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It's a matter of trust. For thousands of years the Darhel, a warrior species conditioned to be incapable of killing, manipulated and controlled the human race. Then the humans threw off their yoke. Now, for the first time, a Darhel has been assigned to the elite Deep Reconnaissance Team commandos. Trust, in a small unit, is vital. And there was no trust to be had on either It's a matter of trust. For thousands of years the Darhel, a warrior species conditioned to be incapable of killing, manipulated and controlled the human race. Then the humans threw off their yoke. Now, for the first time, a Darhel has been assigned to the elite Deep Reconnaissance Team commandos. Trust, in a small unit, is vital. And there was no trust to be had on either side. But when the mission encountered an alien device worth more than a king's ransom, it was the humans who betrayed the trust. Now the despised Darhel must race against the team's sniper to prevent the artifact falling into the wrong hands. The Darhel has empathic powers, superhuman strength and the speed of a cheetah. The sniper has years of experience and enormous ability. The sniper can kill. The Darhel cannot. The fate of the galaxy and the human race for the next thousand years rests on the shoulders of a Darhel. The Hero has a thousand faces, but is one of them the face of an elf?


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It's a matter of trust. For thousands of years the Darhel, a warrior species conditioned to be incapable of killing, manipulated and controlled the human race. Then the humans threw off their yoke. Now, for the first time, a Darhel has been assigned to the elite Deep Reconnaissance Team commandos. Trust, in a small unit, is vital. And there was no trust to be had on either It's a matter of trust. For thousands of years the Darhel, a warrior species conditioned to be incapable of killing, manipulated and controlled the human race. Then the humans threw off their yoke. Now, for the first time, a Darhel has been assigned to the elite Deep Reconnaissance Team commandos. Trust, in a small unit, is vital. And there was no trust to be had on either side. But when the mission encountered an alien device worth more than a king's ransom, it was the humans who betrayed the trust. Now the despised Darhel must race against the team's sniper to prevent the artifact falling into the wrong hands. The Darhel has empathic powers, superhuman strength and the speed of a cheetah. The sniper has years of experience and enormous ability. The sniper can kill. The Darhel cannot. The fate of the galaxy and the human race for the next thousand years rests on the shoulders of a Darhel. The Hero has a thousand faces, but is one of them the face of an elf?

30 review for The Hero

  1. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I can hardly believe this was written by the same guy who wrote "Into the Looking Glass." I liked that book very much. This one was just really, really bad, I'm sad to say. Ringo did have a co-author named Michael Z. Williamson, so I don't know if Williamson wrote most of the book or not. If I had read this one first, I'd never ever have read another Ringo book. As it is, it'll be a long time before I risk it after this. And now for the spoilers. First, we spend almost 190 pages getting to know a I can hardly believe this was written by the same guy who wrote "Into the Looking Glass." I liked that book very much. This one was just really, really bad, I'm sad to say. Ringo did have a co-author named Michael Z. Williamson, so I don't know if Williamson wrote most of the book or not. If I had read this one first, I'd never ever have read another Ringo book. As it is, it'll be a long time before I risk it after this. And now for the spoilers. First, we spend almost 190 pages getting to know a group of characters. They are not an exciting 190 pages and consist of some chattering, some commentary about weaponry, and some military training. Finally the squad lands on what we are hoping is an enemy planet. They quickly discover an alien artifact that is worth a lot of money. Promptly, one of the squad uses a grenade to kill all but two of the people we've spent 190 pages getting to know. The rest of the book, about 200 pages, is spent in the murderer and the two survivors chasing each other around and trying to kill each other. I was so pissed off by that time that I only sped read the rest of it. Very disappointing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Hamad

    I'm not sure what's worse: - An entirely pointless story - Spending half the book getting to know a completely irrelevant group of characters - Spending half the book reading about a single stalking episode with no purpose and nobody with an expectation of winning worth rooting for - The complete lack of relationship to any other part of this universe - The attempt at universe building without anything to support it ... Or so many other failures I can't even begin to think them through. I'm not sure what's worse: - An entirely pointless story - Spending half the book getting to know a completely irrelevant group of characters - Spending half the book reading about a single stalking episode with no purpose and nobody with an expectation of winning worth rooting for - The complete lack of relationship to any other part of this universe - The attempt at universe building without anything to support it ... Or so many other failures I can't even begin to think them through.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    05/30/17 3rd re-read. Not bad, a tad drawn out with combat scene after combat scene, but still quite good.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Neil

