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In Tyranny, brisk, spare text and illustrations that deal head-on with anorexia propel the reader along on Anna’s journey as she falls prey to the eating disorder, personified as her tormentor, Tyranny. The novel starts with a single question: “How did I get here?” The answer lies in the pages that follow, and it’s far from simple. Pressured by media, friends, the workplace In Tyranny, brisk, spare text and illustrations that deal head-on with anorexia propel the reader along on Anna’s journey as she falls prey to the eating disorder, personified as her tormentor, Tyranny. The novel starts with a single question: “How did I get here?” The answer lies in the pages that follow, and it’s far from simple. Pressured by media, friends, the workplace, personal relationships, and fashion trends, Anna descends into a seemingly unending cycle of misery. And whenever she tries to climb out of the abyss, her own personal demon, Tyranny, is there to push her back in. The contest seems uneven, and it might be except for one thing: Anna’s strength of character has given rise to her deadly enemy. Ironically, it is that same strength of character that has the ultimate power to save her from the ravages of Tyranny. Brilliantly and realistically presented, Tyranny is a must-read for anyone looking for a better understanding of eating disorders and for everyone looking for a compelling page-turner that is truly a story of triumph and hope.


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In Tyranny, brisk, spare text and illustrations that deal head-on with anorexia propel the reader along on Anna’s journey as she falls prey to the eating disorder, personified as her tormentor, Tyranny. The novel starts with a single question: “How did I get here?” The answer lies in the pages that follow, and it’s far from simple. Pressured by media, friends, the workplace In Tyranny, brisk, spare text and illustrations that deal head-on with anorexia propel the reader along on Anna’s journey as she falls prey to the eating disorder, personified as her tormentor, Tyranny. The novel starts with a single question: “How did I get here?” The answer lies in the pages that follow, and it’s far from simple. Pressured by media, friends, the workplace, personal relationships, and fashion trends, Anna descends into a seemingly unending cycle of misery. And whenever she tries to climb out of the abyss, her own personal demon, Tyranny, is there to push her back in. The contest seems uneven, and it might be except for one thing: Anna’s strength of character has given rise to her deadly enemy. Ironically, it is that same strength of character that has the ultimate power to save her from the ravages of Tyranny. Brilliantly and realistically presented, Tyranny is a must-read for anyone looking for a better understanding of eating disorders and for everyone looking for a compelling page-turner that is truly a story of triumph and hope.

30 review for Tyranny

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    A short, small-book memoir by Lesley Fairfield about the eating disorder that nearly killed her. Nothing in it is very new or surprising to me, and even depicting the disorder as a monster (named Tyranny) who takes over her life is not surprising. And though there is not some elaborate origin story for this monster--in other words, we don't really know how it is Fairfield began seeing herself differently than others did, it is still pretty scary and powerful. The presentation is spare, almost li A short, small-book memoir by Lesley Fairfield about the eating disorder that nearly killed her. Nothing in it is very new or surprising to me, and even depicting the disorder as a monster (named Tyranny) who takes over her life is not surprising. And though there is not some elaborate origin story for this monster--in other words, we don't really know how it is Fairfield began seeing herself differently than others did, it is still pretty scary and powerful. The presentation is spare, almost light and airy, making it easier to read than one might expect. I've never until now been so convinced that anorexia is a neurological disorder a distortion of perception. Surely it is influenced by societal expectations in some respects, and Fairfield visits pro-ana sites in the process so you can see how it is reinforced by others, but it seems to me fundamentally neurological in this telling. And she gets help to keep alive to tell her tale.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    One of the best books I have ever read on eating disorders...from the perspective of someone living with the problem.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Licha

