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Meet Julie

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Julie Albright doesn t want to move away from her San Francisco neighborhood near Chinatown, even if her new apartment is just a few miles away. Moving means leaving her best friend, Ivy, and her pet rabbit, Nutmeg. Worst of all, it means leaving Dad, now that her parents are divorced. Julie tries to make the best of her new situation by joining the school s basketball tea Julie Albright doesn t want to move away from her San Francisco neighborhood near Chinatown, even if her new apartment is just a few miles away. Moving means leaving her best friend, Ivy, and her pet rabbit, Nutmeg. Worst of all, it means leaving Dad, now that her parents are divorced. Julie tries to make the best of her new situation by joining the school s basketball team, but the coach won t allow girls to play. She learns that it s up to her to make positive changes in her new school - and her new life. The "Looking Back" section discusses the women s movement, divorce, and other issues of the turbulent 1970s. This book is the first in a series of six historical books filled with inspiring lessons of compassion, courage, and friendship. Julie s entire book set includes: Meet Julie; Julie Tells Her Story; Happy New Year, Julie; Julie and the Eagles; Julie s Journey; and Changes for Julie.


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Julie Albright doesn t want to move away from her San Francisco neighborhood near Chinatown, even if her new apartment is just a few miles away. Moving means leaving her best friend, Ivy, and her pet rabbit, Nutmeg. Worst of all, it means leaving Dad, now that her parents are divorced. Julie tries to make the best of her new situation by joining the school s basketball tea Julie Albright doesn t want to move away from her San Francisco neighborhood near Chinatown, even if her new apartment is just a few miles away. Moving means leaving her best friend, Ivy, and her pet rabbit, Nutmeg. Worst of all, it means leaving Dad, now that her parents are divorced. Julie tries to make the best of her new situation by joining the school s basketball team, but the coach won t allow girls to play. She learns that it s up to her to make positive changes in her new school - and her new life. The "Looking Back" section discusses the women s movement, divorce, and other issues of the turbulent 1970s. This book is the first in a series of six historical books filled with inspiring lessons of compassion, courage, and friendship. Julie s entire book set includes: Meet Julie; Julie Tells Her Story; Happy New Year, Julie; Julie and the Eagles; Julie s Journey; and Changes for Julie.

30 review for Meet Julie

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I decided to "Meet Julie" when my daughter, who is rapidly approaching her eighth birthday, scanned through the "Historical Character" section of the American Girl website and got all excited about this character and the year 1974 . . . the year I was born. Well. That's enough to plunge anyone into a midlife crisis: I mean, seriously, "historical"? Looking at Julie, I noticed that she comes wearing a turtleneck I used to actually own, has the same hair I had, and is living in San Francisco, just I decided to "Meet Julie" when my daughter, who is rapidly approaching her eighth birthday, scanned through the "Historical Character" section of the American Girl website and got all excited about this character and the year 1974 . . . the year I was born. Well. That's enough to plunge anyone into a midlife crisis: I mean, seriously, "historical"? Looking at Julie, I noticed that she comes wearing a turtleneck I used to actually own, has the same hair I had, and is living in San Francisco, just a few hundred miles north of where I was living at that age, San Diego. It's probably (wait, who am I kidding -- I've lived my life -- it's DEFINITELY) the closest I'll ever get to seeing myself in a wax museum and it was creepy. Anyway, having all my dreams of stitching samplers (Felicity) or learning Spanish (Josefina) with my daughter shattered, I got the book to see what might be in store. Here is a sample: "Class," said Ms. Hunter. "President Ford is about to sign a bill that will soon have the whole country using the metric system. It's what the rest of the world uses. Australia and New Zealand have converted. The metric system is taking over the world, and we Americans don't want to be left behind." Julie sighed. Millimeters? Decimeters? What's wrong with good old inches? she wondered as she picked up T.J.'s ruler. She felt just inches away from throwing up her hands in frustration. Or was it centimeters? Not that Julie doesn't have bigger problems: her parents have recently divorced, she's the new girl in town, and she's going to need Title Nine to help her achieve her basketball dreams. But reading Megan McDonald's (of Judy Moody fame) version of my childhood to my daughter is -- well, it's weird, not to mention bland, by-the-numbers writing. Maybe the problem of my whole American Doll idea was that I was going to carefully worm an Educational Experience into my child's life. Now that it's both trite and personal, I can't bring myself to do it. For my eighth birthday, I went to the zoo (that's what we used to do back then); I remember it because we went to the San Diego Zoo and I got to go on an elephant ride. If my daughter wants to have a similar experience, we'll do it -- and if she wants me to show her how to macrame a plant holder or make a friendship bracelet, we can do that too -- no book necessary. No need to "Meet Julie."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Penny

