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John Perkins has seen the signs of today's economic meltdown before. The subprime mortgage fiascos, the banking industry collapse, the rising tide of unemployment, the shuttering of small businesses across the landscape are all too familiar symptoms of a far greater disease. In his former life as an economic hit man, he was on the front lines both as an observer and a perp John Perkins has seen the signs of today's economic meltdown before. The subprime mortgage fiascos, the banking industry collapse, the rising tide of unemployment, the shuttering of small businesses across the landscape are all too familiar symptoms of a far greater disease. In his former life as an economic hit man, he was on the front lines both as an observer and a perpetrator of events, once confined only to the third world, that have now sent the United Statesâ€"and in fact the entire planetâ€"spiraling toward disaster. Here, Perkins pulls back the curtain on the real cause of the current global financial meltdown. He shows how we've been hoodwinked by the CEOs who run the corporatocracyâ€"those few corporations that control the vast amounts of capital, land, and resources around the globeâ€"and the politicians they manipulate. These corporate fat cats, Perkins explains, have sold us all on what he calls predatory capitalism, a misguided form of geopolitics and capitalism that encourages a widespread exploitation of the many to benefit a small number of the already very wealthy. Their arrogance, gluttony, and mismanagement have brought us to this perilous edge. The solution is not a "return to normal."But there is a way out. As Perkins makes clear, we can create a healthy economy that will encourage businesses to act responsibly, not only in the interests of their shareholders and corporate partners (and the lobbyists they have in their pockets), but in the interests of their employees, their customers, the environment, and society at large.We can create a society that fosters a just, sustainable, and safe world for us and our children. Each one of us makes these choices every day, in ways that are clearly spelled out in this book. "We hold the power," he says, "if only we recognize it." Hoodwinked is a powerful polemic that shows not only how we arrived at this precarious point in our history but also what we must do to stop the global tailspin.


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John Perkins has seen the signs of today's economic meltdown before. The subprime mortgage fiascos, the banking industry collapse, the rising tide of unemployment, the shuttering of small businesses across the landscape are all too familiar symptoms of a far greater disease. In his former life as an economic hit man, he was on the front lines both as an observer and a perp John Perkins has seen the signs of today's economic meltdown before. The subprime mortgage fiascos, the banking industry collapse, the rising tide of unemployment, the shuttering of small businesses across the landscape are all too familiar symptoms of a far greater disease. In his former life as an economic hit man, he was on the front lines both as an observer and a perpetrator of events, once confined only to the third world, that have now sent the United Statesâ€"and in fact the entire planetâ€"spiraling toward disaster. Here, Perkins pulls back the curtain on the real cause of the current global financial meltdown. He shows how we've been hoodwinked by the CEOs who run the corporatocracyâ€"those few corporations that control the vast amounts of capital, land, and resources around the globeâ€"and the politicians they manipulate. These corporate fat cats, Perkins explains, have sold us all on what he calls predatory capitalism, a misguided form of geopolitics and capitalism that encourages a widespread exploitation of the many to benefit a small number of the already very wealthy. Their arrogance, gluttony, and mismanagement have brought us to this perilous edge. The solution is not a "return to normal."But there is a way out. As Perkins makes clear, we can create a healthy economy that will encourage businesses to act responsibly, not only in the interests of their shareholders and corporate partners (and the lobbyists they have in their pockets), but in the interests of their employees, their customers, the environment, and society at large.We can create a society that fosters a just, sustainable, and safe world for us and our children. Each one of us makes these choices every day, in ways that are clearly spelled out in this book. "We hold the power," he says, "if only we recognize it." Hoodwinked is a powerful polemic that shows not only how we arrived at this precarious point in our history but also what we must do to stop the global tailspin.