    I read this when it first came out and, while not quite "hating" it, extremely, extremely disliked it. I think it was because as drawn-out as the story was, the ending was exceptionally anticlimactic. I have not read it since, and only read it because I was reading the series "in chronological order" as much as possible. This clearly being the "final book" in the series [as it takes place over one thousand years after the events in the first eleven books], it was the last one I read [unless the I read this when it first came out and, while not quite "hating" it, extremely, extremely disliked it. I think it was because as drawn-out as the story was, the ending was exceptionally anticlimactic. I have not read it since, and only read it because I was reading the series "in chronological order" as much as possible. This clearly being the "final book" in the series [as it takes place over one thousand years after the events in the first eleven books], it was the last one I read [unless the author ever decides to finish the portion of the series involving the war with the Hedren]. It was okay. I'd probably rank it 2.3 - 2.5 stars but am rounding it down. It is slow, very slow. I cannot say if the character development was "good" or "bad" [as some of it did produce some strong emotional reactions, but those reactions could have been more because of poor writing than good development]. I was glad when it was over, though. I will admit, I did enjoy it more this time around, but that could have been because of the residual emotional negativity I associated with the book the first time around. I have read that this book is no longer considered "canon" for the series. Whatever. What I did like about the book: (view spoiler)[It introduces some "aspects" of the universe that Ringo created that are actually built upon in other books. For example, there is mention of a group of Posleen called the Tular that live in relative peace with the rest of the Galactic community; I am sure this stems from Tulo'stenaloor and his followers being intercepted by the Indowy at the end of Hell's Faire and which was further expanded upon in The Tuloriad. So it was a "nice touch" that I missed entirely the first time I read the book. This book was the first "hint" or "clue" that some aspect of the O'Neal clan was still alive, around, and kicking. Mention is made that favors were being called in with the Bane Sidhe O'Neal at the end by the Bane Sidhe Darhel due to the Aldenatan technology discovered on the planet. I did think it was clever how the indigenous species were used as decoys in the book, and I also thought the authors were somewhat clever in how they used the indigenous species. I think that is partly what makes the ending ["final fight"] so anti-climactic; however, I will not deny that what the authors did was rather clever (in some respects). (hide spoiler)] This book is (was) very different than the first four books in the series. (view spoiler)[There is very little fighting or action or violence in it. I would say the majority of the violence described in the book is between indigenous species on the planet or the indigenous species and the soldiers. The book boils down to a "three-way stalk" between three individuals, one of whom is the Darhel. It was a pretty boring book, to be honest, as most of it consisted of talking and taunting each other. (hide spoiler)] I would say the authors go for a "twist" that is supposed to turn any assumptions the reader has on their head in reference to the players in the story, but I do not know how well the "twist" works. I suppose it works fairly well, but this book is still my least favorite in the series. The only reason I kept it was because it was a part of the series, and one of my faults is that I am a "completist" (or was at the time). (view spoiler)[The planet they visited kind-of reminded me of the planet Murray Leinster's The Forgotten Planet, but only if THAT planet had been bonded with the planet in David Drake's Redliners. Hahahah It was pretty crazy, a planet whose "higher life forms" consisted primarily of giant "insectoids" and the occasional mammalian creature. It was an interesting planet. (hide spoiler)] (view spoiler)[Dagger's death was crazy! The way he was taunted with being left with just one bullet and to use it wisely! (hide spoiler)] I am glad that I reread it [after not having read it once since it came out thirteen years ago, the memory of the distaste for it still being so strong after all this time] as I actually did enjoy some of it more than I did the first time around. Still do not like the ending. But I am glad that I visited it again.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    I liked Michael Z. Williamson's first novel so well that I thought I'd check out something else by him. The only thing I had handy was this collaboration by Ringo and Williamson, so... I was a bit disappointed. It's possibly my own fault. I stopped reading Ringo's Posleen war series after about the fourth book, and that was quite some time ago, so there was probably a lot of background information that would have made this book make far more sense to me. There were probably many interesting things I liked Michael Z. Williamson's first novel so well that I thought I'd check out something else by him. The only thing I had handy was this collaboration by Ringo and Williamson, so... I was a bit disappointed. It's possibly my own fault. I stopped reading Ringo's Posleen war series after about the fourth book, and that was quite some time ago, so there was probably a lot of background information that would have made this book make far more sense to me. There were probably many interesting things in this book about the nature of the Posleen, Aldenata, and Darhel races that avid readers of the series have been puzzling over for years, but they were pretty much lost on me. Ringo and Williamson spend quite a bit of time building the characters on a special forces team, letting us get to know them, perhaps to empathize with them. The team is sent to a world where the Blobs (a new enemy, as far as I can tell) have an outpost. Previous teams have failed to come back with any information. The team discovers an ancient ruin of the Aldenata civilization, with some sort of mysterious artifact, which they remove and take with them. They also find the Blob outpost, and it turns out to be a decoy. They begin to head back to their waiting ship to return to the home worlds, when one of their number, Dagger, betrays and kills most of them with a neural grenade, intending to steal the artifact for himself, as it's potentially worth a billion credits. What the heck? Why did they give us all this information about characters who were merely going to be cannon fodder after a short portion of the book? The one alien member of the team, who can sense emotions and sometimes thoughts, if they are intense enough, a Darhel named Tindal, realizes the attack is coming just in time to grab the artifact and run. Another member of the team, Ferret, reacts just enough to avoid being killed, though he is somewhat crippled by the neural damage to his legs. From that point forward, the three of them play a cat-and-mouse game on the route back to the rendezvous point. Dagger wants the artifact for himself, Tindal wants to take it to his home planet, where it can be studied by his people, and Ferret just wants revenge for his fallen comrades. Aside from the tension of them stalking each other for the next 150 pages or so, there's not a lot of meat to this novel. There were some interesting "reveals", perhaps, about the Darhel race, for those who have been following the series more closely. I don't think this was either author's best work.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chip Hunter