    After having read some of the negative reviews I kind of imagined reading this book and thinking it wouldn't have terribly much for my daughter. Having been born after Julie, I'm not sure I have the same problem with feeling old and that the 1970s aren't really history as some parents. Julie would only be 47-48 this year, so for some parents it's entirely possible that their children have read these books and learned about their mother's childhood, but not mine. When I was in school we learned a After having read some of the negative reviews I kind of imagined reading this book and thinking it wouldn't have terribly much for my daughter. Having been born after Julie, I'm not sure I have the same problem with feeling old and that the 1970s aren't really history as some parents. Julie would only be 47-48 this year, so for some parents it's entirely possible that their children have read these books and learned about their mother's childhood, but not mine. When I was in school we learned about classic rock (rock from the 60s and 70s) and that entire era was before my time. I would think the book might have some kind of historical significance to kids because it's hitting the point that this might be their grandparents' generation, not theirs. This book clearly illustrates that things were different in the 1970s than when even I was growing up. Just looking at some of what was going on then, it's understandable how a child might take some part of American history out of it. They touch upon the Vietnam War. They talk about women's rights. Title 9 was still a pretty big and new thing. As much as I hear parents outraged that Julie didn't just demand to play because it was federal law to allow her, that's not exactly how things worked. From my own research there were a lot of girls that wanted to play and weren't allowed to because the schools didn't really care about Title 9. Unless a complaint was made or someone made a fuss, it often got ignored. In today's level of equality that's something hard to understand. It helps for girls to know exactly how hard of a fight women had to gain equality so they appreciate the rights they've been granted. Not only is Julie's story about a period of history, but it's also just like all the other American Girl stories. Julie has a huge challenge in her life, even if it is something we take for granted in modern America. She has to fight to overcome that challenge in the face of everyone looking down on her. Playing basketball on the boys' team means going against a coach who doesn't want her to play. It means her father's disapproval. The girls in school call her a tomboy. She ends up losing her friendship with her best friend. On top of that, she's already got it rough because her parents are divorced. This has meant moving across town for starters. As if that wasn't enough, the girls in school whisper behind her back and she's completely embarrassed by the business her mother started to support them, even though the other kids unexpectedly find it cool. What I like best about this book is how well you can almost feel the changes going on in the country. It's right in the middle of women gaining more acceptance. As Julie's mom pointed out, it was only 40 years prior that women were finally granted the right to vote. Now women are starting to fight to gain their independence from men to the point where they can be self-sufficient creatures. Divorce, while still not common and highly looked down on is becoming more prevalent. Women are starting to not only be able to accept the same jobs as men with better pay than their previous jobs afforded, but they're also able to run their own businesses. It's one of the first periods in history where a woman truly doesn't need a man in her life to be successful. It's obviously not easy on Julie's whole family, but you get to see a role model of a strong, independent, and self-sufficient woman for the first time in possibly the whole American Girl's series, at least the series I've read so far. The American Girl books aren't just about creating interesting characters from history. They're also about teaching girls not to settle for less than the best. They teach girls that they truly can be anything they want to be, and to fight against the oppression women have faced through the ages. All of these girls are strong willed, daring, and have beliefs that they stand for. Sure, Julie's struggle to be treated equally as a boy may not sound as impressive as dealing with child labor laws, being a run-away slave, or refusing tea in support of the Boston Tea Party, but she stood up for something she believed in, and this time period was the first time in history where a woman was able to make such a bold move. Once again I'm impressed with the American Girl series and their ability to show girls that whatever their goals are, they can find a way to make it happen. They just have to work hard enough.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ciara

