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Los Angeles: A.D. 2017

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A novel based on the TV series The Name of The Game.


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A novel based on the TV series The Name of The Game.

30 review for Los Angeles: A.D. 2017

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bandit

    This was essentially an ambitious expansion of a screenplay from the 1970s tv show that dropped flat on its face. The author was a strong early proponent of the climate crisis theories and as such the book reads eerily prescient in the actual year 2017 where the budget cuts to environmental protections agencies have just been slashed. But while the book starts off promisingly and socially relevant (some paragraphs can be ripped right out of modern newspapers, the top financial magnates refusing This was essentially an ambitious expansion of a screenplay from the 1970s tv show that dropped flat on its face. The author was a strong early proponent of the climate crisis theories and as such the book reads eerily prescient in the actual year 2017 where the budget cuts to environmental protections agencies have just been slashed. But while the book starts off promisingly and socially relevant (some paragraphs can be ripped right out of modern newspapers, the top financial magnates refusing to reign in their abuse of nature's resources citing this impediment to progress as unAmerican and son on is practically a satire), it soon remembers that it is a child of the 70s (1971 to be precise) and proceeds as such, a sort of prurient gallop through the futuristic subterranean fascist like society that has developed very specific survival strategies/sex politics including reasonably well argued for eugenics and creepy argued for, not to mention absolutely inexcusable, pedophilia. And so it goes on with a distinctly 70s vibe to its tiresome sex scenes until the inevitable and hugest cop out of all time ending....it was all a dream. Disappointing as a book, this one probably should have been left as a tv episode. At least a pretty quick read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    I picked up this book several years ago on a lark; I buried it under a stack of other books and said I was going to wait until 2017 to read it and, amazingly, I did. Wylie produced some very good early science fiction, such as Gladiator and When Worlds Collide, and I believe he wrote at least one of the old Charlie Chan films. This was originally a screenplay written for an almost forgotten NBC television series called The Name of the Game; the episode was directed by Steven Spielberg, and Wylie I picked up this book several years ago on a lark; I buried it under a stack of other books and said I was going to wait until 2017 to read it and, amazingly, I did. Wylie produced some very good early science fiction, such as Gladiator and When Worlds Collide, and I believe he wrote at least one of the old Charlie Chan films. This was originally a screenplay written for an almost forgotten NBC television series called The Name of the Game; the episode was directed by Steven Spielberg, and Wylie subsequently novelized his own script. Sadly, it's not a very good book. There is a lot of prolonged philosophizing about sex that's quite awkward and very '60s Hefneresque, and the attitudes and situations are frequently wince-worthy. The writing is odd in that there are commas sprinkled apparently, randomly, everywhichwhere, as, if the, typesetter had a, quota to, fill, that makes, the reading, rather, stilted. And the ending is a real drop. On the plus side, the information presented about the effects of pollution and over-population on the environment is quite striking and thought-provoking, coming as it does from a half-century in the past. It's presented in rather dogmatic clumps, but points out that we've known the dangers for a long time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ralph Jones

    To be suddenly brought to almost 50 years into the future would be traumatizing, right? That’s what Los Angeles A.D. 2017 by Philip Wylie is all about. Glenn Howard finds himself in 2017 where everyone in Los Angeles had to live underground because the air is too bad to live in. Even though this book was published in the 1970s, while the real situation in 2017 is not as bad as the one depicted in the book, we should acknowledge how this is a story about the consequences for not taking care of the To be suddenly brought to almost 50 years into the future would be traumatizing, right? That’s what Los Angeles A.D. 2017 by Philip Wylie is all about. Glenn Howard finds himself in 2017 where everyone in Los Angeles had to live underground because the air is too bad to live in. Even though this book was published in the 1970s, while the real situation in 2017 is not as bad as the one depicted in the book, we should acknowledge how this is a story about the consequences for not taking care of the environment. However, was this book really necessary? In our current time, we call this kind of a book a movie tie-in, which, in this case, a tie-in from an episode of a television show. The plot is kind of interesting, because the police were run by psychiatrists. But the fact that it all ended with a scene where Glenn was only dreaming, it takes away the whole suspense in the plot. Though, we did receive a scene where he sees a dead bird. A bad omen, but it could mean anything. In conclusion: we have to take care of our environment nonetheless, but to have the story ended with “it was only just a dream” was pretty lame.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Is it real? The story begins at a conference of business moguls and scientists and sex. It continues with more sex and questions why all the sex. One of the strangest books I’ve read in a while.

  5. 4 out of 5

    L.G.

    This just didn't work for me. I borrowed it by mistake. I had confused the title of this book with a book by a different author. But, since I had it, I didn't return it. I do enjoy reading Science Fiction books. But, I wouldn't recommend this one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David Szondy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It starts out as a promising expansion of the screenplay, but soon veers off into a novel-length lecture on the wonders of the sexual revolution that seem downright creepy when seen from the other side. The villains are cardboard, as are the other characters, the dystopia never rings true, and, worst of all, the environmentalist theme (which was the whole point of the teleplay)is dumped right out the window by the last chapters.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris Stutts

    Saw the episode in prime time. Directed by Spielberg?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    Well, written example of dystopian SF. Based on a television episode the author wrote, Wylie actually went much anything that could ever have been shown on 1971 television.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jes McBride

  10. 4 out of 5

    John Silbersack

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Hummel

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emil

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  14. 4 out of 5

    James G

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Beaulieu

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mitch

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

  18. 4 out of 5

    Zac Finger

  19. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  20. 5 out of 5

    Al

  21. 5 out of 5

    Peter

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tab

  23. 5 out of 5

    Peter

  24. 5 out of 5

    Grandmat

  25. 4 out of 5

    Al Jones

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mhorg

  27. 4 out of 5

    John

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mabelle C. Hennessey

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kurt McNeely

  30. 5 out of 5

    BOB RUST

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