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If America Were a Village: A Book about the People of the United States

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America, with all its diversity, is not easily defined. David J. Smith's If America Were a Village takes a snapshot - past, present and future - to help define America for children. Using the same successful metaphor of the international bestseller If the World Were a Village, the book shrinks down America to a village of 100. The metaphor helps children easily understand America, with all its diversity, is not easily defined. David J. Smith's If America Were a Village takes a snapshot - past, present and future - to help define America for children. Using the same successful metaphor of the international bestseller If the World Were a Village, the book shrinks down America to a village of 100. The metaphor helps children easily understand American ethnic origins, religions, family profiles, occupations, wealth, belongings and more. Shelagh Armstrong's expansive illustrations imagine America as a classic, vibrant small town. Who are the people living in this vast and varied nation? Where did they come from? What are they like today? How do they compare with people in other countries? The book's simple statistical analysis provides a new way of learning about where people live in America, the state of their health, the shapes and sizes of families, what they use and more - forming a concise picture of a country. If America Were a Village is part of CitizenKid: A collection of books that inform children about the world and inspire them to be better global citizens.


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America, with all its diversity, is not easily defined. David J. Smith's If America Were a Village takes a snapshot - past, present and future - to help define America for children. Using the same successful metaphor of the international bestseller If the World Were a Village, the book shrinks down America to a village of 100. The metaphor helps children easily understand America, with all its diversity, is not easily defined. David J. Smith's If America Were a Village takes a snapshot - past, present and future - to help define America for children. Using the same successful metaphor of the international bestseller If the World Were a Village, the book shrinks down America to a village of 100. The metaphor helps children easily understand American ethnic origins, religions, family profiles, occupations, wealth, belongings and more. Shelagh Armstrong's expansive illustrations imagine America as a classic, vibrant small town. Who are the people living in this vast and varied nation? Where did they come from? What are they like today? How do they compare with people in other countries? The book's simple statistical analysis provides a new way of learning about where people live in America, the state of their health, the shapes and sizes of families, what they use and more - forming a concise picture of a country. If America Were a Village is part of CitizenKid: A collection of books that inform children about the world and inspire them to be better global citizens.

30 review for If America Were a Village: A Book about the People of the United States

  1. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    Excellent for showing how America's melting-pot identity resists generalization. Explanations are straightforward and understandable. The ugly illustrations mean that unfortunately, many children will shun the book. One star docked for those. Excellent for showing how America's melting-pot identity resists generalization. Explanations are straightforward and understandable. The ugly illustrations mean that unfortunately, many children will shun the book. One star docked for those.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    I love these statistic laden books; I think they’re great fun, as well as being informative. I recently read and loved If the World Were a Village: A Book about the World's People. The only downside of this one is, as they say, it’s a snapshot, in this case taking place in 2009. Well, and it seems to be designed for (only?) America’s children if I go by the Contents list. However, one of the things I liked best about this book though is it’s not just about today’s United States in a vacuum; there I love these statistic laden books; I think they’re great fun, as well as being informative. I recently read and loved If the World Were a Village: A Book about the World's People. The only downside of this one is, as they say, it’s a snapshot, in this case taking place in 2009. Well, and it seems to be designed for (only?) America’s children if I go by the Contents list. However, one of the things I liked best about this book though is it’s not just about today’s United States in a vacuum; there is information about past & present and information about how the United States compares with the rest of the world. Topics included are: Welcome to America, Who are we?, Where do we come from?, Where do we live?, What are our families like?, What religions do we practice?, What do we do?, How old are we?, How wealthy are we?, What do we own?, What do we use?, How healthy are we?, America past and future, Helping our children understand America, and a note on sources. I loved the final couple of pages. They give excellent tips on how to broach and delve into these issues with children. The illustrations are pleasant to view, but they don’t really enhance the information all that much.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dee Dee G