    julie is one of the newer historical american girls. i believe she was introduced in 2007. the fact that she is historical is a source of some controversy, as her era in 1974. yeah. five years before i was born. it's weird. the idea of little girls in the year 2011 going out & buying a 70s-style doll with a long side braid & a tacky turtleneck & then outfitting her with a lava lamp, an awful rug shaped like a foot, & a basketball set straight out of the harlem globetrotters' locker room is prett julie is one of the newer historical american girls. i believe she was introduced in 2007. the fact that she is historical is a source of some controversy, as her era in 1974. yeah. five years before i was born. it's weird. the idea of little girls in the year 2011 going out & buying a 70s-style doll with a long side braid & a tacky turtleneck & then outfitting her with a lava lamp, an awful rug shaped like a foot, & a basketball set straight out of the harlem globetrotters' locker room is pretty horrifying. plus, her story isn't that great. while other historical characters are preparing for the revolutionary war or escaping from slavery, julie is bummed out because her parents are getting divorced. apparently julie's dad is a bit of a stick in the mud. he is portrayed as conservative, supportive of nixon, & an airline pilot. julie's mom is more influenced by the hippies: she wears her hair long, she is friends with a grizzled activist veteran in the neighborhood, & she runs a junk shop called gladrags. it's all a little embarrassing. granted, in 1974, it was a bit unusual to have divorced parents--more unusual than it is today, anyway. but because divorce is so prevalent now, julie's story really pales in comparison to the woes of some of the other characters. her B-plot is that she likes to play basketball, & her new school offers a basketball team for older kids (fourth, fifth, & sixth graders). julie decides to sign up, but when she stops by the coach's office to do so, he tells her to get lost because no girl is going to be playing on his team. all i could imagine during his scenes was biff from "back to the future". his name is even coach manley. i mean...really? at first julie is cowed & disappointed, but then she remembers reading something in the newspaper (nine-year-olds read newspapers?) about a new piece of legislation that mandates that girls be allowed to play on boys' teams if their schools don't offer teams specifically for girls. she brings this to coach manley's attention, but he blows her off. again...really? i mean, maybe this is historically accurate but it's really difficult for me to imagine someone engaging in such a blatant act of illegal discrimination. rather than point this out or get an adult to do so, julie takes a page from the book of the activist veteran & writes up a petition. she gets 150 signatures from folks in the neighborhood that support julie's right to play on the boys' team. but when she presents it to the coach, he throws it away. so julie digs through the trash after school, recovers it, & presents it to the principal. the principal, rather than saying something like, "it is crucial for us to be in compliance with federal law in order to maintain our funding, so yes, you can play on the team & the coach will be severely reprimanded if not fired for this act of egregious discrimination," instead says, "i like basketball too. & i like your moxie, kid. you've got a spot on the team!" it really seemed like he just said yes because he was impressed with julie's determination, as evidenced by the petition, & not because IT'S THE FUCKING LAW. WTF, book? this was weird. a person should not have to earn the right to have the law apply to them.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. While nothing earth-shattering happens here, the ups and downs of Julie's life will resonate as important to girls her age and her triumph in joining the basketball team is no small feat. The Julie series is the first of the American girl series to feature divorced parents and it has the most recent setting. In fact, other than some details like mood rings and the historical events mentioned (Vietnam, Title IX), the story doesn't feel like historical fiction at all. The book is clearly the start While nothing earth-shattering happens here, the ups and downs of Julie's life will resonate as important to girls her age and her triumph in joining the basketball team is no small feat. The Julie series is the first of the American girl series to feature divorced parents and it has the most recent setting. In fact, other than some details like mood rings and the historical events mentioned (Vietnam, Title IX), the story doesn't feel like historical fiction at all. The book is clearly the start of a series and girls will want to read on to find out how Julie actually fares on her basketball team.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    I liked this much better yesterday than I did in 2007, but even though I enjoyed recognizing different period details that I didn't have an appreciation for back then, this is still only a two-star book for me. It educates children about Title IX and overcoming sexism, but the pacing is off, and it frustrates me that the author never explains why Julie's parents divorced, since this is so central to her emotional arc. Mr. and Mrs. Albright's split has a huge effect on their children, and Julie st I liked this much better yesterday than I did in 2007, but even though I enjoyed recognizing different period details that I didn't have an appreciation for back then, this is still only a two-star book for me. It educates children about Title IX and overcoming sexism, but the pacing is off, and it frustrates me that the author never explains why Julie's parents divorced, since this is so central to her emotional arc. Mr. and Mrs. Albright's split has a huge effect on their children, and Julie struggles with the sense of stigma that this brings in her new school, but there is never any explanation of what their home life was like before, or why the parents separated. Were the parents fighting all the time? Did someone cheat? Did the mom just want to start over and have a new life without her husband? It's all up to the reader's speculation. Since divorce is an earth-shattering event for any child and was especially difficult to navigate back then, it's strange that Julie never processes anything related to why the divorce happened, or what events led to this rupture in her family. She is a nice kid and a likable character, but this aspect of the story makes it hard for me to suspend disbelief, and because this book's near-history setting, mostly ordinary events, and uneven pacing don't offer much more, I still think that this book is merely okay.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    I'll do a proper review when I finish the whole series, but I liked this one more than I had expected to. I was worried that McDonald would take a heavy hand with the 70s slang and trend, but she was actually pretty restrained. ETA 11/5/12: After reading the rest of the series, plus Ivy's tie-in, I'm still pretty impressed. By the third book, I felt pretty confident in saying that the timeframe (mid-70s) was chosen so they could show a family navigating divorce. Here's the sad thing: the main sto I'll do a proper review when I finish the whole series, but I liked this one more than I had expected to. I was worried that McDonald would take a heavy hand with the 70s slang and trend, but she was actually pretty restrained. ETA 11/5/12: After reading the rest of the series, plus Ivy's tie-in, I'm still pretty impressed. By the third book, I felt pretty confident in saying that the timeframe (mid-70s) was chosen so they could show a family navigating divorce. Here's the sad thing: the main storyline of the first book is Julie's attempts to play basketball with the boys. What's sad about that? The fact that it could have been written word for word the same in a contemporary book. The same goes for a lot of the plot developments, actually. In general, Julie's fairly likeable, and so is her family.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marya

