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The third book in the Charles Lenox series finds the gentleman detective trying to balance a heated race for Parliament with the investigation of the mysterious simultaneous deaths of two veteran reporters. It’s Christmas, 1866, and amateur sleuth Charles Lenox, recently engaged to his best friend, Lady Jane Grey, is happily celebrating the holiday in his Mayfair townhouse The third book in the Charles Lenox series finds the gentleman detective trying to balance a heated race for Parliament with the investigation of the mysterious simultaneous deaths of two veteran reporters. It’s Christmas, 1866, and amateur sleuth Charles Lenox, recently engaged to his best friend, Lady Jane Grey, is happily celebrating the holiday in his Mayfair townhouse. Across London, however, two journalists have just met with violent deaths--one shot, one throttled. Lenox soon involves himself in the strange case, which proves only more complicated as he digs deeper. However, he must leave it behind to go north to Stirrington, where he is fulfilling a lifelong dream: running for a Parliamentary seat. Once there, he gets a further shock when Lady Jane sends him a letter whose contents might threaten their nuptials. In London, the police apprehend two unlikely and unrelated murder suspects. From the start, Lenox has his doubts; the crimes, he is sure, are tied, but how? Racing back and forth between London and Stirrington, Lenox must negotiate the complexities of crime and politics, not to mention his imperiled engagement. As the case mounts, Lenox learns that the person behind the murders might be closer to him--and his beloved--than he knows.


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The third book in the Charles Lenox series finds the gentleman detective trying to balance a heated race for Parliament with the investigation of the mysterious simultaneous deaths of two veteran reporters. It’s Christmas, 1866, and amateur sleuth Charles Lenox, recently engaged to his best friend, Lady Jane Grey, is happily celebrating the holiday in his Mayfair townhouse The third book in the Charles Lenox series finds the gentleman detective trying to balance a heated race for Parliament with the investigation of the mysterious simultaneous deaths of two veteran reporters. It’s Christmas, 1866, and amateur sleuth Charles Lenox, recently engaged to his best friend, Lady Jane Grey, is happily celebrating the holiday in his Mayfair townhouse. Across London, however, two journalists have just met with violent deaths--one shot, one throttled. Lenox soon involves himself in the strange case, which proves only more complicated as he digs deeper. However, he must leave it behind to go north to Stirrington, where he is fulfilling a lifelong dream: running for a Parliamentary seat. Once there, he gets a further shock when Lady Jane sends him a letter whose contents might threaten their nuptials. In London, the police apprehend two unlikely and unrelated murder suspects. From the start, Lenox has his doubts; the crimes, he is sure, are tied, but how? Racing back and forth between London and Stirrington, Lenox must negotiate the complexities of crime and politics, not to mention his imperiled engagement. As the case mounts, Lenox learns that the person behind the murders might be closer to him--and his beloved--than he knows.

30 review for The Fleet Street Murders

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brackman1066

    It's refreshing to find a series with a detective who is quiet, intelligent, and decent. Don't get me wrong; some of the detectives who are alcoholic, anti-social, shell-shocked, miserably partnered, devastatingly widowed, etc. are well-drawn and engaging. However, as Jasper Fforde so mercilessly showed up in *The Big Over-Easy*, characterization by quirk has been overdone, and Lenox is a good antidote. In fact, Lenox is almost a challenge to the axiom that the detective has to be some kind of o It's refreshing to find a series with a detective who is quiet, intelligent, and decent. Don't get me wrong; some of the detectives who are alcoholic, anti-social, shell-shocked, miserably partnered, devastatingly widowed, etc. are well-drawn and engaging. However, as Jasper Fforde so mercilessly showed up in *The Big Over-Easy*, characterization by quirk has been overdone, and Lenox is a good antidote. In fact, Lenox is almost a challenge to the axiom that the detective has to be some kind of outsider. His reserved demeanor itself fits him into his Victorian society, and engages the reader, in part because of Finch's prose. Admittedly, the sidekick in this series has some of the "usual" qualities listed above, and I hope Finch doesn't go overboard with that. Add to Lenox a well-written cast of supporting characters (most of whom are at their best in book 2, although still strong in book 3), and one has a series that I'm going to stay devoted to.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    I listened to the ending of the story twice to make it last a little longer. Lady Jane, Charles, Edward, Robert, Toto and Graham all feel like an extended part of my family now. I can't wait to meet them again. I am grateful to the folks at the Dundee, Illinois Public Library for the InterLibrary loan of this book on CD so that I could listen to it. I will try to think about the wonderful ending and surprise that was revealed while I wait patiently for the next story to reach my library. (view spo I listened to the ending of the story twice to make it last a little longer. Lady Jane, Charles, Edward, Robert, Toto and Graham all feel like an extended part of my family now. I can't wait to meet them again. I am grateful to the folks at the Dundee, Illinois Public Library for the InterLibrary loan of this book on CD so that I could listen to it. I will try to think about the wonderful ending and surprise that was revealed while I wait patiently for the next story to reach my library. (view spoiler)[I am looking forward to the wedding, that I thought was going to happen in this book. (hide spoiler)] My favorite part of the story was Edward being there for Charles after the election in the country. James Langdon, your voice transports me. Thank you and Tantor Audio making it possible. Charles Finch, thank you most of all for your wonderful stories.

