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Histories of City and State in the Persian Gulf: Manama Since 1800

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In this path-breaking and multi-layered account of one of the least explored societies in the Middle East, Nelida Fuccaro examines the political and social life of the Gulf city and its coastline, as exemplified by Manama in Bahrain. Written as an ethnography of space, politics and community, it addresses the changing relationship between urban development, politics and so In this path-breaking and multi-layered account of one of the least explored societies in the Middle East, Nelida Fuccaro examines the political and social life of the Gulf city and its coastline, as exemplified by Manama in Bahrain. Written as an ethnography of space, politics and community, it addresses the changing relationship between urban development, politics and society before and after the discovery of oil. By using a variety of local sources and oral histories, Fuccaro questions the role played by the British Empire and oil in state-making. Instead, she draws attention to urban residents, elites and institutions as active participants in state and nation building. She also examines how the city has continued to provide a source of political, social and sectarian identity since the early nineteenth century, challenging the view that the advent of oil and modernity represented a radical break in the urban past of the region.


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In this path-breaking and multi-layered account of one of the least explored societies in the Middle East, Nelida Fuccaro examines the political and social life of the Gulf city and its coastline, as exemplified by Manama in Bahrain. Written as an ethnography of space, politics and community, it addresses the changing relationship between urban development, politics and so In this path-breaking and multi-layered account of one of the least explored societies in the Middle East, Nelida Fuccaro examines the political and social life of the Gulf city and its coastline, as exemplified by Manama in Bahrain. Written as an ethnography of space, politics and community, it addresses the changing relationship between urban development, politics and society before and after the discovery of oil. By using a variety of local sources and oral histories, Fuccaro questions the role played by the British Empire and oil in state-making. Instead, she draws attention to urban residents, elites and institutions as active participants in state and nation building. She also examines how the city has continued to provide a source of political, social and sectarian identity since the early nineteenth century, challenging the view that the advent of oil and modernity represented a radical break in the urban past of the region.

37 review for Histories of City and State in the Persian Gulf: Manama Since 1800

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zaynab

    I wouldn't say the book is well written but it does contain within it some very important facts about Bahrains history that i found intriguing. The parts i found most interesting were the ones about the different revolutions and uprisings that took place in the past century. The government controlled media in Bahrain has attacked this book, that in itself should promote it. One of the realizations i reached reading it, was to what extent some known families in Bahrain supported both the alkhalif I wouldn't say the book is well written but it does contain within it some very important facts about Bahrains history that i found intriguing. The parts i found most interesting were the ones about the different revolutions and uprisings that took place in the past century. The government controlled media in Bahrain has attacked this book, that in itself should promote it. One of the realizations i reached reading it, was to what extent some known families in Bahrain supported both the alkhalifas and the british imperialists for personal gain, some of those families remain to this day wealthy and powerful. While many of the villages and their Baharna residents (natives) also inherit much of the oppression, poverty and the reality of being second class citizens. On a more positive note they also inherit "Shi'ism as an ideology of resistance against state power". Which frankly is many times in Bahrains history the only outlet for the frustrations of the oppressed. Some parts also reflect imperialist attitudes towards our country, by for example calling our mosques "little better than barns" or describing Bahrainis as "ignorant intellectually dull and naturally stupid". In truth the british government to this day say they are the friends of Bahrain, but in reality they are and always were only the friends of the oppressors in our country, and that definitely does not make them friends to Bahrainis. My favourite part of the book was bringing an example of how the Baharna in 1932 in an Ashoura play about Imam Hussain, depicted Ibn Zyad dressed in the uniform of a british soldier. Shia Anti imperialism at its best :)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shay Morris-Doty

  3. 4 out of 5

    Elena

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bur

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed

  7. 4 out of 5

    Abdulrahman

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ebrahim Mohammed

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ali Faqihi

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anurag

  11. 4 out of 5

    Yusuf Abdulwahab

  12. 4 out of 5

    إبراهيم الجامع

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ali Karimi

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ghadeer Alkhenaizi

  16. 4 out of 5

    Foppe

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rayyash

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zainab A

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hadi

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed al-Jamri

  21. 5 out of 5

    Waleed

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joel Trono-Doerksen

  23. 5 out of 5

    Zainab Al-Sammak

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vance

  25. 4 out of 5

    Leofgyth

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alam

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ali Al-Khalifa

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amar Baines

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mariam Alnoaimi

  30. 4 out of 5

    Audrey E

  31. 5 out of 5

    Noor Ali

  32. 4 out of 5

    Rohith

  33. 4 out of 5

    Abeer Qaed

  34. 4 out of 5

    Camille Ammoun

  35. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Mercille

  36. 5 out of 5

    Ali

  37. 4 out of 5

    Razi Tahir

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