    As soon as you open this book to page 1, you're assaulted by the brutality of the horrible monster named Tyranny, who is the voice and conscience of Anna. Tyranny is choking her out, lifting her in the air and yelling at Anna: I TOLD YOU NOT TO EAT. YOU ARE TOO FAT!! The image made me gasp in horror and I was unable to take my eyes off this drawing. I immediately felt so bad for Anna. Seeing Tyranny throughout the rest of the book did not make it easier to get used to it. It is one of the best w As soon as you open this book to page 1, you're assaulted by the brutality of the horrible monster named Tyranny, who is the voice and conscience of Anna. Tyranny is choking her out, lifting her in the air and yelling at Anna: I TOLD YOU NOT TO EAT. YOU ARE TOO FAT!! The image made me gasp in horror and I was unable to take my eyes off this drawing. I immediately felt so bad for Anna. Seeing Tyranny throughout the rest of the book did not make it easier to get used to it. It is one of the best ways I've seen someone capture what an eating disorder must be like. We start by seeing Anna as a child, with happy dreams of what she will do when she grows up. This made me so sad to think that here was a normal, happy girl and at some point someone will say something negative to her and all those dreams will be shattered with one critical statement to her self-esteem. No young girl ever has dreams of one day being a skinny woman and how perfect she'll look thin. Then a day comes when that girl will see an image of what society considers to be the ideal woman, or perhaps someone will tell her she's gaining a little too much weight or that an outfit would look so much better on her if she just lost a couple of pounds. The disease begins to consume her time, her life and her mind. Anna starts going through that precarious stage of puberty and starts seeing curves, breasts, hips. Every time she looks in the mirror she sees a big girl looking back at her. The more she looks in the mirror, the bigger the girl looks. Anna's mother tries to console her by telling her she's not fat, but then adds a remark that I'm sure so many parents probably don't think they are saying harmfully to their daughters. She tells Anna, "Well, it's not [fat], dear. Just be careful you don't gain too much more weight." In one little contradicting sentence, she sets Anna spiraling out of control. Anna stops eating as much, starts weighing her food and counting it. Her dad stops hugging her which confuses Anna and makes her even more ashamed of her body as if her new body is what's putting dad off. Anna's spiraling descent into this disease and mindset is horrible to watch and really very saddening. She drops out of high school, loses her boyfriend who has come to a point where he doesn't know how else to help her, she alienates herself from her parents so they won't see the state she's in, and she basically shuts herself away from the world. Tyranny however is always by her side, always feeding the self doubt, demanding her not to eat. I wanted to yell at it to GO AWAY! Leave Anna alone. Tyranny may not be the typical monster we all get scared off and hide under our blankets from, but it's equally scary, if not more so, because it's in our head, that negative voice that always nags at us. Seeing as Anna's body starts to deteriorate, her heart always beating out of control, was scary. One day her body finally gives in and she collapses on the street and you see her just laying there on the sidewalk, no one helping her. Eventually an old lady helps her up and it so touched my heart when Anna says "A complete stranger had more compassion for me than I do for myself." This was a heartbreaking read. There's no way we can stop the media from feeding girls what the perfect image of a woman should be, but as parents we need to learn to give our daughters a good self-esteem and teach them to have a healthy relationship with food and exercise that's not about their looks but about their health. Also important and one I had not thought of as being a factor in this disease until I read this book is the way puberty is handled. The changes in a girl's body can sometimes be scary and confusing, especially if they come on all of a sudden and at an increased level. As parents we need to be educated on giving our daughters a sense of self-confidence so that they won't ever fall in the clutches of these horrible eating disorders.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    There are many things that are standard about this eating disorder novel. Like so many, the storyline begins with the main character – named Anna in this case – as she is in the worst stages of her disease. The narration then flips back in time to her early childhood and teen years, highlighting her evolving attitude towards friends and family, food and body image. Like so many novels of the genre, the main character's catharsis comes at the death of a friend who also has an eating disorder. But There are many things that are standard about this eating disorder novel. Like so many, the storyline begins with the main character – named Anna in this case – as she is in the worst stages of her disease. The narration then flips back in time to her early childhood and teen years, highlighting her evolving attitude towards friends and family, food and body image. Like so many novels of the genre, the main character's catharsis comes at the death of a friend who also has an eating disorder. But Tyranny transcends the genre in spades. First, it is a graphic novel. This is a particularly apt format for the subject because the reader can see Anna's dysmorphia with their own eyes. On each page, Anna's image belies her words. Fairfield shows Anna's struggle as a conflict between two people inside the same body. The one who wants her to not eat is called Tyranny. Anna must fight with Tyranny. She must conquer Tyranny. This is a great analogy for an eating disorder. The novel as a whole is nothing short of brilliant. The language is spare and unflinching. The illustrations are eye-catching, and the various boxes and asides provide more information than a simple narrative can. Writing about eating disorders is a tricky thing. Handled irresponsibly, a novel can became a manual for developing an eating disorder; handled well, a novel can inform and warn and save lives. Tyranny falls into the second category, and it manages to be a compelling read as well. This novel will appeal to the exact person who should read it: teens, whether they're strong readers or not. And because it is short, gut-punching, and never condescending, those readers will be informed of the dangers and will be given tools to avoid an eating disorder. Readers who already have an eating disorder will see themselves in the pages and may seek help. I hope every school and library in the country buys this book because it could save lives. Lesley Fairfield's writing and drawings and message all shine.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Saarah Niña

