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Crisis

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Dr. Robin Cook, the inventor of the medical thriller--and bestselling author of Coma, Abduction, Invasion, Marker, and many other chilling novels--now shows readers a healer's dark side, in the terrifying story of a doctor who plunges into a web of corruption and lies.


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Dr. Robin Cook, the inventor of the medical thriller--and bestselling author of Coma, Abduction, Invasion, Marker, and many other chilling novels--now shows readers a healer's dark side, in the terrifying story of a doctor who plunges into a web of corruption and lies.

30 review for Crisis

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sandie

    At the risk of being CRITICAL, let me just state that Robin Cook’s novel CRISIS is convoluted enough, and has more than enough medical mumbo-jumbo to place it at the top of your list of books most likely to put you into a COMA. With CRITICAL he took us into the arena of hotel-like specialized private hospitals that are in fact stockholder owned big businesses. In CRISIS we once again visit the dark side of medicine, this time examining the system known as “concierge medicine” where doctors are pa At the risk of being CRITICAL, let me just state that Robin Cook’s novel CRISIS is convoluted enough, and has more than enough medical mumbo-jumbo to place it at the top of your list of books most likely to put you into a COMA. With CRITICAL he took us into the arena of hotel-like specialized private hospitals that are in fact stockholder owned big businesses. In CRISIS we once again visit the dark side of medicine, this time examining the system known as “concierge medicine” where doctors are paid an upfront membership fee that insures the patient of “extras” such as 24 hour access to your doctor, same day appointments for the very ill and house calls when you are too ill to come into the office. (I am old enough to remember when these “concierge” offerings, now deemed as “extras” requiring additional payment, were standards services your family doctor provided to all of his patients). The other ogre rearing its ugly head in CRISIS is that of medical malpractice suits. Cook has created a scenario in which there are very few “good guys”. The doctor accused of malpractice comes across as a greedy, self-absorbed creep; the trial lawyers are of the slimy “win at any cost” mindset and the plaintiff employs his own hired muscle in his attempt to achieve his ends. Just about the only characters with morals or values are Jack the medical examiner, his sister Alexis and Jacks fiancée Laurie. Jacks investigation into the circumstances surrounding the death of the plaintiffs’ wife is a long and boring read and his findings and the ultimate conclusion of the story come right out of left field. In my opinion, there is little reason to recommend this book be added to your “books to read” list.