30 review for Hoodwinked: An Economic Hit Man Reveals Why the World Financial Markets Imploded & What We Need to Do to Save Them

  1. 5 out of 5

    Will Byrnes

    Perkins’ Confessions of an Economic Hit Man was a scorching look at how western capital exploits third world countries in order to use their resources and encourage them to take on unsupportable mounds of debt to ensure their future subservience. He is back in familiar, shark-infested waters showing how the forces that made an art of international rape and pillage are applying the same methods inside the USA. John Perkins Perkins touches on a wide range of topics, all relevant, and all interestin Perkins’ Confessions of an Economic Hit Man was a scorching look at how western capital exploits third world countries in order to use their resources and encourage them to take on unsupportable mounds of debt to ensure their future subservience. He is back in familiar, shark-infested waters showing how the forces that made an art of international rape and pillage are applying the same methods inside the USA. John Perkins Perkins touches on a wide range of topics, all relevant, and all interesting, yet I felt that the book was all over the place and needed some editorial direction. But, while it may leave me unsatisfied as a focused, cogent argument, each of the individual chapters are rich with information and insight. Among the items of interest are looks at the true cost of the US military, the varying public and legal expectation of corporations regarding a requirement that they behave in a responsible manner, the impact of debt on a range of actors, from foreign nations to Joe Six-pack, the ability of corporations to externalize their costs onto the public, and the significance of shifting from an economy that produces things to one that produces paper. Perkins offers some directions for changing from our suicidal status quo. I found much of his program bromitic and naïve. But I may be wrong. He suggests that we, as concerned citizens, take specific actions to change corporate behavior. Creating, and participating in, movements to demand change. A movement by people refusing to buy sneakers manufactured in sweat shops was one such effort that has had some success. Buying locally produced food is another. His approach at least offers individuals an opportunity to take concrete personal action. And that is a worthwhile thing. It is certainly true that some such activity has had noticeable market effect. Hopefully some change can be effected at a higher, governmental, level. But as long as government and the corporatocracy are so closely intermingled, government is unlikely to offer much. Personally, I favor torches and pitchforks, but that is probably not a viable program in a world so rich with automatic weaponry. Bottom line is that, while Hoodwinked is no Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, it is a worthwhile read in which the elements offer sufficient fodder to make a decent meal. =============================EXTRA STUFF Links to the author’s personal, Twitter and FB pages

