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Lord Sunday

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On the seventh day, there was a choice. The House is falling apart, and when it is destroyed, all existence will be destroyed with it, Arthur Penhaligon and his friends Leaf and Suzy are caught in the chaos, separated by events but drawn together in their fight to survive. They must use every power at their disposal - magical or practical - to defeat the enemies attacking t On the seventh day, there was a choice. The House is falling apart, and when it is destroyed, all existence will be destroyed with it, Arthur Penhaligon and his friends Leaf and Suzy are caught in the chaos, separated by events but drawn together in their fight to survive. They must use every power at their disposal - magical or practical - to defeat the enemies attacking them from all sides. For Arthur, the biggest challenge comes from Lord Sunday, the most illusive of the trustees of the will. Lord Sunday's magic is unlike any Arthur has encountered before - and his secrets have the potential to destroy not only Arthur but also the people he holds most dear. On Monday, Arthur Penhaligon was just an ordinary boy thrust into an extraordinary situation. From Tuesday to Saturday, he emerged as the Rightful Heir to the Architect who created everything within the House. Now, on Sunday, he will face a choice of astonishing proportions - the remarkable conclusion to a completely unforeseen adventure.


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On the seventh day, there was a choice. The House is falling apart, and when it is destroyed, all existence will be destroyed with it, Arthur Penhaligon and his friends Leaf and Suzy are caught in the chaos, separated by events but drawn together in their fight to survive. They must use every power at their disposal - magical or practical - to defeat the enemies attacking t On the seventh day, there was a choice. The House is falling apart, and when it is destroyed, all existence will be destroyed with it, Arthur Penhaligon and his friends Leaf and Suzy are caught in the chaos, separated by events but drawn together in their fight to survive. They must use every power at their disposal - magical or practical - to defeat the enemies attacking them from all sides. For Arthur, the biggest challenge comes from Lord Sunday, the most illusive of the trustees of the will. Lord Sunday's magic is unlike any Arthur has encountered before - and his secrets have the potential to destroy not only Arthur but also the people he holds most dear. On Monday, Arthur Penhaligon was just an ordinary boy thrust into an extraordinary situation. From Tuesday to Saturday, he emerged as the Rightful Heir to the Architect who created everything within the House. Now, on Sunday, he will face a choice of astonishing proportions - the remarkable conclusion to a completely unforeseen adventure.