  3. 4 out of 5

    HBalikov

    The time is the Mid-1860s; the place is England (both London and the “North”); the private investigator is Charles Knox, a member of the upper class, rich enough to indulge this “hobby.” The murders take place almost immediately. Knox is again involved mostly from his curiosity and his “connections” with the very “young” Scotland Yard. (I find it a bit puzzling that it takes until almost three-quarters of the book is written before Finch gives his readers some background on what is “Fleet Street” The time is the Mid-1860s; the place is England (both London and the “North”); the private investigator is Charles Knox, a member of the upper class, rich enough to indulge this “hobby.” The murders take place almost immediately. Knox is again involved mostly from his curiosity and his “connections” with the very “young” Scotland Yard. (I find it a bit puzzling that it takes until almost three-quarters of the book is written before Finch gives his readers some background on what is “Fleet Street” and how it became the ground zero for much of London’s newspapers.) Finch’s mysteries are not filled with suspense, non-stop action or brutality. They are more on the cozy side. This volume is no exception. We meander through Knox’s now intimate relationship with Lady jane Grey; take some time over a domestic crisis between two of their friends; come almost full-stop while Knox runs for Parliament in a northern England district; and get full descriptions of Knox’s house and its domestics, as well as, those at the abode of Lady Jane. Those who indulge regularly in the British mystery genre of bygone years may find Charles Knox bears resemblance to other notable detectives. I will mention only one. Like Dorothy Sayers Lord Peter Whimsey, Knox has his Graham (to Whimsey’s Bunter) and they are both reliable and utterly devoted. My only problem is with Finch’s description of Graham as Knox’s friend. Any friendship should be on a level plane and if you must always be calling the other person some variant of “sir” (whether or not in other’s company) and waiting on his every need, can it really be a friendship? With regard to the class-conscious society that characterized Britain at that time, there is more to note. Finch gives us plenty of description, bordering at times on satire, of the following: Rich vs. Middle-class vs. Poor The Nobility and their circle The Old Money vs. those with aspirations City “mice” vs. Country mice Landed gentry vs. the industrial/business class Manners and societal norms All of this helps to round out a story and make it more interesting. The mystery hangs over the narrative but the reader is not allowed enough information to do more than guess at the solution(s). Knox is a pleasant-enough character whose approach to investigation is advanced with “gut intuition” as much as deduction. His love, Lady Jane, is worthy of his attention but her substantial intellect (so far) isn’t allowed to focus on Knox’s cases. Too bad, but perhaps this will change when they are married. Hoping for improvement, but not impatient to start another in this series.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    This third in the series had a few twists and surprises in store. I'm enjoying these books more and more as I go along. Good historical mysteries!

  5. 4 out of 5

    LJ

    First Sentence: It was late in the evening, and a thin winter rain beat down over London’s low buildings and high steeples, collecting in sallow pools beneath the streetlights and insinuating its way inside the clothes of the miserable few whom fate had kept outside. Amateur sleuth Charles Lenox is recently engaged to his best friend and neighbor, Lady Jane Grey, and is running for parliament in the small town of Stirrington, north of London. However, two important Fleet Street journalists are mu First Sentence: It was late in the evening, and a thin winter rain beat down over London’s low buildings and high steeples, collecting in sallow pools beneath the streetlights and insinuating its way inside the clothes of the miserable few whom fate had kept outside. Amateur sleuth Charles Lenox is recently engaged to his best friend and neighbor, Lady Jane Grey, and is running for parliament in the small town of Stirrington, north of London. However, two important Fleet Street journalists are murdered on the same night at nearly the same time but one mile apart. Lenox becomes involved in the investigation but must do so remotely while he works on his election. Finch brings Victorian England to life taking us from the residences of London society, to a small working town, to Newgate Prison making each real. The characters are diverse and real as the settings. I like that Charles and Lady Jane are not young, with Charles being not quite fifty. Graham is Charles friend and butler, their friends who suffer a miscarriage, the young son of a noble house who Lenox is trying to save from a life of dissipation by teaching him investigation and many others. I love British historical mysteries and authors who seamlessly incorporate people, events and places into their books, such as Dickens drinking at the Fleet Street Pub, Ye Old Cheshire Cheese; a pub still in operation today. Even Finch’s narration conveys the decorum of the time, “…their conversation devolved into all the endearments and stolen kisses and long laughs that belong to any new love—and that scarcely need to be repeated here.” Following Lenox through his campaign was fascinating and very much, I’m certain, still the way of campaigns today, perhaps even down to buying votes although one hopes not. Balanced against that is the unfolding of the investigation, much of which he has to conduct remotely and with the help of others. The various story lines are very well constructed, seamlessly blended and each as interesting as the other. The story builds to a very exciting chase and an unexpected twist. My fondest wish is for many more Charles Lenox books to come. THE FLEET STREET MURDERS (Hist Mys-Charles Lenox-England-Victorian/1866) – VG+ Finch, Charles – 3rd in series Minotaur Books, 2009, US Hardcover – ISBN: 9780312565510

