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A God Who Hates: The Courageous Woman Who Inflamed the Muslim World Speaks Out Against the Evils of Islam

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From the front page of The New York Times to YouTube, Dr. Wafa Sultan has become a force radical Islam has to reckon with. For the first time, she tells her story and what she learned, first-hand, about radical Islam in A God Who Hates, a passionate memoir by an outspoken Arab woman that is also a cautionary tale for the West. She grew up in Syria in a culture ruled by a g From the front page of The New York Times to YouTube, Dr. Wafa Sultan has become a force radical Islam has to reckon with. For the first time, she tells her story and what she learned, first-hand, about radical Islam in A God Who Hates, a passionate memoir by an outspoken Arab woman that is also a cautionary tale for the West. She grew up in Syria in a culture ruled by a god who hates women. “How can such a culture be anything but barbarous?” Sultan asks. “It can’t,” she concludes “because any culture that hates its women can’t love anything else.” She believes that the god who hates is waging a battle between modernity and barbarism, not a battle between religions. She also knows that it’s a battle radical Islam will lose. Condemned by some and praised by others for speaking out, Sultan wants everyone to understand the danger posed by A God Who Hates.


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From the front page of The New York Times to YouTube, Dr. Wafa Sultan has become a force radical Islam has to reckon with. For the first time, she tells her story and what she learned, first-hand, about radical Islam in A God Who Hates, a passionate memoir by an outspoken Arab woman that is also a cautionary tale for the West. She grew up in Syria in a culture ruled by a g From the front page of The New York Times to YouTube, Dr. Wafa Sultan has become a force radical Islam has to reckon with. For the first time, she tells her story and what she learned, first-hand, about radical Islam in A God Who Hates, a passionate memoir by an outspoken Arab woman that is also a cautionary tale for the West. She grew up in Syria in a culture ruled by a god who hates women. “How can such a culture be anything but barbarous?” Sultan asks. “It can’t,” she concludes “because any culture that hates its women can’t love anything else.” She believes that the god who hates is waging a battle between modernity and barbarism, not a battle between religions. She also knows that it’s a battle radical Islam will lose. Condemned by some and praised by others for speaking out, Sultan wants everyone to understand the danger posed by A God Who Hates.

30 review for A God Who Hates: The Courageous Woman Who Inflamed the Muslim World Speaks Out Against the Evils of Islam

  1. 4 out of 5

    La Petite Américaine Cash App: $Covid2020sucks

    I first came across Wafa Sultan the way most Americans did: In 2006, someone sent me a link to a YouTube video of Sultan participating in a debate on Al-Jazeera. I thought she was courageous, well-spoken, and right -- I like any woman who debates men in authority and uses her superior intelligence to makes them look stupid. Then I stopped caring for a good 7 years or so. I downloaded her book a few weeks ago because it seemed a lot better than reading the Daily Mail's wall-to-wall coverage of IS I first came across Wafa Sultan the way most Americans did: In 2006, someone sent me a link to a YouTube video of Sultan participating in a debate on Al-Jazeera. I thought she was courageous, well-spoken, and right -- I like any woman who debates men in authority and uses her superior intelligence to makes them look stupid. Then I stopped caring for a good 7 years or so. I downloaded her book a few weeks ago because it seemed a lot better than reading the Daily Mail's wall-to-wall coverage of ISIS and Syria. What can I say? I don't like Islam (and don't comment that I'm an Islamophobe, as I have 3 whole Muslim friends). I'm not into an ideology that hasn't reformed for 1400 years and, as Bill Maher said on Friday, is “the only religion that acts like the mafia, that will fucking kill you if you say the wrong thing, draw the wrong picture or write the wrong book.” The recoil effect that Islam has with me, Bill Maher, and any rational human being is nothing compared to what Wafa Sultan feels about the religion. This chick hates Islam, and she should. She saw barbaric murders occur in the name of Allah; she had female patients whose beatings and rapes went hushed away because Islamic societies punish the woman and not the perpetrator; she had no rights or autonomy until she left Syria for the United States. The only problem with this book is that Wafa Sultan is too good of a writer. She explains the Muslim mentality with sweeping, easy-to-understand sound bytes that are alarmingly simple. She makes statements that are meant to encompass all Muslims, and she has the remarkable ability to get you to agree with her. As much as I like Sultan and enjoyed her book, the lack of wiggle room she allows strikes me as dangerous. I may not like Islam. Wafa Sultan certainly doesn't. But I'm sure there are at least a few Muslims out there who don't hate Jews, who don't believe in some America-Zionist-kufar conspiracy, who don't think women need to wear a niqab, who don't think adulterers should be publicly executed, who don't agree that drawing a cartoon of Muhammad should land a person in jail, etc. etc. There must be a handful of these people, right? I mean...fundamentalists like Anjem Choudary who call for global jihad? Round them up and deport them. The little ISIS punks who like to play with knives and lop off the heads of journalists and aid workers? Hunt them down and kill them. People who plot terror attacks? Send them to Cuba. Then plant some leaders in the region who can start enforcing a secular education, bring the mentality of the religion to the 21st century, and take people's minds beyond the madrassa. (It all sounds so simple when I'm in charge, doesn't it?) But for those who aren't fundamentalists, who are rational people who just want to follow their religion and do good for humanity? I wish Sultan had taken a few pages to focus on them as well. Maybe she can drop that in her next book. Either way, I'm buying it. Debates aside, the woman can write, and I found the book to be educational and entertaining. The chick has some serious gonads. I like it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    K.K.

    Ought to be required reading for anyone considering "reverting" to Islam. Islam's uglier than ever, after reading this book. Wafa Sultan has ovaries of steel for writing this. Ought to be required reading for anyone considering "reverting" to Islam. Islam's uglier than ever, after reading this book. Wafa Sultan has ovaries of steel for writing this.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Riobhcah

    Unfortunately, Wafa Sultan is confusing true Islam with Pre-Islamic tribal customs that have continued to persist and are nothing to do with true Islam.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rod Horncastle