30 review for Lord Sunday

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Lord Sunday (The Keys to the Kingdom #7), Garth Nix Lord Sunday is the seventh book concluding Garth Nix's The Keys to the Kingdom series. The book was released on 1 February 2010 (Australia). Falling from the Incomparable Gardens in Superior Saturday, Arthur, having won the Sixth Key, escapes impalement on Saturday's Tower by entering the Improbable Stair. His uncontrollable falling leads the Stair to spit him out somewhere completely unexpected - he is under attack from sentient insects somewhe Lord Sunday (The Keys to the Kingdom #7), Garth Nix Lord Sunday is the seventh book concluding Garth Nix's The Keys to the Kingdom series. The book was released on 1 February 2010 (Australia). Falling from the Incomparable Gardens in Superior Saturday, Arthur, having won the Sixth Key, escapes impalement on Saturday's Tower by entering the Improbable Stair. His uncontrollable falling leads the Stair to spit him out somewhere completely unexpected - he is under attack from sentient insects somewhere in the Secondary Realms, and is unable to concentrate to use the Fifth Key to escape. Meanwhile, Arthur's friend Suzy Turquoise Blue plots to escape from her prison in Saturday's Tower while battle rages above and below her. Saturday's forces are pressing into the Incomparable Gardens, but are also engaged in a fierce struggle to keep the Piper and his army of Newniths at the bottom of the Upper House. Suzy is being held captive by the intelligent but forgetful Giac, a Sorcerous Supernumerary (meaning he failed his final sorcery exams). She, with some help from the sixth part of the Will, persuades Giac to free her and accompany her to the Citadel in the Incomparable Gardens. On Earth, Leaf, responsible for the Sleepers from Lady Friday, struggles to cope with the aftermath of a nuclear strike and desperately needs help, especially since she herself has become a target for intruders from the House, namely Lord Sunday's Dusk and his 'pet'. Within the House, Nothing continues to rise and must be stopped before it can destroy the entire House and Universe.[3] Sunday intends to hold Arthur to ransom by controlling Leaf and his mother; to this end, he dispatches the "Reaper" (Sunday's Dusk) to take Leaf through the Front Door. It is then revealed that the Door is filled with Nithlings and is collapsing through contamination by Nothing. The Lieutenant-Keeper of the Door is vanquished in battle with the Nithlings; the Reaper comes to his aid a few minutes too late, and the Keeper dies, handing over the post to an unwilling Leaf. As the new Lieutenant-Keeper, Leaf cannot be compelled to leave the Front Door, so the Reaper goes back to Lord Sunday to report his failure. Arthur returns from the unknown planet in the Secondary Realms by a supreme effort of will and control over the Improbable Stair, because his ear was shot off before he fully entered the Stair; once healed, he believes he has returned to his bedroom on Earth, but as he searches his house he finds his mother (who went missing during the events of "Lady Friday") in the living room. As he approaches her he realizes that she can't see him. It is later revealed that Arthur's mother is trapped in a time loop and is being displayed as an exhibit in the Incomparable Gardens. He cannot interact with her; when he looks out of the windows he can see nothing but green leaves draped against them. Soon after, a Piper's child (employed as a gardener) enters the house with a flaming pitchfork; Arthur grabs and deactivates it, then forces the boy to lead him out of the house. The boy professes not to have heard of the upheavals among the Trustees; he thinks Arthur is the Reaper (leading Arthur to suspect that the Reaper is Sunday’s Dawn, Noon or Dusk). ... تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز ششم ماه اکتبر سال 2014 میلادی عنوان: لرد یکشنبه؛ نویسنده: گارت نیکس؛ مترجم: مریم رفیعی؛ تهران: بهنام‏‫، ‫1392؛ ‬‬در 272 ص؛ شابک: 9789645668974؛ موضوع: داستانهای نوجوانان از نویسندگان استرالیایی - سده 21 م نقل از پشت جلد: «عمارت در آستانه فروپاشی است؛ آرتور پنهالیگون و دوستانش سوزی و لیف در جریان هرج و مرج‌های داخل عمارت از یکدیگر جدا افتاده‌ اند، ولی نبردشان برای زنده ماندن، آن‌ها را به یکدیگر پیوند می‌زند. آن‌ها باید همه قدر‌ت‌های جادویی و غیر جادویی‌شان را به کار گیرند تا بر دشمنان‌شان پیروز شوند. بزرگترین چالشی که آرتور پیش رو دارد لرد یکشنبه، مرموزترین متولی وصیت‌نامه معمار است، کسی که رازهایش می‌تواند نه‌ تنها آرتور بلکه عزیزان او را نیز نابود کند. آیا وارث بر حق معمار می‌تواند بر آخرین چالش پیش رویش پیروز شود و عمارت و قلمرو‌های ثانویه را از نابودی نجات دهد؟» پایان نقل از پشت جلد؛ نقل از متن:«باد شدیدی که می‌وزید چشم‌هایش را سوزاند و به موها و لباسش چنگ انداخت. آرتور از سوراخ حاصل از دژکوب شنبه رد شد و از کنار ریشه‌ ها و شاخک‌های گیاهان کف باغ‌های بی‌همتا گذشت. اکنون در حال سقوط از بین ابرها بود، و بخش کوچکی از وجودش می‌دانست که اگر زودتر دست به کار نشود، محکم با برج شنبه برخورد می‌کند و به احتمال زیاد چنان جراحات سنگینی برمی‌دارد که حتی جسم جدیدش هم نمی‌تواند از آنها جان سالم به در ببرد. بدون شک یا می‌مُرد، یا آرزوی مرگ می‌کرد.» پایان نقل. ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nic

