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American Higher Education In The Twenty First Century: Social, Political, And Economic Challenges

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This new edition of American Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century explores current issues of central importance to the academy: leadership, accountability, access, finance, technology, academic freedom, the canon, governance, and race. Chapters also deal with key constituencies - students and faculty - in the context of a changing academic environment. While the co This new edition of American Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century explores current issues of central importance to the academy: leadership, accountability, access, finance, technology, academic freedom, the canon, governance, and race. Chapters also deal with key constituencies - students and faculty - in the context of a changing academic environment. While the contributors agree with critics who argue for ongoing reassessment of public institutions, they provide a more balanced perspective. They take issue with the crisis culture that has emerged among critics of current higher education practices, pointing out that higher education has faced challenges through its history. By illuminating the complex interplay between institutions and external forces, the book provides a key to guide the endeavors of faculty, students, and administrative leaders. Fully revised and updated, the second edition includes a new chapter on higher education markets.


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This new edition of American Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century explores current issues of central importance to the academy: leadership, accountability, access, finance, technology, academic freedom, the canon, governance, and race. Chapters also deal with key constituencies - students and faculty - in the context of a changing academic environment. While the co This new edition of American Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century explores current issues of central importance to the academy: leadership, accountability, access, finance, technology, academic freedom, the canon, governance, and race. Chapters also deal with key constituencies - students and faculty - in the context of a changing academic environment. While the contributors agree with critics who argue for ongoing reassessment of public institutions, they provide a more balanced perspective. They take issue with the crisis culture that has emerged among critics of current higher education practices, pointing out that higher education has faced challenges through its history. By illuminating the complex interplay between institutions and external forces, the book provides a key to guide the endeavors of faculty, students, and administrative leaders. Fully revised and updated, the second edition includes a new chapter on higher education markets.

30 review for American Higher Education In The Twenty First Century: Social, Political, And Economic Challenges

  1. 4 out of 5

    Breanna Tidwell

    Some of the articles could be hard to get through, but most were interesting

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Wycoff

    Recycled tripe published every 8-10 years since the 1970s by higher education scholars...I have _Higher Education in American Society_ (1981), edited by Philip G. Altbach and Robert O. Berdahl, on my bookshelf as well. There is little difference between the two volumes as if the twentieth (1981) and twenty-first (2011) centuries do not differ. Well, the "authors" change. In 1981, T. R. McConnell is attributed for "Autonomy and Accountability" (Chapter 3). In 2011, Frank A. Schmidtlein and Robert Recycled tripe published every 8-10 years since the 1970s by higher education scholars...I have _Higher Education in American Society_ (1981), edited by Philip G. Altbach and Robert O. Berdahl, on my bookshelf as well. There is little difference between the two volumes as if the twentieth (1981) and twenty-first (2011) centuries do not differ. Well, the "authors" change. In 1981, T. R. McConnell is attributed for "Autonomy and Accountability" (Chapter 3). In 2011, Frank A. Schmidtlein and Robert O. Berdahl are attributed for "Autonomy and Accountability" (Chapter 3). The subtitles of Chapter 3 change, but the underlying text/outline in both articles is nearly the same. Compare the top of page 40 (1981) to page 69 (2011): "If a college or university is to effectively define its goals and select or invent the means of attaining them, it must have a high degree of" independence (1981) / autonomy (2011). The sentence is identical with the exception of independence/autonomy. McConnell (1981) cites no other scholar for this profound (?) insight, while Schmidtlein and Berdahl (2011) cite a work (without placing the identical text in quotations) by Howard R. Bowen from 1977 as if McConnell is one who first plagiarized these words! (I recall I found a similar sentence in a work from earlier in the 1970s but could not verify for this impetuous review...) Unfortunately, higher education students have been asked to read this ideological trash as if it is disciplinary canon for nearly 50 years now. For tenured scholars, the words appear to be some sort of worldly wisdom to be passed on, memorized, scribed (copied), and unquestioned by their graduate school pupils. Oh, wait, how do I know this? I wrote a book about the history of higher education scholarship, focusing on the use and abuses of "institutional autonomy" since the 1950s (_Honors of Inequality_).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Beth

    I read this book for a class on perspectives in higher education in the United States for my master's degree program. I was only required to read the first nine chapters, so I've only read about 300 of the roughly 450 pages in this book, but I think enough to give a review. This book is composed of 17 chapters by different authors on various topics in higher education. Topics reviewed include academic freedom, the federal and state government, accreditation, the legal environment, and patterns i I read this book for a class on perspectives in higher education in the United States for my master's degree program. I was only required to read the first nine chapters, so I've only read about 300 of the roughly 450 pages in this book, but I think enough to give a review. This book is composed of 17 chapters by different authors on various topics in higher education. Topics reviewed include academic freedom, the federal and state government, accreditation, the legal environment, and patterns in higher education. Like most compilations of essays, some of these were better than others. I particularly liked the breakdown of patterns and trends in higher education broken down by decades. For those who work or study within America's higher education system and are curious to learn more about its history or the complexity of the system, this book is a good place to start. It gives a good overview of numerous topics from the evolving job of the college president to the influence of the GI bill on colleges and universities. On the other hand, this book is somewhat dated. The edition I read was published in 1999. Substantial changes in public policy and trends in higher education have taken place in the fifteen years since this was written. Therefore, this text is probably a better resource for historical overview of higher education in America rather than current practices.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This is another book that does not collect dust on my shelf in my office. I reference it frequently when considering strategies and planning our way forward, within student affairs, at my institution. It should be read by higher education professionals for no other reasons than the sections on leadership, history of higher education, and the state and federal legal and legislative influences on institutions. It is particularly enlightening on current thought leadership on what is around the corn This is another book that does not collect dust on my shelf in my office. I reference it frequently when considering strategies and planning our way forward, within student affairs, at my institution. It should be read by higher education professionals for no other reasons than the sections on leadership, history of higher education, and the state and federal legal and legislative influences on institutions. It is particularly enlightening on current thought leadership on what is around the corner, so to speak, economically and politically.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Thanks, Harvard Extension School class on Higher Education Strategy and Management! Very interesting book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Felix

    Used it in my first semester in Drexel. Good overview of the major issues in higher education.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jason Panella

    The third edition is filled with tons of excellent articles. (I was surprised, honestly.) Most of the newer articles look at where some of the current higher ed trends are heading.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Godfrey Linnex

    where is the book?

  9. 5 out of 5

    katie

    This contained a few good articles, but was too dry for my tastes.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  11. 5 out of 5

    Blake Bedsole

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Mouser (she/her)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hamad

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becky

  15. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

  16. 5 out of 5

    Holly Hunt

  17. 5 out of 5

    James

  18. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    RMU

  19. 4 out of 5

    S.byndom

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Ll

  21. 5 out of 5

    Z

  22. 5 out of 5

    Susan Duncan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Teanna R. Downs

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah White

  25. 4 out of 5

    Devon

  26. 5 out of 5

    P.J.S. Martin

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  28. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  29. 5 out of 5

    David Labaree

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Clevenger

    Required for school not for casual reading, not even for casual learning.

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