    This stand-alone novel set in the Ringo's original universe was a major disappointment. The Posleen War 'trilogy' (starting with A Hymn Before Battle) had such an enormous scope, with all of the universe getting involved and the Earth being transformed forever, that I couldn't help expecting more from THE HERO. Instead of an epic struggle that further develops the Legacy of the Aldenata series, this book presents an isolated incident without any obvious impact on the rest of the universe. A few This stand-alone novel set in the Ringo's original universe was a major disappointment. The Posleen War 'trilogy' (starting with A Hymn Before Battle) had such an enormous scope, with all of the universe getting involved and the Earth being transformed forever, that I couldn't help expecting more from THE HERO. Instead of an epic struggle that further develops the Legacy of the Aldenata series, this book presents an isolated incident without any obvious impact on the rest of the universe. A few scraps of information contributing to the series as a whole were appreciated, but they were few and far between and only provided limited information. This is a short and simple story that I wouldn't recommend even to fans of the previous books. Taking place over 1,000 years after the end of the Posleen War, THE HERO begins by introducing some fairly interesting characters that make up a special operations team about to head out on a dangerous-sounding mission. A new enemy has been identified (sadly called the Blobs) and the team is to do some preliminary reconnaissance on a fringe world. Seems like a decent set up, but half way through the story Ringo and Williamson throw you a major curve ball and change the entire plot in a single page. From that point on you're left with a pretty nasty three-way fight for survival on a strange planet between three of the original team. Interesting looks into the psyches of a lunatic and a Darhel (the most mysterious of the aliens populating this universe) are interspersed with fairly tense but predictable action sequences. That is all you get through the end of the book. Entertaining, but not a good fit into the previously excellent series. I hope that the other coauthored books in the series will please me more, or else I won't be continuing with the series. Not recommended.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This book is a stand-alone novel set in John Ringo's Posleen War universe. It is co-written by John Ringo and Michael Z. Williamson. They are two of my favorite Military Science Fiction authors. That being said I was somewhat disappointed in this book. The Posleen War trilogy, starting with A Hymn Before Battle, had such an enormous scope, with all of the universe getting involved and the Earth being transformed forever, that I couldn't help expecting more from THE HERO. Instead of an epic strug This book is a stand-alone novel set in John Ringo's Posleen War universe. It is co-written by John Ringo and Michael Z. Williamson. They are two of my favorite Military Science Fiction authors. That being said I was somewhat disappointed in this book. The Posleen War trilogy, starting with A Hymn Before Battle, had such an enormous scope, with all of the universe getting involved and the Earth being transformed forever, that I couldn't help expecting more from THE HERO. Instead of an epic struggle, this book presents an isolated incident without any obvious impact on the rest of the universe. None of the characters from books 1 - 4 are in this book. A few scraps of information contributing to the series are included, but they were few and far between and only provided limited information. This book is not up to the usual standards of either John Ringo or Michael Z. Williamson. I wouldn't recommend this book to fans of the previous books or to fans of these authors.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    I have loved all 4 of the previous books in the series. This book was just long and boring. Imagine a single story line about the Battan Death March....told every step by step. And that's the book. "Hero"? All the other books at hero's and this one had 3 characters that made a long long long death march. Single story line. I felt like I was the one getting tortured. Clearly this book aims to be some sort of leap to allow the situation at the end of book 4 to be transitioned much further along in I have loved all 4 of the previous books in the series. This book was just long and boring. Imagine a single story line about the Battan Death March....told every step by step. And that's the book. "Hero"? All the other books at hero's and this one had 3 characters that made a long long long death march. Single story line. I felt like I was the one getting tortured. Clearly this book aims to be some sort of leap to allow the situation at the end of book 4 to be transitioned much further along in time. And I hope there resumes the excellent story telling of the first 4 books. Frankly, I don't think this book gave much insight or resolution on the Darhel anymore than the opening scene of the very first book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Anderson

