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The Food Revolution: How Your Diet Can Help Save Your Life and Our World (for Readers of Whole and the China Study)

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The man who started the food revolution with the groundbreaking Diet for a New America now boldly posits that, collectively, our personal diet can save ourselves and the world. Robbins argues for adopting a vegetarian diet for personal wellbeing as well as for the wellbeing of the planet. Photos, charts & tables. The man who started the food revolution with the groundbreaking Diet for a New America now boldly posits that, collectively, our personal diet can save ourselves and the world. Robbins argues for adopting a vegetarian diet for personal wellbeing as well as for the wellbeing of the planet. Photos, charts & tables.


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The man who started the food revolution with the groundbreaking Diet for a New America now boldly posits that, collectively, our personal diet can save ourselves and the world. Robbins argues for adopting a vegetarian diet for personal wellbeing as well as for the wellbeing of the planet. Photos, charts & tables. The man who started the food revolution with the groundbreaking Diet for a New America now boldly posits that, collectively, our personal diet can save ourselves and the world. Robbins argues for adopting a vegetarian diet for personal wellbeing as well as for the wellbeing of the planet. Photos, charts & tables.

30 review for The Food Revolution: How Your Diet Can Help Save Your Life and Our World (for Readers of Whole and the China Study)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    Over twenty years ago I read Diet for a New America and after a short flirtation with vegetarianism; I somehow managed to forget most of what I absorbed. Since having my own family, facing increasing, personal health issues and growing up a little, I have slowly been working up the courage to face the facts so clearly outlined in this book. This is one of those books that you wish everyone would read. If the information about diet and health, modern food production, the torture of animals in the Over twenty years ago I read Diet for a New America and after a short flirtation with vegetarianism; I somehow managed to forget most of what I absorbed. Since having my own family, facing increasing, personal health issues and growing up a little, I have slowly been working up the courage to face the facts so clearly outlined in this book. This is one of those books that you wish everyone would read. If the information about diet and health, modern food production, the torture of animals in the name of appetite instead of necessity and the environmental destruction that is occurring as a result was more widely known, surely there would be a massive change in every North American’s lifestyle and health. I am shocked at how effective the advertising campaigns of dairy and meat producers have been in brainwashing me into believing those foods were necessary for my health. Apparently the overwhelming majority of world-wide research shows that a plant based diet greatly decreases the risk of acquiring heart disease and many types of cancer and in cultures where this type of diet is standard, incidence of these diseases are very low. Reading about the deplorable conditions of animals in huge, overcrowded, factory farms, the way they are transported to the slaughterhouse and what happens when they get there made me sick to my stomach. Reading about how the tropical rainforests are being destroyed and thousands of plant and animal species lost forever in order for more cattle to graze so we can have hamburgers 5 cents cheaper is horrifying. The amount of water needed to produce a pound of vegetables or grains is a fraction of what is needed to produce a pound of beef for our consumption. John Robbins goes on page after page backed up by worldwide research that we are doing enormous damage to our selves and the rest of the natural world by continuing unnecessarily to eat a diet rich in animal products. The last part of the book focuses on genetically modified foods being designed with pesticides and herbicides built right in. The potential for destruction is enormous and terrifying. Many soybean, corn and canola crops currently planted in North America are of this Round-up Ready variety. I will be reading every label that could potentially contain oil or ingredients made from these products with infinite care. There is so much valuable and urgent information contained within this book. If you are the least bit interested in your health or the health of our world and all of its inhabitants then I urge you to read this work. On the back of the book it says, “This book can save your life”. Not only can it save your life, but if enough people opened their eyes to the truths contained within and acted on them, I believe it could also help save our world.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Damien