    This is an educational graphic novel. It can be of use to someone experiencing anerexia or body dysmorphia, or someone witnessing it happen to another person. It's honest and holds nothing back. If you want to know what it's like, to be in that suffering person's head for a few moments, give this book a read. I'll recommend it to parents particularly, as it's important with these things that we try to empathise as opposed to criticise and lecture. It's all too easy to advise "You should eat more This is an educational graphic novel. It can be of use to someone experiencing anerexia or body dysmorphia, or someone witnessing it happen to another person. It's honest and holds nothing back. If you want to know what it's like, to be in that suffering person's head for a few moments, give this book a read. I'll recommend it to parents particularly, as it's important with these things that we try to empathise as opposed to criticise and lecture. It's all too easy to advise "You should eat more. You look as if you're about to break." But far more effective would be to say, that it's not their fault. It is an illness, not a choice. With a book like this, I'd advise an adult to be there to talk with the child reading it about the issues explored such as body image, expectations, stress, health issues etc. I do think it can help young children figure out what they're feeling in relation to themselves. Weight is a big thing. It's shallow to be consumed by it, but it's human. I've never liked discussing how I'm so thin and in shape, without having to run miles. Never liked seeing envy on a friend's face when we are all dressed up. I know it seems like such a frivolous thing in the grander scheme of things. It doesn't matter and yet, it does. I read this because the cover intrigued me and though I've thankfully never battled aneroxia, I've always been teased for being thin, called a 'zombie' or 'stick-woman' or 'skinny bones'. This isn't much the same thing, as for an anorexic being thin is the ultimate goal and it's a far greater struggle with discipline and mind control. It's an illness, your mind bullying you. Not people. Nonetheless, I have worried about my weight, maybe I am making myself ill? Are they exaggerating, or do they really think I'm looking ill? The thing was, in my case, had I spoken up and said I wasn't ill but that I was healthy (for my height and weight); had I laughed when I heard the comments of 'sticks and bones'; they would have thought I had body dysmorphia, that in the mirror, I wasn't seeing a thin woman but someone bigger. That I was, at the very least, mildly anorexic. And, that would have let to a whole host of other problems. With weight, especially when you're a woman, everyone feels entitled to speak with you about it publicly. Are you pregnant? Dieting? It comes up over a shared meal, when asking if you'd like to have something to eat or, when you haven't seen someone in a long time. It's a shallow thing but we do notice change. And we can only discuss a new hairstyle or an outfit, for so long. Plus, these days, it seems as if everyone is in the business of getting in shape. No bad thing, I just don't like that it is becoming somewhat of an obsession. For me, I have been the same weight since I was eleven! Yes, I fleshed out - a little- but otherwise exactly the same. At that age, I was oblivious to the comments. I couldn't care less. I wish I could be like that again. So sure in myself. I've been around the same weight since I was eleven, though everyone insists that I've lost some more. I feel like they just say it to have something to say. These are often people, relatives more than friends, whom I rarely see. We aren't close and, I would feel embarrassed enquiring the same thing of their weight. It's exhausting. But worse if they remark about my weight to someone else, with me just in the same room. Why can't it be a conversation left between sisters or between mothers and daughters? Or spouses? Doctors and patients? Why can't it be something we volunteer to share, like your foot size? Can we bring back this one particular social taboo? Someone talking about your weight is off-putting. Praising someone for their weight when they haven't discussed it with you is plainly patronising. It really plays with your self esteem. You no longer feel confident or comfortable in yourself. Are my clothes hanging off my frame? Do I look like a zombie? If everyone is saying it, does that mean it's definitely true? It's a horrible feeling and people inflict it on each other without a second thought. This is a book that will help you understand. Even now writing this, I feel a little uneasy - I'm complaining about being thin in the UK, where obesity is a national health crisis, where more children are at risk than ever before. I do have it easier than most, of course. But this is about weight. Thin and not thin. Can we stop caring so much about the weight of people we barely know?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eric Piotrowski

    As a male feminist with a fairly good body image, the question of anorexia has always fascinated and horrified me. I've watched female friends struggle with the problem of body image (and how to relate to food in general), and I've never known quite how to react to such things. When I became a high-school English teacher these issues became a bit more urgent, as I began to wonder if any students were wrestling with them. I rant about the culture and advertising industries which train us all to ha As a male feminist with a fairly good body image, the question of anorexia has always fascinated and horrified me. I've watched female friends struggle with the problem of body image (and how to relate to food in general), and I've never known quite how to react to such things. When I became a high-school English teacher these issues became a bit more urgent, as I began to wonder if any students were wrestling with them. I rant about the culture and advertising industries which train us all to hate our bodies, and I encourage everyone to love themselves just as they are, but of course it always feels like I'm having little, if no, impact. Ms. Fairfield's graphic novel, about a young woman's confrontation of an embodiment of her anorexia, is a vivid and potent insight into the problem. It is, of course, and complex and multifaceted issue, and this book provides a vital glance into the life of someone who lives it. (Although the book is fiction, it's based on Fairfield's own thirty-year battle with anorexia.) As Lisa Simpson pointed out in Season 16's "Sleeping With the Enemy", it's a complex problem that can't be easily remedied. (Tonight I learned that Yeardley Smith, the voice of Lisa, has herself wrestled with anorexia and bulimia.) Still, understanding and awareness are key tools in the struggle, and this book provides plenty of both. Highly recommended.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eimear