    I was skeptical of this book at first; did we really need another blond in the American girls canon to not relate to? But then I realized Julie, as the 1974 girl, is the one who can really tackle the complexities of divorce in a time period where everything seemed to be breaking apart (fun Watergate reference!). Julie's best friend Ivy, a Chinese-American, seems like a more interesting character choice (there is no Asian American historical girl), but in the simplicity of the AG world, I guess a I was skeptical of this book at first; did we really need another blond in the American girls canon to not relate to? But then I realized Julie, as the 1974 girl, is the one who can really tackle the complexities of divorce in a time period where everything seemed to be breaking apart (fun Watergate reference!). Julie's best friend Ivy, a Chinese-American, seems like a more interesting character choice (there is no Asian American historical girl), but in the simplicity of the AG world, I guess another white chick with problems will have to do.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shelby S.

    Meet Julie is about a girl named Julie. Her parents just got divorced and she has to move away from her dad her pet bunny and her best friend Ivy. But later in the story it gets better and Julie finds a new friend named Tj. She also trys out for the basketball team Overall it is a really good book and Julie has a really fun personality and I think that it is overall a really good book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Beatrice

    I liked how she was able to change and play on the boys basketball team. I also liked how her friend signed a petition for friendship.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    Julie is the American Girl from the 1970's. She likely is just about the age I was back then. Which is a rather freaky thought, that a historical fiction character is my age! Since I wasn't athletic, I was not really conscious of Title Nine, but I would hear about it more and more in my teen years. Title Nine was the section that mandated boys and girls be treated the same way in sports, then I think in other fields. Julie made use of Title Nine to try and get on the basketball team. Will she su Julie is the American Girl from the 1970's. She likely is just about the age I was back then. Which is a rather freaky thought, that a historical fiction character is my age! Since I wasn't athletic, I was not really conscious of Title Nine, but I would hear about it more and more in my teen years. Title Nine was the section that mandated boys and girls be treated the same way in sports, then I think in other fields. Julie made use of Title Nine to try and get on the basketball team. Will she succeed? Will she succeed and lose her best friend, Ivy? Read and find out!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I'm a long-time fan of the American Girl series, despite my age, but I didn't feel like I was stepping very far back into history with this one. It's set in 1974 and I was born just 8 years later, so obviously it wasn't a huge leap for me. Julie herself is interesting, though, as are her family and friends. I think she will make a good role model for girls. Overall, it's a nice series so far and a more familiar world than any described in previous American Girl books. I'm a long-time fan of the American Girl series, despite my age, but I didn't feel like I was stepping very far back into history with this one. It's set in 1974 and I was born just 8 years later, so obviously it wasn't a huge leap for me. Julie herself is interesting, though, as are her family and friends. I think she will make a good role model for girls. Overall, it's a nice series so far and a more familiar world than any described in previous American Girl books.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julie Schwartz