    It's like a horror story, except that the zombies, vampires and maniacs with power tools are chasing YOU. And it's for real. It even has a happy ending, except for the very last scene when it may be that the monster could come back. (you don't read that in the book, but you feel it in the back of your mind) Every one should read it, especially smug meat-eaters and complacent suburbanites- unless you suffer from depression, because this one could send you over the edge to suicide. Valuable infor It's like a horror story, except that the zombies, vampires and maniacs with power tools are chasing YOU. And it's for real. It even has a happy ending, except for the very last scene when it may be that the monster could come back. (you don't read that in the book, but you feel it in the back of your mind) Every one should read it, especially smug meat-eaters and complacent suburbanites- unless you suffer from depression, because this one could send you over the edge to suicide. Valuable information- very valuable. And there are a few touching and cute stories, and random unexpected laughs scattered about. Derrick Jensen should read this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    Another hit. I cannot wait to read Healthy at 100 and the China Study, also by John Robbins. Not many people give up swimming in an ice cream cone shaped pool, along with a life of luxury, for writing books that champion veganism. This book goes further to make the point and backs up the way of life even more than ever before. Hey, even if you eat a vegan/vegetarian meal once a week you'll make a difference. The question is: How far will you go?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lucinda

    Although I think this book is an important read for some reasons, I caution against any book with an author that is fanatical about one diet - vegetarianism. I am, in fact, a "recovering vegetarian"! :) He can scare you into not eating meat with all of his disgusting stories of the meat industry, which are true and which is why I am a strong proponent of only purchasing local meat from a farmer you know so you know how your food is raised. No animal should live in poor conditions, be treated bad Although I think this book is an important read for some reasons, I caution against any book with an author that is fanatical about one diet - vegetarianism. I am, in fact, a "recovering vegetarian"! :) He can scare you into not eating meat with all of his disgusting stories of the meat industry, which are true and which is why I am a strong proponent of only purchasing local meat from a farmer you know so you know how your food is raised. No animal should live in poor conditions, be treated badly and be fed a diet that is not naturally what it would eat. The meat from those animals is full of toxins. Don't eat abused meat! Basketball star Bill Walton was fanatical about vegetarianism until he developed osteoporosis and his career ended with too many broken bones. He became a spokesperson for the meat industry! This book is useful for learning how the food we eat is so tied to politics and so controlled by corporations that should not be controlling our food. What you will learn about genetically modified foods is apalling. Most of the corn, soy and sugar beet crops in our nation are grown from "round-up ready" seeds that have been dipped in Round-Up so many times until the seeds themselves are genetically a pesticide! The crops no longer need to be sprayed with Round-Up to kill bugs! I feel really strongly that my step-daughter developed an auto-immune disease because she eats poorly and her diet largely included white flour, sugar, hydrogenated oils and genetically modified foods. I also believe that the author grossly exaggerates his point that we couls save our world by eliminating cattle farming. I have read his statistics on how much land they use and how much water they consume and I have read other sources on the same subject and I believe they serve their purpose and should not be eliminated, but the farming should return to smaller farms and huge feed lot farming that is unhealthy for the animal should be eliminated.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jon Gauthier

    Robbins comes off as a bit of a fanatic in The Food Revolution. He first states facts which are surprising and certainly worth serious discussion. I would've appreciated a briefer book that left off there. But Robbins also persistently pelts the reader with dramatic personal tales, apparently chosen to reinforce his own image as a trustworthy and unbiased source. They do the opposite for me. I don't mean to suggest that his "facts" are not true. Some of these results seem pretty overwhelmingly cl Robbins comes off as a bit of a fanatic in The Food Revolution. He first states facts which are surprising and certainly worth serious discussion. I would've appreciated a briefer book that left off there. But Robbins also persistently pelts the reader with dramatic personal tales, apparently chosen to reinforce his own image as a trustworthy and unbiased source. They do the opposite for me. I don't mean to suggest that his "facts" are not true. Some of these results seem pretty overwhelmingly clear support for the vegan/vegetarian case; others will require the careful reader to examine the actual associated scientific studies before making any conclusion. The author's aggressive style obscures the nuance of these facts. Very much worth a skim to understand Robbins' viewpoint and some of the facts on his side. But keep it at a skim level, or you'll get sucked in by the many unnecessarily romantic anecdotes. [In case you think I'm biased – I've been a happy vegetarian for about two years now.]

