninteresting; a great disappointment and doesn't do the title justice! This collaboration is not working! The stories were flat, uninteresting; a great disappointment and doesn't do the title justice!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Very interesting read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I enjoyed the beginning of this book but as it went on it seemed disjointed and disappointing . I don’t think the collaboration of authors worked in my opinion .

  10. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Really enjoyed each of the stories, and the end wrap-up made me smile.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elysia

    2.5 stars for this one as 3/5 of the stories pretty good but the rest mind numbing. I'm sure some people will really enjoy this one but sadly not for me. 2.5 stars for this one as 3/5 of the stories pretty good but the rest mind numbing. I'm sure some people will really enjoy this one but sadly not for me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Reveiws by Nojus

    Everything just rings so true in this book and I could not put it down. I have been so fortunate to receive so many wonderful books as a reviewer.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    Very creative and will kept your interest.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nuciform

    Reminded me of some of the mystery books I read when a kid, where new inventions are employed to fight lurking evil.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gustovich

    Murderers also treated to enough character development and interaction which serves that good mix that would make us want more.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Quitugua

    I did enjoy reading this. There is a lot of action and nail biting chapters.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Antonia

    It made me giggle a few times and I also found it hard to put down.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Robbin Golden

    This was a good story with a disjointed delivery.

  19. 5 out of 5

    rabbitprincess

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. * * 1/2 that will likely be rounded up to three I went back and forth on whether to award this book a two- or a three-star rating in the no-halvsies Goodreads rating system. In the end I went in favour of three, because I liked the book well enough and am sufficiently tempted to check out other books in the series. That being said, this book was not without its flaws, as shall be discussed below. The premise is rather interesting to an Arthur buff like myself: a series of five interlinked mysterie * * 1/2 that will likely be rounded up to three I went back and forth on whether to award this book a two- or a three-star rating in the no-halvsies Goodreads rating system. In the end I went in favour of three, because I liked the book well enough and am sufficiently tempted to check out other books in the series. That being said, this book was not without its flaws, as shall be discussed below. The premise is rather interesting to an Arthur buff like myself: a series of five interlinked mysteries focusing on the bones of King Arthur and the various calamities that befall those who attempt to steal them, or even those who hide his bones in preparation for that mythical uprising when he will return to aid his country in their hour of greatest need. Anyway, I figured the best way to approach these interlinked mysteries was to let the plot serve as my primary entertainment, in case the multiple voices proved distracting. This was at the outset, when I was not aware that the mysteries, while sharing characters at some points and of course Arthur's bones, do stand up as individual works, so it's not like they're supposed to be a seamless blend. The first act was probably the best, considering it was the most directly relevant to Arthur's bones (that's when they were first discovered, at Glastonbury Abbey). I enjoyed the scene where the Abbey's scholar dug out all of these Arthurian references, such as Gildas and William of Malmesbury. I read excerpts from those fellas in a King Arthur class I took in university, so that brought back some happy memories. The writing was okay, although I raised an eyebrow at the part where the buzz of the crowd surrounding the excavation where the bones were found was compared to the sound of bees -- I don't think there were too many other buzzing things in the 1100s. It's not like the Benedictine monks had chainsaws or leaf blowers or other gadgets that buzz. But that's just me quibbling. Act 2 was all right, certainly full of family intrigue and strong-willed female characters (always a plus in fiction set in this time period). At one point somewhere around here I became confused because two men died and they had the same first name but were several decades apart. I think Act 3 was probably the weakest. I've tried a book by this author before and it was completely forgettable, so I am not surprised that it was my least favourite. It had its moments, but the dating system used for the section headings struck me as kind of pretentious because nobody else did it. Also he had to footnote it with the date in our standard format, so what was the point exactly? It didn't really help establish atmosphere; on the contrary, it was a distraction. And the author here had a habit of explaining things twice, like he'd introduce a character on page 1 and say "Mr. So and So was an undertaker, the best in London" and then perhaps 10 pages later or whenever the character next appeared he would say "Mr. So and So was the best undertaker in London." My theory is that the author nods off while he's writing, then wakes up and can't remember where he is in the story, so he sticks in the explanation again. I think better editing would help eliminate such repetition. Act 4 was okay character-wise, because it involved Shakespeare, who is great, and of course anything involving the animals in the Tower is bound to have some fun. But I found that one had the least amount of relevance to the Arthur's bones story. It seemed to be more like "Hey, here's Shakespeare and King Arthur's bones in the same story! That's cool enough, right?" I did like the idea of WS writing a play about Arthur (but then abandoning it because of his brush with the bones), but other than that the story was merely okay. Act 5, set in the early 1800s, started out a bit slow but turned out slightly more interesting by the end, once again helped by a strong-willed female character (the part where she grabs the body-snatcher's privates and refuses to let go until he's given them what they need to know was somewhat amusing, and certainly that part was very descriptive). And the epilogue... fell kind of flat. Also the part where the Welsh archaeologist is taking the bones back to her lab (and it's revealed she's a descendant of the Guardians who have been trying to keep the bones safe lo these many centuries) and then King Arthur and his men are sleeping in a cave nearby, then Arthur smiles and goes back to sleep, nearly made me yell "OH COME ON." Not that I am opposed to the thought of Arthur sleeping in a cave, but it felt kind of silly when she supposedly has a good portion of his bones in a box in her car. In short, this is supposed to be a light read, so don't treat it any more seriously than you have to. If you like Arthur, if you like any of these authors, you'll probably enjoy this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alison C