    Fairfield describes eating disorders incredibly well in this book. It shows how innocent comments on a person's body and the images portrayed in the media can seriously affect a person's mental health. A dialogue showing how a simple voice in the head can turn into a monster is captured perfectly in Anna's "best friend" Tyranny. Tyranny follows Anna everywhere and ensures that she fears food. It's great to see Anna going through the stages of recovery. Fairfield describes eating disorders incredibly well in this book. It shows how innocent comments on a person's body and the images portrayed in the media can seriously affect a person's mental health. A dialogue showing how a simple voice in the head can turn into a monster is captured perfectly in Anna's "best friend" Tyranny. Tyranny follows Anna everywhere and ensures that she fears food. It's great to see Anna going through the stages of recovery.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    This graphic novel shares the author's battle with the eating disorder annorexia in a way that helps the reader understand her thought processes and actions as she moves through different stages of her disease. It isn't an easy book to read, but it is an important book for anyone who has a friend with this disease. This graphic novel shares the author's battle with the eating disorder annorexia in a way that helps the reader understand her thought processes and actions as she moves through different stages of her disease. It isn't an easy book to read, but it is an important book for anyone who has a friend with this disease.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    Pretty standard graphic novel. Wasn't terrible, though. Pretty standard graphic novel. Wasn't terrible, though.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Guerin

    There's a sense in which I cannot review this book--those of us who haven't suffered from the kind of debilitating trauma that anorexia and bulimia inflict on its victims are in no place to judge the accuracy of Fairfield's portrayal. I can say that as a teacher, a woman, and a mom, I would recommend this book for its poignant story, its believable main character, and its no-frills approach to an important topic. Fairfield's narrator, tormented by the specter of her eating disorder, earns reader There's a sense in which I cannot review this book--those of us who haven't suffered from the kind of debilitating trauma that anorexia and bulimia inflict on its victims are in no place to judge the accuracy of Fairfield's portrayal. I can say that as a teacher, a woman, and a mom, I would recommend this book for its poignant story, its believable main character, and its no-frills approach to an important topic. Fairfield's narrator, tormented by the specter of her eating disorder, earns readers’ compassion almost instantly. We all know or have been the woman on these pages, grappling with self-acceptance in a world obsessed with unrealistic portrayals of our gender. Highly recommended for librarians trying to build a graphic novel collection that addresses pertinent social topics for young readers.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Not bad, but it was nothing special. I thought it was skewed really young -- this is one I'd hand to a 9-12 year old. What I did like was that MALES were in the treatment center, too. Male eating disorders aren't out there enough. More to come ... Not bad, but it was nothing special. I thought it was skewed really young -- this is one I'd hand to a 9-12 year old. What I did like was that MALES were in the treatment center, too. Male eating disorders aren't out there enough. More to come ...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Candis

    Simple, sparse and cuts to the quick of body dysmorphia and anorexia. Great drawings, tight story, a rapid-fast read: good stuff.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Skyler

    How it begins: "As long as I'm thin and perfect, I'll be invincible!" How it feels: "My life is gone, but I'm alive and dead too." How it is realized: "Am I dying? I don't want to die! It's too soon! Let me live." How it is conquered: "For the first time in a long time, I have a future, and I'm happy! So, once and for all, I don't care about being thin!" By definition, the word "tyranny" encompasses multiple definitions and can also refer to any "despotic abuse of authority" or "undue severity or ha How it begins: "As long as I'm thin and perfect, I'll be invincible!" How it feels: "My life is gone, but I'm alive and dead too." How it is realized: "Am I dying? I don't want to die! It's too soon! Let me live." How it is conquered: "For the first time in a long time, I have a future, and I'm happy! So, once and for all, I don't care about being thin!" By definition, the word "tyranny" encompasses multiple definitions and can also refer to any "despotic abuse of authority" or "undue severity or harshness." In Lesley Fairfield's graphic novel, Tyranny, that is just what Anna's own personal demon manifests itself as- a cruel dictator. Tyranny bullies Anna relentlessly, telling her what's right, what's wrong, and how she must look. In Anna's mind, Tyranny rules. Tyranny grabs Anna by the neck and pulls her off the ground. "I told you not to eat. You are too fat!!" Anna quickly dips her spoon into the bowl in retaliation as Tyranny gasps with disapproval. "I've got to try!!" Tyranny snatches the bowl out of Anna's hands and tosses it aside. "No, you don't! You'll ruin your life!!" Tyranny's displeasure is palpable as Anna begins to cry desperately. "But how can I live and not eat?"" Thus begins Anna's story recounting her battle with a brutally malevolent and monstrous eating disorder. From lapses into complete desperation, to therapy in a specialized eating disorder unit, and ultimately to confronting her inner voice, Tyranny, Anna's journey towards recovery leaves nothing to the imagination. Tyranny is a must-read for anyone who can't quite seem to fathom life with an eating disorder. Much of the story stems from the personal experiences of author Lesley Fairfield (pictured below) who struggled through her own thirty-year battle with anorexia and bulimia. **Please note that this book can be potentially triggering for those who are not currently in a good place with their eating disorders.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lyndsey O'Halloran