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rindy Girl

    This book is amazing and insightful. It's interesting to just flip through and read the little excerpts. I read it cover to cover and it converted me from being a vegetarian to becoming a vegan. I think it's a wealth of knowledge for anyone but especially those interested in veganism or animal rights. There is so much going on behind the scenes that the average person is completely unaware of and ignorant of. It's important for everyone to be educated on these issues so they can make the right d This book is amazing and insightful. It's interesting to just flip through and read the little excerpts. I read it cover to cover and it converted me from being a vegetarian to becoming a vegan. I think it's a wealth of knowledge for anyone but especially those interested in veganism or animal rights. There is so much going on behind the scenes that the average person is completely unaware of and ignorant of. It's important for everyone to be educated on these issues so they can make the right decision for themselves, the animals and the environment.

  7. 4 out of 5

    cheryl

    Wow - what didn't I learn from this book. It has changed my whole perspective and lifestyle. I could go into the details of how my life is different after reading this book, but its better if you pick it up and read it yourself. The thing that was most impressive to me was the 40 pages of footnotes in the back, providing scientific research that you can check out yourself. This book is no joke.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Wow. This book is one of the very few books that literally changed my life. I've read plenty of books that have inspired me or brought about minor changes, but this book really inspired true change in my life. I became vegetarian by page 50, vegan by page 100 and haven't looked back since. I realized that I've spent my life eating whatever was around without any thought as to where it came from, how it was prepared, or what it would do to my body. This book has helped me to see the bigger pictur Wow. This book is one of the very few books that literally changed my life. I've read plenty of books that have inspired me or brought about minor changes, but this book really inspired true change in my life. I became vegetarian by page 50, vegan by page 100 and haven't looked back since. I realized that I've spent my life eating whatever was around without any thought as to where it came from, how it was prepared, or what it would do to my body. This book has helped me to see the bigger picture and realize how the eating decisions I make impact much more than just myself. I recommend this book to anyone who has heart problems in their family, anyone who has ever tried to diet before, anyone who has ever eaten a hamburger, and anyone who has respect for life on earth! I say again....WOW!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Charlie

    Simply put this book is about why you should adopt a vegetarian diet. It breaks the argument down into three categories; Compassion, Health, and Ecology. If at least one of these areas concerns you this book will make a convincing argument for dietary change. Lots of interesting facts and busting of popular myths.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    It's not that I don't agree with the message of this book or that it didn't inspire me to eat less meat. I just got tired of the author's weak attempts at humility and barely veiled self-promotion. The structure of the book got old fast. Ultimately, I decided that life is too short to finish reading this book, so I stopped around page 120.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pax Gethen

    The Food Revolution is a remarkable book. John Robbins was heir to the Baskin-Robbins ice cream fortune, but turned it down to become a vegan activist. His earlier book Diet for a New America, published in the mid-80s, opened a lot of people's eyes to the horrible conditions animals live in on American "factory" farms. Now even many omnivorous people I've met will not eat veal, for example, and hopefully may come to see foie gras the same way.[return][return]When reading both of these books, I a The Food Revolution is a remarkable book. John Robbins was heir to the Baskin-Robbins ice cream fortune, but turned it down to become a vegan activist. His earlier book Diet for a New America, published in the mid-80s, opened a lot of people's eyes to the horrible conditions animals live in on American "factory" farms. Now even many omnivorous people I've met will not eat veal, for example, and hopefully may come to see foie gras the same way.[return][return]When reading both of these books, I at times felt numbed by the large number of statistics, detailing the harmfulness of animal products in the diet, the destruction of the environment caused by factory farming, and the potential dangers of genetically-modified foods. In some ways this was preaching to the choir for me, as I'd been vegetarian and already trying to go vegan for years.[return][return]But beyond all of the statistics and doom-and-gloom predictions, there was a stronger message: of compassion. Robbins is one of the very, very few authors who has moved me to tears. I'm hardly a person who never cries, but when I do it's usually because of some petty personal reason (relationship troubles, etc.). But reading his books has showed me not only how wonderful and precious our animal friends are, but how opening up and truly listening to people you may not agree with can be transforming.[return][return]I hope more people read his books. Robbins really does cover pretty much all of the reasons why I am a mostly-vegan vegetarian: health, ethical, and environmental, and has plenty of footnote references for validation and further information. Yet despite what he's written, Robbins himself doesn't say that everyone should become a vegan; he states "I don't care whether you call yourself a vegan, a vegetarian, or an asparagus". He just wants to inform people of the issues involved, and hopes that if enough people are convinced, the world (America in particular) will move toward a more plant-centered diet.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alan Scott