    Wow, would I ever love to have a long chat with this remarkable woman. I even watched some youtube videos of Wafa confronting some (very proud) Muslim men about their opinions. I'm very glad she gave us this book to examine - it ought to make a few million people very irate. The big problem I have with Wafa's stance is: She claims to know who the enemy of freedom is - but what is the full source of her FREEDOM and goodness? This book attempts to reveal the evil and oppression of Islam but Wafa ha Wow, would I ever love to have a long chat with this remarkable woman. I even watched some youtube videos of Wafa confronting some (very proud) Muslim men about their opinions. I'm very glad she gave us this book to examine - it ought to make a few million people very irate. The big problem I have with Wafa's stance is: She claims to know who the enemy of freedom is - but what is the full source of her FREEDOM and goodness? This book attempts to reveal the evil and oppression of Islam but Wafa has no understanding of love and morality. I honestly think she assumes that if you remove the badguys you get left with only goodguys by default. But history is filled with thousands of years of non-Islamic corruption and abuse. How does that fit into her utopia? I believe there is an answer.... So can we trust everything Wafa claims is fact? Well, after personally chatting with Muslims from all over the world (for the last few years) I can easily say she understands Islam and Muslims very accurately. Sure there are wonderful, kind, loving Muslims who desire peace and prosperity - these folks are known as lazy rebellious liberal Muslims who don't spend alot of time reflecting on their religion. Some call these people MODERATE Muslims, but that is only a matter of convenience and time. This is the problem I have with all religions: what is their ENDGAME? What happens when these beliefs and worldviews rise to dominance and military might? How does their core source of values affect the rest of us? WELL - The Quran is very clear about that. People should carefully do this with all belief systems. For instance: What would the world look like if certain groups got their way... imagine; An atheistic world with No real rules or source of morality. An Islamic world with only Islamic views accepted as reasonable. A Buddhist world with everyone fending for their own cosmic enlightenment. A HIndu world with the caste system dominating all areas of life and potential. I bring all this up to delve further into Wafa's American freedoms that she so appreciates. What is the source of this freedom? And the next big question: When has this freedom gone too far? Is there a middle ground and balance? Yes, there is. That balance is the Bible and Christianity. Wafa even hints at this without fully understanding it. What is the alternative to a god who hates??? It's a God who loves and protects. You can't have love without justice and purpose. And a universe without God is basically meaningless and just a useless blip of existence where anything truly goes - even the most horrific evils are just variety: One mans prostitute is another mans daughter/mother/sister. I just finished reading the entire Quran. All the danger that this author warns about is clearly in its pages. From Heavenly prostitutes (houris) to a society that tolerates men having 4 wives. The Quran only mentions 1 woman by name (that would be Mary, the mother of Jesus)... compare this to the Bible which mentions 100's of women and their significant roles in directing and saving God's creation from insanity. It is easy to see how terrorists cheerish the Quran and it's teachings. Final comment: I will forever remember how Wafa shows us the bully of Islam; It is like an Ogre that causes people to fear from within. "To each person I appear as big as his fear. And as long as they refuse to approach and confront me they will never know my true size." Yes, Islam is an ugly Ogre that must be confronted exactly for what it is. Wafa has shown us this. I applaud you for your efforts.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I first came across the name of Wafa Sultan through the shrill YouTube video that went viral, accompanied by seemingly awed descriptions of the "brave and gallant woman" who dared to speak out against the evils of Islam. Like the book that followed, Sultan's video is awash with hyperbole, overstatement and "facts" that are, to put it mildly, questionable - but damn, does that woman have a knack for telling the bigots exactly what they want to hear! Laila Lalami, a Moroccan-born writer describes I first came across the name of Wafa Sultan through the shrill YouTube video that went viral, accompanied by seemingly awed descriptions of the "brave and gallant woman" who dared to speak out against the evils of Islam. Like the book that followed, Sultan's video is awash with hyperbole, overstatement and "facts" that are, to put it mildly, questionable - but damn, does that woman have a knack for telling the bigots exactly what they want to hear! Laila Lalami, a Moroccan-born writer describes the work of writers like Sultan in the following way: "...billed as profound meditations on faith and searing critiques of Islam's treatment of women and minorities, but they are riddled with inaccuracies and generalisations.” “In their persistent conflating of religion, civilisation, geographical region and very distinct cultures," she continues, "these books are more likely to obfuscate than educate." On one hand, I found myself thinking, "If this was her (Sultan’s) experience, I'm not surprised at how she views Islam," but hard upon that thought would come another: "Is she telling the truth or telling a good story?". Sultan has already been exposed for at least one important falsehood, namely regarding the assassination of a professor that she describes as having been murdered before her eyes to the shouts of "Allahhu Akbar". According to a number of sources, a professor was indeed assassinated at about the time Wafa suggests, but the murder took place off campus - not in a classroom, as she states. It appears unlikely that Sultan could have witnessed it, but she goes on to leave the following helpful footnote, presumably for the benefit of non-Muslims: "When Muslims kill, they shout "Allahu Akbar!" - "Allah is the greatest!". This phrase, uttered during every prayer, now takes on a murderous connotation and one can only wonder at the effect it would have on one of Sultan's readers who took her tome as gospel and then happened to visit a mosque! By the way, didn't any of Sultan's worshipful reviewers ever suspect just a teensy bit of exaggeration in her claim to be the first "Muslim" woman ever to tell a man to be quiet in fourteen centuries? Oh dear, guess not!

  6. 5 out of 5

    David Johnston

    Wafa Sultan claims to be an atheist, and maybe to Muslims she is because she is no longer a Believer in the god who hates, but she sounds more agnostic than anything else. Perhaps atheism is a purgatorial stage she must go through to finally escape the ogre of Islam. She relates a fable where a brave, young traveler comes upon a village where all the people are afraid and have no spirit and furtively sneak around looking over their shoulders because of a huge ogre who lives in a cave high upon a Wafa Sultan claims to be an atheist, and maybe to Muslims she is because she is no longer a Believer in the god who hates, but she sounds more agnostic than anything else. Perhaps atheism is a purgatorial stage she must go through to finally escape the ogre of Islam. She relates a fable where a brave, young traveler comes upon a village where all the people are afraid and have no spirit and furtively sneak around looking over their shoulders because of a huge ogre who lives in a cave high upon a mountain which overlooks the village. The ogre shrieks and threatens them and fear of the ogre has sapped their intellect and their will to live. The young man decides to go and face this ogre, but to his surprise, the closer he gets the smaller and less frightening the ogre becomes. When he finally reaches the ogre, it is no bigger than his little finger. It jumps up onto his flattened hand and the young man asks "Who are you?" "I am Fear," the ogre replies. "Fear of what?" the young man asks. "That depends on who you are and what you are afraid of." "To each person I appear as big as his fear. And as long as they refuse to approach and confront me they will never know my true size." Wafa Sultan has faced her fear of radical Islam and reveals the real size of the God Who Hates.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ebookwormy1

