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The Witch's Guide to Cooking with Children

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When Sol and Connie Blink move to Grand Creek, one of the first people to welcome them is an odd older woman, Fay Holaderry, and her friendly dog, Swift, who carries a very strange bone in his mouth. Sol knows a lot more than the average eleven-year-old, so when he identifies the bone as a human femur, he and Connie begin to wonder if their new neighbor is up to no good. I When Sol and Connie Blink move to Grand Creek, one of the first people to welcome them is an odd older woman, Fay Holaderry, and her friendly dog, Swift, who carries a very strange bone in his mouth. Sol knows a lot more than the average eleven-year-old, so when he identifies the bone as a human femur, he and Connie begin to wonder if their new neighbor is up to no good. In a spine-tingling adventure that makes them think twice about who they can trust, Sol and Connie discover that dangerous secrets lurk in even the most pleasant neighborhoods.


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When Sol and Connie Blink move to Grand Creek, one of the first people to welcome them is an odd older woman, Fay Holaderry, and her friendly dog, Swift, who carries a very strange bone in his mouth. Sol knows a lot more than the average eleven-year-old, so when he identifies the bone as a human femur, he and Connie begin to wonder if their new neighbor is up to no good. I When Sol and Connie Blink move to Grand Creek, one of the first people to welcome them is an odd older woman, Fay Holaderry, and her friendly dog, Swift, who carries a very strange bone in his mouth. Sol knows a lot more than the average eleven-year-old, so when he identifies the bone as a human femur, he and Connie begin to wonder if their new neighbor is up to no good. In a spine-tingling adventure that makes them think twice about who they can trust, Sol and Connie discover that dangerous secrets lurk in even the most pleasant neighborhoods.

30 review for The Witch's Guide to Cooking with Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Christiane

    What if the witch from Hansel and Gretel did not die in the oven? What if she's now an ordinary old woman, living in a suburb (which was once a deep wood) with her little dog Swift, who is carrying a bone in his mouth that eleven-year old Sol identifies as a human femur? Sol and his younger sister have an oddly indifferent father and a not-really-very-nice step-mother, but surely that's just coincidence. A creepy retelling of the fairy tale, with parts told from the witch's point of view. Bonus What if the witch from Hansel and Gretel did not die in the oven? What if she's now an ordinary old woman, living in a suburb (which was once a deep wood) with her little dog Swift, who is carrying a bone in his mouth that eleven-year old Sol identifies as a human femur? Sol and his younger sister have an oddly indifferent father and a not-really-very-nice step-mother, but surely that's just coincidence. A creepy retelling of the fairy tale, with parts told from the witch's point of view. Bonus points for the librarian who rants about "...having to put up with you kids. You run around the library like it's a playground. And you lose your library cards every other week!" This would have been 4 stars but for the abrupt and unsatisfactory ending---probably setting up for a sequel---but I felt cheated by all the loose ends left lying around.

  2. 5 out of 5

    SheriC (PM)