    Life Changing Perspective Flipper I literally read this entire book in one sitting-- all three hundred and eighty pages, which for me was an all time record. It is an incredibly compelling and horrifying story which Robbins gives us, more compelling than most fictitious thrillers: a world threatened by global economic corporations, but, in this case, IT'S ALL REAL PEOPLE. However, Robbins also gives us a vision of hope and love, and in that, he reminds me a bit of Thich Nhat Hanh. His style is Life Changing Perspective Flipper I literally read this entire book in one sitting-- all three hundred and eighty pages, which for me was an all time record. It is an incredibly compelling and horrifying story which Robbins gives us, more compelling than most fictitious thrillers: a world threatened by global economic corporations, but, in this case, IT'S ALL REAL PEOPLE. However, Robbins also gives us a vision of hope and love, and in that, he reminds me a bit of Thich Nhat Hanh. His style is like an overpowering blast of fresh air, so pure and honest in these times of guck and media frenzied goober frenzy. The book is written is so clear a style it's like crystal, and it's so well stated and balanced; I was deeply impressed with Robbins powerful command of the written word. His points are expertly presented and powerful. This book is a beautiful, empowering, poetical statement of love to all the world. He tells us that we all have the power to make a difference by making simple and humane changes to our diets and living practices. He supports his statements with empirically derived facts and statistics culled from reliable sources. I could not recommend this book more highly. I wish everyone I love, and even those I don't, would read this book because it could possibley change their lives and the very world itself.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Johanna

    Another fascinating read! I hadn't realised until I started reading this that John Robbin's father and uncle were of the Baskin & Robbins ice cream empire. Which made this an even more interesting read. This book, along with The China Study, just reinforces in a very articulate and abundantly well researched way that plant based diets might not only save our lives but also that of the planet. Thoroughly enlightening. I'll definitely be reading a few of his other books. Another fascinating read! I hadn't realised until I started reading this that John Robbin's father and uncle were of the Baskin & Robbins ice cream empire. Which made this an even more interesting read. This book, along with The China Study, just reinforces in a very articulate and abundantly well researched way that plant based diets might not only save our lives but also that of the planet. Thoroughly enlightening. I'll definitely be reading a few of his other books.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ethan Fixell

    changed my life. really. best health book of all time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kimmay