    I have never been able to find a book about Islam that deals with the salvation of women. This has lead me to wonder if Islam offers salvation to women. A well read relative sent me this book by mail with instruction to note the later chapters that deal with women and Islam. This is a distressingly painful read. I learned many things. As can be imagined, the author does not see Islam in a favorable light. She is dealing with Islam in the macro, and certainly her observations cannot be universally I have never been able to find a book about Islam that deals with the salvation of women. This has lead me to wonder if Islam offers salvation to women. A well read relative sent me this book by mail with instruction to note the later chapters that deal with women and Islam. This is a distressingly painful read. I learned many things. As can be imagined, the author does not see Islam in a favorable light. She is dealing with Islam in the macro, and certainly her observations cannot be universally applied to all Muslims. The weakness of the book is two-fold: 1) Sultan has studied psychiatry in the USA, and the book encumbered by her tendency to try to get into the psychology of Islam and religion in general; and 2) While I can see the editor wanted to preserve a conversational, as opposed to academic feel, the book could have been edited more thoroughly to eliminate repetitive concepts. I should also mention that occasional hubris, particularly in the section accounting the incidents that brought Sultan to public recognition are a little distracting. Strengths of the work include Sultan's personal experience with Islam, growing up in the religion/ culture and immigrating to the USA after she had married and had children. This has provided her with a wealth of anecdotal material about Muslims in the middle east and the west, as well as personal knowledge of the language (not dependent on translation) and culture (an understanding of what people/ situations/ teachings really mean). Sultan deals with difficult topics that others might shy away from, including the women issue. I found much agreement between her account and that of Robert Spencer in "The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam and the Crusades." Pages 236-237 contain a section in which Sultan contrasts what America has been to her with what her homeland was to her - it is an eloquent writing not to be missed, and is especially refreshing after trudging through the book. I finally had to break down and include it in my notes below. In the end, I spent a lot of time pondering a couple of questions. If Sultan abhors Muhammad as a model, disagrees with the teachings of the Koran, and wants to see the people of the middle east freed from the fear and oppression of Islam, why does she still claim the label of Muslim? I could only conclude that she wants the stronger voice granted to an insider instead of the alienation of an outsider. If she sees the destruction/ oppression of Muhammad/ the Koran/ Islam and the contrast between what it has wrought and life in the West, why does she not embrace Christianity, upon whose foundation western civilization was built? Especially when an examination of Jesus/ Bible/ Christianity would reveal it triumphs in these areas in which she has found Islam lacking? After all, she seeks "a God who loves" and a people who are like that loving God (1 John 4:16)? My conclusion here was that this answer is also tied up with the above. Sultan has rejected Christianity and chosen to believe that God does not exist, but is merely an entity created in our own mind, in our own image, to soothe our soul. Therefore, she cannot truly reject Islam, because she doesn't actually have a viable replacement for the tendency to worship with which all humanity is wired. Repeatedly, while working through this book, I found my mind returning to this passage from the Bible: "[Jesus was incarnated and died that He:] might free those who... were subject to slavery all their lives." Hebrews 2:15 While the first hand account is valuable, if a reader were to chose one book to read about Islam, I would recommend Robert Spencer's "The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam and the Crusades." 2 stars. _______________________________________________________ Sultan presents the concept of raiding (I want/take what you have but hate you for wanting/taking what I have) and how it shapes Muslim culture and the interactions of Muslims with non-Muslims: "The Muslim will agree to the establishment of such a relationship [with a non-Muslim:] only in one of two possible situations: to promote his own interests or to harm the interests of others." pg. 59 I was struck/ shocked by Sultan's documentation of the duplicity of Muslims in the West (specifically in America)and how her concept of 'raiding' plays out among immigrants. "[A Muslim:] is convinced he has come to this country to despoil it and cause harm... my friend... is here only to pillage and cause harm to her enemies... she regards the comforts here as her own private booty." pg. 67 While I was reading this section, I happened to pick up a magazine talking about persecution of Christians worldwide. The publication contained quotes from both natives and western missionaries in a country who were suffering for their faith. All talked about how they wanted to be a blessing to the country, to bring it the gospel of Christ and help the people to live a better life (free from fear). The contrast in attitudes was startlingly clear - the contrast in teachings of the two religions emphasized as polar opposites. It also should be noted though, that Sultan herself still claims to be a Muslim, yet one would assume that she does not embrace the ideas of "pillaging" and "raiding" herself. So, we need to be cautioned that while many Muslims behave as she has described, there is still an element of choice that creates a spectrum of behavior among Muslims in the USA. After all, I myself has known Muslims who have immigrated to get AWAY from fundamentalist society. "Islamic teachings include the notion of *taqia* (literally, 'caution, prudence'), which allows a Muslim to conceal his true feelings and cherished beliefs when he feels that non-Muslims around him have the upper hand, while at the same time working secretly to achieve his great objective, so that he can attack them when the time is ripe." pg. 242 "No one can be a true Muslim and a true American simultaneously. Islam is both a religion and a state, and to be a true Muslim you must believe in Islam as both religion and state. A true Muslim does not acknowledge the US Constitution, and his willingness to live under that constitution is, as far as he is concerned, nothing more than an unavoidable step on the way to that constitution's replacement by Islamic Sharia law." pg. 243 Does this mean that Sultan, still claiming to be a Muslim, is not a true American? Or, does it mean that Sultan, claiming to be an American, is not a true Muslim? I was unaware of the challenges of literacy within the Arabic language group: "Arabic is different from many other languages in that the official language used for reading and writing is completely different from the colloquial language used in conversation. Illiterate people are perfectly fluent in the colloquial language, but are virtually unable to comprehend the form of Arabic used for reading and writing." pg. 69 Wafa Sultan has trained as a psychiatrist in America, making much of the book a tedious exploration of the 'psyche'. The strongest sections are those where she writes of her own experience. "I became addicted to reading both Islamic and American books, and the more assiduously I read, the more I discovered that our tragic condition in the Muslim world, as compared with that of the United States, is simply the sad result of our Islamic belief system. I had expected that the slender thread, which during the first four years of my life in America had continued to bind me to Islam, would be replaced by a sturdy rope [via study:], only to discover day by day that it hand become more fragile than ever." Sultan's experience resonates with the concept I first encountered in "The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam and the Crusades" that Western culture is built upon Christianity, and that even people who do not believe benefit from the principles that guide our civilization. This quote also spoke to this idea: "These teachings have failed to create steadfast, productive, and creative human beings... The Muslim and the teachings he believes in are chasing each other around a circular track. The teachings pursue him, while he can find nothing to pursue except them. They will lead him to disaster, but his