    King Arthur's Bones is the fifth in a series of shared-world books by some of England's best-known historical mystery writers - Susanna Gregory, Bernard Knight, Ian Morson, Michael Jecks and Philip Gooden - who collectively call themselves The Medieval Murderers. Each book takes one object and sends it through time, from the 12th Century to the present, and each writer has one of his or her series characters from their various historical mysteries come into contact with the object, with the fina King Arthur's Bones is the fifth in a series of shared-world books by some of England's best-known historical mystery writers - Susanna Gregory, Bernard Knight, Ian Morson, Michael Jecks and Philip Gooden - who collectively call themselves The Medieval Murderers. Each book takes one object and sends it through time, from the 12th Century to the present, and each writer has one of his or her series characters from their various historical mysteries come into contact with the object, with the final "epilogue" being set in the present day. In this case, as is obvious from the title, the article in question is a partial skeleton, believed to be that of King Arthur. Since the legend says that Arthur has not died, but is only sleeping, it becomes important that these bones be concealed but not lost, for who's to say whether he might not be resurrected from the bones themselves in the time of Britain's greatest need? As always, the five stories vary in tone and strength, and each reader might like different stories; for what it's worth, my favourites were Bernard Knight's tale set in 1282 Wales, war-torn from the English invasions, and Philip Gooden's story set in Shakespeare's time and featuring Nick Revill, Gooden's "player" in Shakespeare's theatrical company. The Epilogue is nicely done too, with the bones being restored to their proper land....This group of authors has definitely concocted a fun series of unrelated books, and while I didn't find this as gripping as The Tainted Relic or The Lost Prophecies, it's certainly well worth reading, especially if you enjoy historical - and historically accurate - mysteries. Recommended.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. mp3 Writers: Philip Gooden, Susanna Gregory, Michael Jecks, Bernard Knight, Ian Morson, C J Sansom. Narrator: Paul Matthews Duration: 14:14 Synopsis: 1191. During excavation work at Glastonbury Abbey, an ancient cross is discovered buried several feet below the ground. Inscribed on it are the words: Here lies buried the renowned King Arthur. Beneath the cross are skeletal remains. Could this really be the legendary King Arthur? As the secret of the bones' hiding place is passed from generation to g mp3 Writers: Philip Gooden, Susanna Gregory, Michael Jecks, Bernard Knight, Ian Morson, C J Sansom. Narrator: Paul Matthews Duration: 14:14 Synopsis: 1191. During excavation work at Glastonbury Abbey, an ancient cross is discovered buried several feet below the ground. Inscribed on it are the words: Here lies buried the renowned King Arthur. Beneath the cross are skeletal remains. Could this really be the legendary King Arthur? As the secret of the bones' hiding place is passed from generation to generation, those entrusted to safeguard the king's remains must withstand treachery, blackmail and murder in order to keep the legend intact. This maybe my last MM - I have sort of lost enthusiasm for this multi-authored genre and this was particularly unedifying. When you come to the end of a lollipop...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    An old legend proclaims that Arthur is alive but sleeping in a cave to be awakened if Wales is threatened. When King Arthur's bones are found in 1191 as work is being done at Glastonbury Abbey a Welsh monk is alarmed that the bones might be given to the English monarch, an enemy of Wales. He contacts a patriot and with a band called 'The Guardians' the real bones are replaced with other old bones and then smuggled out of Glastonbury to be hidden until Arthur is needed. The story is told in parts An old legend proclaims that Arthur is alive but sleeping in a cave to be awakened if Wales is threatened. When King Arthur's bones are found in 1191 as work is being done at Glastonbury Abbey a Welsh monk is alarmed that the bones might be given to the English monarch, an enemy of Wales. He contacts a patriot and with a band called 'The Guardians' the real bones are replaced with other old bones and then smuggled out of Glastonbury to be hidden until Arthur is needed. The story is told in parts by members of the Medieval Murderers group and while each part is separate the unifying theme is the role of Arthur's memory and of its protection of Wales. The story spans the centuries from medieval times to the 21st century with stops in Shakespere's London and the Napoleonic Wars. No sex No violence