    I am not sure I can say enough GOOD about this book. It is a book that everyone should read no matter what they eat, if you eat, you should read it. It is enlightening in a sort of horrifying way, as one other previewer put it it reads like a horror story only worse because it is true. Even though this book was written ten years ago, and I am sure some of the statistics are outdated, I learned a lot and feel compelled to learn more. It also made me rethink my seafood cosumption, that is the only I am not sure I can say enough GOOD about this book. It is a book that everyone should read no matter what they eat, if you eat, you should read it. It is enlightening in a sort of horrifying way, as one other previewer put it it reads like a horror story only worse because it is true. Even though this book was written ten years ago, and I am sure some of the statistics are outdated, I learned a lot and feel compelled to learn more. It also made me rethink my seafood cosumption, that is the only animal/flesh I still eat on occasion, but it made me think maybe I should either limit it even further or eliminate it all together... I only have seafood maybe once , tops twice a month... but maybe i should examine this more. I only buy consume eggs from my local Amish neighbor and still eat ice cream and cheese on occasion, but NOW always organic. Still since reading this book, i have to say i have also rethought the frequency that i purchase these items and there again I always pay the extra money and buy organic. Not just because of this book, but it sure did reinforce why i buy organic and local when possible. The part aboutthe dairy cows / and the veal industry did not sit well with me... now every time i have a dairy product like ice cream or cheese I can't help but think my buying this promotes veal production...yeah i can tell you my consumption of dairy had dropped tremendously because of this fact... It really ticks me off that we still have this stuff in our food when other countries have BANNED it, and the big corporations complied, but not with our products...? that is just crappola. It also sux about all the pestacides and GMO's that are in our foods and no one even knows it. what kind of crap is that ? i shouldn't have to hunt down clean food.... our kids should be able to get clean healthy food in our schools... and they shouldn't be mislead like they are. Kids should have the best of the food, not junk. the school systems should all have to read this stuff. instead they offer high fat high sodium food contaminated with pesticides and GMO's and then say it is healthy and yell at your kid if they pack their lunch and don't eat theirs. Yikes talk about scary... then wonder why our nation is riduled with all these health problems, well do the math... garbage in... garbage out. I felt the book was written well and the author really seems genuine and like a really nice person, the kind you would love to have as a neighbor or a friend. Seriously... I am super picky about who I would want as a neighbor so that in itself is a huge compliment. The book is one of the best books i have read. Yeah it is a five star book no question, five stars easy, even if the chapter on the pigs & the pig farmer did make me cry like a little baby. It still gets five stars. I am on the wish list at the library for his newest book, and have already surfed his website. Very informative stuff. I do feel that reading this book has helped me make some smarter choices. I can not recomend this book enough, even if itis ten years old... it still has great points, great philosophy and a wonderfully positive vibe.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    John Robbins was heir to the Baskin Robbins chain but gave up the money and endless supply of ice cream to become a vegan advocate (and, it seems, something of a hippie). In this book, Robbins takes a critical look at the ways our diet effect our bodies, the lives of animals and the future of the planet. While the first portion of the book concentrates on the many health benefits of a plant-based diet, the rest of the book definitely helped me look at my food choices in a broader context and rea John Robbins was heir to the Baskin Robbins chain but gave up the money and endless supply of ice cream to become a vegan advocate (and, it seems, something of a hippie). In this book, Robbins takes a critical look at the ways our diet effect our bodies, the lives of animals and the future of the planet. While the first portion of the book concentrates on the many health benefits of a plant-based diet, the rest of the book definitely helped me look at my food choices in a broader context and realize that picking up locally-grown fruit or vegetable will have a much more positive impact on the world than picking up a cheesesteak. I was most surprised by his information on genetically engineered foods and the way they are embraced by the U.S. government despite the health risks. My favorite thing about the book is the "Is that so?" boxes. Robbins picks out statements from the meat industry and then juxtaposes them with statements from reputable sources to show the subtle deceptions and sometimes bald-faced lies the industry is telling us.

  17. 4 out of 5

    James

    I appreciate the points Robbins makes, and agree with him on most of the issues presented in this book (that animal consumption is cruel, bad for our health, and not environmentally sustainable). That being said, he comes across as really pompous and full of himself. He seems very self-congratulatory (a stereotype from which many vegetarians and vegans want to distance themselves), and many of the tales he recounts in the book (especially the one about the surly pig farmer who breaks down crying I appreciate the points Robbins makes, and agree with him on most of the issues presented in this book (that animal consumption is cruel, bad for our health, and not environmentally sustainable). That being said, he comes across as really pompous and full of himself. He seems very self-congratulatory (a stereotype from which many vegetarians and vegans want to distance themselves), and many of the tales he recounts in the book (especially the one about the surly pig farmer who breaks down crying) just come off as apocryphal. I would not recommend.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    Truly inspiring. I've read many books on this subject, so naturally there is often an overlap of information, but John Robbins has this unique way of expressing himself which is truly enchanting. There is a particular passage at the end of the book which has influenced me greatly - that every one person who makes that change for the better DOES matter. That our compassion makes a big difference in the world, more than we many ever know.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    In the conclusion, the author asks a long lists of questions about what will happen in the next 10-15 years. Now that 14 years has gone by, I am sure he is disappointed in the answers to most of them....

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aubrey

    There are a handful of non-fiction books that I feel should be read by all. This is one of them, right behind "The China Study."