  2. 5 out of 5

    The Cats’ Mother

    I hadn't read a Robin Cook novel since Coma in the 80s - and so was somewhat surprised to discover that not only is he still alive, but he has an ongoing series about a couple of New York Medical Examiners and that the twelth instalment comes out in December. This is number six - but apart from the background story of the relationship between them, it would seem each book stands alone and explores a different aspect of modern American medicine. I got this from Book Club and it's been on my shelf I hadn't read a Robin Cook novel since Coma in the 80s - and so was somewhat surprised to discover that not only is he still alive, but he has an ongoing series about a couple of New York Medical Examiners and that the twelth instalment comes out in December. This is number six - but apart from the background story of the relationship between them, it would seem each book stands alone and explores a different aspect of modern American medicine. I got this from Book Club and it's been on my shelf for a year - I only started it because I thought I wouldn't get very far and could get it off the shelf, but unlike many other reviewers, I was rapidly intrigued and keen to know how things turned out. Unfortunately the rest of the book didn't live up to the first chapters and was let down by an ill-judged ending. Craig Bowman is a Boston physician who has dedicated his life to medicine and his patients, to the detriment of his marriage and family life, health and psyche. After a very typical mid-life crisis - including marital separation, an affair with his nubile young secretary and a red Porsche - he has switched to a lucrative practice offering "concierge medicine" - where wealthy patients who can afford the hefty retainer have constant access to their personal physician for house calls or as many appointments as they wish. Craig is loving being able to practice medicine unrestricted by the limitations of insurance companies, and give each patient the time they need to look after them properly, and has never been happier. The only downside is patients like Patience (!) - hypochondriacs who summon him at all hours, to describe every inconsequential symptom in excruciating detail - but never follow his advice, never improve and never believe him that there is nothing physically wrong. When Patience's husband calls him for the second time that day to report she is much more unwell than when he saw her at home that morning, he swallows his irritation at the interruption to his planned trip to the symphony to show off his trophy girlfriend, and assumes it will be more of the same - so is horrified on arrival to find her blue and nearing cardiac arrest. He rushes her to hospital, but all attempts at resuscitation are futile, and while he is disappointed to have failed her, he is secretly relieved to be rid of her - until he is served notice that he is being sued by Patience's husband for negligence. Seven months later, the trial begins, and is not going well. Craig's arrogance and narcissism make him a poor witness and the crafty counsel for the plaintiff is using every trick in the book to discredit him in the eyes of the jury. Desperate to help, Craig's wife - with whom he has reunited to try and repair his image - calls her brother, maverick New York ME Jack Stapleton - for help, and on reviewing the case, Jack decides that doing an autopsy may help exonerate Craig - but someone doesn't want their secret exposed and will go to shocking lengths to prevent him revealing the truth. I don't read a lot of medical thrillers, as unless they are actually written by a qualified doctor the mistakes tend to annoy me too much, but this one is actually more of a legal thriller - and as it happens Robin Cook was an ophthalmologist before he turned to writing, and from the range of issues he has covered in his books obviously keeps up to date with medical developments. I initially felt a lot of sympathy for Craig - possibly more than most readers as I could relate to the burnout from the impossible demands of primary care - in my case there was no Porsche and no change of partner, just a switch to Travel Medicine and Clinical Research, with the pay cut more than offset by the improved quality of life. I also recognised the need for validation from one's peers or seniors and devastating psychological impact of being criticised despite feeling like you gave someone your best efforts - and the frustration that lay people don't understand that medicine is rarely black and white and hindsight is always 20/20... As the book went on, however, he did become progressively harder to sympathise with as his selfish introspection and complete disregard for his family's feelings took over. I thought this was very well done. Unfortunately, the middle section of this book was pretty slow, and about 100 pages too long, as we follow Jack around Boston from the court to the hospital to the funeral home to the police station and back to the Bowman’s house as he attempts to organise a post mortem and avoid the cartoon gangster bad guys, all the while worrying that he won’t make his wedding back in New York at the end of the week. While I was fascinated by the medical details, I can see they would add nothing for the average reader. Then the ending seemed very abrupt with multiple plot threads left unresolved - but it didn’t seem like these would be resolved in the next book, just that the author reached his word count and left it there. Other reviewers have complained about the dialogue but I can’t say it bothered me. I was impressed by the twist which I did not see coming, but was well set up. In the afterword the author gives his own perspective on concierge medicine, including the disconnect between disapproving of it in principle but acknowledging the fact that most people who could afford it would want it, and most doctors would like to practice in it - which I did find interesting. This was published in 2006 but I can’t imagine that things have improved any since then. While he acknowledges that the crisis in primary care is occurring around the world, the USA and it’s calamitous medicolegal system lies at the root of most of the problem and I’ve never heard of this concept taking off anywhere else. Overall this was an average legal thriller which explored some aspects of medicine that are probably only really of interest to people working in the field and an overly drawn out mystery which is incompletely resolved. 3.5 rounded down for the ending.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Roush

    I was disappointed in this book. I thought the outcome was way too predictable. I had it figured out from nearly the beginning but since it took so long to build up to the conclusion I had hoped there was going to be more to it and I would be wrong. I also felt like a big part of the story line was not explained at the end. I guess I can assume the purpose of the particular story line, but I felt like since it was given such a big part of the book that it should have been tied up at the end. Als I was disappointed in this book. I thought the outcome was way too predictable. I had it figured out from nearly the beginning but since it took so long to build up to the conclusion I had hoped there was going to be more to it and I would be wrong. I also felt like a big part of the story line was not explained at the end. I guess I can assume the purpose of the particular story line, but I felt like since it was given such a big part of the book that it should have been tied up at the end. Also being a court reporter, I was excited at the references made to the court reporter in the book but was disappointed that the references did not accurately portray how a court reporter would handle situations in real life, such as sidebar arguments out of the court reporter's presence or the court reporter being told to delete something from the record. I also felt like the writing style did not flow smoothly; the characters didn't speak as smoothly as they would in real life. And I felt like the author often used "big" words just to use "big" words. I haven't read any books by this author in quite a while, but he was one of my favorites for years. I don't know if my expectations were higher than they should have been or perhaps my reading preferences have changed or whether his earlier books were better.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lianna