  23. 4 out of 5

    Angie Taylor

    I have now read and enjoyed a good number of this series and this is, in many ways, another enjoyable contribution. Suzanna Gregory's chapter was probably my favourite: I liked the strong intelligent Gwenllian and would welcome more stories about her. By contrast, Ian Morson's Napoleonic tale was less engaging though it did also have a pleasingly strong, likeable and intelligent female character in Doll. The ending was generally satisfying and overall, I found the tales connected well. I look fo I have now read and enjoyed a good number of this series and this is, in many ways, another enjoyable contribution. Suzanna Gregory's chapter was probably my favourite: I liked the strong intelligent Gwenllian and would welcome more stories about her. By contrast, Ian Morson's Napoleonic tale was less engaging though it did also have a pleasingly strong, likeable and intelligent female character in Doll. The ending was generally satisfying and overall, I found the tales connected well. I look forward to the next Medieval Murderers collaboration.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    As with any kind of anthology, some entries are better than others, but on the whole any book that combines King Arthur and historical mysteries (especially medieval mysteries) can't be all bad! I enjoyed the first couple of stories best, with the discovery of what may or may not have been King Arthur's bones buried on the grounds of Glastonbury Abbey, and the events pertaining to the Guardians -- the men who swore to hide and protect Arthur's remains until the once and future king is needed onc As with any kind of anthology, some entries are better than others, but on the whole any book that combines King Arthur and historical mysteries (especially medieval mysteries) can't be all bad! I enjoyed the first couple of stories best, with the discovery of what may or may not have been King Arthur's bones buried on the grounds of Glastonbury Abbey, and the events pertaining to the Guardians -- the men who swore to hide and protect Arthur's remains until the once and future king is needed once more.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    I really liked this book,each chapter has a different flavour,like a bag of coloured sweets, tracing the the bones to their different whereabouts, a rider is added to each story, telling us about the basis of truth to the tale. The book then is,apart from being about king Arthur's bones, also the filling and dressing of the bones of the tales. Exciting and sometimes intriguing,a very colourful and interesting book. I really liked this book,each chapter has a different flavour,like a bag of coloured sweets, tracing the the bones to their different whereabouts, a rider is added to each story, telling us about the basis of truth to the tale. The book then is,apart from being about king Arthur's bones, also the filling and dressing of the bones of the tales. Exciting and sometimes intriguing,a very colourful and interesting book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Georgia Lengyel

    Quite a different book since there are seven sections, written by 5 different authors. Each section is a progression in years from 1191 until 2004. I really enjoyed some of the authors, but two of them didn't flow into the whole story as well as the other three. All in all, I will probably read one of the other books in this "series". Quite a different book since there are seven sections, written by 5 different authors. Each section is a progression in years from 1191 until 2004. I really enjoyed some of the authors, but two of them didn't flow into the whole story as well as the other three. All in all, I will probably read one of the other books in this "series".

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pauline Borgeaud

    2.5-3 stars. The 3 first acts were quite interesting, but the last 2 were just boring and I ended up not caring at all for the end. There was no connection between the first 3 and the last 2 acts and didn't know why I kept on reading it. 2.5-3 stars. The 3 first acts were quite interesting, but the last 2 were just boring and I ended up not caring at all for the end. There was no connection between the first 3 and the last 2 acts and didn't know why I kept on reading it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Soumya Sreehari

    The first book I have read from The Medieval Murderers. The story-telling is interesting. I found the idea of one thread spreading over centuries intriguing. The stories are engaging. The crime solving process is contextual. I liked the journey of reading the book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vickie

    Interesting to see what a group of authors can come with and not be an anthology, but a seamless story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Each chapter, or act, is written by a different author. So far my favorite has been Act I, but I've only read 2 acts. Each chapter, or act, is written by a different author. So far my favorite has been Act I, but I've only read 2 acts.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.