failure will serve only to increase his dependence on them." pg. 177 I learned some new things about Muhammad, who Sultan does not portray favorably. "When God's Prophet [Muhammad:] coveted his adopted son's wife and God ordered him to satisfy that desire, this behavior, for Muslims, became enshrined in both religious and secular law. Muhammad banned adoption in order to justify his socially unacceptable marriage - by the standards of the time - to the wife of his adopted son. This ban put an end to a social system that at the time helped save many children who, for one reason or another, had been left fatherless, and the ban, to this day, continues to rot the soul of Muslim societies." pg.126. The prohibition on adoption in Islamic law was particularly disheartening to me, as I have a passion for adoption. This account also contrasts Allah/ Muhammad/ the Koran with God/ Jesus/ the Bible. The Bible specifically teaches that: We are not to covet ANYTHING of our neighbors (Duet 20:17), a parent having relations with a child's spouse is immorality (Lev 20:12), God has compassion on the orphan and is a father to the fatherless (Psalm 68:5), God seeks justice for the widow and orphan (Psalm 146:9) and God uses adoption as a picture of His adoption of us as sinners into His family through belief in Jesus Christ (Romans 8:15). Sultan's conclusions about Muhammad's treatment of women include the following: "When discussing the deteriorating position of women in the Muslim world some defenders of Muslim law protest, claiming that Islam revered women, but that some of its followers had misunderstood the Koran and the Prophetic tradition. But I still have a question: Have the same followers misunderstood the Prophet's attitude to women in his life? Where are the Koranic verses or Prophetic traditions that can alleviate the ugliness of these attitudes? They are not to be found." pg. 127 and this on a section about the impact of Islam on economics: "It rejected the principle of excellence and the laws of supply and demand... these teachings did not emphasize the importance of work. The concept of work in Islam was confined to nomadic migration, raiding, booty, and the struggle for survival." pg. 179-180 She talks extensively about the concept of Master-Slave relationships within Islam. She asserts that all relationships break down to master and slave (a man is slave to a master boss, a son is slave to a master father and a wife is slave to a master husband, etc). The teachings referenced in regard to the question of women are... I cannot even find the word... but we should note that Judaism and Christianity, which both precede Islam by thousands and hundreds of years, respectively, do not view women in this way. "Islam was born into an environment that sanctioned the capture and rape of women, holding them - not the man committing the crime - responsible. Islam did not proscribe what was already permissible. On the contrary, it legalized it and enshrined it in canonical law." pg 129 "Muhammad in a hadith told his followers: [QUOTE:] Oh ye women, you are the majority of those who dwell in hell, for when you receive you express no thanks, when afflicted you show no patience, and when I keep aloof from you, you complain." Just imagine for a moment how it must feel to hear this over and over again, having it drummed into your head until it becomes part of your very being." pg. 138 "...hadith: 'A woman shall neither fast nor pray without her husband's authorization." pg. 139 "... hadith: 'A man has the right to expect his wife, if his nose runs with blood, mucus or pus, to lick it up with her tongue" pg. 139 On salvation within Islam, Sultan writes: "The still believe that jihad is the only way to guarantee their entry into paradise in the hereafter." pg. 181 "... it is the Muslim's objective in war either to kill his enemy or be killed by him, and he considers himself to have won whichever turns out to be the case." pg. 183 "When we were young, our elders drummed a saying into us: 'We love death as much as our enemy loves life.'" On relationships with other religions: "We hold the Jews 'responsible' for our military failures, our economic backwardness, and our technological dependency. We believe the Jews control the world, and that, in consequence, the whole world, dancing to their tune, wants to get rid of us." pg. 185 "If you read the history and teachings of Islam you will get the initial impression that Islam is more accepting of and less hostile to Christians and Jews, as it recognizes the sanctity of their holy books. But anyone who scrutinizes this history carefully with a critical eye will realize that Islam has declared war on both religions, and has entrusted it's followers with a sacred mission: to fight them until the End of Days. Islamic teachings make no mention of Hinduism, Buddhism, or Zoroastrianism, even though these religions existed at the time and people practiced them. Muhammad, however, might never have heard of them. The more likely explanation is that they presented no threat to himself or his followers and therefore, he displayed no aggression toward them." pg. 192 "Jews and Christians, according to Islam, believe in the same God as Muslims do, but this does not work in their favor. Islam defines its relationship with them by their attitude toward Muhammad, not by their attitude toward God. No Muslim, on the basis of the verse quoted above, can have a trusting relationship with a Jew or a Christian. The Koranic verse does not include any mention of other religions, and so the conflict remains at it's most extreme with Jews and Christians, who in Muhammad's day refused to accept him as a prophet." pg. 193 America is to me... by Wafa Sultan "The God Who Hates" pg. 236-237 "For me America was- and still is- leaving home at 5am and making my way to Starbucks for my morning cup of coffee without fear that someone might see me and accuse me of immoral behavior. American for me means saying "good morning" to my neighbor and chatting with him for a few moments without being accused of having spent the night with him. America for me means my daughter can come home and tell me she's had lunch with her boyfriend without being beaten for having impugned the family honor. America means I can wear what I like, eat what I like, and go where I like without anyone's interfering in my decisions. America means I can buy new shoes before my toes begin to peep out of the old ones and that I can buy new clothes without having to deprive my infant son of milk for a week. America means calling a government office and hearing a polite voice say: "Good morning, this is Jessica, how can I help you?" America means I can go into a public washroom, find it equipped with running water, soap and paper towels, and not have to wade through another person's waste. America means getting smiled at by a stranger just because our glances have met. America means spending the day with my family in a beautiful public park without getting eaten alive by flies or being surrounded by piles of garbage at every turn. America means that the stranger who bumps into me accidentally says, "I'm sorry, I do apologize!" America means I can enter a place of worship and listen to the sermon without hearing other religious denominations being vilified. America means someone can knock at my door and I can decide whether or not to open it without having to fear for my life. America means I can lodge a complaint against the policeman with whom I have a different opinion, in broken English mixed with Arabic and - possibly- win my case. America means I can speak Arabic-inflected English and people who hear me will tell me, "You do speak English well!" without the slightest hint of mockery or scorn. America is the hearing aid my son received in the first week after his arrival in the United States, restoring his hearing after nine years of deafness in Syria. America means that I live in a street with people of nine different nationalities and that, when American Independence Day brings us together in the public area in front of our homes, each of us brings along his or her national dish for the others to taste. America means I can live my life and no one will judge me because of my color, gender, race, religion, political opinions, or country of origin; instead I am evaluated on my work and my personality. America, to put it briefly indeed, is my freedom. People have asked me in the past, and many more will ask me after they read this book: "Why don't you see America's bad points?" Perhaps I am blind, but I can see no bad points in America. In order to understand my perspective, of course, you would have to be a woman who has lived in Syria or another Muslim country for thirty years!"