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    I first heard about John Perkins when my husband read Confessions of an Economic Hit Man. In that book, he discusses how he was employed by a consulting firm to essentially bribe leaders of third-world countries to accept huge loans that would end up leaving their countries so indebted they would have no choice but surrender their natural resources to US corporations at bargain basement prices free of any pesky environmental regulations. I've been meaning to read that one for a while now, but op I first heard about John Perkins when my husband read Confessions of an Economic Hit Man. In that book, he discusses how he was employed by a consulting firm to essentially bribe leaders of third-world countries to accept huge loans that would end up leaving their countries so indebted they would have no choice but surrender their natural resources to US corporations at bargain basement prices free of any pesky environmental regulations. I've been meaning to read that one for a while now, but opted to pick up Hoodwinked instead since its subtitle indicated it would reveal insider knowledge of what was behind the current financial crisis. Unfortunately, it doesn't really do that, at least, not to the degree or depth that I was expecting. It does a number of other interesting things, however, which do come together to make it worthwhile reading. Since this was my first book of Perkins', it was exceedingly disturbing to read about concrete examples of my own government's involvement in the assassination of democratically elected leaders in undeveloped countries in the name of corporate gain. The system of economic exploitation he outlines is nothing short of heartbreaking and important for everyone to understand. Perkins goes on to discuss the Icelandic economic collapse and how the loans granted to that country to harness its geothermal energy for aluminum production were actually the first economic "hit" orchestrated by his former colleagues in a first-world country. He also touches briefly upon the high debt levels taken on by American consumers and how that makes them easier for corporations to exploit. Unfortunately, he spent far less time and detail on these topics than I had hoped. One of the things he does instead is provide an overview of the various stages capitalism has gone through during its multi-century history. Despite having seen first hand the worst violations of capitalism, Perkins retains his faith in the benefits of the system itself. He makes a compelling argument that the profits-above-all focus of capitalism that has dominated the world since 1980 is actually a "mutant virus" form of the system that is not fundamental to its nature, but a self-destructive abuse of it. His discussion of various periods of time in which capitalism was also infused with a sense of social responsibility makes a compelling argument that capitalism itself is not the problem and actually can be reformed. A significant portion of the book is devoted to describing his vision for how the system can be reigned in from its current abusive state and become something that benefits everyone and not simply those at the top of the Western food chain. He believes in the power of citizens to bend corporations to better behavior through purchasing choices and passionate activism, and does his best to paint a picture of a world in which we all understand that the few cannot benefit at the expense of the many for any extended period of time. He is calling for a radical shift in thinking and behavior which will be nothing new to those of a more liberal bent, but I doubt will be grounded enough to appeal to those who do not already subscribe to such beliefs. Though Perkins does his best to end the book on an optimistic note, a brief discussion of the 2009 Honduran coup and a breakdown of the difference between what was heard in the American press (that President Zelaya was attempting to abolish term limits and on the path to becoming a dictator) versus what he heard from people behind the scenes (that Zelaya had been attempting to raise the income of those earning poverty level wages in agribusiness plantations), along with a discussion of specific people in Obama's administration who are, shall we say, of the "old school," left me feeling more than a little uneasy. While I hope that Perkins is right that we can force change from the bottom up, the facts of his own book make all too clear that task is going to be anything but easy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    The title of this book is misleading. It isn't really a treatment specifically explaining why financial markets imploded. It's more of a concise explanation of how U.S. predatory capitalism has really operated in the world over the last forty years. In other words, it's something of a handy rewrite of the author's Confessions of an Economic Hitman. But this one is more streamlined, and he gets to anticipate objections better. Also, here, Perkins is more positive about the future of capitalism, e The title of this book is misleading. It isn't really a treatment specifically explaining why financial markets imploded. It's more of a concise explanation of how U.S. predatory capitalism has really operated in the world over the last forty years. In other words, it's something of a handy rewrite of the author's Confessions of an Economic Hitman. But this one is more streamlined, and he gets to anticipate objections better. Also, here, Perkins is more positive about the future of capitalism, even offering constructive redirections. For all that, this might be helpful for someone on the fence, needing a basic introduction to many issues. But it wouldn't convince an ideological conservative, since Perkins doesn't identify and criticize conservative axioms. So they'll just dismiss most of it a priori. They also wouldn't be able to handle the trendy environmentalism, new age hints, and mild statism in the more constructive, positive parts of the book. Still, Perkins is best with his critique.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Christian

    I was really amazed when reading this book that these things actually go on. OK, call me naive but the thought that our government and large corporations send businessmen (ie hitmen) to other countries with the sole intention of conning them into giving us their natural resources and going into debt just disgusts me. John Perkins really opens readers eyes to what's going on in the global market. He gives an insight into the global meltdown that many people haven't previously considered. He discus I was really amazed when reading this book that these things actually go on. OK, call me naive but the thought that our government and large corporations send businessmen (ie hitmen) to other countries with the sole intention of conning them into giving us their natural resources and going into debt just disgusts me. John Perkins really opens readers eyes to what's going on in the global market. He gives an insight into the global meltdown that many people haven't previously considered. He discusses how just a few large corporations own much of the capital, land and resources around the world and he talks about how these corporations influence and control our politicians. The second part of Hoodwinked talks about the solution to the problem. He discusses how we can create a healthy economy that encourages businesses to act responsibly and by doing this to create a more sustainable world. I think this is a really valuable book for people to read. It will truly open your eyes to the ways our government and corporations work and it will get you thinking about ways to fix capitalism. I do agree with John Perkins. I think capitalism can be fixed and I think it's a worthy system that deserves to be fixed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    I was going to review this book, but I made to mistake of checking for friend reviews first and there is no point now: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/... I can only add that the book Lena is looking for about the GFC is this one: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/73... and if she would like more the four books in the Blowback series gives more detail on US foreign policy for corporate benefit: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/... Vale Mr Johnson - you are sorely missed. I sincerely hope Mr I was going to review this book, but I made to mistake of checking for friend reviews first and there is no point now: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/... I can only add that the book Lena is looking for about the GFC is this one: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/73... and if she would like more the four books in the Blowback series gives more detail on US foreign policy for corporate benefit: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/... Vale Mr Johnson - you are sorely missed. I sincerely hope Mr Perkins is right that passionate action by the people will end the rapacious excesses of trinket capitalism. On a good day I can see hope rising in the distance, but on a bad day there is nothing but storm clouds.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mike S