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kate Baxter

    This third book in Charles Finch's "Charles Lenox Mystery" series continues a brilliant story of an aristocratic, bright and intelligent self-made detective. The writing is excellent and imagery - atmospheric. The setting is 1866 London. Our 40ish detectective is betrothed to his childhood friend and must leave her as he campaigns in Stirrington for a Parliamentary seat. She has developed cold feet and he's now gone. Meanwhile, two journalists are murdered, virtually simultaneously. One is deeme This third book in Charles Finch's "Charles Lenox Mystery" series continues a brilliant story of an aristocratic, bright and intelligent self-made detective. The writing is excellent and imagery - atmospheric. The setting is 1866 London. Our 40ish detectective is betrothed to his childhood friend and must leave her as he campaigns in Stirrington for a Parliamentary seat. She has developed cold feet and he's now gone. Meanwhile, two journalists are murdered, virtually simultaneously. One is deemed virtuous and the other, "a corrupt and corruptible soul". Will Scotland Yard carry out its due diligence and find the perpetrators of these crimes or will Charles again step into the breach to resolve the matter at hand. Mr. Finch has written a most clever story, drawing on English history and laying out the breadcrumbs for the mystery loving reader. The references to a prior book of the series were a delicious reminder of much which came before. I eagerly look forward to reading the subsequent books of this brilliant series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Charles Lenox tries to solve the murder of two journalists as he campaigns for a Parliamentary seat in the town of Stirrington. The political part of the story was a little less interesting to me, but the murder mystery made up for it. As is usual for this series, great characters and a feeling of being totally immersed in Victorian London society. An enjoyable read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    I would go to the bookstore very often and every time I would pause at this book until finally I picked it up and bought it. I wish I would have known that was the third in the series but glad I could read it out of order. I really enjoyed this book. It is very similar to a Sherlock Holmes book except with a more personable character as the detective. There is a character similar to Watson, Moriarty, Mycroft, and even Lestrad. It had enough differences though that it didn't feel like a total She I would go to the bookstore very often and every time I would pause at this book until finally I picked it up and bought it. I wish I would have known that was the third in the series but glad I could read it out of order. I really enjoyed this book. It is very similar to a Sherlock Holmes book except with a more personable character as the detective. There is a character similar to Watson, Moriarty, Mycroft, and even Lestrad. It had enough differences though that it didn't feel like a total Sherlock Holmes knock off. But maybe it is but I love Sherlock Holmes so any book that has a similar feel to it I will love. When I read a lot of the reviews for this book some people felt that there was too much of the political aspect and some felt that there was not enough or not enough of the crime. I felt like the book had a very good balance between the crimes in Fleet Street and Lenox running for a seat in Parliament. Even though I really wanted more of the crime aspect I still enjoyed the political aspect at the book that I didn't miss it too much. I really liked the main character Charles Lenox and his relationships with all his friends. I especially enjoyed how his butler was one of his best friends and liked the conversation that went between them. The case itself was interesting and I found the conclusion intelligently pleasing. All in all it was a classic murder mystery story similar to a classic Sherlock Holmes story. I would say that anyone who loves Sherlock Holmes like I do will really enjoy this book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    Charles Lenox runs for a House of Commons seat and investigates suspicious deaths of men in finance. Lenox and Lady Jane Gray make plans for their wedding. While I'm certain the author will use the Parliamentary seat in future novels, it seemed more a distraction in this one. I'm not certain how I feel about a private investigator holding that title and continuing to practice private investigation. James Langton always does a good job narrating books.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dorie