    This book didn't even remotely felt like it was written by Ringo. The style and everything about it (barring the 1000 years later in the same universe) was utterly different. I didn't like the first half at all. The second half was more tolerable, largely because it had more action and suspense, but I still didn't think it was that great. (view spoiler)[It was also somewhat hard to stomach that the main "good" character was Darhel, seeing as they were the hidden bad guys from the main series. (hi This book didn't even remotely felt like it was written by Ringo. The style and everything about it (barring the 1000 years later in the same universe) was utterly different. I didn't like the first half at all. The second half was more tolerable, largely because it had more action and suspense, but I still didn't think it was that great. (view spoiler)[It was also somewhat hard to stomach that the main "good" character was Darhel, seeing as they were the hidden bad guys from the main series. (hide spoiler)]

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Hero is a side story to Ringo's Aldenata series set hundreds of years after the main story line. A special ops unit is destroyed by a mutineer and sets off a predator/prey race among the three survivors to save/steal an alien artifact. Much of this book feels like the movie Enemy at the Gates. Hero is a side story to Ringo's Aldenata series set hundreds of years after the main story line. A special ops unit is destroyed by a mutineer and sets off a predator/prey race among the three survivors to save/steal an alien artifact. Much of this book feels like the movie Enemy at the Gates.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    I'm not sure how the series skipped a thousand years into the future, but there no way to piece the series together from this point forward. This story feels like a short story that got out of hand. Just enjoy each work as a stand alone. I'm not sure how the series skipped a thousand years into the future, but there no way to piece the series together from this point forward. This story feels like a short story that got out of hand. Just enjoy each work as a stand alone.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    A Remake of the good the bad and the ugly?, Not quite but the three-way dual was a great action thriller, not really part of the last few books but a good stand alone, but I would read the earlier books just to understand the races. This was a good Read

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jeff J.