    This was so well done. It’s geared towards children understanding America but a lot of American adults could benefit by reading this also.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    Author David J. Smith and illustrator Shelagh Armstrong, who previously collaborated on If the World Were a Village: A Book about the World's Peoplee, join forces again in this similar examination of the United States of America. Imagining the population of the USA (around 306 million at the time of publication) as a village of one hundred people, the author explores everything from demographics to wealth distribution, family structure to health situation. This approach gives young readers an id Author David J. Smith and illustrator Shelagh Armstrong, who previously collaborated on If the World Were a Village: A Book about the World's Peoplee, join forces again in this similar examination of the United States of America. Imagining the population of the USA (around 306 million at the time of publication) as a village of one hundred people, the author explores everything from demographics to wealth distribution, family structure to health situation. This approach gives young readers an idea of the larger picture, when it comes to the population of the United States, simplifying what would otherwise be a very complicated topic... I enjoyed Smith and Armstrong's first book some years ago, and had always meant to pick up this companion volume, but somehow never managed to get around to it. Having recently been reading other titles in the Citizen Kid collection, I finally managed to track it down, and I'm glad I did. Although probably already a little dated - it was published in 2009 - If America Were a Village: A Book about the People of the United States is still a very valuable book, breaking down statistics in easily understood ways for children. As the author notes in his afterword, 100 is an easily understood number, and will help children to understand the topic. Numbers in the millions begin to feel abstract and unreal, I think, so Smith's approach is definitely helpful, as are the strategies he suggests, for discussing these topics with children. Although I wouldn't say it was a personal favorite, the artwork here, done in acrylic paint, is nevertheless colorful and engaging. All in all, a very worthwhile book, one I would recommend to young readers with an interest in geography and/or statistics. This could be a very useful addition to an upper primary or middle-grade social studies unit.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    You can't rush through this book. It's filled with so many statistics and interesting facts that you need to go slowly so that you you can get your head around it all. There's a LOT to talk about and think about here. This book would be great for math lessons in fractions and charting and graphing all the statistics. One depressing statistic--one twentieth of all the people in the U.S. have more than half the wealth!! Another depressing statistic--the U.S. ranks 40 in the world in life expectanc You can't rush through this book. It's filled with so many statistics and interesting facts that you need to go slowly so that you you can get your head around it all. There's a LOT to talk about and think about here. This book would be great for math lessons in fractions and charting and graphing all the statistics. One depressing statistic--one twentieth of all the people in the U.S. have more than half the wealth!! Another depressing statistic--the U.S. ranks 40 in the world in life expectancy, because the quality of our health care is so much poorer than in other countries. Like I said, LOTS to talk about. Recommended for adults as well as children.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    I have infinite respect for children’s books that attempt to clarify concepts that are difficult for the human brain to understand. Trying to comprehend the concept of a million? There’s David M. Schwartz’s How Much is a Million to help you. A little foggy on philosophical topics like the nature of good and evil? Really Really Big Questions by Stephen Law is the book for you. And the population of The United States of America? Look, you can lob numbers at the head of a ten-year-old all day for a I have infinite respect for children’s books that attempt to clarify concepts that are difficult for the human brain to understand. Trying to comprehend the concept of a million? There’s David M. Schwartz’s How Much is a Million to help you. A little foggy on philosophical topics like the nature of good and evil? Really Really Big Questions by Stephen Law is the book for you. And the population of The United States of America? Look, you can lob numbers at the head of a ten-year-old all day for all the good it’ll do you. Tell a child that there are 306 million people in The United States today and I’m sure they’ll dutifully write down the number, but what will it really mean to them? How on earth do you get someone to understand the real statistics of their country in a fun, informative, and memorable fashion? Author and teacher David J. Smith hit upon the answer in 2002 when he wrote If the World Were a Village. The concept was simple: Reduce the population of the world to a mere 100 people in a village. With that village, Smith was able to discuss race, religion, poverty, and other topics. Now Smith is back with illustrator Shelagh Armstrong to present If America Were a Village. Same concept, but far more down-to-earth, and something that may yet penetrate the brains of the readers who pick it up. Classrooms everywhere, rejoice. After reducing 306 million American people to a mere 100, David Smith covers all the essential topics. Ethnicity, occupations, religion, consumption, health, etc. Accompanied by thick acrylic paintings of this village of 100, kids get an in-depth look at the state of the United States today. A note at the beginning defines the terms “America” and “American” while backmatter includes suggestions for projects related to this subject, and an extensive Bibliography contains websites and primary print sources galore. As with any book that relies on statistics, this book is only as up-to-date as the latest census poll. So with the ups and downs of the current economy, we have to be lenient if the number of villagers in this book that have slipped into poverty has gone up since this book was originally written. Interestingly, though this book is all about the numbers, there’s only a small section projecting our state in the future. “By 2050, the population is predicted to be about 419 million, about one-third larger than today. If the population were shrunk to a village of 100, there would be 72 whites (including 24 Hispanics), 15 blacks, 8 Asians and 5 who identify themselves as members of other races.” I suppose it makes a fair amount of sense that Smith wouldn’t say much more than this. It could be problematic if any of those projections or predictions turned out to be false. It would date a book that, by dint of its very existence in time, must be dated. Illustrator Shelagh Armstrong’s style is not one that would have been my immediate first choice as a companion to this material, but I think the improves upon If the World Were a Village. In that title Armstrong was criticized for not showing enough faces of the people in the village. In this book, the villagers’ faces are everywhere. You certainly have the impression that this is an active, working, contemporary village. Mind you, when Smith offers us information about the unfortunate state of health and poverty in America today, the pictures certainly do not match. Smith might be offering a complex look at the ups and downs of our country based entirely on numbers, but Armstrong seems inclined to show only the good at all times. So while many of the people in the village “live below the poverty line” (14 as of 2008), 13 people have trouble finding food, and 65 people are overweight, the accompanying images are always of happy people, sometimes with babies. While it is possible that there are kids out there who adore statistics and will find this book fascinating, I see the potential for this title to be pretty curriculum based. Smith backs me up on this one by providing copious backmatter that will be useful to teachers who wish to do units on America, but want to try something a little different. And if teachers are hoping to pair this with another book that gives the vast scope of the world a different kind of look, consider When It’s Six o’clock in San Francisco: A Trip Through Time Zones by Cynthia Jaynes Omololu. As it stands, it’s hard not to get a kick out of this book. A unique idea applied to a subject area we are all familiar with, Smith injects life into a usually dry, rote subject area. Necessary purchase, this one. For teachers, librarians, and already interested kids, anyway. Ages 9 and up.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer (JenIsNotaBookSnob)