    Tyranny is the first graphic novel that I have ever read but I accepted it for review as I thought the subject matter was extremely important, not only in the YA genre, but for everyone. The book is extremely informative as to what can happen with eating disorders and it doesn’t try to hide anything. Tyranny follows the life of Anna as she goes from being a normal teenager with a healthy appetite, to a girl who cant stand to look at herself and wants to be someone different. As the story follows Tyranny is the first graphic novel that I have ever read but I accepted it for review as I thought the subject matter was extremely important, not only in the YA genre, but for everyone. The book is extremely informative as to what can happen with eating disorders and it doesn’t try to hide anything. Tyranny follows the life of Anna as she goes from being a normal teenager with a healthy appetite, to a girl who cant stand to look at herself and wants to be someone different. As the story follows Anna as she develops anorexia, you get to see what kinds of things she is thinking about herself to make her not want to eat anymore. The way that Anna sees herself is quite shocking. Instead of seeing the slim girl that she actually is, she sees a completely different person in the mirror and this is where her problems begin. The range of feelings Anna experiences really go from one extreme to another, depending on her situation at particular times but it was really interesting to see how quickly a person could change their views about themselves. What gives this book the possibility to stand out to a lot of people is the way in which it is illustrated. Instead of just people told what Anna is going through, the reader is able to see her change over time and how things change in regards to her eating disorder. Not only does Anna’s appearance change but you can also see her personality and confidence changing at the same time. Pictures of Tyranny are not very nice at all and he is really made out to be a monster which I thought was fantastic. Tyranny is a very important book for people to read. Children and teenagers would really benefit from reading this book to highlight the importance of looking after yourself and eating properly but also think many adults would benefit from it as well. I am really glad that this was my first graphic novel and that I can make people more aware of it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sinclair

    Tyranny is an amazing short graphic novel. The illustrations are frightening and expressive. I absolutely adore the art, I couldn't have asked for a better style to illustrate an eating disorder. The story is not overwhelmed by text. The illustrations, narration, and dialogue both carry the subject lightly enough to be a fast but reflective graphic novel. Tyranny is a quick read, it's not supposed to be a long and windy. Instead, it gives you the most emotional and painful snapshots of someone wi Tyranny is an amazing short graphic novel. The illustrations are frightening and expressive. I absolutely adore the art, I couldn't have asked for a better style to illustrate an eating disorder. The story is not overwhelmed by text. The illustrations, narration, and dialogue both carry the subject lightly enough to be a fast but reflective graphic novel. Tyranny is a quick read, it's not supposed to be a long and windy. Instead, it gives you the most emotional and painful snapshots of someone with an eating disorder's daily struggles. The main character is not very fleshed out in terms of uniqueness and goals, but that works for self-injecting yourself into the story so you can empathize. The most compelling character I think is the main character's inner voice 'Tyranny'. Tyranny is abusive and downright scary. The complete lack of control and self-hating inner monologue (in the form of Tyranny) are nailed in this book. What I love most about the book is the recovery in the end. Nothing more to be said besides it is a satisfying completion to the graphic novel. I highly recommend this book to graphic novel readers and people who don't read graphic novels. It is very easy to pick up and understand without any prior experience or knowledge of the graphic novel format and eating disorders.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    Tyranny by Lesley Fairfield caught my eye at the library. It's a graphic novel that looks at causes of anorexia and the devastating effects it has on people. The book starts near the end of the story with the protagonist, Anna, wondering how she has gotten to this point in her life. She goes back and examines her home life and how little things piled together to make her stop eating and fearing food. Throughout, Anna's anorexia is personified by this scribble woman whom she calls Tyranny. She nags Tyranny by Lesley Fairfield caught my eye at the library. It's a graphic novel that looks at causes of anorexia and the devastating effects it has on people. The book starts near the end of the story with the protagonist, Anna, wondering how she has gotten to this point in her life. She goes back and examines her home life and how little things piled together to make her stop eating and fearing food. Throughout, Anna's anorexia is personified by this scribble woman whom she calls Tyranny. She nags Anna when she eats and praises her when she doesn't. She pushes her to exercise to the point of exhaustion and so forth. Slowly over the course of the book Anna begins to look more and more like her inner demon. The book is raw and upfront about the dangers of a poor body image and the destructive nature of anorexia. The scribble scrabble line drawings work well to reinforce the themes and emotions of the story.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Raina