    I enjoyed this, but there’s not much here. The first four books of the Posleen War series was a sprawling saga with multiple characters. This novel was more tactical in nature, ultimately coming down to one character chasing an alien. Bit drawn out, but diverting.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Howard Kurtz

    Excellent continuation Good read. Storyline easy to follow. Good character development. Tags into original storyline as centuries later. Great reminder at end to stories in earlier books.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kubany Csongor

    Actually it is one of the better book of the series. It either should come as a short story, or should put some more ideas/plot into it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    William Snee

    While it has some interesting concepts, the story just seemed to drag out throughout the entire book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Product Description It's a matter of trust. For thousands of years the Darhel, a warrior species conditioned to be incapable of killing, manipulated and controlled the human race. Then the humans threw off their yoke. Now, for the first time, a Darhel has been assigned to the elite Deep Reconnaissance Team commandos. Trust, in a small unit, is vital. And there was no trust to be had on either side. But when the mission encountered an alien device worth more than a king's ransom, it was th Product Description It's a matter of trust. For thousands of years the Darhel, a warrior species conditioned to be incapable of killing, manipulated and controlled the human race. Then the humans threw off their yoke. Now, for the first time, a Darhel has been assigned to the elite Deep Reconnaissance Team commandos. Trust, in a small unit, is vital. And there was no trust to be had on either side. But when the mission encountered an alien device worth more than a king's ransom, it was the humans who betrayed the trust. Now the despised Darhel must race against the team's sniper to prevent the artifact falling into the wrong hands. The Darhel has empathic powers, superhuman strength and the speed of a cheetah. The sniper has years of experience and enormous ability. The sniper can kill. The Darhel cannot. The fate of the galaxy and the human race for the next thousand years rests on the shoulders of a Darhel. The Hero has a thousand faces, but is one of them the face of an elf? From the Author I've noticed a lot of confusion over the nature of the device. The following is a spoiler, so if you've read the book and didn't grasp the significance of the artifact, here it is: Hardcover, page 310 bottom and 311 top Paperback, page 390 top to 2/3 down. The device is a Lindal, an artificial means of initiating Lintatai--catatonia--in an empathic Darhel. This is the psychological danger Tirdal faces throughout the book. This genetically engineered trait is called Lindai. Obviously, the Aldenata needed some way of keeping a race as dangerous as the Darhel from rebelling, and this was the extra safety--a psionic device to prevent them from entering controlled areas. Naturally, it would be disastrous to allow humans to study this device and possibly gain control of Darhel. Which left as the ending of the story: which one of the three was the hero?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andreas

    This story is set about a thousand years after the events in the Posleen War series. The titular hero is a Darhel. The Darhel are known as being the puppetmasters of humanity a millennium earlier, and also for being incapable of killing. He is assigned to a Deep Reconnaissance Commando team due to his psychic ability to sense living beings. The rest of the team is made up of humans. They are sent on a scouting missions to a planet held by the “Blobs”, a mysterious enemy. While there, they find a This story is set about a thousand years after the events in the Posleen War series. The titular hero is a Darhel. The Darhel are known as being the puppetmasters of humanity a millennium earlier, and also for being incapable of killing. He is assigned to a Deep Reconnaissance Commando team due to his psychic ability to sense living beings. The rest of the team is made up of humans. They are sent on a scouting missions to a planet held by the “Blobs”, a mysterious enemy. While there, they find an Aldenata artifact, and the team sniper betrays the team, killing almost all of the members in a bid to secure the valuable artifact for himself. The Darhel now has to evade the sniper and eliminate him as a threat, despite his racial inability to kill. This book is a very tight knit drama of a few individuals. The psychological aspects are very interesting, delving into motivations and character. The story itself was unfortunately somewhat weak. The first half is basically a set up for the chase in the second half. The chase, though interesting, felt a bit long-winded. If you are interested in special forces and sniper operations, it is a decent read, but despite its exposition on Darhel physiology and psychology, it does not add very much to the Legacy of the Aldenata universe. http://www.books.rosboch.net/?p=1197