    I can't believe there was a 70+ page prologue and a 6 page ending. Who edits these? Not sure I understand what the deal was in Cuba. The book just kind of ended. It tricked me into reading the author's note afterwards to see if he explains the ending. ***SPOILER ALERT*** He doesn't. Kept me interested. Got impatient for a few hundred pages waiting for the characters to figure out what caused Patience's death; Cook made it pretty obvious what they should have investigated by continually mentioning I can't believe there was a 70+ page prologue and a 6 page ending. Who edits these? Not sure I understand what the deal was in Cuba. The book just kind of ended. It tricked me into reading the author's note afterwards to see if he explains the ending. ***SPOILER ALERT*** He doesn't. Kept me interested. Got impatient for a few hundred pages waiting for the characters to figure out what caused Patience's death; Cook made it pretty obvious what they should have investigated by continually mentioning it abstractly. Looks like some other good readers claimed to have called the entire ending early on; don't see how as the author never really says what the ending is. I did learn interesting technical names for things, like the white part of an eye and the lottery machine for drawing jurors. If that guy in the Revolutionary War had read Crisis he would have said "Don't fire until you see their sclera!" Way more efficient.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Del

    Mindless read. The dialogue in the book about drove me crazy. A lot of unnecessary exclamation points in character dialogue! Shouldn't bother me but it did! Dialogue was also stilted and between that and the exclamation points, only the addictive story line kept me reading!!! (Exclamation points included here for emphasis!)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Quite possible the best Cookbook I've read. I think this is my fourth?? Still a great performance by narrator George Guidell. The pacing here was much faster and the subject more interesting. I was concerned for a second at we'd spend this entire novel in the courtroom but gratefully that wasn't the case. My only complaint of any would be that I am actually still unclear as to the ending. I mean, what happened? Lol

  7. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

    This book took me about 2 months to finish! It was VERY slow for much of it, picking up about 5 chapters or so from the end. I thought the ending was crappy. Wouldn't recommend this to anyone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Paul Weiss

    A twist in the tale ... ! Somewhat of a departure for Robin Cook, Crisis is not so much medical thriller as it is legal thriller in a medical environment. But, whatever he chooses to write, Cook has certainly got a firm stranglehold on the ability to rivet a reader's attention from first page to last! Craig Bowman is an affluent, successful Boston physician. That affluence is directly attributable to his controversial "concierge" practice - his patients pay a hefty up-front retainer that buys them A twist in the tale ... ! Somewhat of a departure for Robin Cook, Crisis is not so much medical thriller as it is legal thriller in a medical environment. But, whatever he chooses to write, Cook has certainly got a firm stranglehold on the ability to rivet a reader's attention from first page to last! Craig Bowman is an affluent, successful Boston physician. That affluence is directly attributable to his controversial "concierge" practice - his patients pay a hefty up-front retainer that buys them special attention and a higher degree of direct, personal care because of their "membership" in a lower volume practice. When Patience Stanhope - a hypochondriac "problem patient" that Bowman inherited from the previous owner of the practice - dies of a heart attack, her husband sues Bowman for malpractice. As the trial progresses, Bowman's ability to function on a personal and professional level descends into a downward spiralling hole of misery. Bowman's wife begs her brother, New York medical examiner Jack Stapleton, to come to Boston to see if, as an outside observer with an eye for detail, he might spot a way out of the judgment that now seems will almost certainly go against Bowman. Stapleton's investigations point in the direction of foul play and the story accelerates as the proof must be discovered before the malpractice verdict is handed down in the courtroom of a harried judge determined to bring the trial to a rapid conclusion! While Cook hasn't proposed any solutions, he certainly hasn't hesitated to use Crisis as a platform to indicate his concerns with a number of problems in the US medical and legal systems - for example, the inherent controversy of the "concierge" practice and the perception of its omission of medical care for the poor; the litigious nature of the US legal system and the devastating personal effect of a malpractice suit on a practicing physician; the basic flaws of an adversarial court system that allows legal tricks wherein the skills and personalities of the lawyers involved may overshadow the "facts" of the case; the huge diagnostic problems associated with false positive and negative outcomes in laboratory tests; and the propensity of the standard medical education to commonly produce extreme narcissistic personalities in those students that successfully persevere to graduate as medical practitioners (or perhaps it is a system designed to allow only individuals with already pronounced narcissistic tendencies to succeed?). The thinking reader won't come away with any simple ideas for resolution of these problems but the eyebrows will be raised on more than one occasion as the issues and their repercussions are showcased in a provocative thriller. I wouldn't have hesitated to give 5 stars to Crisis except that I found the sub-plot of Stapleton rushing to get to his own wedding completely unnecessary. The timing of the trial provided all of the urgency necessary and, frankly, I found the threats and posturings of Stapleton's fiancée childish and irritating. The ultimatums that she issued during every conversation about the results of Stapleton's failing to appear at the altar would have been more than enough reason for me to simply call the whole thing off anyway. But that minor quibble will be forgotten as Cook closes Crisis with a blockbuster unexpected twist - in the style of Jeffrey Deaver's Twisted or Jeffrey Archer's A Twist in the Tale, the quirky ending is held in reserve until the final sentence of the novel . Thoroughly enjoyable and highly recommended! Paul Weiss