    This is a really cool book. Basically, the book imagines if American was a village of 100 people and shows the proportions of people in poverty, how many have TV's and so on. It's a really interesting book. There is another book, It the World Were a Village which is even better. If you can only choose one, I would probably choose the world version. However, they are both great books, just one has a narrower focus. It is kind of long, paragraphs per page, but, good for children with longer attent This is a really cool book. Basically, the book imagines if American was a village of 100 people and shows the proportions of people in poverty, how many have TV's and so on. It's a really interesting book. There is another book, It the World Were a Village which is even better. If you can only choose one, I would probably choose the world version. However, they are both great books, just one has a narrower focus. It is kind of long, paragraphs per page, but, good for children with longer attention spans or good broken up into a page or two at a time.

  8. 5 out of 5

    David

    If America Were a Village: A Book about the People of the United States by David Julian Smith, illustrated by Shelagh Armstrong imagines America as a village of 100, in a similar way as in If the World Were a Village. This metaphor helps children more easily understand American ethnic origins, religions, family profiles, occupations, wealth, belongings and more. This unique and objective resource examines origins, race, languages, nationalities, population distribution, family characteristics, re If America Were a Village: A Book about the People of the United States by David Julian Smith, illustrated by Shelagh Armstrong imagines America as a village of 100, in a similar way as in If the World Were a Village. This metaphor helps children more easily understand American ethnic origins, religions, family profiles, occupations, wealth, belongings and more. This unique and objective resource examines origins, race, languages, nationalities, population distribution, family characteristics, religions, occupations, ages, wealth, possessions, water, energy and resource use, health and America in the past and in the future. In the back of the book is advice on teaching children about America in the global village, including websites, book resources, questions, travel, cultural heritage, American symbols, etc., and and a note on American statistical resources and how the calculations were made. The illustrations are bright, but seem to reflect a more positive look than many of the statistics being discussed would indicate. This is an amazingly valuable resource to help children, teens and adults understand American population numbers and conditions in the United States. Many fascinating facts are made comprehensible. Among the points that leaped out to me are: “In 1900, 96 percent (of American immigrants) came from Europe…. In 2000, 15 percent came from Europe, 49 percent came from Latin America, 31 percent from Asia and 5 percent from other places.” page 8 "50, half the population, live in just nine states - 12 in California, 8 in Texas, 6 each in New York and Florida, 4 each in Illinois, Pennsylvania and Ohio, and 3 each in Michigan and Georgia." page 11 “Americans are also the world’s top users of water…. You’d need an Olympic-sized swimming pool to hold the water each American uses, on average, each year – about 456,000 gallons….” page 23 "5 people have more than half of all the wealth." page 20 “Sixty-five people are overweight.” (out of our 100) page 27 The United States is aging faster than the world as a whole. page 19 Peope in the US village of 100 own 81 cars, 73 cell phones, 74 TV's, 200 radios, 76 computers, 39 bicycles and 40 portable media players. page 23. My only quibble other than the illustrations is the placement of 'A note on the words "America" and "American" ' on a page before the contents where many readers, including me, may miss it on the first reading and not immediately know that America is being substituted for The United States. This book will help teach children a valuable lesson about what we have in the world, compared to so many others. There are many possible curricular uses for this book, including social studies, geography, math and science. This book is highly recommended for school and public libraries, for home schoolers, and for those who wish to foster a world view in children. Hopefully it will be updated, as has If the World Were a Village. For grades 4 to 7 (and up), multicultural, statistics, world-mindedness, social studies, geography, natural resources, distribution of resources, population themes, and fans of David J. Smith and Shelagh Armstrong.

