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Kuru Sorcery: Disease and Danger in the New Guinea Highlands

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Kuru, a fatal neurological disease thought to be transmitted through cannibalism, is examined in the Fore, a New Guinea people afflicted with the disease, who believe it to be caused by sorcery. The author also discusses Fore beliefs about diagnosis and prevention of other diseases.


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Kuru, a fatal neurological disease thought to be transmitted through cannibalism, is examined in the Fore, a New Guinea people afflicted with the disease, who believe it to be caused by sorcery. The author also discusses Fore beliefs about diagnosis and prevention of other diseases.

30 review for Kuru Sorcery: Disease and Danger in the New Guinea Highlands

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melvin Marsh, M.S.

    Interesting little book about Kuru and the tribes reaction and what they felt was going on.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    I read this for Medical Anthropology in Biocultural Perspective, and for an assigned academic text, it was actually fascinating. She balances well the epidemiology of kuru with her observations of Fore political organization, social kinship structure, and beliefs about health and illness. There's a constant awareness of context, as if she's always asking, "Okay, so this practice or phenomenon happens. Why? What does it stem from?" I admire that. I read this for Medical Anthropology in Biocultural Perspective, and for an assigned academic text, it was actually fascinating. She balances well the epidemiology of kuru with her observations of Fore political organization, social kinship structure, and beliefs about health and illness. There's a constant awareness of context, as if she's always asking, "Okay, so this practice or phenomenon happens. Why? What does it stem from?" I admire that.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

    An older, but invaluable document of the Fore society in a time of great transition. Despite the inclusion of "Kuru" in the title, this isn't a medical study but an anthropological one, discussing how a sweeping, incurable plague impacted a society, how they interpreted it, and what changes this forced. Fascinating reading. An older, but invaluable document of the Fore society in a time of great transition. Despite the inclusion of "Kuru" in the title, this isn't a medical study but an anthropological one, discussing how a sweeping, incurable plague impacted a society, how they interpreted it, and what changes this forced. Fascinating reading.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    Real people eating dead people. And getting really sick...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    An interesting ethnography.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Thom Dunn

    {Velvetink RECO: for disease transmitted by cannibalsim.}

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Jahn

  9. 5 out of 5

    Darcy Bird

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marlene

  11. 5 out of 5

    Makayla

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  13. 4 out of 5

    Perry

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chris Yavelow

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Gorgy

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rosy Enriquez

  20. 4 out of 5

    Karl Reinhard

  21. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  22. 4 out of 5

    Evgenia

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Grubbs

  24. 5 out of 5

    Merlene

  25. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sergio Remon Alvarez

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katy

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

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