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    The expected good medical thriller from Robin Cook with a very tense plot. However, I disliked the resolution on this one. I didn't think the ending was nearly as good as most of his, even though there was a twist. Still 4.25/5 on rating though.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Markus

    I dislike Robin Cook as a writer. I feel that he is preachy, redundant, and an over-user of medical terminology which laypeople cannot comprehend, perhaps without having first read many of his other novels or being a previous medical student. It was hard to keep focus, and it took me a lot longer to read than it should have for its size. I kept putting it down, out of boredom. As thrilling as his fans claim his writing is, I couldn't help but feel like I was reading one big chronology of the Bos I dislike Robin Cook as a writer. I feel that he is preachy, redundant, and an over-user of medical terminology which laypeople cannot comprehend, perhaps without having first read many of his other novels or being a previous medical student. It was hard to keep focus, and it took me a lot longer to read than it should have for its size. I kept putting it down, out of boredom. As thrilling as his fans claim his writing is, I couldn't help but feel like I was reading one big chronology of the Boston cityscape and the difficulty with which the main character traversed the town's confusing surface streets. Also, the end was unpredictable, but not in a suspenseful twist kind of way. It ended completely out of left-field, and the author gave very little insight or reasons for the way he ended the story. I would not recommend this book to anyone. P.S. my grandmother loved it, and I foresee myself reading something similar if not identical to this work for her next book club choice. Wish me luck.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Well I have to admit that this book kept me turning pages. But ultimately it dragged on quite a bit, the dialog was a little silly, and the ending didn't really answer all my questions. In fact I'm not sure it was even logically consistent with the rest of the book. And, oh... near the beginning, there is a bit of foreshadowing where it says something along the lines of "but he couldn't possibly know that over the next few weeks these two cases would have a surprising connection." (I can't be bo Well I have to admit that this book kept me turning pages. But ultimately it dragged on quite a bit, the dialog was a little silly, and the ending didn't really answer all my questions. In fact I'm not sure it was even logically consistent with the rest of the book. And, oh... near the beginning, there is a bit of foreshadowing where it says something along the lines of "but he couldn't possibly know that over the next few weeks these two cases would have a surprising connection." (I can't be bothered to look up exactly what it says.) Well... No. In fact, one case is immediately forgotten and never mentioned again. There is no connection, the entire novel is about only one of the cases, and there seems to be no point to the section at the beginning detailing the second case. The impression I get is that Cook shifted gears to focus on only one case but that due to poor editing the section introducing the other case and this statement remained. Pretty sloppy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    1.0 out of 5 stars Whatever happened to the real Robin Cook?, October 28, 2006 This review is from: Crisis (Hardcover) This book was implausible and boring. Lots of errors that editors should have found -- I'm too uninterested even to bother pointing them out because fixing them won't improve the book anyway. Dumb premise -- stupid characters -- unanswered questions -- bad ending Where is the "medical" in this thriller? I am even tired of Jack and Laurie and basketball and unrealistic chase scenes 1.0 out of 5 stars Whatever happened to the real Robin Cook?, October 28, 2006 This review is from: Crisis (Hardcover) This book was implausible and boring. Lots of errors that editors should have found -- I'm too uninterested even to bother pointing them out because fixing them won't improve the book anyway. Dumb premise -- stupid characters -- unanswered questions -- bad ending Where is the "medical" in this thriller? I am even tired of Jack and Laurie and basketball and unrealistic chase scenes that have absolutely no bearing on the climax of the story or the rationales the doctor provides. Nothing at the end made sense and I didn't like this book at all.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Beth (bibliobeth)