    I thought this was a good followup to Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, he explains what's going on with our economy, stresses that this gov't cannot continue it's atrocious policies without our consent, and gives examples of ways you we can change things non-violently. I would have liked a little more detail but it's still a worthwhile read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    David

    for those who do not know enough of the elite level operations (Illuminati), then this book serves as basic entry of how EHM (foot soldiers) have been continuing casting damages on other countries, regardless of any countries. Perkins only touches the basic surface of the global operations of those in higher up at the Elite level by stating the flaw lies on economic idealogy shift from Keynesian to M. Friedman during the Reagan year. Of pure deregulation or no government intervention which becam for those who do not know enough of the elite level operations (Illuminati), then this book serves as basic entry of how EHM (foot soldiers) have been continuing casting damages on other countries, regardless of any countries. Perkins only touches the basic surface of the global operations of those in higher up at the Elite level by stating the flaw lies on economic idealogy shift from Keynesian to M. Friedman during the Reagan year. Of pure deregulation or no government intervention which became the major culprit for corporatocracy, we are affected tremendously to become the senseless, mindless consumeristic tribes ..those who are involved are the evil Gates, Welch, Chambers, etc who continue to suck the wealth out of the massive middle classes. Perkins was right on the money in general, but again, stop short of exposing the ultimate goal from the Elite (Illuminati)....solutions Perkins provide are probable and plausible if everyone is awakened to revolt. Such as telling Nike not to continue to establish and make shoes through low wage sweatshops...and Perkins is trying to awake people to be, at least, taken part as CSR...highly recommend readers to read his first 2 books..

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    This book is a good starting point for somebody that doesn't know alot about, or wants recent information on corporate greed and government deregulation's role in the economic crisis that was manufactured and brought to this country and how the same policies and philosophies have been used in other countries for years as a means of exploiting the world's resources for profit. Fun Stuff!!!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marc

    Good follow up to Confessions of an Economic HitMan.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    I don't put bumper stickers on my car, but if I did, I always thought that this would be the one I would put on: "I Love My Country, But I Fear My Government." Now, after reading John Perkins' book, "Hoodwinked: An Economic Hit Man Reveals Why the Global Economy IMPLODED--and How to Fix It," I more firmly believe this idiom. If you want to know why our government is solely responsible for the 9-11 attacks and the deaths of 2,977 innocent people, and the illness and deaths of countless others over I don't put bumper stickers on my car, but if I did, I always thought that this would be the one I would put on: "I Love My Country, But I Fear My Government." Now, after reading John Perkins' book, "Hoodwinked: An Economic Hit Man Reveals Why the Global Economy IMPLODED--and How to Fix It," I more firmly believe this idiom. If you want to know why our government is solely responsible for the 9-11 attacks and the deaths of 2,977 innocent people, and the illness and deaths of countless others over decades and decades, then you need to read this book. Why in God's name, I wonder, have these lawless atrocities been allowed to happen, and why in God's name, after the publication of this book and others by Perkins about his and others' past endeavors, has there not been a huge hew and cry over our government's complicity, and the fact that corporatocracies now rule the world and not our "freely-elected" leaders? After reading Perkins' eye-opening book and seeing, in black and white, a list of the names of foreign countries' leaders (some of them democratically elected) who were assassinated by CIA jackals or removed from office by CIA-backed and -led coups (with our elected officials' knowledge and tactic agreement) in the name of greed, I am now ashamed to call myself an American and a U.S. citizen.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Vaidyanathan