    This is a revision of Hansel and Gretel, in a modern setting. A brother and sister fight off the witch who eats children. The witch no longer lives in a gingerbread house in the woods. Her woods have all be cut down and the city has grown up around it, so she now lives in an apartment building and accepts donations of from parents who are annoyed by their children. It’s a cute idea, but the story is a little muddled by seemingly pointless additional characters and the writing is not terribly eng This is a revision of Hansel and Gretel, in a modern setting. A brother and sister fight off the witch who eats children. The witch no longer lives in a gingerbread house in the woods. Her woods have all be cut down and the city has grown up around it, so she now lives in an apartment building and accepts donations of from parents who are annoyed by their children. It’s a cute idea, but the story is a little muddled by seemingly pointless additional characters and the writing is not terribly engaging, compared to other middle grade books I’ve read recently. The illustrations could be interesting, but the book copy I’m using is so poorly printed that the pictures are a dark mass of graytones. I can hardly complain, though. I picked this up in a thriftshop, mostly because the title caught my eye and I thought it might be amusing. I read this for the Witches square in the 2016 Halloween Bingo.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    I picked this up because it was recommended to readers who enjoyed A Tale Dark & Grimm on Amazon. I loved the humor and the quirky twist on the fairy tale of Hansel and Gretel in A Tale Dark and Grimm, and I just plain love fairy tales, so I am looking for innovative, interesting retellings of these classic stories. I'm glad my library had this on audio. It was a fun and quick read, about 3 hours (It took me longer because I listened in spurts). Initially, I was very drawn in. The characters of S I picked this up because it was recommended to readers who enjoyed A Tale Dark & Grimm on Amazon. I loved the humor and the quirky twist on the fairy tale of Hansel and Gretel in A Tale Dark and Grimm, and I just plain love fairy tales, so I am looking for innovative, interesting retellings of these classic stories. I'm glad my library had this on audio. It was a fun and quick read, about 3 hours (It took me longer because I listened in spurts). Initially, I was very drawn in. The characters of Sol and Connie are captivating, their story was somewhat poignant. I definitely felt for these kids. If you're familiar with Hansel and Gretel, you can get a head start on the storyline, although McGowan throws in some novel touches that were fun. I won't say which, because that's the fun of reading it. Sol is a young genius and inventor who gets a huge blow to his confidence that he has to work through. His mischievous, free-sprited, and intuitive sister Connie carries a burden of guilt related to Sol's greatest failure. This is a pivotal element of this story, and the author does carry it through successfully to the end. The story shows what the child-eating witch is up to in the modern age, and she's definitely streamlined her operation. The child-eating witch is truly heinous. What makes it even more harrowing is that people actually volunteer their kids to be eaten because of the manifold failings of those kids! Definitely folks who shouldn't have reproduced! It's humorous, but on one level it's really kind of disturbing that parents would set their children up to be eaten by a witch just because they misbehave or fail to live up to certain standards. I think that they are even worse than the witch, honestly. This is one of those books that won't appeal if you don't like a dark and kind of twisted sense of humor. Let me just say that here and now. But I think readers who like the Hansel and Gretel story won't find anything here that countermands the original story. Instead, this is just a modern update with more humor. If there was anything I was underwhelmed with, it was the use of the secondary character who happened to be a witch as well, but she's a good witch. I understand why she couldn't help the kids very much, but I still feel she was underutilized in the story. I also wished there was some sort of confrontation between her and the evil witch. Also, I feel the ending was too abrupt. I know this is supposed to be a short book, but I wasn't fully satisfied with the ending. I definitely wanted more story and more closure. Overall, this was pretty good. It's hard to rate it higher or to perform a very intensive analysis, because it's very short. I am glad this was recommended to me because I liked A Tale Dark and Grimm. However, it doesn't live up to the excellence of that book, and that's one caveat I would give any reader who is investigating humorous, middle grade/juvenile fairy tale retellings. As far as suitability for young readers, I think it's fine for kids who are 8-12 (or older readers who like J/MG fiction). However, this would be too scary for a younger reader. Not that much is described, but the idea of a witch eating bad kids or even worse, their parents giving them away to the witch, is pretty disturbing, even for a much older reader like myself. If you are able to get this on audiobook, I recommend it. I liked the narrator. Overall rating: 3.25/5.0 stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    This book had such great potential, but I really didn't like it. First off, I am going to guess that the author did some research about air pressure, so why would he put the air pressure as station pressure rather than adjusted sea level pressure? This would be much more useful to the budding scientist. And, since Sol and Connie lived by the mountains, why was the station pressure so low? I guess this part would only bother a meteorologist. Second, I felt like the forgiveness idea was treated so This book had such great potential, but I really didn't like it. First off, I am going to guess that the author did some research about air pressure, so why would he put the air pressure as station pressure rather than adjusted sea level pressure? This would be much more useful to the budding scientist. And, since Sol and Connie lived by the mountains, why was the station pressure so low? I guess this part would only bother a meteorologist. Second, I felt like the forgiveness idea was treated so strangely in this book. How could the author just leave the ending like that? And, speaking of the ending, what the heck was that? Is he planning on doing a sequel? I felt the ending was very abrupt and resolved very little. What is going to happen to the "parents"? How about the woman who sort of helped them? (And, how exactly did she help/not help them? I don't really understand her point or the dogs who understand German.) Finally, I was not impressed with the creativity or the style of writing. Honestly, the writing style reminded me a lot of a short story I wrote for my sixth grade young author's competition. I also question the intended audience of this book. The writing style seemed to be aimed at very young elementary, but the book was 176 pages long? I know there are a lot of voracious readers out there, but the length-style combo don't seem to mesh. I felt disappointed after reading this book since it does have such a great title. Sigh.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tanti

    If you like Roald Dahl's books, you'll like this one. This is a darkly hilarious story. The two kids at the center of the story were adorable, and a bit eccentric, just like every other person in the town it seemed. I was hooked from the very first page.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stefani Putria