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. OH MY GOSH I cannot believe the ending to this book! [This review does contain spoilers like whoah.] Not in a bad way. I'm staggered by the ending, though. Staggered. It's totally unexpected and, while things come out (sort of) okay in many ways, it's terribly tragic in others. The author also does a good job not making every single thing follow neatly or tie up the way one expects. This adds a sense of realism - although also, as you might expect, some confusion. Small but slightly twitch point: t OH MY GOSH I cannot believe the ending to this book! [This review does contain spoilers like whoah.] Not in a bad way. I'm staggered by the ending, though. Staggered. It's totally unexpected and, while things come out (sort of) okay in many ways, it's terribly tragic in others. The author also does a good job not making every single thing follow neatly or tie up the way one expects. This adds a sense of realism - although also, as you might expect, some confusion. Small but slightly twitch point: the last part of the Will, and Lord Sunday, both fail at telling Arthur important stuff (somewhat relative to their differing definitions of "important"). They try to, but they keep getting interrupted and stuff. Ka-fail. The power of plot compels you! BUT, I mostly enjoyed the book. I felt it was a little slow to get started, and some of the writing a tad clunky, but once it grabbed me, it didn't let go. Following are the highlights of my reactions to this book. These showcase some of the unpredictability that I admired - and they are also chock full of spoilers, so if for SOME REASON you're STILL READING THIS REVIEW, and you haven't read the Keys to the Kingdom series yet and think you might do so sometime, stop reading the review now for the love of all that is awesome! 1. Wow, they nuked the hospital. I, uh, really didn't think they'd nuke the hospital. Where were Leaf's family when this happened again? 2. Arthur's transformation is pretty neat. GRAAR ARTHUR SMASH. 3. WHOAH WHOAH WHOAH the Will's been murdering the Trustees! This is one of those excellent plot twists that jars you when you first read it, but then you go, "Of course!" 4. So THAT'S why the elephant's there. (I like Elephant in this book, but I do think it's a slight faltering that when it appears a couple of books back, there's kind of a, "whuh?" sense that didn't really leave until this one makes use of Elephant.) 5. I KNOW you did not just kill Suzy Turquoise Blue, you heartless bastard! I DREW FANART OF HER! 6. So the Architect . . . oh, then . . . that makes sense! Oh, wait, no it doesn't. (Seriously, though: she had to do all that just to free the Old One? Wouldn't it maybe make more sense for Nix to have just said that the Architect couldn't destroy herself without destroying all her creation, and leave it at that? It's really kind of weird that she had to destroy all of everything to break bonds that, um, she created. And all.) But still WHOAH MOTHER OF ALL PLOT TWISTS! (Possibly literally!) 7. So . . . Arthur and the New Architect . . . whoah. This is trippy. (Also, didn't the New Architect specifically say he wasn't going to split off a part of himself like the previous one had? Guess he just changed his mind?) Even though it's POV-hopping, which happens sometimes in this book and annoys me a little, I really like the line where the New Architect tells Arthur he's mortal . . . and is lying. Also OH SNAP Arthur's mother is dead! That's really sad! *Delayed reaction after putting down book* Hey, most of the other dozens of named characters we've met at various times are also dead! Everyone in the House who wasn't on the Elysium! Is dead! I mean, none of these characters was very deeply characterized, but still! *** I'm not actually sure whether the New Architect just said, "Wacky powers, remake everything that's in this book, but with these few changes, and make it snappy!" or whether he actually spent untold ages reforming things according to the snapshot saved in the Atlas. The new Arthur awakes thinking it's been just moments, but the new Arthur is wrong about a few other things, isn't he? I am kind of amused by the not-really-resolution of my, "Will Suzy or Leaf become a romantic interest for Arthur?" question. Neither of them does within the book. This might just be because they kind of don't have enough time together to manage it, but I still sort of appreciate that Nix doesn't toss in an obligatory hero-gets-the-girl at the end somewhere. Though it cracks me up that Arthur will go back to Earth with Leaf (where he will presumably live out his life until the day when the New Architect deems the time right to tell him that he can't die?) while the New Architect, having taken the form of a twenty-one-year-old Arthur, will now be fixing up a brand-new House with the assistance of *cue wacky powers* twenty-one-year-old Suzy! It does make me think that Lord Sunday, during the MORE THAN TWELVE HOURS he has Arthur imprisoned, some of which he spends scolding Arthur, could have explained things. Heck, even if he'd made a just slightly more generous offer to Arthur re: saving the Universe, Arthur might have actually accepted. Maybe Lord Sunday could just have said, "Look, for now, let's fight off the Piper and the Nothing together, and then I'll be happy to give you the Seventh Key after you and I have a little chat about the motives of the Will and the Architect." I don't know, SOMETHING. *** I wonder, too, whether some of the events of this book were actually a result of things unplanned by Mister Nix. He may have dug himself into some holes that didn't have neat, tidy ways out. Either way, I think it works quite well. I'd probably give the book five stars if the writing were a little better. Otherwise, good stuff.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Bittersweet ending to a very good series. It is Lewis Carroll's Alice, but with more consequence. It is Rowling's Harry Potter, but with more protagonist activity. It is C.S. Lewis Chronicles of Narnia, but not Christian. Through its strengths and weaknesses, Lord Sunday and The Keys to the Kingdom series is an engrossing tale full of memorable characters, exaggerated realities, and a boy struggling to remain human.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tina ➹ the girl who lives in Fandoms (Book.Enchantress)