  9. 5 out of 5

    529_Regina

    If America Were a Village A Book about the People of the United States by: David J. Smith, Illus. by Shelagh Armstrong Intermediate and up Kids Can Press (2009) 32p. ISBN-10: 1554533449 $12.89 "Each person in this village of 100 will represent more than 3 million Americans in the real world." David Smith takes the 306 million people living in America and describes them in the context of 100 people living in the village of America. This picture book is more of a resource than it is a story. It doesn't If America Were a Village A Book about the People of the United States by: David J. Smith, Illus. by Shelagh Armstrong Intermediate and up Kids Can Press (2009) 32p. ISBN-10: 1554533449 $12.89 "Each person in this village of 100 will represent more than 3 million Americans in the real world." David Smith takes the 306 million people living in America and describes them in the context of 100 people living in the village of America. This picture book is more of a resource than it is a story. It doesn't read as a narrative but as expository text relaying information about the religions, economy, ethnicity, language , etc. of the people of the Village of America. The illustrations are beautifully done and support the sentiment of the text. However a novice reader could not use the illustrations to assist in their understanding of the text. While the information is useful, I believe it is a challenging text to use in the classroom setting. You could read this book with children in the 3rd grade through 12th. I believe it has a place at a wide range of levels. However there are some draw backs to the style of writing and "story pattern". Visual and spacial learners would have to "see" the numbers as you're reading it. Although 100 is a much smaller number than 306 million, it is still difficult to visualize. The author of the book includes some suggestions in making the text come alive in the last pages of the book. (awesome resource). In the past, I've used another of David Smith's titles in may class IF THE WORLD WERE A VILLAGE. In that lesson I created a power point and used bingo chips to help illustrate the numbers depicted in the text. Even after the lesson, I found it imperative for the students to read the book for themselves. The second reading really brought the idea home Even after stating all of that, I plan on using this book to begin the year in the fall as an introduction to the modern American society. I will be teaching about the America from the turn of the century to present day. I think this book will be an awesome start.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    If the World Were a Village is one of my favorite all-time books. I’ve always wanted to use that book at school to talk to kids about what people are like all over the world. So I was very happy to see this new book, a sequel of sorts. And it is satisfying for someone such as me who loves statistics and who is always trying to figure out what makes people the way they are. Smith reduces the 306 million people in the United States down to a village of 100 people. He does this to make it clearer t If the World Were a Village is one of my favorite all-time books. I’ve always wanted to use that book at school to talk to kids about what people are like all over the world. So I was very happy to see this new book, a sequel of sorts. And it is satisfying for someone such as me who loves statistics and who is always trying to figure out what makes people the way they are. Smith reduces the 306 million people in the United States down to a village of 100 people. He does this to make it clearer to children (and grownup readers) what the people of the US are like. A few random facts that interested me from the book: “In 1900, 96 percent (of American immigrants) came from Europe….In 2000, 15 percent came from Europe, 49 percent came from Latin America, 31 percent from Asia and 5 percent from other places.” “…Americans are not the top users of cell phones…the highest number, 158 per 100 people, in Luxembourg.” Why, I wonder. “Americans are also the world’s top users of water….You’d need an Olympic-sized swimming pool to hold the water each American uses, on average, each year – about 456,000 gallons….” Whew! That’s a half million gallons of water for each person! And in one day, Americans use 4 million plastic cups. Scary! Another scary fact: “Sixty-five people (out of our 100) are overweight.” Oh dear. I wish the pictures had helped tell the story a little more. For me, I would have liked pictures that enhanced the difficult concepts a bit more. A great place for thinking maps.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Fjóla