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kamas Kirian

    Overall, I liked it. Where the previous novels in the series were solid 4 to 4.5, this was more like a 3.5 to a weak 4. While the first part of the story introducing all of the characters was OK, it seemed a little slow going. Things picked up once the team got inserted on the planet, but it didn't really get good until the betrayal and stalk. I feel like I've read the stalking sequence, at least in part, before. But, I'm not sure where, perhaps John Ringo or Michael Z. Williamson put out a shor Overall, I liked it. Where the previous novels in the series were solid 4 to 4.5, this was more like a 3.5 to a weak 4. While the first part of the story introducing all of the characters was OK, it seemed a little slow going. Things picked up once the team got inserted on the planet, but it didn't really get good until the betrayal and stalk. I feel like I've read the stalking sequence, at least in part, before. But, I'm not sure where, perhaps John Ringo or Michael Z. Williamson put out a short story similar to it? Set a thousand years in the future, I felt like I was missing some part of the story. I liked the characters, wish Gun Doll and Ferret could have made it all the way through. The resolution of the hunt was fairly predictable. Decent book, but not quite as strong as the others. Definitely worth the read if you liked the previous novels, but not something to start with. The eBook was formatted fine with no obvious spelling/grammar errors. Thanks to Baen for the Free Library and promotional CDs.

  20. 4 out of 5

    William Bentrim

    The Hero (Posleen War Series #5) by John Ringo and Michael Z. Williamson We met the Darhel earlier in this series. An alien race that played a huge part in the Posleen War. This story places Tirdal, a Darhel, in a deep reconnaissance team with humans. They are sent on a mission to determine if the new foe has established a beachhead on their target world. The interplay between the humans and their alien teammate provides the tension for the story. This is not the typical action dominated Ringo st The Hero (Posleen War Series #5) by John Ringo and Michael Z. Williamson We met the Darhel earlier in this series. An alien race that played a huge part in the Posleen War. This story places Tirdal, a Darhel, in a deep reconnaissance team with humans. They are sent on a mission to determine if the new foe has established a beachhead on their target world. The interplay between the humans and their alien teammate provides the tension for the story. This is not the typical action dominated Ringo story. In that, it was a disappointment. However as a study of interspecies relations it was excellent. An understanding of the Darhel fills some gaps in the background of the Posleen series. The implacable Dagger, a sniper, faces the immutable Tirdal in a contest of wills. Ferret provides the positive human role model that offsets the despicable Dagger. This was an excellent character study that fleshed out parts of the Posleen series. I am sure it is disappointing to the adrenalin junkies who revel in the mad mayhem that often is a hallmark of John Ringo but I liked the book. At the end, you will find yourself wondering, who was the hero? I recommend it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sayomara Vesper

    If you've read much of John Ringo's Legacy of the Aldenata series you most likely are expecting very classic military science fiction which characteristic of the early books like a Hymn before Battle. Or your expecting the spy vs spy nature of Cally's War books. The Hero is more the latter than the former. Yes the book is about a Darhel who is member of a special forces team but is only part of the story. I would say the book could have been edited down a bit in the last few chapters it could ea If you've read much of John Ringo's Legacy of the Aldenata series you most likely are expecting very classic military science fiction which characteristic of the early books like a Hymn before Battle. Or your expecting the spy vs spy nature of Cally's War books. The Hero is more the latter than the former. Yes the book is about a Darhel who is member of a special forces team but is only part of the story. I would say the book could have been edited down a bit in the last few chapters it could easily drop 30 pages and not really lose anything. Its an enjoyable read. The mind games shifting perspective which can get old in other Ringo books it really works here. And there is a real sense of drama on who is going to come out of the book alive sense these are all unknown character granted our Darhel drops a hint early on that does undercut that a bit. Its an important part of the character but drama would have been a bit higher without it. If you've enjoyed the Cally's War books I think you will enjoy "The Hero"

  22. 5 out of 5

    David L

    Note : this review is of the Kindle edition. This book is an oddity. Though now put as number 5 in the Posleen war saga, it is not in the main sequence at all. It is set approximately a thousand years later than all the other books. It is also different in having a very small cast of characters. There are points in the book where I was left thinking, this is 'Arena' (Star Trek, original series), aka the Fredric Brown short story, and other derivatives, or 'Enemy Mine'. Fortunately John Ringo does Note : this review is of the Kindle edition. This book is an oddity. Though now put as number 5 in the Posleen war saga, it is not in the main sequence at all. It is set approximately a thousand years later than all the other books. It is also different in having a very small cast of characters. There are points in the book where I was left thinking, this is 'Arena' (Star Trek, original series), aka the Fredric Brown short story, and other derivatives, or 'Enemy Mine'. Fortunately John Ringo does not chicken out into a chorus of Kumbayah round a campfire, but follows the logic of the story out to a neat, if not completely original, ending. Persevere, as the book gets better as you go on.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chompa

