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Latin American women’s movements played important roles in the democratic transitions in South America during the 1980s and in Central America during the 1990s. However, very little has been written on what has become of these movements and their agendas since the return to democracy. This timely collection examines how women’s movements have responded to the dramatic poli Latin American women’s movements played important roles in the democratic transitions in South America during the 1980s and in Central America during the 1990s. However, very little has been written on what has become of these movements and their agendas since the return to democracy. This timely collection examines how women’s movements have responded to the dramatic political, economic, and social changes of the last twenty years. In these essays, leading scholar-activists focus on the various strategies women’s movements have adopted and assess their successes and failures. The book is organized around three broad topics. The first, women’s access to political power at the national level, is addressed by essays on the election of Michelle Bachelet in Chile, gender quotas in Argentina and Brazil, and the responses of the women’s movement to the “Bolivarian revolution” in Venezuela. The second topic, the use of legal strategies, is taken up in essays on women’s rights across the board in Argentina, violence against women in Brazil, and gender in the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Peru. Finally, the international impact of Latin American feminists is explored through an account of their participation in the World Social Forum, an assessment of a Chilean-led project carried out by women’s organizations in several countries to hold governments to the promises they made at international conferences in Cairo and Beijing, and an account of cross-border organizing to address femicides and domestic abuse in the Juárez-El Paso border region. Jane S. Jaquette provides the historical and political context of women’s movement activism in her introduction, and concludes the volume by engaging contemporary debates about feminism, civil society, and democracy. Contributors. Jutta Borner, Mariana Caminotti, Alina Donoso, Gioconda Espina, Jane S. Jaquette, Beatriz Kohen, Julissa Mantilla Falcón, Jutta Marx, Gabriela L. Montoya, Flávia Piovesan, Marcela Ríos Tobar, Kathleen Staudt, Teresa Valdés, Virginia Vargas


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Latin American women’s movements played important roles in the democratic transitions in South America during the 1980s and in Central America during the 1990s. However, very little has been written on what has become of these movements and their agendas since the return to democracy. This timely collection examines how women’s movements have responded to the dramatic poli Latin American women’s movements played important roles in the democratic transitions in South America during the 1980s and in Central America during the 1990s. However, very little has been written on what has become of these movements and their agendas since the return to democracy. This timely collection examines how women’s movements have responded to the dramatic political, economic, and social changes of the last twenty years. In these essays, leading scholar-activists focus on the various strategies women’s movements have adopted and assess their successes and failures. The book is organized around three broad topics. The first, women’s access to political power at the national level, is addressed by essays on the election of Michelle Bachelet in Chile, gender quotas in Argentina and Brazil, and the responses of the women’s movement to the “Bolivarian revolution” in Venezuela. The second topic, the use of legal strategies, is taken up in essays on women’s rights across the board in Argentina, violence against women in Brazil, and gender in the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Peru. Finally, the international impact of Latin American feminists is explored through an account of their participation in the World Social Forum, an assessment of a Chilean-led project carried out by women’s organizations in several countries to hold governments to the promises they made at international conferences in Cairo and Beijing, and an account of cross-border organizing to address femicides and domestic abuse in the Juárez-El Paso border region. Jane S. Jaquette provides the historical and political context of women’s movement activism in her introduction, and concludes the volume by engaging contemporary debates about feminism, civil society, and democracy. Contributors. Jutta Borner, Mariana Caminotti, Alina Donoso, Gioconda Espina, Jane S. Jaquette, Beatriz Kohen, Julissa Mantilla Falcón, Jutta Marx, Gabriela L. Montoya, Flávia Piovesan, Marcela Ríos Tobar, Kathleen Staudt, Teresa Valdés, Virginia Vargas

29 review for Feminist Agendas and Democracy in Latin America

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    An in depth collection of essays that focuses on establishing the current demands, projects, and problems that feminist activist groups, NGOs and governmental organizations are involved in throughout the region. This book does a good job of rounding up the different agendas, specifying the advances that have ocurred in recent years and measuring their success with a final section that works on looking at the transnational capabilities and objectives achieved by the regional feminist groups.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    I've got a full review up on my blog. Initial review: I would actually give this book 3.5 if I could. I'll have a review up shortly, but I'll just say for now that this would be great reading for any Women's Studies course that covers global perspectives or any Latino Studies course. It also makes for a good book to read if you're interested in any other the issues listed in the title because that's really what the book is about. I would say that my biggest problem was that it focused on mostly t I've got a full review up on my blog. Initial review: I would actually give this book 3.5 if I could. I'll have a review up shortly, but I'll just say for now that this would be great reading for any Women's Studies course that covers global perspectives or any Latino Studies course. It also makes for a good book to read if you're interested in any other the issues listed in the title because that's really what the book is about. I would say that my biggest problem was that it focused on mostly the same countries and Latin America is much bigger than that and much more complex. But, like I said, I'll have a review up soon.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sally

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jenni

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mrs. Raichal

  6. 5 out of 5

    Katie Kuhn

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erin Jex

  8. 5 out of 5

    Natalia F. Meneses

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carolina

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sade

  11. 5 out of 5

    Criss

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joel ?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Readinglaw

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emmanuel Martinez

  15. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Reyes

  16. 5 out of 5

    J. X.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Angelica Rubio

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ella

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alison

  22. 5 out of 5

    Negra Martin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Monica

  24. 4 out of 5

    Frances King

  25. 5 out of 5

    Derz

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rebeka Aguilar

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lili

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nada Rafik

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