    Fairfield chronicles her experience with eating disorders. She manifests her disorder with a character named "Tyranny." I'm not in love with the illustration style, and the I felt like the narrative could have been tighter. Certainly appropriate for the audience, I suppose, which I'm assuming is made up of girls with eating disorders. But.... I think maybe my problem with it is that it tries to do some sophisticated things with the illustrations - non-linear speech bubbles, an "imaginary" charac Fairfield chronicles her experience with eating disorders. She manifests her disorder with a character named "Tyranny." I'm not in love with the illustration style, and the I felt like the narrative could have been tighter. Certainly appropriate for the audience, I suppose, which I'm assuming is made up of girls with eating disorders. But.... I think maybe my problem with it is that it tries to do some sophisticated things with the illustrations - non-linear speech bubbles, an "imaginary" character, some visual symbolism - but it's done in such a simplistic illustration style, those things seem out of place and confusing. Also, the narrative climax/eureka moment seems, in retrospect, to have to do with the death of a friend, but that really isn't built up at all, so that it's only in retrospect that you realize that that was the turning point.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nelo

    I have no problem with eating because i fell like i have a natural black hole in my stomach. this book has made me realize that there are people who suffer from eating disorders and it has made me thankful that i can eat. sometimes we take the little things in life for granted without knowing that other people might be missing that little thing which completes you and makes you happy. This book in my opinion should be in all high schools and primary schools to educate both young girls and boys. I p I have no problem with eating because i fell like i have a natural black hole in my stomach. this book has made me realize that there are people who suffer from eating disorders and it has made me thankful that i can eat. sometimes we take the little things in life for granted without knowing that other people might be missing that little thing which completes you and makes you happy. This book in my opinion should be in all high schools and primary schools to educate both young girls and boys. I pray people would learn to love themselves more after reading this and i also pray that the world in general would stop feeding the younger generations head with a false image of who they should be.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Erin Moulton

    This was a good read chronicling Lesley Fairfield's struggle with and recovery from an eating disorder. I found many similarities in the personal journey to the book Lighter Than My Shadow. I'd hand to teens who are interested in this subject but looking for something less daunting in mass than the previous title. This was a good read chronicling Lesley Fairfield's struggle with and recovery from an eating disorder. I found many similarities in the personal journey to the book Lighter Than My Shadow. I'd hand to teens who are interested in this subject but looking for something less daunting in mass than the previous title.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    This is a lovely yet wrenching example of graphic memoir. Fairfield bravely shares her battle with eating disorders; it is important to see Tyranny as a wound-up, scraggly manifestation of her mind. This coming-of-age arc is so familiar to me; she reclaims herself much the way I did (through entirely different circumstances and struggles). I love its length and size: small but dense, short but engaging. This is an important title for a library collection, and I would have no trouble pitching it This is a lovely yet wrenching example of graphic memoir. Fairfield bravely shares her battle with eating disorders; it is important to see Tyranny as a wound-up, scraggly manifestation of her mind. This coming-of-age arc is so familiar to me; she reclaims herself much the way I did (through entirely different circumstances and struggles). I love its length and size: small but dense, short but engaging. This is an important title for a library collection, and I would have no trouble pitching it to tween and teen readers.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This is an exceptional graphic novel (autobiographical, I believe) with (I almost hate to say it with such a serious subject matter) cute illustrations. I loved the artwork. The story was interesting enough to keep me reading, and I really liked how the ED was portrayed as an entity in the story. It's a short and fast read, well worth it, imo. Anyone who has ever struggled with any type of body image insecurities will be able to relate, in part, to this story. This is an exceptional graphic novel (autobiographical, I believe) with (I almost hate to say it with such a serious subject matter) cute illustrations. I loved the artwork. The story was interesting enough to keep me reading, and I really liked how the ED was portrayed as an entity in the story. It's a short and fast read, well worth it, imo. Anyone who has ever struggled with any type of body image insecurities will be able to relate, in part, to this story.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dee

    If you work with teenagers this is one to check out!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Keen

    “When you slip backwards, you’ll never fall back to the very beginning. If you keep trying, you’ll get there.” This is a really well written and powerfully drawn memoir which evokes the horror, frustration and sheer exhaustion of living and coping with long term anorexia and all that goes with it. Although this is a condition I have never suffered from myself I have certainly known some women who have had to deal with their own similar struggles and have seen the many problems it can cause. "Tyran “When you slip backwards, you’ll never fall back to the very beginning. If you keep trying, you’ll get there.” This is a really well written and powerfully drawn memoir which evokes the horror, frustration and sheer exhaustion of living and coping with long term anorexia and all that goes with it. Although this is a condition I have never suffered from myself I have certainly known some women who have had to deal with their own similar struggles and have seen the many problems it can cause. "Tyranny" really put me in mind of other strong and memorable graphic fiction/memoirs such as “The Bad Doctor”, “The Facts of Life” and “The Nao of Brown” that are also unafraid to examine and deconstruct mental illness.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carly