    The third book in this series was wonderful from start to finish. Charles Lenox is at his best in this book, besotted with his fiance Lady Jane Grey, campaigning for a seat in Parliament while simultaneously trying to solve the double homicide of two journalists. Some of the story takes place in Stirrington (a smallish town north of London) where Charles is trying to win over the people to gain their vote and represent them in Parliament. Unfortunately for him he is going up against a local busi The third book in this series was wonderful from start to finish. Charles Lenox is at his best in this book, besotted with his fiance Lady Jane Grey, campaigning for a seat in Parliament while simultaneously trying to solve the double homicide of two journalists. Some of the story takes place in Stirrington (a smallish town north of London) where Charles is trying to win over the people to gain their vote and represent them in Parliament. Unfortunately for him he is going up against a local businessman, and much is made of his "outsider" status by the opposite party. It's going to take a lot to win over the populace, but if anyone can accomplish this it would be Charles Lenox! I enjoyed reading about his campaigning and his debates with the opposing candidate. Charles has a great deal of wit and charm, which makes any book featuring him a joy to read. The murder mystery was clear and interesting, complex without being too complicated, and I was unable to guess the ending although it made sense in the end. The twist at the end of the book I saw coming, but to be honest I would have been unhappy if it had not occurred. Very recommended for anyone who likes Victorian mysteries.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Spuddie

    Another interesting story in this historical series in which the main character, Charles Lenox, is running for a seat in Parliament and due to the death of the man who would have retired leaving the vacant seat, he must go north to Stirrington and do a very intense two-week campaign. All this while two murders of prominent newspaper reporters baffle London and Scotland Yard, with Lenox itching to get his nose in and discover the truth. Enjoyable story, interesting characters and easy-reading styl Another interesting story in this historical series in which the main character, Charles Lenox, is running for a seat in Parliament and due to the death of the man who would have retired leaving the vacant seat, he must go north to Stirrington and do a very intense two-week campaign. All this while two murders of prominent newspaper reporters baffle London and Scotland Yard, with Lenox itching to get his nose in and discover the truth. Enjoyable story, interesting characters and easy-reading style and very much looking forward to the next one.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    The Charles Lenox mysteries are truly wonderful. They are smart but with elegance and lightness of touch. There are characters you like and really care about. Poor Charles Lenox is in love, but at least he's engaged to his darling, Lady Jane. In the meantime, he is running for Parliament when a murder pokes its head up demanding to be paid attention to. All the clues are there, there is a lot of to-ing and fro-ing, as well as little window into how a 19th century political campaign was run. (Not The Charles Lenox mysteries are truly wonderful. They are smart but with elegance and lightness of touch. There are characters you like and really care about. Poor Charles Lenox is in love, but at least he's engaged to his darling, Lady Jane. In the meantime, he is running for Parliament when a murder pokes its head up demanding to be paid attention to. All the clues are there, there is a lot of to-ing and fro-ing, as well as little window into how a 19th century political campaign was run. (Not very honestly, as it turns out.)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laurel Hicks

    Finch's mild-mannered Victorian mysteries are a refreshing addition to our century.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    This one didn't do anything for me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Michelle

    This book begins with two very brutal murders that takes you completely by surprise and immediately sucks you into the story and there is barely time to breathe throughout the whole book. Intrigue, secrets, sadness, cheating, scandals, beer [!!] and a romp down a river in the middle of the night all make this book close to unputdownable and I loved every second of it. This is such a great series and I highly recommend it to anyone who loves a good mystery mixed with some well researched historic This book begins with two very brutal murders that takes you completely by surprise and immediately sucks you into the story and there is barely time to breathe throughout the whole book. Intrigue, secrets, sadness, cheating, scandals, beer [!!] and a romp down a river in the middle of the night all make this book close to unputdownable and I loved every second of it. This is such a great series and I highly recommend it to anyone who loves a good mystery mixed with some well researched historical fiction.

  16. 5 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    Once again Charles is called on to look into not only one but two murders. However this slams up against his desire to stand for Parliament. As Charles divides his time between campaigning and worrying about his friend the doctor and his wife Toto, about Lady Jane and teasing out the truth of the murders surprises are in store for all. Another great read!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Matt Schiariti