    I tried to like this one and finished it soon but I couldn't enjoy to read it. Retelling Hansel and gratel in modern era, buth both character little annoying.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hafsah Faizal

    This review was written by my 10 year old sister! Eleven year-old Solomon and eight year-old Constance Blinks, Sol and Connie for short, have just moved into their new house. That's where they meet old and odd Fay Holaderry and her friendly dog Swift. Swift carries a very strange, eerie-looking bone in his mouth. At first Fay seems like a normal old woman, even if she's slightly odd, so who cares? That's before they stumble upon her diary. Can Sol and Connie figure out what old Fay Holaderry This review was written by my 10 year old sister! Eleven year-old Solomon and eight year-old Constance Blinks, Sol and Connie for short, have just moved into their new house. That's where they meet old and odd Fay Holaderry and her friendly dog Swift. Swift carries a very strange, eerie-looking bone in his mouth. At first Fay seems like a normal old woman, even if she's slightly odd, so who cares? That's before they stumble upon her diary. Can Sol and Connie figure out what old Fay Holaderry is up to now? Before it's too late? Before I started reading The Witch's Guide to Cooking with Children, I thought it was about cooking. Boring.... But to my ultimate surprise, the book was filled with adventure. Holaderry's diary was the funniest and the best part of the book. There was only one problem, in one part it was a bit confusing, but after I reread it, everything made more sense. Author Keith McGowan tells a splendid story inspired from an old fairy tale - Hansel and Gretel. I recommend this book to fans of fairy tales and anyone looking for a fun and adventurous read!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dana Wright

    This book is a Texas Bluebonnet and I wanted to see what everyone was talking about. It was great! A worthwhile book for my witchy fiction and nookbook collection!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Robyn Hawk

    How can you resist - The Witch's Guide to Cooking with Children? It brings to mind the old WC Fields adage - when asked if he liked children, Fields purportedly answered, Yes - with a little mustard and relish! All joking aside - this book is being touted as a lot of things...a modern version of the Hansel & Gretel tale, garnering comparisons to Roald Dahl's The Witches, and the tone of a Lemony Snicket narration. The really great part is that kids will read and love it - it is a quick witty - s How can you resist - The Witch's Guide to Cooking with Children? It brings to mind the old WC Fields adage - when asked if he liked children, Fields purportedly answered, Yes - with a little mustard and relish! All joking aside - this book is being touted as a lot of things...a modern version of the Hansel & Gretel tale, garnering comparisons to Roald Dahl's The Witches, and the tone of a Lemony Snicket narration. The really great part is that kids will read and love it - it is a quick witty - smart read! The Witch's Guide to Cooking with Children has everything it needs to make it a modern day fairy tale - smart, funny, sleuthing siblings - their father (who is not their father) - a wicked stepmother - scary librarian and bits from a witch's journal!!! This is a debut from author Keith McGowan, and the illustrations throughout by Yoko Tanaka lend a graphic element that stops just short of graphic novel. Product Description from Amazon: When Sol and Connie Blink move to Grand Creek, one of the first people to welcome them is an odd older woman, Fay Holaderry, and her friendly dog, Swift, who carries a very strange bone in his mouth. Sol knows a lot more than the average eleven-year-old, so when he identifies the bone as human, he and Connie begin to wonder if their new neighbor is up to no good. In a spine-tingling adventure that makes them think twice about who they can trust, Sol and Connie discover that solving mysteries can be a dangerous game—even for skilled junior sleuths.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Wendi Lau

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 4th grader says: It was interesting. I liked that the witch survived in the end and that her dog was very protective of her.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ana Mardoll