    Exhilarating read. I am officially now a fan of John Perkins. Having read and quoted his book - the confessions of an economic hitman for quite some time now, this widens the horizon created by that book considerably. Looking forward to a John Perkins binge read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    ilham.mukhtar

    Great theories of how corporatocracy worked. Vague solutions.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Albert Lopez

    Control How we try and control other countries, agriculture, World Bank , loans , poverty, ruin local farmers and local company’s.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    I have to give Perkins a lot of credit for what he’s done in this book. Most importantly, Perkins identifies immediate problems, and provides tangible solutions that can be carried out individually on a daily basis, (i.e. spending our money only with firms that operate in a socially and environmentally sustainable way). While the solutions that Perkins proposed are not exhaustive, they do rely on the rudiments of capitalism, and therein provide a solid and realistic foundation upon which to build I have to give Perkins a lot of credit for what he’s done in this book. Most importantly, Perkins identifies immediate problems, and provides tangible solutions that can be carried out individually on a daily basis, (i.e. spending our money only with firms that operate in a socially and environmentally sustainable way). While the solutions that Perkins proposed are not exhaustive, they do rely on the rudiments of capitalism, and therein provide a solid and realistic foundation upon which to build. Again, I laud Perkins for writing on the vanguard. I think in doing so his work becomes subject to some inherent criticism, but also raises opportunities for further development. The following commentary is not intended to denigrate Perkins’ work in any way. To the contrary, any good work should provoke additional questions: Part 1: The Problem- I think Perkins’ analysis of “The Problem” could be strengthened if addressed with greater academic rigor, (i.e. more citations/cross references to other works and a greater breadth of sources). His analysis, I think, will find a willing audience from those who already agree with him, and may sway some who are on the fence, but won’t win many defectors. Caveats— 1) I recognize that I am not necessarily Perkins’ target audience, (preferring to read the notes and references as much as the actual text). Perkins writing is very readable, and as such, probably appeals to a much wider spectrum. 2) Perkins is writing about current events, so the number of credible sources out there to reference is likely limited. 3) While I have read Economic Hitman, I’ve not read The Secret History of the American Empire. I’m sure that his analysis of “The Problem” is more robust and airtight if all of his works are taken en masse. It’s a tricky balance to write in a manner that does not recover too much old ground, and yet provides enough credibility for a book to stand on its own and not invite unjust criticism. Part 2: The Solution- As I mentioned above, Perkins’ solutions provide a foundation upon which solutions can be built. I am eager to see these solutions become further developed. Perkins suggests that we spend our money only with companies that practice sustainability, and that ultimately, market forces will drive change. I agree wholeheartedly, however, I also feel that this is not feasible in some circumstances, (i.e. monopolies), or will take longer than many are willing to wait. First, it’s easy for me to not buy Nike, but it is difficult to choose a different power company if my current provider relies on coal generation. While I will absolutely conserve energy, I can’t see myself erecting a windmill in my suburban backyard anytime soon. How do we address situations where our choices are severely limited? Second, rather than simply changing our spending habits, then waiting for downstream consequences to occur, I think that there are opportunities to adopt a value-added approach aimed at addressing components of the entire value chain as it exists. For example, Perkins maintains that industry has a very strong voice in shaping legislation in the US. While I recognize the value of influencing industry, (choosing where to spend our money), and thereby indirectly influencing legislation, I think that this approach is insufficient. We must also directly influence government, (as well as other willing participants), at all levels of the value-chain using a variety of methods. Great work Mr. Perkins. Keep it up.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mark Valentine