    Fleet Street picks up shortly after The September Society. While Lennox and Lady Jane are planning their wedding two things happen nearly concurrently. The first, which is what the book is titled, is a pair of near simultaneous murders on Fleet Street. Two journalists are murdered in their own homes. The two murders set the city alight and, as always amateur sleuth Charles Lennox itches to get at the cases. However the death of the man sitting in a Parliament seat up north makes Lennox's involve Fleet Street picks up shortly after The September Society. While Lennox and Lady Jane are planning their wedding two things happen nearly concurrently. The first, which is what the book is titled, is a pair of near simultaneous murders on Fleet Street. Two journalists are murdered in their own homes. The two murders set the city alight and, as always amateur sleuth Charles Lennox itches to get at the cases. However the death of the man sitting in a Parliament seat up north makes Lennox's involvement in this case next to impossible. The Liberal party, whom you'll remember wanted Lennox to run in the near future, wants him to go to the town up north NOW to start his campaign. Lennox finds himself torn between his need to do good by way of his hobby/passion of detective work and his life long dream of doing the greater good as a member of the British Parliament. Each of those two situations makes the other more complicated. As the case deepens while he's campaigning up north telegram after telegram from London find him during his long days. Jenkins asks for help from Scotland Yard for fear that Exeter, the lead on the murders, will do his usual unimaginative job and Dallington, Lennox's new protege happens to know one of the prime suspects in the murders and begs his help. This along with some more personal issues between he and Jane as well as some new developments in the lives of their close friends, Toto and Thomas McConnell makes for a very harried and worrisome Charles Lennox! Some may have a problem with the Parliament campaign portion of the book. In a way it may seem to take away from the main mystery plot of the novel, but I thought Finch handled this well. Not only is it part of a bigger portion of Lennox's life, one not involving his passion for detective work, but it's filled with very well written and interesting townsfolk. It was also interesting to see how Finch used it to flesh out Charles Lennox even more by showing how he truly cares for his country and fellow person regardless of how society would caste them. The mystery portion of the book is also clever and well plotted. Lennox just CANNOT let the mystery go, no matter how busy his Parliament run keeps him. Other than being journalists how are the two crimes related if at all? Were they random? Is Dallington's friend innocent or guilty? The murders deepen in mystery as Lennox reasons them out and what he finds will shock even him. Is this a trilogy or will there be more? As a trilogy it stands well on its own, but I do hope to see these characters come back for some more adventures. I'd surely like to see what other trouble Lennox can get himself into!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bev

    The Fleet Street Murders is the third novel in Charles Finch's series of Victorian-era mysteries starring gentleman detective Charles Lenox. The story begins on Christmas in 1866. It's a pleasant day for Lenox who is still basking in the glow of having recently become engaged to his long-time friend and love of his life, Lady Jane Grey. But the day is not a pleasant one for two journalists across town. Within minutes of each other, Winston Carruthers and Simon Pierce are stabbed and shot (respec The Fleet Street Murders is the third novel in Charles Finch's series of Victorian-era mysteries starring gentleman detective Charles Lenox. The story begins on Christmas in 1866. It's a pleasant day for Lenox who is still basking in the glow of having recently become engaged to his long-time friend and love of his life, Lady Jane Grey. But the day is not a pleasant one for two journalists across town. Within minutes of each other, Winston Carruthers and Simon Pierce are stabbed and shot (respectively). The police quickly track down suspects, but Lenox and his assistant Dallington believe there must be more to the story than what the police have found so far. Soon, one of the suspects is dead by hanging--meant to appear a suicide, but proved to be murder--and then the investigating officer is killed as well. Lenox becomes convinced that someone is directing the action from behind the scenes--someone with a bigger motive than just removing two bothersome journalists. The investigation is made difficult for Lenox by several "distractions" in his life. Worries about his betrothal, Lady Jane repeatedly assures him that she does want to marry him--but needs time. Time for what? Worries about his friend Thomas and his wife Toto who have recently lost their unborn child. And worries about his run for Parliament in the northern town of Stirrington. He's got a lot on his mind--and feels guilty taking time for any of his obligations in lieu of any of the others. And the distractions tell a bit. This story doesn't seem to run quite as smoothly as the first two and it's definitely not as good as the second novel in the series. Finch does have a very firm grasp of characterization and he gives every character from Lenox down to the pub owner in Stirrington their due. You definitely feel like these folks are real people. It makes it a lot easier to overlook the flaws in the mystery plot. Not obvious holes--just the lack of smoothness (with all the rushing about from London to Stirrington and around Stirrington and then back to London) and the slightly disjointed method of story-telling. But an interesting mystery and a good, solid three star outing. This review was first posted on my blog My Reader's Block. Please request permission before reposting. Thanks.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    The third book in the Charles Lenox series takes place at Christmas , 1866 in London and finds the gentleman detective in an heated race for a Parliament seat. In Britain, the person vying for the seat doesn't have to be from a district to represent the area. He is also trying to solve the murders of two journalists who have met with violent means of death. One shot and one throttled. Lenox needs to leave for Stirrington when he is opposing a native of the city. He has a local man trying to help The third book in the Charles Lenox series takes place at Christmas , 1866 in London and finds the gentleman detective in an heated race for a Parliament seat. In Britain, the person vying for the seat doesn't have to be from a district to represent the area. He is also trying to solve the murders of two journalists who have met with violent means of death. One shot and one throttled. Lenox needs to leave for Stirrington when he is opposing a native of the city. He has a local man trying to help him, but the strongest help comes from his butler who has traveled with him. He has recently become engaged to Lady Jane Grey, a lifelong friend he has realized he loves. He receives a letter from her saying she would like to postpone the marriage until the following year which greatly disturbs him. Yet, he cannot leave Stirrington as he must vie for the seat in Parliament. In London, the police apprehend two murder suspects , but Lenox has doubts about the culpability of the two men. Racing back and forth between London and Stirrington, he must navigate the complexes of crime, politics, and his relationship with Jane. As he learns more about the murders, he realizes et;he person behind the murders is closer to him and Jane then he could have imagined.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Al