    4.5 Silver Stars with Golden Sparks RTC after re-read my top favourite in the series the end is near I liked how it ended. how the series ended. {I love both covers of this one!} I liked the innovation in naming titles: Mister Monday: ★★★★(★)/5 Grim Tuesday: ★★★/5 Drowned Wednesday: ★★★/5 Sir Thursday: ★★★/5 Lady Friday: ★★★/5 Superior Saturday: ★★★★/5 Lord Sunday: ★★★★(★)/5

  5. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    Wow, I did not anticipate that ending. As a seventh and concluding book, it had a tough job of carrying out a grand and satisfying conclusion, but it managed it. Book 6 ends on quite a cliffhanger (almost literally), and Book 7 picks up right there. There is a lot that happens in this rather short book, so it’s jam-packed. POV alternates between Arthur, Leaf, and Suzy. Arthur is forced to confront Lord Sunday rather early on, whereas in most of the other books he doesn’t meet the Trustee until th Wow, I did not anticipate that ending. As a seventh and concluding book, it had a tough job of carrying out a grand and satisfying conclusion, but it managed it. Book 6 ends on quite a cliffhanger (almost literally), and Book 7 picks up right there. There is a lot that happens in this rather short book, so it’s jam-packed. POV alternates between Arthur, Leaf, and Suzy. Arthur is forced to confront Lord Sunday rather early on, whereas in most of the other books he doesn’t meet the Trustee until the end. Sunday’s domain is the Incomparable Gardens, so all his minions are plant-based people and creatures. (The narrator gives Sunday a rather odd American accent. It’s like part New York, part Chicago, part Western. And why doesn’t everyone else get an Australian accent? I’m pretty sure Arthur is Australian.) I don’t want to spoil anything, so I’ll just say I enjoyed the pacing, the characters, and the bittersweet — and surprising — ending. Clean content; some violence involving fantastical creatures/beings

  6. 4 out of 5

    Wealhtheow

    Arthur Penhalligan was just an ordinary kid (albeit one with extraordinarily bad asthma) when he was randomly chosen to recieve the first part of the Architect's Will. Although no one expected him to be able to hang on to it (in fact, the plan was for him to expire just moments after being handed it), he not only lived, he managed to free several other parts of the Will as well. As each part is freed from its prison, the Will grows stronger and the various "trustees" of the Will grow more desper Arthur Penhalligan was just an ordinary kid (albeit one with extraordinarily bad asthma) when he was randomly chosen to recieve the first part of the Architect's Will. Although no one expected him to be able to hang on to it (in fact, the plan was for him to expire just moments after being handed it), he not only lived, he managed to free several other parts of the Will as well. As each part is freed from its prison, the Will grows stronger and the various "trustees" of the Will grow more desperate to stop Arthur. This is the final showdown. And what a showdown it is! Armies on the march, nuclear bombs, death-trap clocks--and Arthur has to use more and more of the Will's powers to survive it all, losing a little piece of his humanity every time he does. It's enthralling and enraging and fantastic. The worlds created for this series are absolutely fascinating, from Superior Saturday's transparent and perpetually raining tower where clerks work frantically underneath umbrellas, to Drowned Wednesday's world of pirates and Raised Rats, to Tuesday's perpetual war amidst lands that move every sunrise. Arthur's world is just as interesting, because it's like an alternate universe version of our own, but with frequent pandemics and slightly futuristic tech. The characters are another bright spot, from Arthur's solid moral center (even when it costs him and his allies) to Suzy Turquoise Blue's stubborn ability to thrive in any situation. They all felt like real people from early on, and by the end of this seven book series I felt like I knew them as well as I know anyone. In fact, I miss them. I hope Nix choses to write some short stories or something with them, because I'd snatch them up.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Arthur, in this last book, (view spoiler)[is clearly less human. Physically, he isn't human at all. It seems as though he is also being influenced by the House and his transformation until he is acting less human, less compassionate (this was already true in Superior Saturday). But in Lord Sunday, we learn that the pernicious influence of the keys makes Arthur stronger, but also makes him angry. (hide spoiler)] I don't like the ending. While it seems inevitable (especially given the direction of Arthur, in this last book, (view spoiler)[is clearly less human. Physically, he isn't human at all. It seems as though he is also being influenced by the House and his transformation until he is acting less human, less compassionate (this was already true in Superior Saturday). But in Lord Sunday, we learn that the pernicious influence of the keys makes Arthur stronger, but also makes him angry. (hide spoiler)] I don't like the ending. While it seems inevitable (especially given the direction of the last few books), it is also deeply sad, and I found it disappointing. I have no patience for (view spoiler)[the Architect, who destroys the universe and everyone in it because she is bored. The ending seemed so unsatisfying, because it is so deeply sad (unlike the end of the Abhorsen trilogy, which is bittersweet but also clearly triumphant). In the Keys to the Kingdom, the House is destroyed and nearly everyone in it (with only a few exceptions), Arthur's mother is dead, much of the city (and all the poor people in Lady Friday's hospital) has been destroyed by a nuke, and Arthur can never be human again. That is a high price for the Architect's suicide. (hide spoiler)] A few notes on the series. I don't like the term Nothing. I am bothered by it because (view spoiler)[nothing doesn't have properties, and yet Nix gives it properties, which is rather contradictory. I think it should be named something else, because it can spontaneously generate things (Nithlings), it can dissolve matter (like fast acting acid), and it can be used to create things (by using the keys, or by particularly powerful people using their minds). (hide spoiler)] But while this annoyed me throughout the entire series, it is really a minor point. One of the interesting aspects of the Keys to the Kingdom series is that each of the seven trustees is afflicted with a deadly sin. Monday is afflicted with (view spoiler)[sloth, Tuesday with greed, Wednesday with gluttony, Thursday with wrath, Friday with lust, Saturday with envy, and Sunday with pride. (hide spoiler)] It would be easy for there to be a sense of sameness to all these, but instead, each feels different. Monday seems different, and differently expressed, than either Tuesday or Wednesday, or any of the other trustees.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    What a great ending to this series! I was quite surprised at how this ended, but I'm really happy about it. It wasn't a perfect happily ever after, but it was good and felt realistic. I loved how Arthur's friends helped him with this War and retrieving the keys of the kingdom. Arthur's humanity and his friendships were probably my favorite part of this series. It's weird, it doesn't feel like the series is over. Also, we finally get the whole story about the Architect, which I have been waiting f What a great ending to this series! I was quite surprised at how this ended, but I'm really happy about it. It wasn't a perfect happily ever after, but it was good and felt realistic. I loved how Arthur's friends helped him with this War and retrieving the keys of the kingdom. Arthur's humanity and his friendships were probably my favorite part of this series. It's weird, it doesn't feel like the series is over. Also, we finally get the whole story about the Architect, which I have been waiting for the entire time. Now everything makes sense and I can go on with my life lol. I kind of wish there was an extended epilogue since I'd love to see (view spoiler)[ exactly how Art, Suzy and the other denizens remade the House and everything else. (hide spoiler)] Overall, this was such a great series and it was really easy to read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carllee