    I usually enjoy Robin Cook's medical thrillers, this one however had a lot more court-room drama going on in it and read a bit like a poor mans John Grisham. The storyline was good and some characters had a lot of potential but it was never really developed. The small cliffhangers at the end of every chapter a la James Patterson didn't work at all for this style of story. Please see my full review at http://www.bibliobeth.wordpress.com I usually enjoy Robin Cook's medical thrillers, this one however had a lot more court-room drama going on in it and read a bit like a poor mans John Grisham. The storyline was good and some characters had a lot of potential but it was never really developed. The small cliffhangers at the end of every chapter a la James Patterson didn't work at all for this style of story. Please see my full review at http://www.bibliobeth.wordpress.com

  14. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Whittaker

    Wasted several hours of my perfectly good life on this huge disappointment. Dreadful, trite descriptions, incongruent ending - Cook must have been having a crisis of his own to throw this together so poorly. Have read other titles by Cook and enjoyed them - don't know what happened to him here.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Orser

    Fast read because the book was very exciting. I enjoy novels about trials because of the two competing sides both have an agenda and use all the tricks to win. This is the 6th in the Jack Stapelton and Laurie Montgomery series and I look forward to the rest of this group of novels. Enjoy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Helenk

    My husband and I listened to this as a book on CD. We found ourselves driving around so we could finish it. We were left with many unanswered questions but it certainly made our 5 hour drive home quickly.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Adam Vasko

    Good book but I didn’t fully understand the ending. Still would defiantly recommend it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Paul Bolton