    As a blonde children's librarian named Julie, I felt obligated to read at least the first in the new "Julie" American Girl series...so I read the first two. The books are cute and serve their purpose well. I can't say I'm itching to read the rest of the "Julie" books, but alas, I'm not 9 anymore either! As a blonde children's librarian named Julie, I felt obligated to read at least the first in the new "Julie" American Girl series...so I read the first two. The books are cute and serve their purpose well. I can't say I'm itching to read the rest of the "Julie" books, but alas, I'm not 9 anymore either!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hattie

    I definitely didn't like this American Girl. The others deal with slavery, death, moving 6000mi to never return to their homeland, etc. she deals with a divorce.which i get is hard, but seriously. or if they want a character with a divorce, i would be interested what a divorce would be like in the 1800's or something. not the 70s, which is hardly historical, if at all I definitely didn't like this American Girl. The others deal with slavery, death, moving 6000mi to never return to their homeland, etc. she deals with a divorce.which i get is hard, but seriously. or if they want a character with a divorce, i would be interested what a divorce would be like in the 1800's or something. not the 70s, which is hardly historical, if at all

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This book really gives me the feel of living in San Francisco in the 1970's. Julie is truly a very interesting girl, she loves mysteries, dogs, and her hamster Nutmeg.When she finds out she has to move into a small apartment above her moms store Glad Rags she is thrilled to solve more mysteries in her new home. This book really gives me the feel of living in San Francisco in the 1970's. Julie is truly a very interesting girl, she loves mysteries, dogs, and her hamster Nutmeg.When she finds out she has to move into a small apartment above her moms store Glad Rags she is thrilled to solve more mysteries in her new home.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    I felt like there were maybe too many 1970's references, which distracted from the flow of the story a little. I felt like there were maybe too many 1970's references, which distracted from the flow of the story a little.

  16. 5 out of 5

    A. L.

    I understand the many negative reviews of this book. It’s just a bit bland. But, growing up in 1974, as a 9 year old, doesn’t really compare to having your world destroyed and remade by war or slavery or moving across the world with only a few bags of possessions. However, I did like how it shows my daughter how things have changed for women today, compared to 47 years ago. Julie wants to play basketball, but her new school doesn’t have a girls team. So she tries to convince the coach (a Coach M I understand the many negative reviews of this book. It’s just a bit bland. But, growing up in 1974, as a 9 year old, doesn’t really compare to having your world destroyed and remade by war or slavery or moving across the world with only a few bags of possessions. However, I did like how it shows my daughter how things have changed for women today, compared to 47 years ago. Julie wants to play basketball, but her new school doesn’t have a girls team. So she tries to convince the coach (a Coach Manley; no worries about being too subtle here!) to let her play on the boys team. He tells her “ain’t no way, no how, no girls!” (More or less.) So Julie has to find a way to be allowed to play too. Throughout all of the American Girl books my daughter and I have been reading together, the treatment and expectations of women are one theme we keep returning too. This one, while not the most exciting story, does show how things have changed from just before my birth to where my daughter is today.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Danielle T

    In 2007, I was certainly too old for American Girl and had other things going on, like trying to graduate from high school. Nevertheless, AG had FINALLY introduced an Asian American character, albeit as the best friend and not lead for the 1970s period. There's since been an Amazon Prime adaptation of Ivy's standalone book, but to better understand her, I figure I should read Julie's books for context. It's a little weird to have a historical character that's a decade younger than my parents, bu In 2007, I was certainly too old for American Girl and had other things going on, like trying to graduate from high school. Nevertheless, AG had FINALLY introduced an Asian American character, albeit as the best friend and not lead for the 1970s period. There's since been an Amazon Prime adaptation of Ivy's standalone book, but to better understand her, I figure I should read Julie's books for context. It's a little weird to have a historical character that's a decade younger than my parents, but at the same time it's surprising to realize things like Ms. as a widespread honorific and Title IX are relatively recent things within the last 50 years. Julie is also AG's proxy for talking to kids about divorce- something socially unacceptable in prior periods. I'm interested to see where this goes.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    Read this with my seven year old (actually listened to the audio version) and really enjoyed it! She chose this doll to get for her birthday, so we were excited to read her story. Being a 70s girls myself, I am loving the trip down memory lane! I also am enjoying the story -- family wrestling with divorce, learning about the Chinese cultures through her friend Ivy, life in California back in the day, and a young girl standing up for herself and fighting to play on the boys' basketball team. My d Read this with my seven year old (actually listened to the audio version) and really enjoyed it! She chose this doll to get for her birthday, so we were excited to read her story. Being a 70s girls myself, I am loving the trip down memory lane! I also am enjoying the story -- family wrestling with divorce, learning about the Chinese cultures through her friend Ivy, life in California back in the day, and a young girl standing up for herself and fighting to play on the boys' basketball team. My daughters really like the story as well!