    We'd been planning to read this book for a while, but I was greatly underwhelmed by it. I like the concept, but the numbers did not spring alive in this book. My son showed interest, but I myself ended up finding it really tedious, as much as I otherwise love numbers and statistical data. In short it's an enumeration of census data, with acrylic illustrations. Aside from the pictures and explaining percentages in terms of a village of a hundred people, there was no attempt to make the text more We'd been planning to read this book for a while, but I was greatly underwhelmed by it. I like the concept, but the numbers did not spring alive in this book. My son showed interest, but I myself ended up finding it really tedious, as much as I otherwise love numbers and statistical data. In short it's an enumeration of census data, with acrylic illustrations. Aside from the pictures and explaining percentages in terms of a village of a hundred people, there was no attempt to make the text more interesting. The cover of the book, an illustration also found inside the book, looked great to me, but none of the other illustrations come anywhere close in the level of detail, so overall I wasn't terribly impressed with the picture either unfortunately.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shaeley Santiago

    Like If the World Were a Village: A Book about the World's People, this book presents the statistics about America in the context of a 100 person village. It covers topics ranging from religion, money, ancestry, occupations, age, and other demographics. Might work well in the classroom for social studies units on an overview of the U.S., the census or related statistics or even in comparison with other countries in the world. Could also be used for math to demonstrate the concept of percentages. Like If the World Were a Village: A Book about the World's People, this book presents the statistics about America in the context of a 100 person village. It covers topics ranging from religion, money, ancestry, occupations, age, and other demographics. Might work well in the classroom for social studies units on an overview of the U.S., the census or related statistics or even in comparison with other countries in the world. Could also be used for math to demonstrate the concept of percentages.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    What a fascinating book! It "is an attempt to take a statistical snapshot of America -- past, present, and future -- to make it more comprehensible to children. By reducing the entire population to a village of 100, we can see the various groups and the similarities and differences amont them. We can also compare America with other countries to see what similarities and differences this reveals." Looking at a large, abstract concept this way is very eye-opening. Includes an author's note with mo What a fascinating book! It "is an attempt to take a statistical snapshot of America -- past, present, and future -- to make it more comprehensible to children. By reducing the entire population to a village of 100, we can see the various groups and the similarities and differences amont them. We can also compare America with other countries to see what similarities and differences this reveals." Looking at a large, abstract concept this way is very eye-opening. Includes an author's note with more suggestions for helping children understand America, and some cited sources.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christina Maxwell

    An easy to understand statistical look at what makes up America as a country.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Abbey

    This is a great book for second grade +. The book attempts to explain statistical information so that children can understand the demographic composition of the United States. Basically, by breaking down a statistic about religion they claim there is a village of 100 people and 82 of them are Christian, etc.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Josie Miller

    I liked this book. The pictures were really engaging and I thought that it gave an interesting perspective of what the United States looks like in a scaled down form. This book talked about different races, languages, home lives, activities, jobs, and religions. It tried to include everyone and talked about celebrating the fact that the United States is full of diverse people.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Holland

    Fascinating perspective of America as seen through ratios. The author shares facts about America depicting America as a village of 100 people. This book helps students understand the power of ratios and percents, as well as the impact that many factors have on the world, and on America.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ana Hernandez

    The book talks about religion, employment, ethnicity, and history about America. The book can be use to talk about America's history and ethnicity. Even though the book was published in 2009 the history is the same and we could compare current research to the book. We could also hypothesize the future of America according to the book and further research. The book talks about religion, employment, ethnicity, and history about America. The book can be use to talk about America's history and ethnicity. Even though the book was published in 2009 the history is the same and we could compare current research to the book. We could also hypothesize the future of America according to the book and further research.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kary

    This would be a great book to use in a Social Studies classroom - would not work as well for a storytime.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Watson