  8. 4 out of 5

    Surender Negi

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A God Who hates : Chilling account of life and society where Wafa Sultan born Wafa Born in Syrian Islamic Society and portrayed dark and gloomy situation of Muslim women under Religious state of Syria and Arab World. There is no doubt that any religious rule/state is dangerous for growth and free thinking (forget human rights of women). Not in Arab, any state which is either religious or semi religious first targets children and women (The weak). Wafa explains her early understanding of Islamic w A God Who hates : Chilling account of life and society where Wafa Sultan born Wafa Born in Syrian Islamic Society and portrayed dark and gloomy situation of Muslim women under Religious state of Syria and Arab World. There is no doubt that any religious rule/state is dangerous for growth and free thinking (forget human rights of women). Not in Arab, any state which is either religious or semi religious first targets children and women (The weak). Wafa explains her early understanding of Islamic world and status of women in society which is mostly gloomy in nature. She also asserted that Its any how intertwine with the religion of state and position of women which they hold about themselves after brainwashing they went through entire life. The position of women, no matter what? in war torn country or religious imposed nation is always dangerous. She ask very deep question about religious brainwashing and construction of religion in arab state which forced women to held position as second class. She asserted that how a women can not be guardians of her own child while her husband in not around. How women in Arab is blindly depend on Men for small opinion to marriage decision. How women treated as subject of use rather than respect as human being in society. I partially agree with her because I am not aware about the culture and religion she went through. I can put light from Hinduism prospective. In ancient India, women were given chance to study, write the basic text vedas, can be scholar but still women treated as subject of men. She were forced to obey the husband and Father. Father and husband were protector of women in patriarch societies. However, many state in India has matriarch society where women were head of village and state. With arrival of Islam in India, things changed . Under Islamic rule of Mughals and their control. Womens were subject to abuse (They were subject to abuse before that but it increase with the time). The "Gonghat" become Hindu women Burkha, Girl child were killed so they dont spent their time in Mughals haram as war booty after raid . Male child were become patriarch to control the narrative and protection of women from raider while slowly control the power over women. However there were many example after Mughals where the Women raise to status of King Like Rani Laxmibai, Rani Chennama etc. Later, Wafa explain that how intertwine the religion and life in arab countries affect the ideology and behavior of people. She explain how the most Muslims who run away from their native nation criticism the United state after being successful. How they shift there loyalties towards the arab nation where they have been exploited. This remind me a small section written by Veer Savarkar in His book ; Hindutva . Veer Sawarkar asserted that, Christianity and Islam is not only religion or way of life but they are political doctrinal which consist how an state shall be work and how it should be work towards universalism of Monotheism. Veer savarkar says that the design of Monotheism is so perfect that no matter where such people [who believed in monotheism or political religion] they always will be loyal to force outside of their nation. Be it Christians who will disregard/Reject the culture/political/economical model of their native nation against Vatican order or An Muslims who reject constitution for a Fatwa issued from Kabba Well, She made her point; Right or Wrong It is subject to debate. But this book is eye opener to the people who want to peep into the society which mostly been understood through the various propaganda.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sverre

    ==Presenting a god who commits followers to a dessert of despair== Wafa Sultan is one of the world’s most influential and outspoken women, having great courage to reveal her candid opinions about Islam, and especially how most women and girls are unjustly—even inhumanely—treated in Moslim culture. Her main contentions focus on Islam’s founder, Mohammad, whom she regards as a warrior and plunderer who lacked the meritorious spiritual qualities required to act as a mentor for today's Arabs. She rec ==Presenting a god who commits followers to a dessert of despair== Wafa Sultan is one of the world’s most influential and outspoken women, having great courage to reveal her candid opinions about Islam, and especially how most women and girls are unjustly—even inhumanely—treated in Moslim culture. Her main contentions focus on Islam’s founder, Mohammad, whom she regards as a warrior and plunderer who lacked the meritorious spiritual qualities required to act as a mentor for today's Arabs. She recites numerous examples from the Koran and Islamic writings, purportedly dictated by God through Muhammad, of his actions and sayings as recorded by his followers, which give weight to her argument that Islam is a religion of fear, suppression, intolerance, suspicion, abuse and murder. Having been raised a Moslim in Syria where she lived until emigrating to the U.S. at age thirty-three, she would seem to have the qualifications and experience to provide true insight on Islam. Liberal Christians, Unitarians, New Agers, universalists and the politically correct have long touted the auspicious truism that all religions are founded on the “do unto others” axiom; hopefully, they keep insisting, believing the aphorism “say something often enough and it becomes true.” Sultan challenges modern liberal humanitarians, politicians, academics and positivists to examine the stark facts about Islam literally, historically and culturally. After doing so can they in good conscience include Islam as a being a valid benevolent, moral and peace-loving religious organism that can contribute to mankind’s enlightenment, progress and democratic stability? This is perhaps a challenge which can only be given by an Arab Moslim to those who have not been raised in close contact with that culture. Clearly and emphatically she remonstrates that Islam is unworthy of being held high as a valid doctrine for mankind and should not be put on an equal footing with other world religions. “Our Muslim societies are governed by a religious law that imposes itself by force and relies on fear as a means of perpetuating and protecting itself. Islam, as I have already emphasized, was born in an arid and desolate environment where people had to struggle to survive. It adopted the customs of that environment and that era, absorbed them, and then refused to allow them to change with the times.” (pp 204-5) This book can be an eye opener to the uneducated and naïve about the depths of Islamism’s depravities and it reveals numerous detestable literary citations. However, everything is not as monochromatic in this world as Sultan presents it. There are millions of “reformed” and peace-loving Moslims and I know some of them. For example, the Shia Ismailis, residing in nearly thirty countries, allow several layers of meaning in interpreting the Koran which offer nuances that are adaptable to modern times. An excerpt from the [...] website: “Bridge-building between cultures and religions through dialogue and cooperation is an important means to promote a peaceful and humanistic society. In September, the Ismaili Centre, Lisbon played host to a lecture that was part of the UN Alliance of Civilizations Summer School programme.” In order to claim validity for our age religions must show themselves to be living organisms willing to make progressive steps both in the spiritual as well as the material realms. Those religious branches and individuals who hold to outmoded doctrines—especially the fear-mongering and violent ones—will sadly continue to be part of the problem, not the solution.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Miebara Jato

    An incredibly courageous woman. And a good writer, too.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Wafa Sultan gives a brave,honest and very eye opening look at life in the Muslim world. Although I had heard stories of the treatment of women in the middle east, I think I really didn't want to believe that it was true. Sultan reveals a world that is harsh for everyone, but especially women. I was amazed at some of the stories that she told that are common occurrences for women under the thumb of Islam. She also does a great job of explaining, not only the tenets of Islam and translations of th Wafa Sultan gives a brave,honest and very eye opening look at life in the Muslim world. Although I had heard stories of the treatment of women in the middle east, I think I really didn't want to believe that it was true. Sultan reveals a world that is harsh for everyone, but especially women. I was amazed at some of the stories that she told that are common occurrences for women under the thumb of Islam. She also does a great job of explaining, not only the tenets of Islam and translations of the Koran, but also the background and history that gave rise to this harsh belief system. It was interesting to read explanations of the ideas behind this religion and world view that went into it's formation. Although Sultan is very critical of Islam, she goes to pretty great lengths to show how it came about and why it still has followers. I would love to meet this woman. She is so honest and forthright and very open about her own feelings of prejudice against Christians and Jews that she gradually overcame. At the end of the book she talks about all of parts of life in the US that she is so grateful for. I was touched by her list and was reminded about all of the freedoms and advantages that I take for granted.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Vineeth Maller