    Perkins continues on his earlier themes from his two earlier exposes, Confessions of an Economic Hitman and the Secret Empire. In this third installment, he casts his perspective of the recent financial meltdowns and links the defaults and collapses to trend established starting with Reagan and the de-regulation wave. Perkins calls the current malaise "mutant capitalism" and uses the term, 'corporatocracy' to describe the merger between big business and government and those chieftains who cross Perkins continues on his earlier themes from his two earlier exposes, Confessions of an Economic Hitman and the Secret Empire. In this third installment, he casts his perspective of the recent financial meltdowns and links the defaults and collapses to trend established starting with Reagan and the de-regulation wave. Perkins calls the current malaise "mutant capitalism" and uses the term, 'corporatocracy' to describe the merger between big business and government and those chieftains who cross over to direct it (Dick Cheney, George Shultz, Paulson, etc.). Our age has some deep problems, no argument. But what become really important for me--and one of the reasons why I really liked reading this (depressing) book--Perkins provides several solutions for citizens/consumers to get involved and work to change these problems. We can be informed about our purchasing decisions, boycotting and avoiding corporations who use corrupt means to make a profit; we can work toward green projects, supporting local growing and commerce; and we can vote as informed citizens, making the effort to be informed and resist the propaganda pushes by the big finance public relations firms. This book had gone to press before the BP oil spill in the Gulf so I shudder to think of the invective that Perkins could release now that that fiasco spews. I think that event would be highly-illustrative of the kind of corporate abuse and ensuing cover-up that Perkins writes about. Perkins is not a conspiracy nut, For years he worked as an insider, but he left it and has become an embolden voice for change. I highly encourage others to read his works and better yet, get involved for positive change.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nael

    This book is definitely enjoyable, entertaining and gives you good hopes. But its not what the title says..\ in this book perkins do explain some policies followed by the free market that led to the crises, but he didn't explain how did the crises happened technically. he didnt differentiate between whats an economical theories and between those who took advantage of it. fredrich von hayek was a pro free market advocate his entire life, only when he was really old the markets started to take the sh This book is definitely enjoyable, entertaining and gives you good hopes. But its not what the title says..\ in this book perkins do explain some policies followed by the free market that led to the crises, but he didn't explain how did the crises happened technically. he didnt differentiate between whats an economical theories and between those who took advantage of it. fredrich von hayek was a pro free market advocate his entire life, only when he was really old the markets started to take the shape he believed in. its not his fault that the system was manipulated with and led to the crises, its the fault of the unworthy, the fault of the heartless criminals who overdosed the market and took advantage of the ignorant. i believe that perkins should differentiate between those two, sometimes being an economist is just like being a philosopher, you have a system that you believe in thats all, how is it manipulated with..thats not your fault.. the book is divided into 2 parts, one part is considered the problem, the other one is the solution, its brief and in the solution part perkins turns all positive in explaining some conscious capitalism he believes should be implemented. over all, its a nice read, i'll give it four stars for his writing style, courage and some very very detailed explicit conclusions that requires an expert to reach to.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Teddy

    This is a guest review by my husband Bill. Welcome Bill! Thanks to Teddy for requesting this book for me to review. It was one I highly coveted. After Confessions of an Economic Hit Man and The Secret History of the American Empire, Hoodwinked is the latest in John Perkins trilogy explaining how predatory capitalism has formed an unholy alliance with the imperialism of the American empire to threaten the economic, social and environmental fabric of the world. While it can stand on its own for thos This is a guest review by my husband Bill. Welcome Bill! Thanks to Teddy for requesting this book for me to review. It was one I highly coveted. After Confessions of an Economic Hit Man and The Secret History of the American Empire, Hoodwinked is the latest in John Perkins trilogy explaining how predatory capitalism has formed an unholy alliance with the imperialism of the American empire to threaten the economic, social and environmental fabric of the world. While it can stand on its own for those who have not read the previous two books, they provide more background detail, and are worthwhile additions to a reading list. Perkins explains how he was recruited after graduating college as an economic hit man (EHM). Working for the Boston-based MAIN consulting firm, his job entailed selling governments in Third World countries on development schemes with forecasts of benefits that he knew to be wildly exaggerated. The intention of this deception was to saddle these countries with debts they could not possibly pay, when those projects inevitably failed...Read the rest of my review here