    So many cool facts!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Clement

    This beautiful Informational Picture Book introduces readers to America. Since there are 306 million people living in America David Smith, the author of this magnificent book, reduces America to a village of just 100 people to make it easier for children to grasp. This book uses a simple metaphor to create a snapshot of America. Through the detailed text and beautiful, colored illustrations readers learn about the population, the economy, religions, natural resources, what Americans do and how t This beautiful Informational Picture Book introduces readers to America. Since there are 306 million people living in America David Smith, the author of this magnificent book, reduces America to a village of just 100 people to make it easier for children to grasp. This book uses a simple metaphor to create a snapshot of America. Through the detailed text and beautiful, colored illustrations readers learn about the population, the economy, religions, natural resources, what Americans do and how they live focusing on both the past and the present. This book was published in 2009 and through the beautiful pictures and explicit text it makes America come alive to the eyes of a child. I would highly recommend this book! It honors the multi-cultures of America and represents America in a fashion that children can relate to and understand. It was very informative for my second graders and they really enjoyed listening to it and the text and the pictures generated a great discussion about my students' immense world around them that they often take for granted!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    I'm highly intrigued by this book. Author David J. Smith has made an effort to break down statistical information about US citizens into manageable terms by reducing the population of our country to 100. This makes it easy to really understand what portions of our population work in certain field, practice certain religions, live in certain areas, etc. I'd recomend this book to anyone - children or adults - who's looking to put a few things about our nation into perspective. This would also be a I'm highly intrigued by this book. Author David J. Smith has made an effort to break down statistical information about US citizens into manageable terms by reducing the population of our country to 100. This makes it easy to really understand what portions of our population work in certain field, practice certain religions, live in certain areas, etc. I'd recomend this book to anyone - children or adults - who's looking to put a few things about our nation into perspective. This would also be a great book for classroom use in about our country today and/or diversity. Yes, the book is time-sensitive and this information will no longer be entirely relevent in 10 years time. But for now, it's really fascinating to learn that in our village of 100, one person (representing 3 million people) holds over 30% of the nation's wealth. And only one person is Jewish, and one other Muslim. Wow.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey Kalinski

    I chose to pair this text to The Keeping Quilt by Patricia Polacco. If America Were a Village: A Book about the People of the United States informs children all about the diversity and uniqueness of the United States from its founding to present day. The Keeping Quilt is a story about a family from Russia who immigrates to the United States. It tells about their traditions that followed them all along the generation of their family that have lived in America. In the beginning, the first family t I chose to pair this text to The Keeping Quilt by Patricia Polacco. If America Were a Village: A Book about the People of the United States informs children all about the diversity and uniqueness of the United States from its founding to present day. The Keeping Quilt is a story about a family from Russia who immigrates to the United States. It tells about their traditions that followed them all along the generation of their family that have lived in America. In the beginning, the first family that first moved from Russia to the United States make a quilt so that their heritage is never forgotten as it is passed down from generation to generation. While If America Were a Village informs and gives facts to children about how diverse America is, The Keeping Quilt gives children an example of just one of the many backgrounds found in America today.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shersta

    From statistics on where we come from, which languages we speak, the kinds of religions found, to the age, gender, health and even energy consumption habits, If America Were a Village covers it all. Despite a few technical issues and inconsistencies, I greatly enjoyed this approach to teaching kids about the people that make up the citizens of the United States. Overall, Smith has produced an engaging read, on that takes complex numbers and makes them easy to understand. The comparisons to other From statistics on where we come from, which languages we speak, the kinds of religions found, to the age, gender, health and even energy consumption habits, If America Were a Village covers it all. Despite a few technical issues and inconsistencies, I greatly enjoyed this approach to teaching kids about the people that make up the citizens of the United States. Overall, Smith has produced an engaging read, on that takes complex numbers and makes them easy to understand. The comparisons to other countries were also interesting, but tended to distract from the book’s stated purpose at times. With a pensive tone set by illustrations that are beautifully crafted and molded to the text, If America Were a Village is a valuable and educational resource for young readers, and definitely one I’d include in a curriculum.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Theme: processing facts, awareness of the people and cultures around us I first heard about this book in EDR 624 and as soon as it was introduced I knew I needed to read it! What a cool book that presents a ton of information in a way that second graders can wrap their head around. I love all the different topics and the facts presented. As I read each page I was visualizing the US as a village of 100. Classroom connection: I am going to use this book for our families unit as well as when we talk Theme: processing facts, awareness of the people and cultures around us I first heard about this book in EDR 624 and as soon as it was introduced I knew I needed to read it! What a cool book that presents a ton of information in a way that second graders can wrap their head around. I love all the different topics and the facts presented. As I read each page I was visualizing the US as a village of 100. Classroom connection: I am going to use this book for our families unit as well as when we talk about differences in families. It would also be a great book to use during our factions unit. I think this would be a great book to have in our classroom library where the kids can read during daily 5.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Krista Rey