    I really enjoyed this one. I wasn't expecting the fifth book in the series to jump ahead several hundred years and not involve any of the main characters. At first that disappointed me. The book was a solid military adventure for the first half and then a survival/suspense as the remaining characters hunted each other. Quite enjoyable, perhaps because I wasn't expecting it to be after the initial disappointment. I really enjoyed this one. I wasn't expecting the fifth book in the series to jump ahead several hundred years and not involve any of the main characters. At first that disappointed me. The book was a solid military adventure for the first half and then a survival/suspense as the remaining characters hunted each other. Quite enjoyable, perhaps because I wasn't expecting it to be after the initial disappointment.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Davie

    Different. I had expected this to carry on from the end of Hell's Faire. Instead, it's 1,000 years in the future. Sunday and O'Neal's line has continued. The Darhel have been exposed and it's a new enemy that's been added to the roster. Did not get involved with the characters. This story was a blip on the radar. And I sure wouldn't miss it if it disappeared. Loved the cool (& sneaky) war bots in use by then! Different. I had expected this to carry on from the end of Hell's Faire. Instead, it's 1,000 years in the future. Sunday and O'Neal's line has continued. The Darhel have been exposed and it's a new enemy that's been added to the roster. Did not get involved with the characters. This story was a blip on the radar. And I sure wouldn't miss it if it disappeared. Loved the cool (& sneaky) war bots in use by then!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Steven Sheeley

    Like Ringo's other works, I enjoyed this series as well. The writing it a little choppier, but still up to par and the character development seems a little off at the start but gets better. I thoroughly enjoyed the series although I remind everyone that this is fiction and not a documentary so, therefore, the simple fact that we would have been overrun in a situation like this is immaterial, trying to find fact in fiction will only lead to sleeplessness, weight gain and teeth gnashing. Like Ringo's other works, I enjoyed this series as well. The writing it a little choppier, but still up to par and the character development seems a little off at the start but gets better. I thoroughly enjoyed the series although I remind everyone that this is fiction and not a documentary so, therefore, the simple fact that we would have been overrun in a situation like this is immaterial, trying to find fact in fiction will only lead to sleeplessness, weight gain and teeth gnashing.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kuroi

    An interesting follow up. I wasn't sure about how much I'd like a book set so far in the future after the other books and not about the same war as the previous books but I definitely did enjoy the book even though it was so different. It was a brave move to make such a large departure from the previous books but it did pay off. An interesting follow up. I wasn't sure about how much I'd like a book set so far in the future after the other books and not about the same war as the previous books but I definitely did enjoy the book even though it was so different. It was a brave move to make such a large departure from the previous books but it did pay off.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Probably the weakest of the books on the Posleen series. My understanding is that the authors and publisher quietly decided to retcon this book out of the overall Posleen continuity due to ideas and plot threads that did not mesh with the subsequent books. Even if you're a fan of this series, I'd probably give this book a pass. Probably the weakest of the books on the Posleen series. My understanding is that the authors and publisher quietly decided to retcon this book out of the overall Posleen continuity due to ideas and plot threads that did not mesh with the subsequent books. Even if you're a fan of this series, I'd probably give this book a pass.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Barnette

    Solid military type scifi, but the pace dragged in many places and in others it seemed as if the scenes were being rushed. Over all a fairly good book though if the rest drag like this one I may not finish the series.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bill Davis

    Set thousands of years after the Earth Posleen war ended--a hated Darhel on a Deep Recon Team to a Tslek held planet must battle with his genetic code that prohibits him from killing to survive and return to a Fringe world with recon info.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stutley Constable

    I couldn't finish this book. I just was not interested in the characters. The story was taking too long to develop. What I did read was not the greatest but not the worst. I guess this one was just not my sort of story. I couldn't finish this book. I just was not interested in the characters. The story was taking too long to develop. What I did read was not the greatest but not the worst. I guess this one was just not my sort of story.

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