    To tell the truth, I bought this book because of it's title. I already knew how fucked up religions(especially Islam considering it's dire need for reformation) are and wanted to know whether the content did justice to the title. The book is entirely about her life, her surroundings and her experiences. The writer is quite bold and determined. She's not apologetic, In fact to such an extent that she doesn't even allow wiggle room for the secular Muslims(Oxymoron). It was, "Either you join them To tell the truth, I bought this book because of it's title. I already knew how fucked up religions(especially Islam considering it's dire need for reformation) are and wanted to know whether the content did justice to the title. The book is entirely about her life, her surroundings and her experiences. The writer is quite bold and determined. She's not apologetic, In fact to such an extent that she doesn't even allow wiggle room for the secular Muslims(Oxymoron). It was, "Either you join them or you join us". And I felt it was the right move. If there is anything that helps terrorists grow ever determined it is the growling and the whining of the apologetic moderates at any and all criticism of Islam and it's prophet(s). The book exposes the patriarchal features in Islam and a lot of questionable practices and beliefs the Muslims hold as part of their culture. I'd rather have the book explain itself.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This book is a fascinating look at Islam from someone who lived it for 32 years. I finished it in two or three sittings because I couldn't put it down. Wafa Sultan takes her readers inside the Muslim world and we see the daily lives of its followers. Her analysis of how Islam came to be the kind of religion it is, because of the harsh environment it grew out of, was very compelling. One thing I don't think I'll ever forget is what she said about her reaction when she heard Colin Powell say, when This book is a fascinating look at Islam from someone who lived it for 32 years. I finished it in two or three sittings because I couldn't put it down. Wafa Sultan takes her readers inside the Muslim world and we see the daily lives of its followers. Her analysis of how Islam came to be the kind of religion it is, because of the harsh environment it grew out of, was very compelling. One thing I don't think I'll ever forget is what she said about her reaction when she heard Colin Powell say, when asked if Barack Obama was a Muslim, 'what would be wrong with that.' Dr. Sultan said that she almost fell off her chair in disbelief that someone could be so ignorant of the difference between Islam and the Western way of life. I hope Colin Powell and many other political and cultural leaders have read her book by now and have learned the difference.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Aravindan Srinivasan

    This was a waste of time.. had to barrel through to satisfy my OcD of not putting down a book once started..

  15. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    First off, let me say that Wafa Sultan, an American psychiatrist born in Syria, is a very brave woman. She clearly believes that the Muslim religion damages believers, and says so openly, and loudly. Judging from her expectation of how such talk will be received among the primary audience for her essays, fellow Muslims, she qualifies as heroic. America is involved in fighting two wars in Muslim countries, and has contemplated another (Iran). What I’d most like to hear is that 9/11 was an aberrat First off, let me say that Wafa Sultan, an American psychiatrist born in Syria, is a very brave woman. She clearly believes that the Muslim religion damages believers, and says so openly, and loudly. Judging from her expectation of how such talk will be received among the primary audience for her essays, fellow Muslims, she qualifies as heroic. America is involved in fighting two wars in Muslim countries, and has contemplated another (Iran). What I’d most like to hear is that 9/11 was an aberration, that Muslim countries are filled with reasonable people who, being human, have the same general needs, desires, hopes as the rest of non-Muslims on the planet. Unfortunately, I did not get that reassurance in this book. In an earlier review for Jean Sasson’s book, Growing Up bin Laden , I mentioned that Osama Bin Laden appears to hate his enemies more than he loves his family, his countrymen, or his country. Wafa Sultan says much the same thing about all Islamic-adherents in this book. She uses references from the Koran to illuminate the sources of the rhetoric coming from mullahs, clerics, and ordinary citizens of Muslim countries. I appreciate someone leading me through the maze of translations of the Koran and pulling out references, but I did have the uneasy feeling one may get when lines of any big, old, religious text (like the Bible) are quoted. She certainly knows more than I do about Islam, so I must defer to her insistence that these quotes are interpreted literally. Not being a big fan of the Bible, I am not sure how many out there take the words literally today. I would guess a small proportion of those that call themselves Christian are literal in their interpretation of the Bible. I have no idea whether or not I could assume the same level of rationality in the Middle East. Wafa Sultan says no. The author makes many good points which resonate. First, she does not spare herself in her critique, but shows how Islam made her shallow, and narrow-minded in her dealings with Islam’s traditional enemies, Jews, for instance. She also points out that Muslim tend to view themselves as victims, and as such, may have held themselves back from achieving bigger things with their oil wealth and opportunities. Another good point is that the less compelling the idea (Islam), the more virulent the defenders must be to keep it alive (threatening their own people and infidels with destruction). However, the author is somewhat messianic in her message that Muslims cannot be taken at face value, and can never be trusted to interact truthfully with nonbelievers. It is a grim message, and a difficult one for Americans brought up on laissez faire and 'live and let live'. Perhaps hers is a lesson we disregard at our peril.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    I came away from this book feeling a bit hopeless, but also with a strong urge to learn as much as I can about Islam. If what Wafa Sultan writes is true, we westerners really don't have a clue about what we're dealing with, and if we are to have any hope at all of defending ourselves against the militant Islamists (whether at war in the Middle East or at home in our communities) we have to make a real effort to understand where Muslim ideology comes from. A very sobering read. I came away from this book feeling a bit hopeless, but also with a strong urge to learn as much as I can about Islam. If what Wafa Sultan writes is true, we westerners really don't have a clue about what we're dealing with, and if we are to have any hope at all of defending ourselves against the militant Islamists (whether at war in the Middle East or at home in our communities) we have to make a real effort to understand where Muslim ideology comes from. A very sobering read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Basma

    I have filled this book with notes in the margins, underlines, and question marks. I have so much to say about this but not in a written form. To summarize: if you're interested in religion -mainly Islam- and the whole America vs. Middle East conundrum, do yourself a favor and skip this book because it is a waste of time. Also, I'm confused to why she doesn't mention the source of the things she talks about. I have filled this book with notes in the margins, underlines, and question marks. I have so much to say about this but not in a written form. To summarize: if you're interested in religion -mainly Islam- and the whole America vs. Middle East conundrum, do yourself a favor and skip this book because it is a waste of time. Also, I'm confused to why she doesn't mention the source of the things she talks about.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    This author became an atheist, but in writing about it shows bigotry towards persons with muslim names. I did not like this. Obama was one of those named. Atheism is supposed to open your mind, not encourage you to develop prejudices like these.