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    A well written and referenced manifesto and follow up to Diet for a New America. I greatly appreciate the stark contrast between what industry and Cattleman Association state with no evidence and clear scientific references. I do see lots of references of for statements from non-scientific journals and, so, would be interested to see what scientific support we really have, rather than other referencing books by like-minded people. Supporting an argument with an opinion is not very strong; althou A well written and referenced manifesto and follow up to Diet for a New America. I greatly appreciate the stark contrast between what industry and Cattleman Association state with no evidence and clear scientific references. I do see lots of references of for statements from non-scientific journals and, so, would be interested to see what scientific support we really have, rather than other referencing books by like-minded people. Supporting an argument with an opinion is not very strong; although, I do appreciate seeing the medical opinions supporting the arguments. If that was coupled with a research reference that would add extra support to the arguments made here. Overall, though, a great book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    The Food Revolution is an incredibly important book. While I've read much of the content in other books, it is succinct and brings that information into an well-researched book. While I believe that the book is very much about adopting a vegetarian diet, it also shines a light on the dangers of Genetically Modified food, which veganism / vegetarianism will not solve alone. We must be intentional about the food that we eat. After reading this book, and being exposed to all the lies that the corpor The Food Revolution is an incredibly important book. While I've read much of the content in other books, it is succinct and brings that information into an well-researched book. While I believe that the book is very much about adopting a vegetarian diet, it also shines a light on the dangers of Genetically Modified food, which veganism / vegetarianism will not solve alone. We must be intentional about the food that we eat. After reading this book, and being exposed to all the lies that the corporations and government have told us, I'm charged with improving my diet. I think one of the most exciting things for me is knowing that changing my diet can have a huge impact in solving many environment and health-related issues.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christine Kenney