  19. 5 out of 5

    SunnyRay

    The first in a beloved American Girls series follows Julie Albright, a young girl living in San Francisco in the 1970's. Julie moves across town and starts at a new elementary school without her best friend Ivy. This historical fiction text uncovers issues from the time period through the story of Julie and her friends. Specifically, surrounding Title IX and environmental conservation. Julie is a likable and relatable character to girls now and serves as a way for young girls living in the 2020' The first in a beloved American Girls series follows Julie Albright, a young girl living in San Francisco in the 1970's. Julie moves across town and starts at a new elementary school without her best friend Ivy. This historical fiction text uncovers issues from the time period through the story of Julie and her friends. Specifically, surrounding Title IX and environmental conservation. Julie is a likable and relatable character to girls now and serves as a way for young girls living in the 2020's to learn about a past generation.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I didn't expect to like Julie so much. The 1970s aren't a decade that I particularly had any strong feelings about and I didn't really think I'd find much similarity between myself and Julie who is a bit of a tomboy and daughter of divorced parents. But she's got heart and the friendships portrayed were great. I'm enjoying the historical references (the Vietnam War, Title IX) and the pop culture stuff is there too along with the vernacular of the day ("So boss!"). I didn't expect to like Julie so much. The 1970s aren't a decade that I particularly had any strong feelings about and I didn't really think I'd find much similarity between myself and Julie who is a bit of a tomboy and daughter of divorced parents. But she's got heart and the friendships portrayed were great. I'm enjoying the historical references (the Vietnam War, Title IX) and the pop culture stuff is there too along with the vernacular of the day ("So boss!").

  21. 4 out of 5

    FC Marshall

    Meet Julie is not as touching and well thought-out as other American Girl books (at least, not when re-read by an adult studying in college), but Julie is still a fun, relatable character who, though not historical, goes through many things girls of today do as well. Julie is a good role model, the illustrations are well-done (although I wish there were more), and the book is, for this age category, not too long or short.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Julie's books don't feel as 'historical' as the other girls, but I feel that's inevitable. With the rise of Television in the 1960s and 70s, there was more documentation of what was happening when it was happening, so Julie is not challenging nostalgic parents' ideas, but competing with books, tv and movies actually made in 1974. Her story brings up some interesting issues from the 70s, but I've seen most of the plot before in other books. Julie's books don't feel as 'historical' as the other girls, but I feel that's inevitable. With the rise of Television in the 1960s and 70s, there was more documentation of what was happening when it was happening, so Julie is not challenging nostalgic parents' ideas, but competing with books, tv and movies actually made in 1974. Her story brings up some interesting issues from the 70s, but I've seen most of the plot before in other books.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jane Fujiwara

    I was skeptical about a "historical book" about such recent history, but the issue of title nine addressed in the Meet Julie book was a good one. Even the looking back section was very informative. I'm now excited to read the rest of the series. I was skeptical about a "historical book" about such recent history, but the issue of title nine addressed in the Meet Julie book was a good one. Even the looking back section was very informative. I'm now excited to read the rest of the series.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ashleigh

    When there was an American Girl store in our mall, I'd always ask who everyone's favorite American Girl was. They kept saying "Julie," who, due to my age, I had never ever heard of, so I decided to change that. I've found that Julie's pretty cool--totally get it. When there was an American Girl store in our mall, I'd always ask who everyone's favorite American Girl was. They kept saying "Julie," who, due to my age, I had never ever heard of, so I decided to change that. I've found that Julie's pretty cool--totally get it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Coolcat

    Great!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Brown

    One of my favorite series of the AG series. Earth Day, Chinese New Year, endangered animals, bicentennial, and more.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Avery short read but useful and informative for a new doll owner.

  28. 4 out of 5

    AliceElizabeth 101

    Man the 70’s were a horrible time to be alive. Glad I wasn’t alive back then. 🤔

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    It was a cool and fun story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Isabelle Retzlaff

    I think the books have good.

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