  19. 4 out of 5

    John

    The book was everything I expected it to be, which is to say that it was deeply tiresome and occasionally I felt like someone was shitting directly into my brain. The book starts off "Most Muslims, if not all of them, will condemn me to death when they read this book," which gives you a good idea of what you're in for (there are 1.5 billion Muslims, and Wafa Sultan somehow knows what most of them want! She's so very perceptive). The book is full of sloppy logic and dubious conclusions. It also ha The book was everything I expected it to be, which is to say that it was deeply tiresome and occasionally I felt like someone was shitting directly into my brain. The book starts off "Most Muslims, if not all of them, will condemn me to death when they read this book," which gives you a good idea of what you're in for (there are 1.5 billion Muslims, and Wafa Sultan somehow knows what most of them want! She's so very perceptive). The book is full of sloppy logic and dubious conclusions. It also has a fair amount of info on the author's background, and this is the one place the book succeeds, if you read the anecdotes and ignore the conclusions they supposedly inevitably lead to. I believe the author when she describes her own experiences. I don't believe her when she describes the conclusions one must obviously arrive at based on those experiences, because I also believe Marjane Satrapi when she describes *her* own experiences, and I believe the various students I knew in college and the Muslims I've met after I graduated. At any rate, I am extremely glad I finished this book, because I'd love to go on and read something else.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I sat in my room and read the whole thing in a few hours. I spent those hours in tears. What a powerful book, but is she right? I dont know. I dont feel like I'm in a position to state any opinion but she definitely has my attention. I sat in my room and read the whole thing in a few hours. I spent those hours in tears. What a powerful book, but is she right? I dont know. I dont feel like I'm in a position to state any opinion but she definitely has my attention.

  21. 4 out of 5

    JINGYUAN

    It was hard for me to understand someone who wants everyone to think a large population of the world is the enemy of the whole world, especially it is her own origin. I was shocked but accepted As she describes the extreme evil of Islam religion, because I didn't, still don't,know much of it. It was when she tells stories of people In her community, I started doubt. Why is every Muslim living near her hates America? According to her no Muslim should be allowed to come here besides her. It was hard for me to understand someone who wants everyone to think a large population of the world is the enemy of the whole world, especially it is her own origin. I was shocked but accepted As she describes the extreme evil of Islam religion, because I didn't, still don't,know much of it. It was when she tells stories of people In her community, I started doubt. Why is every Muslim living near her hates America? According to her no Muslim should be allowed to come here besides her.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    First off, let me say that Wafa Sultan, an American psychiatrist born in Syria, is a very brave woman. She clearly believes that the Muslim religion damages believers, and says so openly, and loudly. Judging from her expectation of how such talk will be received among the primary audience for her essays, fellow Muslims, she qualifies as heroic. America is involved in fighting two wars in Muslim countries, and has contemplated another (Iran). What I’d most like to hear is that 9/11 was an aberrat First off, let me say that Wafa Sultan, an American psychiatrist born in Syria, is a very brave woman. She clearly believes that the Muslim religion damages believers, and says so openly, and loudly. Judging from her expectation of how such talk will be received among the primary audience for her essays, fellow Muslims, she qualifies as heroic. America is involved in fighting two wars in Muslim countries, and has contemplated another (Iran). What I’d most like to hear is that 9/11 was an aberration, that Muslim countries are filled with reasonable people who, being human, have the same general needs, desires, hopes as the rest of non-Muslims on the planet. Unfortunately, I did not get that reassurance in this book. In an earlier review for Jean Sasson’s book, Growing Up bin Laden , I mentioned that Osama Bin Laden appears to hate his enemies more than he loves his family, his countrymen, or his country. Wafa Sultan says much the same thing about all Islamic-adherents in this book. She uses references from the Koran to illuminate the sources of the rhetoric coming from mullahs, clerics, and ordinary citizens of Muslim countries. I appreciate someone leading me through the maze of translations of the Koran and pulling out references, but I did have the uneasy feeling one may get when lines of any big, old, religious text (like the Bible) are quoted. She certainly knows more than I do about Islam, so I must defer to her insistence that these quotes are interpreted literally. Not being a big fan of the Bible, I am not sure how many out there take the words literally today. I would guess a small proportion of those that call themselves Christian are literal in their interpretation of the Bible. I have no idea whether or not I could assume the same level of rationality in the Middle East. Wafa Sultan says no. The author makes many good points which resonate. First, she does not spare herself in her critique, but shows how Islam made her shallow, and narrow-minded in her dealings with Islam’s traditional enemies, Jews, for instance. She also points out that Muslim tend to view themselves as victims, and as such, may have held themselves back from achieving bigger things with their oil wealth and opportunities. Another good point is that the less compelling the idea (Islam), the more virulent the defenders must be to keep it alive (threatening their own people and infidels with destruction). However, the author is somewhat messianic in her message that Muslims cannot be taken at face value, and can never be trusted to interact truthfully with nonbelievers. It is a grim message, and a difficult one for Americans brought up on laissez faire and 'live and let live'. Perhaps hers is a lesson we disregard at our peril.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jerome Joof

    This is a great book and the writer Wafa Sultan elaborates more on the cultural aspect of her home country and how intertwined it is with their religious beliefs with regards to politics as whole. The suffering of so many people in these Arab countries is repugnant to the extent that one will ask which God do they actually believe in? The amount of hatred, anger and manipulation is bewildering. I therefore, compared Syria and Gambia my home country both Muslim majority but the former more of a I This is a great book and the writer Wafa Sultan elaborates more on the cultural aspect of her home country and how intertwined it is with their religious beliefs with regards to politics as whole. The suffering of so many people in these Arab countries is repugnant to the extent that one will ask which God do they actually believe in? The amount of hatred, anger and manipulation is bewildering. I therefore, compared Syria and Gambia my home country both Muslim majority but the former more of a Islamic governed state than the latter which is “secular” by vast majority. The experiences that the writer shared and therefore generalized to every Muslim nation might be distorting to some degree or more so it might not culminate to my experience growing up in a nation where 90% of the population are Muslims. This book allows me to ponder on the Arab world and question their actions on human life, justice and truth. Islam was born in their midst and therefore the teachings are actually in their language so they must understand what it entails and requires them to undertake as followers. If all the atrocities and way of life portrayed in this book by Wafa based on the teachings of their book, what kind of religion are people from my country practicing and from which book do they get guidance from as oppose to the Arabs? The way of life and treatment of women and others is totally different and I must say it all depends on how much people will assimilate this book with all the evidences and claims in it to start asking sole searching questions for themselves with conviction and not of fear of admonishment from a Devine being.