    I'm glad I read this book and would encourage others to do the same. Robbins provides the most comprehensive review of the myriad issues at stake that I have ever come across. That said, I try reserve 4+ star ratings for books I plan to read repeatedly. This book seems like it serves more as a starting point and empowers readers to dive deeper into other books and documentaries on the topics they found most disturbing periodically when life gets hectic and diet decisions get sloppy. Things that I'm glad I read this book and would encourage others to do the same. Robbins provides the most comprehensive review of the myriad issues at stake that I have ever come across. That said, I try reserve 4+ star ratings for books I plan to read repeatedly. This book seems like it serves more as a starting point and empowers readers to dive deeper into other books and documentaries on the topics they found most disturbing periodically when life gets hectic and diet decisions get sloppy. Things that make me disinclined to re-read this (besides the opportunity cost of forgoing my huge "want to read" backlog): *Robbins backs most of his assertions up with citations and quotes, which is refreshing. However the share of attribution that goes back to his original book, Diet for a New America: How Your Food Choices Affect Your Health, Happiness and the Future of Life on Earth got tiresome, particularly when I realized that Lappe had written about these same ideas 16 years before him in Diet for a Small Planet. In addition, the same questions of bias he raises about politicians and industry representatives' statements could be leveled at his quotes from EarthSave, an organization he founded, although his motives are possibly more altruistic. *While the health and humane reasons for avoiding animal products were compelling to me, there were a couple loose ends in the GMO and environment sections I wish he had taken a stab at refuting. --> Stewart Brand puts forward a pretty good apology for the problem solving potential of GMO (and nuclear power) in Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto. That said, it seems like there is consensus across both authors on the prudence of precaution and rigorous labeling of any transgenic experiments. --> Permaculture thought suggests that diversified land stewardship (including modest amounts of animal husbandry) can result in higher total yield per acre than gardening alone. Kitchen scrap waste can be converted into feed for a small chicken flock, fish controlling mosquito populations in ponds could occasionally be thinned, dairy goats can double as weed whackers, etc. That said, bucolic farm scenes are a far cry from factory monoculture which seems to be the norm. Plus the share of our diets comprised of animal products exceeds the "surplus yield" we might plausibly expect to get from diversified agriculture. *I wish there was more "meat" to the range of grassroots advocacy actions available. I put this book down thinking the most constructive ways to channel my newfound fears would be signing petitions or making contributions to non-profit concerns in animal welfare and environmental areas (of which there are many listed in the resources section) or, failing that, abscond to an EU nation with a more enlightened regulatory atmosphere. But these actions feel like they would just make me complacent, confident that the obligation to respond lays at the feet of my lawmakers and big business. Where I think the biggest impact happens is at the day to day decision level. What do I do with the beef in my fridge I no longer want to eat but realize took enough water to offset a year of daily showers? How do I navigate conversations with the people I break bread with about these issues without having one of us leave the table, alienated by our inability to compromise? How do I approach the tradeoffs of organic food from afar or supporting local foodsheds that are not as strictly organic? That said, reading this book has already sparked some constructive dinner conversations (about what an *organic vegan* poutine flash mob could look like), a deeper appreciation for my CSA, a renewed commitment to favor organic options whenever available, and a healthy distrust of any cutting board that poultry was prepared on. So I guess that's a win and could accrete to an even bigger win if the rest of Robbins' readerbase found this book similarly persuasive.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    At this point, I didn't learn too many things I didn't already know from this, but I'm still glad I read it. Robbins illustrates once again the effects our eating habits - in particular, consuming animal products - have on our health, the animals' welfare, our planet and world hunger. Hint: they aren't *good* effects. If there is one thing I wish it's that more of my friends were to read a book like that. Less than a year ago, I had only a vague idea that what I was doing wasn't exactly right an At this point, I didn't learn too many things I didn't already know from this, but I'm still glad I read it. Robbins illustrates once again the effects our eating habits - in particular, consuming animal products - have on our health, the animals' welfare, our planet and world hunger. Hint: they aren't *good* effects. If there is one thing I wish it's that more of my friends were to read a book like that. Less than a year ago, I had only a vague idea that what I was doing wasn't exactly right and good, and I did a great job not thinking about it. I don't want to preach to anybody about what they're eating, but I just - reading how badly most people's diets effects everything around us is just shocking sometimes. And even though my main concern are the animals, I also would love it if my friends were to live to be 150 years and not be sick, and of course I would also love it if mankind were to stop using nature as a means to make as much profit as possible. But to get back to the book - while I did like it, some of the structure took some getting used to. And while I understand what the author wanted to do by contrasting different opinions, sometimes that seemed a bit cheap (I think Jonathan Safran Foer did that better, although I am not sure why I feel that way.) And every time he used numbers to illustrate these opinions, it just seemed a bit.. unprofessional. I don't doubt the numbers, and I accept that there's a huge list of literature in the back, but it feels like he just picked the best numbers to illustrate his point. I think what I want to say is that it felt too subjective, even though I (rationally) know that a chart or other statistics can be just as manipulated. Either way, it didn't affect my judgment of the book as a whole too much. I admit that sometimes Robbins seems a bit too nice in his approach, but then again, his way is probably more convincing for people. Sometimes it was bordering on being a bit too "esoteric" for my taste, but it never got bad enough to bug me. And I did like the notion of compassion that comes up again and again. So overall, while I did have some nitpicks, this book does give a good overview what's problematic about the so-called standard Western diet.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Hanna

    It's been a while since i read this book but i still use it as a reference when writing papers or arguing for the environmental, health and ethical reasons for going vegetarian/vegan. It was definitly my springboard into exploring veganism. If you're one of those people who immediately turns a deaf ear to vegans and vegitarians because they "whine about the ethical treatment of animals" then READ THIS BOOK. There is plenty to be said for the ethical treatment of animals, plenty, and there is ple It's been a while since i read this book but i still use it as a reference when writing papers or arguing for the environmental, health and ethical reasons for going vegetarian/vegan. It was definitly my springboard into exploring veganism. If you're one of those people who immediately turns a deaf ear to vegans and vegitarians because they "whine about the ethical treatment of animals" then READ THIS BOOK. There is plenty to be said for the ethical treatment of animals, plenty, and there is plethora of material to read or see (Earthlings is a documentary that will scare the shit out of you). However, this book focuses on the health and environmental aspect of vegitarianism and on all the going-ons behind the scenes. Read this book and if you still don't see the point of vegitarianism or feel the need to drastically reduce your consumption of animal products then i will not argue with you, you have at least made an informed decision.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    To say that I "read" this book totally would be a lie. I read about half of it and skimmed the other half. Not because it isn't good, but because most of the stuff in it isn't really that big a surprise. If you are even semi-educated about food and where it comes from, most of his "revolutionary" information won't be that revolutionary to you. Of course this book is almost ten years old, so I think if I had read this back when it first came out, it might have been a different story. If you don't To say that I "read" this book totally would be a lie. I read about half of it and skimmed the other half. Not because it isn't good, but because most of the stuff in it isn't really that big a surprise. If you are even semi-educated about food and where it comes from, most of his "revolutionary" information won't be that revolutionary to you. Of course this book is almost ten years old, so I think if I had read this back when it first came out, it might have been a different story. If you don't know much about how food is grown, where your meat comes from, etc. (and the insane amount of chemicals and disgusting things we are exposed to when we eat)... then I'd go ahead and take a look at it. I'm not a vegetarian (and trust me I love me some bbq!) but thinking about the things in this book (and all the other things I've read) makes me come closer to being one every day!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amy Boyett