    A mystery set in 1866 England. Guess what? The detective, Charles Lenox, reminds us of a more sympathetic Sherlock Holmes, complete with the functional equivalents of Watson, Holmes's brother Mycroft, Inspector Lestrade, Professor Moriarty, and Holmes's quirky living quarters . Unfortunately, Lenox makes his case-solving breakthroughs not on exquisite logic and deductions like Holmes, but on brilliant intuitive flashes, almost godlike in their conception--much less believable. Also, to me at le A mystery set in 1866 England. Guess what? The detective, Charles Lenox, reminds us of a more sympathetic Sherlock Holmes, complete with the functional equivalents of Watson, Holmes's brother Mycroft, Inspector Lestrade, Professor Moriarty, and Holmes's quirky living quarters . Unfortunately, Lenox makes his case-solving breakthroughs not on exquisite logic and deductions like Holmes, but on brilliant intuitive flashes, almost godlike in their conception--much less believable. Also, to me at least, the final explanation and windup of the mystery was very ragged and unconvincing. A large part of the book is devoted not to the crimes in question, but to Lenox's pursuit of a parliamentary seat up for a by-election in a small district in Northern England. Actually, I found this part interesting, having just finished Phineas Finn. A different look at the same sort of situation, and lots of detail about the campaigning and electoral process. Anyway, Lenox's absence from London, campaigning, means that much of the crime-solving plot is developed by telegrams and letters between Lenox and his London colleagues, rather than on-site sleuthing; rather distracting.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gigi

    Take the detective out of London and what happens? Murder and mayhem still abound, but a new cache of characters enter the story - and what characters ! They move the story along nicely, further develop Graham's character (who is fast becoming my favorite literary sidekick), push Lenox into situations out of his control and comfort zone and add to the enjoyment of the reader. Well done.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    This series gets even better and the plotline progresses beautifully with each new story. In "The Fleet Street Murders," the third book in the series, Charles Lenox is a very busy gentleman. He is newly engaged to his lifelong friend, the wonderful lady Jane Grey, he is also running for a seat in Parliament to represent the town of Stirrlington, and he is investigating the murders of two prominent Fleet Street journalist, who will killed on the same day just five minutes apart. Lenox has been abr This series gets even better and the plotline progresses beautifully with each new story. In "The Fleet Street Murders," the third book in the series, Charles Lenox is a very busy gentleman. He is newly engaged to his lifelong friend, the wonderful lady Jane Grey, he is also running for a seat in Parliament to represent the town of Stirrlington, and he is investigating the murders of two prominent Fleet Street journalist, who will killed on the same day just five minutes apart. Lenox has been abruptly recruited to run for Parliament when the elderly Stokes suddenly dies which only give Lenox about two weeks to run his campaign. Thankfully, Lenox has his trusted butler, friend, and confidant Graham helping to promote Lenox to the skeptical townspeople. I love Graham, he has a gentle, persistent way of getting to know people and earning their trust. I hope that Graham is around for the duration of the series and eventually finds a woman of quality to appreciate and love this warm, intelligent, decent man. Another charming character is lord John Dallington, reforming rake and apprentice to Lenox. While Lenox is campaigning in Stirrington, Dr. McConnell arrives drunk and distraught following a recent loss he and his wife Toto has suffered, a friend of Dallington's has been arrested for the murder of one of the murdered journalist, and Lenox receives a letter from Jane asking to postpone their wedding for a year. Charles is torn between his duties as a candidate and his responsibilities back in London. He makes a quick 24-hour trip back to London to look into the murders, update Jenkins at Scotland Yard, recruit the assistance from Dallington, and meet with Jane to learn the source behind her doubts about their nuptials. The campaigning for Parliament and investigating the two Fleet Street murders keeps Lenox and the readers on their toes the entire story. I am trying to take my time reading this series because I want to savor my time with these interesting and relatable characters and being transported back into Victorian era London. Author Charles Finch has created an excellent character in Charles Lenox as well as the fascinating secondary characters who give this series depth and heart. I am completely hooked on this series. Besides the excellent Acton and Doyle series, the Charles Lenox Mysteries is one of the finest mystery series I have read in years.