  18. 5 out of 5

    Benj FitzPatrick

    The format and tone carry over from the first book, which made transitioning into the conceptual framework simple. His premise that the US and other 1st world countries exhibit the same traits as 3rd world countries is interesting and reasonably well supported (by his arguments/examples). As before, there are not enough examples, and the ones provided do not go in depth. Moreover, in this book he teases the reader with even fewer details in his examples. I am not so sure that I buy China as bein The format and tone carry over from the first book, which made transitioning into the conceptual framework simple. His premise that the US and other 1st world countries exhibit the same traits as 3rd world countries is interesting and reasonably well supported (by his arguments/examples). As before, there are not enough examples, and the ones provided do not go in depth. Moreover, in this book he teases the reader with even fewer details in his examples. I am not so sure that I buy China as being a model every country should mimic when trying to achieve prosperity (he neglects the gender gap, the shoddy construction that is coming back to haunt them, and the repercussions of the single-child policy). His solutions to the financial problems in the US simple, but he repeated them ad nauseam. They could have been distilled down to half the current size. Even given the above, I think this book is worth the read. It is frustrating in the lack of detail, but parallels he draws and his solutions are useful (if only to realize they should be common sense).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Edwin Dando

    Good easy read on how a small minority of powerful rich in America have raped and pillaged other countries using debt as their weapon, and then finally how they then turned on their own people and screwed America. Written for an insiders perspective it is factual, frightening and enlightening. Educate yourself on what has really been going on behind the corporate controlled media garbage we've been spoon fed. The second half of the book covers strategies re what we can do about it. Perkins is an i Good easy read on how a small minority of powerful rich in America have raped and pillaged other countries using debt as their weapon, and then finally how they then turned on their own people and screwed America. Written for an insiders perspective it is factual, frightening and enlightening. Educate yourself on what has really been going on behind the corporate controlled media garbage we've been spoon fed. The second half of the book covers strategies re what we can do about it. Perkins is an interesting guy. He's spent time as a economic hit man, the reformed himself and spent time with some incredible leaders including the Dali Lama, founder of Oxfam, international political leaders etc. Great read - get the book!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    I really recommend this book. Aside from the self congratulatory asides where the author details his sexual conquests, I found it incredibly insightful into the huge problem of economic exploitation by the part of "economic hit men" who reduce third world countries to a dependent status in a controlled, calculated series of maneuvers. It is frightening information, and I am glad the author decided to detail the operations he's been a part of. His observations are horrific when it comes to the im I really recommend this book. Aside from the self congratulatory asides where the author details his sexual conquests, I found it incredibly insightful into the huge problem of economic exploitation by the part of "economic hit men" who reduce third world countries to a dependent status in a controlled, calculated series of maneuvers. It is frightening information, and I am glad the author decided to detail the operations he's been a part of. His observations are horrific when it comes to the impact and involvement these policies and attitudes had concerning the economic crisis still plaguing America, and the exploitation of our own country at such enormous cost.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bahar Tajrobehkar

    Great book. I like the author - once again, very eye-opening. Here is a paragraph from the last page of the book: "Whether you are a student, dentist, plumber, housewife or something else, you can talk to your friends, family and clients about the issues, join organizations that represent your passions, send e-mails, use materials that are environmentally and socially responsible, support politicians who take actions oriented to benefit future generations, vote in the marketplace for companies c Great book. I like the author - once again, very eye-opening. Here is a paragraph from the last page of the book: "Whether you are a student, dentist, plumber, housewife or something else, you can talk to your friends, family and clients about the issues, join organizations that represent your passions, send e-mails, use materials that are environmentally and socially responsible, support politicians who take actions oriented to benefit future generations, vote in the marketplace for companies committed to doing the right thing and accomplish objectives you have dared only to dream about until now."