    This book, written by John Robbins - who was once the heir to the Baskin Robbins fortune - decided to turn down the family business in order to write the book Diet For A New America (which evolved into this book). He takes a very close look at the meat and dairy industries and is very brave to call it how he sees it. This book reads more like a text book, and less as an angry tell-all like his first book, but is still very informative and shocking at times. I became vegan for a short time after This book, written by John Robbins - who was once the heir to the Baskin Robbins fortune - decided to turn down the family business in order to write the book Diet For A New America (which evolved into this book). He takes a very close look at the meat and dairy industries and is very brave to call it how he sees it. This book reads more like a text book, and less as an angry tell-all like his first book, but is still very informative and shocking at times. I became vegan for a short time after reading the book (still can't give up cheese) but it's resonated with me ever since. I bought both of my parents a copy of this book after I read it - the type of book that you want to pass on to those you love and want to see live for a long time. If everyone read this book, the world might be a better place.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andreas Michaelides

    This book along with Diet for a new America, presents and analyses and shows why our health and the planets health is in this awful situation, it pin points exactly what’s wrong with everything that is wrong and its our meat eating habits. The solution is become a vegetarian, even better become a Vegan. Amazing book full of positive energy and information’s. A must have for everyone that wants to learn how to save his/her health and the planets and for those who already doing it, ways and argumen This book along with Diet for a new America, presents and analyses and shows why our health and the planets health is in this awful situation, it pin points exactly what’s wrong with everything that is wrong and its our meat eating habits. The solution is become a vegetarian, even better become a Vegan. Amazing book full of positive energy and information’s. A must have for everyone that wants to learn how to save his/her health and the planets and for those who already doing it, ways and arguments to have with you when you argue with non-vegetarian people. I can't say that this book changed my life because I was a plant based eater when I read but it satisfy two needs I had, first to verify that my new diet choices are right and to arm myself with enough information and date to use in any future confrontations or arguments I would had with other omnivores.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tony Jr.

    An Inspiring, science-backed, though-provoking and sometimes depressing look at the problem with our food industry, where were headed and what we can do about it. The author does an excellent job of providing a mixture of science, statistics, stories and case studies to teach and backup his points. He covers GMOs, the propaganda of the meat and dairy industry, why being an informed consumer is so important, the effects of diet on our health, the effects of our diet on the planet and much more. I An Inspiring, science-backed, though-provoking and sometimes depressing look at the problem with our food industry, where were headed and what we can do about it. The author does an excellent job of providing a mixture of science, statistics, stories and case studies to teach and backup his points. He covers GMOs, the propaganda of the meat and dairy industry, why being an informed consumer is so important, the effects of diet on our health, the effects of our diet on the planet and much more. It's really amazing how big of an impact our collective diet has on our bodies, our ecosystem and our planet. Books like this are helping people understand whats at stake and what we can do about it. Tony Rogers Jr Author Visionary: Making a difference in a world that needs YOU

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Didn't read it all, just skimmed it. A book about why you should be a vegan/vegetarian with commentary on the plight of the US with regards to obesity. Some good points that must be weeded through. Truth tinged by his vegan only views... that's fine but I'm not planning to be a vegan.

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