    Although this is perhaps my fault for reading so many adventures of Jack & Laurie back-to-back, I feel that, even though I love the two main characters, I am getting quite tired of the predicable storylines, storylines the don't make sense and the characters that come and go without explanation. However, what really upsets me is how Robin just seems to wrap up the whole story in a couple of paragraphs. I feel that it doesn't really do justice to the time that you have invested, as a reader, to g Although this is perhaps my fault for reading so many adventures of Jack & Laurie back-to-back, I feel that, even though I love the two main characters, I am getting quite tired of the predicable storylines, storylines the don't make sense and the characters that come and go without explanation. However, what really upsets me is how Robin just seems to wrap up the whole story in a couple of paragraphs. I feel that it doesn't really do justice to the time that you have invested, as a reader, to get to that point. This been said, it won't stop me from carrying on reading the series (I think the phrase is 'glutton for punishment'!!!!!!), it just makes me question myself - but as guess it is the on-paper(??) chemistry that exists between Jack and Laurie which pulls me back for more. The story in its self is good, especially as it takes Jack out of his normal stomping ground of New York City to Boston, where he tries to help (or hinder) his sister's husband, who is up against a malpractice charge. Of course, as with all his books, there is healthy dollop of threats, violence, and gangsters, but once you get through this then the story is quite enjoyable. Unlike some of his books it is not too laden with medical gobbledygook and I did not find that it was hard to follow. Also Cook is a very good tension builder, whether it is just for one scene or the underlining story - is Jack going to make it? But as previously mentioned it is the ending of his books that really get to me. I sometimes think that he (Cook) feels that this is the least important aspect of his books and writes the ending because it is what 'should be done', not to satisfy readers or to explain the whys and wherefores of the story/plot. That said, I always go back for more, so maybe he is not doing such a bad job!!!! Over all the book is OK, worth the read, baring feeling short-changed by it conclusion.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    3 stars is me being generous because I usually really really love Robin Cook novels. I am definitely a fan of the medical thriller and I always feel entertained and intrigued by Robin Cook novels. This one was a little different than the norm for Cook. The plot is that a Doctor has been sued for medical malpractice after a patient has died. Much of the action and drama takes place inside a courtroom, and the legal aspect seems to take center stage in this novel. The book kept me interested and I d 3 stars is me being generous because I usually really really love Robin Cook novels. I am definitely a fan of the medical thriller and I always feel entertained and intrigued by Robin Cook novels. This one was a little different than the norm for Cook. The plot is that a Doctor has been sued for medical malpractice after a patient has died. Much of the action and drama takes place inside a courtroom, and the legal aspect seems to take center stage in this novel. The book kept me interested and I do enjoy the returning characters, Jack and Laurie. I enjoyed the courtroom drama and the antics of the plaintiff’s legal team with all their crazy ploys to dissuade Jack from getting involved in the case. The flaws in the book began during the last 1/4 of the book. There were several late stage twists and turns that seemed contrived and really didn’t seem to make sense with where the book seemed to be headed in the beginning. Nor did the outcome seem to relate at all to the violent actions taken earlier to keep the truth from coming to light. The ending was a head scratcher to say the least. It is never explained how these events all relate either. That said, I’m sure I’ll read more of the books in the Jack and Laurie series and hopefully some of those books will be better executed.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    I have always enjoyed books by Robin Cook. I hadn't previously read this particular one, but I loved the combination of urgency and lack of certainty throughout this book – the urgency based on both the upcoming wedding and the end of the trial! Such a whirlwind! Unfortunately, my lasting impressions of all of the characters would spoil the whole book for those reading, and I refuse to do that, but readers should be ready to run the range of emotions! ********************************************* I have always enjoyed books by Robin Cook. I hadn't previously read this particular one, but I loved the combination of urgency and lack of certainty throughout this book – the urgency based on both the upcoming wedding and the end of the trial! Such a whirlwind! Unfortunately, my lasting impressions of all of the characters would spoil the whole book for those reading, and I refuse to do that, but readers should be ready to run the range of emotions! ******************************************************************************* Upon reflecting for a day, I'm continually bothered by the lack of explanations. The overall story – the malpractice lawsuit – is solved and answered, but the intervening actions and mishaps are left glaringly hanging: who WAS trying to kill Jack, and why? What was the whole question of the autopsy? Why were the kids threatened and pressured? I can come up with possible – even probable – explanations, but I think it's part of the job of the author to actually TELL the whole story. Of course, in most situations, I can come up with explanations; no books are actually required for any story. The whole idea of the novel is to provide the explanation of the writer whose invented story IT IS. I had to reevaluate my "stars" rating.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Another audio book passed to me to listen to in the car narrated by George Guidell. Have never read Robin Cook & had no idea this was a series. It stood alone just fine. It was perfect for listening while driving. I haven't delved into medical thrillers so enjoyed it for what it is - entertainment. Boston Doc Craig Bowman has gone through a midlife crisis, leaves his wife Alexis & daughters for a 'concierge' medical practice, & an employee turned lover. He gets slapped with a medical malpractice Another audio book passed to me to listen to in the car narrated by George Guidell. Have never read Robin Cook & had no idea this was a series. It stood alone just fine. It was perfect for listening while driving. I haven't delved into medical thrillers so enjoyed it for what it is - entertainment. Boston Doc Craig Bowman has gone through a midlife crisis, leaves his wife Alexis & daughters for a 'concierge' medical practice, & an employee turned lover. He gets slapped with a medical malpractice law suit for the death of problem patient, Patience Stanhope, who died from a heart attack, or did she? Alexis (also a psychologist) reaches out to her brother medical examiner Doc Jack Stapleton in NYC to try to help her estranged husband. He's about to marry his long time love Laurie so has less than a week to 'help' with the case. There is the creepy ambulance chaser lawyer on the plaintiff side & a race to exhume the body for an autopsy to prove Craig's innocence.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Helene

    Though I had not read any other books in this series, I had no trouble getting to know the characters and settings. I found the book very drawn out and repetitive. The conclusion was certainly a non sequitur and left many unanswered questions. Who hired the thugs who intimidated and threatened the girls? If it was the father, why would he do that to his own children? Besides, he didn't really seem to care one way or another about the autopsy. Why did Tony, the plaintiff's attorney want to stop t Though I had not read any other books in this series, I had no trouble getting to know the characters and settings. I found the book very drawn out and repetitive. The conclusion was certainly a non sequitur and left many unanswered questions. Who hired the thugs who intimidated and threatened the girls? If it was the father, why would he do that to his own children? Besides, he didn't really seem to care one way or another about the autopsy. Why did Tony, the plaintiff's attorney want to stop the autopsy? What did he know? And what was the shootout on the highway all about? Just offended masculinity? It was a bit extreme, even for that. And what were the second thoughts about the wedding all about? That didn't seem to fit either. There was lots of medical language so perhaps people in that profession would find this more interesting. It was all too much fancy detail for me. I WAS curious to read Robin Cook since he came highly rated and recommended but I found he was not for me. Sorry, I would not recommend this series.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Deepesh Rammoorthy