    I read my first graphic novel last year and was instantly converted – I thought it might get confusing trying to understand the layout but I love the blend of illustrations and narrative and think graphic novels, when well done, can be an enhanced reading experience. When I accepted Tyranny for review I think I knew it wasn’t going to be like anything else I’d ever read and that feeling was definitely correct. This is a heartbreaking novel that doesn’t shy away from the truth of eating disorders I read my first graphic novel last year and was instantly converted – I thought it might get confusing trying to understand the layout but I love the blend of illustrations and narrative and think graphic novels, when well done, can be an enhanced reading experience. When I accepted Tyranny for review I think I knew it wasn’t going to be like anything else I’d ever read and that feeling was definitely correct. This is a heartbreaking novel that doesn’t shy away from the truth of eating disorders and I applaud it for its honesty, even if it can make difficult reading at times. The illustrations are great with a specialised style and Tyranny itself is really quite scary – a horrible manifestation of an awful disease. We follow the story of Anna, an anorexia sufferer, as she tries to overcome the illness that has dictated her life for so many years. We see her strengths, her weaknesses, her hardest times are laid completely bare and it’s impossible not to feel for her as she tries desperately to claw her life back, after watching everything slip away because of her illness. I’ve never seen a graphic novel that deals with serious issues before so this made a nice change. I imagine Tyranny is perfect for younger readers and teens, while it is entertaining it’s also educational without preaching or judging anybody involved. It's a quick read, I read it in a single sitting over the course of forty five minutes or so so it's perfect to while away the minutes on that boring train or bus journey. The pace was spot on - I think the intense subject matter makes this work best as a shorter novel. Tyranny is certainly one of the most unique novels I’ve read in a very long time and it’s one that I’m sure will linger in my mind.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    I first heard about this book when I held Body Image and Self-Perfection Month two years ago, when another blogger taking part reviewed it. I was intrigued as to how a graphic novel would deal with such a serious subject, and now I've read it, I'm in two minds. I think Tyranny is a great way to get your first glimpse of what living with anorexia is like, as it covers years of Anna's life and how it effected her. It's a great way to get the discussion going or at least think about it as an individ I first heard about this book when I held Body Image and Self-Perfection Month two years ago, when another blogger taking part reviewed it. I was intrigued as to how a graphic novel would deal with such a serious subject, and now I've read it, I'm in two minds. I think Tyranny is a great way to get your first glimpse of what living with anorexia is like, as it covers years of Anna's life and how it effected her. It's a great way to get the discussion going or at least think about it as an individual, but being a graphic novel, there isn't much opportunity really get into the emotional side of things that comes along with the narrative of a novel. However, Tyranny gets as close as I think a graphic novel can, covering the self-loathing and how those with anorexia see themselves completely differently to what's real. It doesn't shy away from the seriousness of the illness, or how badly things can go. I covers the whole journey right from the very first diet to recovery and becoming well again, and everything inbetween. However, I do think it isn't as shocking or as scary as it can be on the subject. Maybe it's me; I'm not the biggest fan of graphic novels, or maybe it's the length, I read it in about 10-15 minutes, but I found myself detached from the story. It wasn't as hard hitting as I think a story about such things should be. I also wasn't the biggest fan of the style, the language was very simple and almost childlike, and I found the character of Tyranny to be annoying and pretty silly, rather than freaky. I still say it's a pretty good introduction into the fiction side of things to do with this subject, and well worth a read. From Once Upon a Bookcase - YA book blog

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    This is a difficult book to know what to do with. It is probably a best fit for high school students interested in knowing what life is like for an anorexic young woman. It is a graphic novel, and the illustrations convey a great deal of the information allowing words to be kept to a minimum. It is not a story with any subtlety or complexity. It is like a short memoir in graphic novel format with a single plot (no subplots, a single main character [if Tyranny is counted as part of Anna], no sett This is a difficult book to know what to do with. It is probably a best fit for high school students interested in knowing what life is like for an anorexic young woman. It is a graphic novel, and the illustrations convey a great deal of the information allowing words to be kept to a minimum. It is not a story with any subtlety or complexity. It is like a short memoir in graphic novel format with a single plot (no subplots, a single main character [if Tyranny is counted as part of Anna], no setting details, one theme, etc.). The book covers some of the whys and hows of becoming anorexic, as well as the social and physical effects, and the difficulty of overcoming this condition. My difficulty is in where to put the book. It isn't generally what my students are looking for when they look at graphic novels, it doesn't exactly fit with the non-fiction eating disorders books, and it tells a story that is more pointed than most of the novels on the fiction shelves, and the cover doesn't reveal anything about the content of the book. Yet, some of my older middle school girls might want to read this book...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Diana Welsch