    This book is very similar to "If the World Were a Village" in the fact that it is set up in the same format. The book starts out with some basic facts of where we live, what our families are like, religions etc. The one section I really lil was the section "Who are we?" I think sometimes we forget our identity and who we are as people. This book is great for basic facts about our country in more of a story telling type of way. It's not just listed facts about America, but more digging deeper int This book is very similar to "If the World Were a Village" in the fact that it is set up in the same format. The book starts out with some basic facts of where we live, what our families are like, religions etc. The one section I really lil was the section "Who are we?" I think sometimes we forget our identity and who we are as people. This book is great for basic facts about our country in more of a story telling type of way. It's not just listed facts about America, but more digging deeper into the real story and morals behind it. This could be used to promote kindness in the classroom. Children need to see that we are all one and we are all the same despite our differences. This would also be a fun book for kids to just sit down and read on their own if they have time.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Salsabrarian

    Have you ever received the e-mail that reduces the world to 100 people and describes how many of the 100 speak English, are Muslim, have a college education, etc.? This is the same concept but it uses the United States as its base population. A lot of statistics and percentages are thrown out there, making this book somewhat abstract for younger kids. To get the book's points across, adults should be willing to break down the numbers in graphic representations for their kids or students. Middle Have you ever received the e-mail that reduces the world to 100 people and describes how many of the 100 speak English, are Muslim, have a college education, etc.? This is the same concept but it uses the United States as its base population. A lot of statistics and percentages are thrown out there, making this book somewhat abstract for younger kids. To get the book's points across, adults should be willing to break down the numbers in graphic representations for their kids or students. Middle and high schoolers with a good grasp of percentages should be fine. The author includes recommended activities for getting the most out of the book and cites the print and online resources he used to compile statistics. A companion title to "If the World were a Village."

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alexa Maring

    This book would make a great section to teaching about the United States. It is an informational book and David Smith does a fantastic job at turning the United States into a village of people. I would recommend this book for older students because of the amount of information and complexity of simplifying a country into a village of one hundred people. In the higher grades you could also talk about the mathematics behind the author's ability to compress large numbers into a smaller scale. I lov This book would make a great section to teaching about the United States. It is an informational book and David Smith does a fantastic job at turning the United States into a village of people. I would recommend this book for older students because of the amount of information and complexity of simplifying a country into a village of one hundred people. In the higher grades you could also talk about the mathematics behind the author's ability to compress large numbers into a smaller scale. I love how this book talks about size, religion, languages, age, jobs, etc. to help students learn about America and understand how diverse our country is.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Woodman

    The more I think about it the more Iike this book--it is published by Citizen Kid, which purports to aim books at making kids better global citizens. This one talks about what it was like in America 100 years ago, what it is like now, and what the world is like now. So the perspectives of how many people who live here weren't born here, how many people in the world are Muslim compared to here, what percentage of the population lives in cities now versus a century ago., It was a simple approach t The more I think about it the more Iike this book--it is published by Citizen Kid, which purports to aim books at making kids better global citizens. This one talks about what it was like in America 100 years ago, what it is like now, and what the world is like now. So the perspectives of how many people who live here weren't born here, how many people in the world are Muslim compared to here, what percentage of the population lives in cities now versus a century ago., It was a simple approach to what can be complex material

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    I give four stars to the idea of this book, but fewer to the actual presentation of information. Translating huge numbers into a village of 100 is a great way to make difficult concepts easier for kids (and me!) to understand. However, I was disappointed that the illustrations weren't more helpful in conveying the numbers. This book would be useful in a classroom setting or as a conversation starter, but I can't imagine kids sitting down to read it cover to cover. I give four stars to the idea of this book, but fewer to the actual presentation of information. Translating huge numbers into a village of 100 is a great way to make difficult concepts easier for kids (and me!) to understand. However, I was disappointed that the illustrations weren't more helpful in conveying the numbers. This book would be useful in a classroom setting or as a conversation starter, but I can't imagine kids sitting down to read it cover to cover.

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