  24. 4 out of 5

    erl

    I got this book at the recommendation of a friend, and there are a lot of problems with it. While I do not doubt that Ms Sultan witnessed outrageous sexism and blatant fatalism in her native Syria, she overgeneralizes to the point where she contradicts herself. For example, she says that sexism and fatalism, as well as aggression, are inevitable results of Islam. She also says that those who speak Arabic as their native language are more profoundly affected by its negative attitude. Yet she does I got this book at the recommendation of a friend, and there are a lot of problems with it. While I do not doubt that Ms Sultan witnessed outrageous sexism and blatant fatalism in her native Syria, she overgeneralizes to the point where she contradicts herself. For example, she says that sexism and fatalism, as well as aggression, are inevitable results of Islam. She also says that those who speak Arabic as their native language are more profoundly affected by its negative attitude. Yet she doesn't explain how she herself managed to avoid this inevitable trap. Indeed, her husband and her brother also seem to have escaped it. How? She goes into great detail about how classical ("Literary") Arabic is so distinct from colloquial Syrian Arabic as to be unintelligible. She describes how her mother could not understand anything the Imams said, but would rate them on the urgency and stridency in their voices. Yet she disparages Muslims from non-Arabic speaking countries, saying they "parrot" their prayers without knowing what they are saying, while the native Arabic speakers are poisoned by the words they pray-- and understand-- every day. Which is it, Ms. Sultan? Do the native Arabic speakers understand classical Arabic or not? Finally, she acknowledges that she can see no fault at all in the United States. While I certainly appreciate the land of my birth, every place inhabited by humans can use some improvement. I did not find this book to be worth reading. Ms. Sultan doesn't back up her many blanket statements and contradicts herself.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karl

    Is Islam a peaceful religion as so many pro-Islamic organizations would have you believe? The answer to that is ‘No’ according to Dr Wafa Sultan. Dr Sultan is warning us of the encroachment of Shariah Law into western society. It is no small feat to speak out against Islam and Dr Sultan shows through example and metaphor to take on the ogre that Islam has become. In the book 'A God Who Hates', we see the hidden world of women living in an Islamic society. Working at a gynecological department, i Is Islam a peaceful religion as so many pro-Islamic organizations would have you believe? The answer to that is ‘No’ according to Dr Wafa Sultan. Dr Sultan is warning us of the encroachment of Shariah Law into western society. It is no small feat to speak out against Islam and Dr Sultan shows through example and metaphor to take on the ogre that Islam has become. In the book 'A God Who Hates', we see the hidden world of women living in an Islamic society. Working at a gynecological department, intern Sultan was exposed to the plight of Islamic women at the hands of abusive husbands, incestuous relatives and an unsympathetic medical system. What problems do Islamic people have when coming to the west? There are many prejudices Islamic people bring with them when they integrate into western society. Dr Wafa Sultan gets behind the façade that is Islam. I highly recommend this book to people that would like an entertaining and easy read about the true nature of Islam.

  26. 4 out of 5

    David

    I really enjoyed this book and learned more about Islam. From Google Books-- From the front page of The New York Times to YouTube, Dr. Wafa Sultan has become a force radical Islam has to reckon with. For the first time, she tells her story and what she learned, first-hand, about radical Islam in A God Who Hates, a passionate memoir by an outspoken Arabic woman that is also a cautionary tale for the West. She grew up in Syria in a culture ruled by a god who hates women. "How can such a culture be I really enjoyed this book and learned more about Islam. From Google Books-- From the front page of The New York Times to YouTube, Dr. Wafa Sultan has become a force radical Islam has to reckon with. For the first time, she tells her story and what she learned, first-hand, about radical Islam in A God Who Hates, a passionate memoir by an outspoken Arabic woman that is also a cautionary tale for the West. She grew up in Syria in a culture ruled by a god who hates women. "How can such a culture be anything but barbarous?", Sultan asks. "It can't", she concludes "because any culture that hates its women can't love anything else." She believes that the god who hates is waging a battle between modernity and barbarism, not a battle between religions. She also knows that it's a battle radical Islam will lose. Condemned by some and praised by others for speaking out, Sultan wants everyone to understand the danger posed by A God Who Hates.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kiki Bolling

    The book was good, the only thing i didn't like was that Wafa seems to glorify EVERYTHING about America as if it has NO flaws. However she does briefly acknowledge this bias that she has for America. It just seemed SO unbalanced to me. On the other hand the points she made about Islam were good, some things about the religion I never knew. Anyway over all this was a pretty great book. I feel you need to read it with a open mind because if not for SOME people this book may cause some prejudices t The book was good, the only thing i didn't like was that Wafa seems to glorify EVERYTHING about America as if it has NO flaws. However she does briefly acknowledge this bias that she has for America. It just seemed SO unbalanced to me. On the other hand the points she made about Islam were good, some things about the religion I never knew. Anyway over all this was a pretty great book. I feel you need to read it with a open mind because if not for SOME people this book may cause some prejudices to run deeper.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    I am ambivalent about this book. She provides an interesting view of Syria and Islam; nonetheless, she has never found a Muslim who she likes (other than some family members, most of whom she sees as deeply flawed), and never met an American who she doesn't. Even if all of her concerns are valid, it seems unlikely that the US and Americans are as wonderful as she believes (I know we have our own set of flaws), and that Muslims, especially Arabic-speaking Muslims, are as flawed as she describes. I am ambivalent about this book. She provides an interesting view of Syria and Islam; nonetheless, she has never found a Muslim who she likes (other than some family members, most of whom she sees as deeply flawed), and never met an American who she doesn't. Even if all of her concerns are valid, it seems unlikely that the US and Americans are as wonderful as she believes (I know we have our own set of flaws), and that Muslims, especially Arabic-speaking Muslims, are as flawed as she describes. Still, it made me think and look for other books on the Middle East, both good things.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    This book is well written and easy to follow. I'm very interested in reading a book that speaks well of Islam as strongly as she condemns it. It's hard to believe that a religion that is as deeply flawed as she contends has so many followers. Do her experiences speak more clearly of what it is (or was) like to be a woman in Syria? This book is well written and easy to follow. I'm very interested in reading a book that speaks well of Islam as strongly as she condemns it. It's hard to believe that a religion that is as deeply flawed as she contends has so many followers. Do her experiences speak more clearly of what it is (or was) like to be a woman in Syria?

  30. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    Ms. Stultan definitely has a strong view. I always had hoped that Muslims, like Jews and Christians had their extreme groups and than more moderate. According to the author, moderation is not allowed. Her insights into human rights, especially women's, are fascinating. I would love to discuss her writing with Muslim friends, if they will let me! Ms. Stultan definitely has a strong view. I always had hoped that Muslims, like Jews and Christians had their extreme groups and than more moderate. According to the author, moderation is not allowed. Her insights into human rights, especially women's, are fascinating. I would love to discuss her writing with Muslim friends, if they will let me!

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