    The Witch's Guide to Cooking with Children / 978-0-8050-8668-3 I love redone fairy tales of all kinds, from the whimsical to the dark, and I love children's books in general, so this book seemed like a no-brainer for me. Unfortunately, however, I simply did not enjoy reading this book, though I cannot say for certain whether a much younger audience might find the novel more palatable. "The Witch's Guide" carries with it a strong whiff of the amateur about it. Author McGowan seems to be aware of th The Witch's Guide to Cooking with Children / 978-0-8050-8668-3 I love redone fairy tales of all kinds, from the whimsical to the dark, and I love children's books in general, so this book seemed like a no-brainer for me. Unfortunately, however, I simply did not enjoy reading this book, though I cannot say for certain whether a much younger audience might find the novel more palatable. "The Witch's Guide" carries with it a strong whiff of the amateur about it. Author McGowan seems to be aware of the wildly popular "A Series of Unfortunate Events" series, and it feels like he is attempting to recreate the dry, direct narrative that marks that series so uniquely and indelibly. There is a world of difference however, in a direct narrator who is distanced and sympathetic, and direct narrator who is immediate and antagonistic (i.e., the witch). The directness of the narrator in SoUE creates a gulf of time, loneliness, and isolation between the reader and the orphans. The directness of the narrator in TWGtCwC merely seems to serve as an expository device to keep the story chugging along. Fairy tale re-tellings should not, as a general rule, have self-awareness of the tale they are supposedly re-telling. There are exceptions to this rule, but by and large it is a fourth wall that the author really should not break. Having the 'father' (who is actually not the father in an incredibly convoluted sequence of identity theft that seems only necessary to validate why a 'father' would abandon his children...thereby completely undermining all the insistence in the opening paragraphs that real parents give up their children to be eaten all the time) and the 'mother' turn out to somehow be the great-great-great-grandchildren of the "real" father and mother (er, step-mother) of Hansel and Gretel is silly and unnecessary. I understand that McGowan is trying to affix his story in the 'real' world, but the point at which one can find Hansel and Gretel on Ancestry dot com is the point at which I've lost all interest because the issue creates more questions than it can possibly answer. I say that "The Witch's Guide" feels amateurish because it seems to feverishly blunder about with no clear indication of where it wants to go. Details are strewn randomly about, some having minor plot relevance (Sol's failed invention ends up being plot relevant...sort of) and others apparently having to do with characterization but never really going anywhere. McGowan provides a sympathetic adult foil to the witch, but hamstrings her with some half-baked explanation of a curse, all of which fails to resolve into anything plot relevant - she doesn't help the children, nor does the apparent resolution of her curse have any significance. About the time McGowan figures out that the witch can't handle a world-wide operation like this on her own, he shoehorns in another expositionary diary entry explaining how she has a number of goblin helpers just...because... and most of them are librarians or teachers. None of which makes much sense, because the conceit of a goblin librarian handing over a child to be eaten undermines the earlier insistence that the witch only accepts children through "the proper channels", i.e. their parents. You'd think a parent evil enough to toss their child to a witch to be eaten would be capable of just dropping the kid at the house for a 'piano lesson' or other contrived reason, rather than needing a librarian intermediary. All in all, "The Witch's Guide" just feels rushed and unpolished. I think some time with a good editor might have made the plot more readable, but it seems from the foreword that the editor was so taken away with the idea that she apparently wouldn't let anyone touch her new 'baby' with the necessary red editing pen. Children may find this book novel and distracting, but it's a very quick read and lacks the staying power to be worth the price. I'd recommend waiting for a library copy. Final note to parents, there is some lightly risque humor where Connie gets drugged on magical herbs; this scene culminates in her "pretend[ing] to be a dog peeing" and "acting like a dog on all fours, she sniffed near Swift's behind". NOTE: This review is based on a free Advance Review Copy of this book provided through Amazon Vine. ~ Ana Mardoll

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I read a review of this at Booklist Online, and the title grabbed my attention. The witch who eats children, made famous by the fairy tale Hansel & Gretel, is alive and well and living in a city. She's writing a book about her various modern methods of capturing children, since there are no woods anymore for parents to "lose" their children in. Some examples include dumpsters outside of movie theaters marked "Donations" and having child-hating helpers such as baby-sitters and librarians to bring I read a review of this at Booklist Online, and the title grabbed my attention. The witch who eats children, made famous by the fairy tale Hansel & Gretel, is alive and well and living in a city. She's writing a book about her various modern methods of capturing children, since there are no woods anymore for parents to "lose" their children in. Some examples include dumpsters outside of movie theaters marked "Donations" and having child-hating helpers such as baby-sitters and librarians to bring the children to her. Sol and Connie Blink just moved to the witch's town with their father and stepmother. Sol's a science nut who accidentally blew up his school, and Connie is an animal lover. The parents want to get rid of the kids, but Sol is quite resourceful and manages to find his way back home after Mr. Blink tries to lose them in the city. Sol and Connie are smart enough to notice their parents' weird behavior, as well as something strange about the old lady next door... This was a cute story that reminded me a lot of Roald Dahl's The Witches. I thought the set up was great, and I loved the witch's modern techniques. The ties to the original fairy tale were very evident until the end, which I found disappointing. I expected something related to the witch "fattening up" the children and them tricking her. I had also hoped that the mysterious pet shop owner would come into play more, especially since it seemed like riddles would be a major part in the children escaping the witch. The illustrations were quirkily cute and fit the story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    paula