    The cover of this had a cool, edgy look to it, so I picked it up and gave it a look. A graphic novel about a young woman's battle with anorexia? Bound to be powerful. Right? I was expecting more edge and drama from this this than I ended up getting. It had a light-hearted feel to it, mostly due to the art. The illustrations made it look like this would be aimed at younger kids, almost like it could be in Highlights magazine. There was no subtlety in the art or plot whatsoever. While there were s The cover of this had a cool, edgy look to it, so I picked it up and gave it a look. A graphic novel about a young woman's battle with anorexia? Bound to be powerful. Right? I was expecting more edge and drama from this this than I ended up getting. It had a light-hearted feel to it, mostly due to the art. The illustrations made it look like this would be aimed at younger kids, almost like it could be in Highlights magazine. There was no subtlety in the art or plot whatsoever. While there were some parts that were sufficiently emotional (such as the eating disorder patients playing on the playground and having fun for the first time in a long while, and Anna collapsing on the sidewalk and being helped by an older woman), overall it just looked...kinda silly. I would recommend this to younger kids who need to read about something like this, like 5th-8th grade, but the tone wasn't mature enough for older readers. The lack of grit and subtlety on a very serious, life-or-death subject really ruined it for me, and I can't imagine it holding the attention of older teens.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Meryl

    The story was really great and painfully true because so many girls slip into eating disorders. I was surprised it was so small and short, though, the book itself. For me, with the drawing style and the way the story was told, it seemed like a brochure on anorexia, or a little booklet they pass out to you in middle school for health class. I guess it seemed so simple and too straightforward and obvious? I'm not sure. I thought it could have been more raw and dark, though I'm definitely not sayin The story was really great and painfully true because so many girls slip into eating disorders. I was surprised it was so small and short, though, the book itself. For me, with the drawing style and the way the story was told, it seemed like a brochure on anorexia, or a little booklet they pass out to you in middle school for health class. I guess it seemed so simple and too straightforward and obvious? I'm not sure. I thought it could have been more raw and dark, though I'm definitely not saying otherwise about the subject matter. I always think it's brave for someone to write their own story of their dark history. I feel like eating disorders aren't covered enough in graphic novels. Too much action hero, manly-man stuff, or paranormal teen romance. Ugh. So I'm happy for that, and that's why I bought it, because it was a new topic/story that I haven't read before in the comic-style. Nonetheless, I enjoyed the book. It's a very, very short read and informative about the struggles of someone struggling with an eating disorder.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michaela

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Although this book is written with pictures, it is definitely not a children's book. It shows the life of an anorexic/bulimic girl who has troubles fighting her eating disorder. It gets so bad that she drops out of school and has to go to a treatment center. But will she be strong enough to fight for her body or will she just disappear into nothing...? My favourite part from this book was when she decided that Tyranny no longer controled her and she started healing a day at a time. She made a dis Although this book is written with pictures, it is definitely not a children's book. It shows the life of an anorexic/bulimic girl who has troubles fighting her eating disorder. It gets so bad that she drops out of school and has to go to a treatment center. But will she be strong enough to fight for her body or will she just disappear into nothing...? My favourite part from this book was when she decided that Tyranny no longer controled her and she started healing a day at a time. She made a distinction between her and the disease and she fought for her life back. Her friend wasn't so lucky though, and she died of a heart attack. I think that was the day that this girl realized that the same thing could happen to her. She allowed people into her life and she let them help her. It was probably the hardest thing for her to ever do, but if she hadn't done it, who knows where she would be know?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Any book about eating disorders is bound to be heartbreaking. This one was interesting to me in that it didn't begin with any event other than puberty -- losing one's child body and finding it replaced, almost overnight, with another, "bigger" one. The graphic novel format does justice to the body dysmorphia that so often happens: looking in the mirror as one size, and literally seeing another (bigger) size person looking back. No movie or novel can show that as well as a drawing. I'd also been u Any book about eating disorders is bound to be heartbreaking. This one was interesting to me in that it didn't begin with any event other than puberty -- losing one's child body and finding it replaced, almost overnight, with another, "bigger" one. The graphic novel format does justice to the body dysmorphia that so often happens: looking in the mirror as one size, and literally seeing another (bigger) size person looking back. No movie or novel can show that as well as a drawing. I'd also been unfamiliar with the use of laxatives as a way of purging. Lots of painful/dangerous side effects there. (shivers) This book seems to have a happy ending, as Anna gets treatment and tells Tyranny (her dark side) to go away. But the author bio says Lesley has a 30-year battle with anorexia and bulimia. "Anna, when you slip backwards, you'll never fall back to the very beginning. If you keep trying, you'll get there."

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