  23. 5 out of 5

    JD Sutter

    3.5 stars This 3rd Lenox mystery is my least favorite of the series thus far. It's still got all the same charming characters, the wonderful writing style, and a great mystery, but there seemed to be much more cursing including several instances of taking Christ's name in vain. There were also a few disappointing lapses in judgment on the protagonist's part which I believe calls his integrity into question. This just left a bad taste in my mouth. While I don't expect all characters to be perfect, 3.5 stars This 3rd Lenox mystery is my least favorite of the series thus far. It's still got all the same charming characters, the wonderful writing style, and a great mystery, but there seemed to be much more cursing including several instances of taking Christ's name in vain. There were also a few disappointing lapses in judgment on the protagonist's part which I believe calls his integrity into question. This just left a bad taste in my mouth. While I don't expect all characters to be perfect, I also don't think it sends a good message when they do some underhanded things and everyone is fine with it and they not only have no consequences, but actually are rewarded because of it. Aside from these elements, I really enjoyed the story and will continue on with the series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jen St

    All of these books are great, and the characters are so likeable. PBS and BBC, where are you? This would be your next big hit!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Susan Ferguson

    Charles Lenox has been asked to run for a seat in parliament. The incumbent has died unexpectedly which gives him about 2 weeks to meet the people in the constituency and win their support. A member takes him down to meet the people. A publican named Crook is handling his campaign there. Mr. Crook's inn is a rather respectable place and his help are quite good. Charles takes Graham down with him because Graham has a way of getting to know people and they like him. But there have a been a couple Charles Lenox has been asked to run for a seat in parliament. The incumbent has died unexpectedly which gives him about 2 weeks to meet the people in the constituency and win their support. A member takes him down to meet the people. A publican named Crook is handling his campaign there. Mr. Crook's inn is a rather respectable place and his help are quite good. Charles takes Graham down with him because Graham has a way of getting to know people and they like him. But there have a been a couple of murders involving Fleet Street, which is the newspaper district. Two of the top reporters (for different papers) have been killed. Charles is not pleased to be leaving London at this time because he is sure the Inspector is going to make a muddle of the case. In fact, he makes one quick dash back to London for a day to look into some things regarding the case. He hires an old assistant to help him out, as well as his current "apprentice" (a younger son of an old family looking for something to do). He campaigns very hard in the area - his opponent has lived there all his life and owns a brewery. But, he moved his brewery away from the area and many people lost their jobs and livelihood, so are happy to have someone else to represent them. It's really all a lot more complicated than that. A close friend and his wife have just had a miscarriage and there are many problems over that - Lady Jane, Charles' fiancee, is suffering some doubts through this incident, also. There are a lot of side issues. Charles Lenox is a younger son, his older brother Edmund is in the House of Lords. Charles also deals with people not taking his profession of inquiry agent seriously or with great distaste. The novels are set in the era of horse and buggy and Scotland Yard is just being established and gaining its reputation. A wonderful look at the manners and mores of the period. Charles himself is an extremely likeable fellow and Lady Jane is a love person. The characters are well fleshed out - except perhaps for the brewer who is Charles' opponent - but he is not supposed to be a likeable fellow and Charles only has one or two face to face encounters with Almost everything learned about him is an opinion expressed by others. I do enjoy this series. This is the 3rd book in the series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lark of The Bookwyrm's Hoard