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Like a Hal Hartley movie for children, this book follows two siblings through a couple of days in an innocuous, unnamed suburban town that is new to them. There are perils - an old lady wants to eat them and the town librarian is untrustworthy. Notably, their own parents (who are not really their parents) want to get rid of them. But Sol and Connie can handle it. Quirky in an understated way, resourceful and brave, the siblings face their fears, reconcile their emotions, and outwit the witch in a Like a Hal Hartley movie for children, this book follows two siblings through a couple of days in an innocuous, unnamed suburban town that is new to them. There are perils - an old lady wants to eat them and the town librarian is untrustworthy. Notably, their own parents (who are not really their parents) want to get rid of them. But Sol and Connie can handle it. Quirky in an understated way, resourceful and brave, the siblings face their fears, reconcile their emotions, and outwit the witch in a remarkably implacable way. I'm not kidding. Hal Hartley for kids. It's weird. But not unfunny, and not without suspense. It's some unusual writing for kids, and mine really seemed to respond to the author's matter-of-fact presentation. No punches pulled, but no excess build-up either. I will say that the ending, which is rather abrupt and extremely inconclusive, outraged them. This reaction is confirmed by another mom, who listened to the book while baking cookies with her daughter. I'm expecting a sequel, but I kind of wish I weren't. Don't tell, but I LIKED the ending!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Stiles

    I absolutely loved this book! For those of you who like the story of Hansel and Gretel, you will love this new spin on it. The witch, Fay Holaderry has adapted her lifestyle to the present time, living like any elderly person in any community. But, looks can be deceiving. Sol and Connie Blink have just moved to Grand Creek. They have a lovely set of parents who don't really seem to care about them. The reasons, and there are many, become clear as you read the book. Sol is a science nerd. His youn I absolutely loved this book! For those of you who like the story of Hansel and Gretel, you will love this new spin on it. The witch, Fay Holaderry has adapted her lifestyle to the present time, living like any elderly person in any community. But, looks can be deceiving. Sol and Connie Blink have just moved to Grand Creek. They have a lovely set of parents who don't really seem to care about them. The reasons, and there are many, become clear as you read the book. Sol is a science nerd. His younger sister Connie loves animals and loves and admires her brother. Sol has a difficult time believing in himself after a terrible incident in the town they have just moved from. Both Sol and Connie must learn to trust each other if they are to survive what their parents, Ms. Holaderry and many others in the town have set up for them. This story's themes of perseverance, trust and relying on family run all through this story. I can't wait for the first day of school to begin so that I can recommend this book to my new students.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    This re-telling of Hansel and Gretel is quirky, charming and smart. Hansel and Gretel are now Connie, a bit of a trouble maker, and Sol, her science nerd older brother. Soon after their family moves to a new town, the siblings meet neighbor Fay Holaderry and her dog, Swift, who's nibbling on a bone. They immediately get creepy vibes off Holaderry and then later determine, after a trip to the library, that the bone Swift had was a human femur. While I waited to see if Connie and Sol would land in This re-telling of Hansel and Gretel is quirky, charming and smart. Hansel and Gretel are now Connie, a bit of a trouble maker, and Sol, her science nerd older brother. Soon after their family moves to a new town, the siblings meet neighbor Fay Holaderry and her dog, Swift, who's nibbling on a bone. They immediately get creepy vibes off Holaderry and then later determine, after a trip to the library, that the bone Swift had was a human femur. While I waited to see if Connie and Sol would land in Holaderry's stew pot, I got a kick out of the back story and emotional ups and downs Sol and Connie experienced, as many siblings often do: the love and dislike. The characters are drawn with over-sized brows, almost like cave people--perhaps there is a point to be made??