  22. 5 out of 5

    Meme Grey

    An amazing read, John Perkins really opened my mind to what is going on in this crazy world, We should all read this book, it will really make you angry just what is going on across the Globe by a small group of capitalists, hidden from view. I am not in America, but Great Britain, and am well aware that our system is also corrupt and damaged in fact the Whole Western view point of Profit at any cost is a Human disaster that is already imploding, we can look at the Globe and see this happening, b An amazing read, John Perkins really opened my mind to what is going on in this crazy world, We should all read this book, it will really make you angry just what is going on across the Globe by a small group of capitalists, hidden from view. I am not in America, but Great Britain, and am well aware that our system is also corrupt and damaged in fact the Whole Western view point of Profit at any cost is a Human disaster that is already imploding, we can look at the Globe and see this happening, but the book reveals so much more that will take the reader by total surprise, and cause anger and frustration, but the best part is John offers a solution that makes total sense.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    A very good "insiders" look at how our corporations, politicians & financial wizards are taking us down the path of destruction. Unfortunately, we have a long way to go to turn the tide around. Quote from “ Essential Information and the Consumer Education Foundation: “The financial sector invested more than $5 billion in political influence purchasing in Washington over the past decade, with as many as 3,000 lobbyists winning deregulation and other policy decisions that led directly to the current A very good "insiders" look at how our corporations, politicians & financial wizards are taking us down the path of destruction. Unfortunately, we have a long way to go to turn the tide around. Quote from “ Essential Information and the Consumer Education Foundation: “The financial sector invested more than $5 billion in political influence purchasing in Washington over the past decade, with as many as 3,000 lobbyists winning deregulation and other policy decisions that led directly to the current financial collapse.”

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aron

    Perkins writing is almost simplistic in it's style and his name dropping anecdotes can be annoying. Yet this very characteristic allows him to explain complex issues clearly and simply. He gets to the heart of what's wrong with corporate capitalism in a way anyone can understand. His solutions may also sound overly simple minded. But he's right that every individual needs to take personal responsibility and work for change. No one, least of all politicians, are going to do it for us.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Quite a quick read, really explains corporate power. Not as good as Confessions of an Economic Hitman, and devoid of the personal awakening that Wendell Potter demonstrates in The Deadly Spin, making me wonder if this Robin Hood is rather just looking to capitalize on his less than heroic past life. For those who want to know more about the current state of our world, and a crash course in real-life Business Ethics cases, check this book out (of a library, preferably).

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Traylor

    Excellent Book! The first half is devoted to describing the problems of the world, and the second half to their solutions. It's not that often that I see an author give so much space to solutions! As an "economic hit man" he said he watched many countries go down after they got manipulated by debt to the corporatocracy, but none as quickly as the US did in 2008. He makes a good case for all his points, and also gave me a feeling of hope for 2012.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Milano

    A less 'tight ' argumentation on how the destructive mercantilism has long term severe adverse impact. Mr Perkins however convincingly demonstrates how societies that have a greater participation from women in both the political and economic arena are more prosperous, peaceful while remaining vibrant and creative. Ladies, just take whAt is rightfully yours: your leading role. Don't ask, just take. Polite girls sometimes don't go far enough.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    This man is a triple agent not a ex hitman turned good. He uses his popularity and "know how" to make people buy green not buy less. I spoke with this man and even had a few drinks with him at the local bar. He did not even want to touch steady state economics with a 10 foot pole. I read some of his work with an open mind to understand where he is coming from. This book does raise awareness of predatory capitalism but he has no real solutions in a world with real problems.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed

    I found the book repetitive. The main idea is that big corporations seek only to maximize their profits regardless of any other matter. They ignore environmental issues and they are careless about the wellness of whole the world. Corporate executives are paid so much to achieve this goal and they are also involved in political decision, which makes it worse. It is a good book, however it didn't provide much information or details !

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jack

    Back when i first becoming radicalized I really enjoyed John Perkins the information he provided me. Since then I have come to find him being a green capitalist and as much as I want to believe we can save the world without purchasing power I do not agree. The book makes it clear that we are headed for a cliff perhaps already over it, much like coyote in the cartoon we just don't know that we are about to fall.

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