    Robin Cook presents the medical examiner Jack Stapleton yet again as the investigator, with the never-say-die attitude, this time coming to the aid of his estranged sister. Jack pursues the goal of unmasking the real perpetrators with single-minded dedication , despite playing with death on more than one occasion and putting his impending marriage on the line. The finesse with which Robin Cook blends this excellent Medical thriller with an engrossing courtroom drama and unravels the medical , eth Robin Cook presents the medical examiner Jack Stapleton yet again as the investigator, with the never-say-die attitude, this time coming to the aid of his estranged sister. Jack pursues the goal of unmasking the real perpetrators with single-minded dedication , despite playing with death on more than one occasion and putting his impending marriage on the line. The finesse with which Robin Cook blends this excellent Medical thriller with an engrossing courtroom drama and unravels the medical , ethical and legal issues with "Concierge Medicine", on the rise in the US, kept me hooked to this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Gillingham

    A True Who Done It A True Who Done It This book was enjoyable and a fairly good read. I chose this Robin Cook book primarily because I enjoy the Jack Spaulding and Laura characters. They are relatable and could be your folks next door. They are comfortable characters and feel familiar. Of course this book was filled with action and suspense. We had tension between the main characters as well as your auxiliary characters. Throughout the book there was that underlying suspense of whether Jack and La A True Who Done It A True Who Done It This book was enjoyable and a fairly good read. I chose this Robin Cook book primarily because I enjoy the Jack Spaulding and Laura characters. They are relatable and could be your folks next door. They are comfortable characters and feel familiar. Of course this book was filled with action and suspense. We had tension between the main characters as well as your auxiliary characters. Throughout the book there was that underlying suspense of whether Jack and Laura would get married. The mystery part was well written and just when I thought I had figured the mystery out, I learned I hadn't. I enjoyed this read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Toolika Wadhwa

    First, the good things. Despite the five hundred odd pages, it is a quick read. There is a bit more that you learn about each of the characters. All have shades of grey and the book is lengthy because it is a psychological analysis of each person who comes along. The court room drama is more stretched than required. I am not so much in for detailing out the testimonies but if you enjoy reading verbatim records, you might like it. At many places I felt that there was repetition of information whi First, the good things. Despite the five hundred odd pages, it is a quick read. There is a bit more that you learn about each of the characters. All have shades of grey and the book is lengthy because it is a psychological analysis of each person who comes along. The court room drama is more stretched than required. I am not so much in for detailing out the testimonies but if you enjoy reading verbatim records, you might like it. At many places I felt that there was repetition of information which was a put off. Complete review on kitaabikhazaa.blogspot.com

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chaitalee Ghosalkar

    Quite decent than the other crap that Cook has doled out until now (I am reading his books in a chronological order, so this conclusion comes after reading 5 books by him). Since the writing's slightly better, I wish it was backed by a strong plot. The Crisis in question remains limited to the midlife crisis that the main character has been experiencing and its impacts. I wish Cook had read back his books (maybe twice) to see how the strong points in a person's character that he wishes to portray, Quite decent than the other crap that Cook has doled out until now (I am reading his books in a chronological order, so this conclusion comes after reading 5 books by him). Since the writing's slightly better, I wish it was backed by a strong plot. The Crisis in question remains limited to the midlife crisis that the main character has been experiencing and its impacts. I wish Cook had read back his books (maybe twice) to see how the strong points in a person's character that he wishes to portray, come out too strongly to the point of they being reduced to being mere caricatures.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Betty Burkman

    Well named book The author handles a thorny problem in medical care in a easy to read frictional story. That does not mean to trivialize the problem. It's a great book that gives the author the venue to inform the readers about the problems in medical care today in the guise of a fictional story.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ross Sutherland

    Usually love Robin Cook books and when I found this for a 20p on a Help for Heroes stand at a Service Station in Stirling, I thought it was win/win. I still feel I may have been overcharged...this is a dry and lifeless book, which I only stuck with as it's late December and I needed to finish my Reading Challenge for the year.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carleen

    Sometimes clunky writing and a problematic attempt at diversity have this otherwise exciting novel a bit too many distractions. I enjoyed the action scenes and description of facts. The courtroom dialogue is very engaging. However, for me the transgressions in syntax errors and pointless description got in the way of really annoying the novel in its entirety.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Francine Gory

    I was really disappointed in this book. it took 184 pages to even start the foreshadowing of a potential Crisis. Way to much back story and what I felt was filler. I enjoyed the first book I read by Cook, but now I am second guessing future ones. I have not read others in the Stapleton/Montgomery series.

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