    Protagonist Charles Lennox is torn between campaigning for Parliament and investigating two murders in The Fleet Street Murders, the third book in the series. the crimes appear linked, yet were clearly committed by two different killers at virtually the same time. Dallington, Charles’ assistant, is convinced that a friend accused of the crimes is innocent; Charles, more worldly-wise, isn’t so sure. But before he can do more than dip his toes and the case he’s off to Stirrington to campaign. Finch Protagonist Charles Lennox is torn between campaigning for Parliament and investigating two murders in The Fleet Street Murders, the third book in the series. the crimes appear linked, yet were clearly committed by two different killers at virtually the same time. Dallington, Charles’ assistant, is convinced that a friend accused of the crimes is innocent; Charles, more worldly-wise, isn’t so sure. But before he can do more than dip his toes and the case he’s off to Stirrington to campaign. Finch’s research is always meticulous, and this book gives a clear-eyed look at the 19th-century British political process, where candidates could run in and represent a district to which they had no ties whatsoever, votes could be bought for a beer or a few shillings, and rural workers rarely had the time or necessary transportation to vote. It was a world where women’s only power was their influence over their husbands’ votes, and where the process – and the candidates – were often corrupt. Yet good men like Charles Lenox did run, motivated by the desire to serve their country and perhaps their constituents. And the campaign rhetoric sounds surprisingly familiar to anyone who follows US or British politics today. The campaign takes up perhaps a third of the book, the mystery much of what is left, but there is still room for character development as well as developments in the relationships of Charles and his fiancée Jane and their friends, Thomas and Toto McConnell. the mystery itself is satisfyingly complex and leads in unexpected directions offering several twists I didn’t see coming. With its stronger emphasis on character development, I think this installment is even stronger than books 1 and 2 – and that’s saying something, because both of them were excellent. I’m thoroughly hooked on this series. I can’t wait to read the next three as well as number nine, Home by Nightfall, which is coming out this November. At that point, I’ll finally be caught up! Challenges: COYER Scavenger Hunt #54 – a book with just an article of clothing on the cover (glasses) Review originally published at The Bookwyrm's Hoard.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emma Rose Ribbons

    The end of Charles Finch's books is always so, so beautiful and beautifully written. I love detective novels but if I could ask for one thing of the author, it would be to have him write a general fiction book with the same characters. I love them that much. I read something in which he admitted that his favourite part of the books was always the end once the plot was wrapped up and he could concentrate on just the characters and their day-to-day life - 'It's my favorite part of writing the Leno The end of Charles Finch's books is always so, so beautiful and beautifully written. I love detective novels but if I could ask for one thing of the author, it would be to have him write a general fiction book with the same characters. I love them that much. I read something in which he admitted that his favourite part of the books was always the end once the plot was wrapped up and he could concentrate on just the characters and their day-to-day life - 'It's my favorite part of writing the Lenox books, because the really hard work is done and I can just enjoy living in the world - especially because I know that I'm about to leave it, at least for a while.' I think it really translates well on the page, it's always melancholy and lovely and this book was no exception. I can't even tell you where it takes place for it's a spoiler. It's lucky the last few pages are always so hopeful for the plot of this one was particularly gloomy I thought, especially since Lenox spends the majority of his time away from the supporting characters that bring a lot of the light of the book. Plus there are a couple of relationships which are tried, something that, combined to a series of murders, makes for sad reading. The writing is impeccable though and Lennox's new activities (I can't say anymore than that) shed a new light on his personality and breathe some fresh air into the pages. I love the author's attention to detail (oh, the food - more authors should write about what their characters eat and drink, I'm adamant it's one of the liveliest, warmest and most cheerful types of descriptions you can find so why not make liberal use of it?) and period detail, down to the remarkably intricate depictions of London. I enjoyed this book immensely and will happily reread the whole series in the future. While I don't think anything can beat The September Society (the previous volume), I'm more than happy to stay put in my seat and enjoy the rest of the ride.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    This is the third book in a series by Charles Finch featuring his Victorian Age detective, Charles Lennox. Charles Lennox is a middle-aged bachelor who enjoys his comforts, has a penchant for ancient Rome, books, rowing on the Thames, walking about his part of London, visiting with his brother's family and his friends, Lady Jane and the McConnells, and solving crimes. He is ably assisted by his valet, Graham, Scotland Yard Inspector Jenkins, and his detecting apprentice, the son of a Duke, Dallin This is the third book in a series by Charles Finch featuring his Victorian Age detective, Charles Lennox. Charles Lennox is a middle-aged bachelor who enjoys his comforts, has a penchant for ancient Rome, books, rowing on the Thames, walking about his part of London, visiting with his brother's family and his friends, Lady Jane and the McConnells, and solving crimes. He is ably assisted by his valet, Graham, Scotland Yard Inspector Jenkins, and his detecting apprentice, the son of a Duke, Dallington. I think this was the best book in the series so far as Lennox must politic hard for a seat in the House up in the northern part of the country while a double murder in the city, tragedy in the McConnell household, and a troubling concern with in his relationship with Lady Jane occurs. He has many moments of doubt as he is pulled in several directions. As usual, the plot was good with several twists, the well-written characters were a delight to meet again, the historic background is colorful without being distracting and coming to the end with resolution of several matters left a wonderful taste in my mouth for the next book in the series. Recommend!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susan Springer

    The Charles Lenox series just keeps getting better, but they definitely need to be read in sequence to be familiar with all of the characters.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    Finch has hit his stride in this 3rd installment in the series. Just what I like in a mystery: characters whose small thoughts and actions make me think about my own life.

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