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Ball

    The title and cover, I must admit, sold me on this book. What an excellent concept-- a fractured fairy tale version of Hansel and Gretel from (mostly, possibly) the witch's point of view-- the witch's modern point of view, having lived for centuries after the Hansel and Gretel encounter. There is much charm to this book. Some particular children will be enamored with the dark, dry, very much Roald Dahl tone the narrative has. However, while this book is very much in Mr. Dahl's tradition, it do The title and cover, I must admit, sold me on this book. What an excellent concept-- a fractured fairy tale version of Hansel and Gretel from (mostly, possibly) the witch's point of view-- the witch's modern point of view, having lived for centuries after the Hansel and Gretel encounter. There is much charm to this book. Some particular children will be enamored with the dark, dry, very much Roald Dahl tone the narrative has. However, while this book is very much in Mr. Dahl's tradition, it does not exactly live up to his standard of writing. I had my problems with this (I wanted more of Ms. Holaderry, the witch, for instance)-- but Keith McGowan has written a worthwhile, charming young adult's modern fairy tale.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten Murphy

    I was looking forward to reading this book because I do so much with fairy tales and fractured fairy tales with my students and as a school, we LOVE this genre. So, when I realized that a fractured fairy tale version of Hansel and Gretel was on this year's Bluebonnet list, I was excited. Unfortunately, my excitement was short-lived, as this book was a terrible disappointment to me. It was just not what I expected or wanted and I will not be really pushing it this year (although I know that a lot I was looking forward to reading this book because I do so much with fairy tales and fractured fairy tales with my students and as a school, we LOVE this genre. So, when I realized that a fractured fairy tale version of Hansel and Gretel was on this year's Bluebonnet list, I was excited. Unfortunately, my excitement was short-lived, as this book was a terrible disappointment to me. It was just not what I expected or wanted and I will not be really pushing it this year (although I know that a lot of the 3rd & 4th graders will pick it up and read it on their own because it is a fractured fairy tale AND it's a Bluebonnet). I just thought there were too many strange things, situations were never really resolved, and too many loose ends. Like I said, a disappointing read for me.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Loki

    I liked the exciting parts! I liked the end part and the middle and 4 stars for the beginning because it was only a little bit exciting at the beginning, and it was more exciting in the middle and last. I would give it more stars but 5 is all it can go up to. (Odin adds, "I liked the scary parts!" We've read this twice, it's a great book for Loki, who has always been fascinated with the Hansel and Gretel story. This modern day version is great.)

  19. 4 out of 5

    babyhippoface

    You know the witch from Hansel & Gretel? Well, apparently, she is alive and well, and eating children who've been dropped off by their annoyed-to-the-breaking-point parents. Sol & Connie are exceptionally clever children, though, so they just might survive. I have a feeling this will be challenged somewhere, once upon a time. But I don't think it's really objectionable, just dark humor. You know the witch from Hansel & Gretel? Well, apparently, she is alive and well, and eating children who've been dropped off by their annoyed-to-the-breaking-point parents. Sol & Connie are exceptionally clever children, though, so they just might survive. I have a feeling this will be challenged somewhere, once upon a time. But I don't think it's really objectionable, just dark humor.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Natasha North

    I'm feeling somewhere between 3.5 - 4 stars for this one. Points for the delightfully dark tone and for clever, unflappable Sol. The illustrations were pleasing enough if you only looked at a few, as the children's expressions never really changed, whether they were in mortal danger or meeting a dog. Overall, a unique re-imagining.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Roseann

    This twist on the Hansel and Gretel story starts out good; unfortunately, it doesn't develop into much. I also was not happy with the fact that there were few adults to like or trust in the story; especially with a 'witch' who disposes of children around there should be many adults ready to be heroes, and there were none here. A bit of a disappointment.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    This book was extremely clever and fun to read--my only complaint was that I wanted it to go on for much longer! Anyone who is a fan of Roald Dahl or Lemony Snicket would love it. I look forward to reading the continuing adventures of Sol and Connie as soon as the next book comes out.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Colette

    I love children. Eating them that is! has to be my all time favorite first line of a book, chapter, what ever. It is wonderful to read excerpts of this book aloud to children! This book will not disappoint!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Johnson

    I loved this book. It's a re-telling of the classic Hansel and Gretel. It is really short and funny. I loved it!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Norma

    A wonderful children's book based on the Hansel and Gretal storyline. On 2011 Bluebonnet list.

  26. 5 out of 5

    AGM Libraryscience

    loved Fay Holaderry's journal entries where she states why she finds herself "cooking with children"

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mrs. Atterberry

    This clever book keeps you on your toes until the end. I love that you get to know what the witch is thinking, too.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adison

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I thought it was sort of scary, but fantasy can be scary. I thought this book was a little bit like Hansel and Gretel, but I could be wrong. You should really read this.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    This was an excellent book. I loved it. This book is very fast paced and if you think it is like Hansel and Grettel, then you are very wrong.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vandy

    great start...realistic set up...can makes anyone's hair stand up! perfect book for book talk.

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