    I think I'm going to start a book review series called "the problem with finales."* I have had the bitter-sweet pleasure this week of reading two final books from two of my favorite series. One of them was this book, "Lord Sunday" by Garth Nix. The 7th and final book in the Keys to the Kingdom series. Often, as in the case of this book, the last book in a series is delayed and as anticipation grows so does expectations. Is it possible for any concluding book in a series to live up to expectation I think I'm going to start a book review series called "the problem with finales."* I have had the bitter-sweet pleasure this week of reading two final books from two of my favorite series. One of them was this book, "Lord Sunday" by Garth Nix. The 7th and final book in the Keys to the Kingdom series. Often, as in the case of this book, the last book in a series is delayed and as anticipation grows so does expectations. Is it possible for any concluding book in a series to live up to expectations? They have a lot riding on them: the pressure to answers any and all questions, to close the story, and live up to the quality of the previous books in the series. It kind of breaks my heart to give this book only 4 stars. I've been waiting so long and I truly wanted to love this book. That is not to say I didn't like it or that is wasn't a great book; but, with in the context of Keys to the Kingdom and the amazing writing of Garth Nix I thought this book fell a little short. There was something off about the whole story, the characters seemed stiff and the ending seemed rushed and all at once. While in all of the other books in the series we spend pages learning about the realm and the nature of each day's domain, we spend almost no time learning about or experiencing the Incomparable Gardens. I don't want to discredit the book, or the series, because I know the challenge it must be to complete a series. And it Mr. Nix's credit the ending was not what I expected at all. All I could have wished for was more time in the Gardens and perhaps more for shadowing in the previous books about the events / character changes that were coming in the book. Book Rating 8/10 *Oddly I only see this only being a problem with books that go beyond a trilogy, that is 4 or more books. For Example: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Breaking Dawn, etc

  10. 4 out of 5

    Taina

    The last installment of this series deserved 5 stars for the ending alone. But overall, this was a great book. I loved loved loved how Nix was able to turn everything we thought we knew about EVERYTHING on its head. I NEVER saw that ending coming and I never even assumed that she was she and he was them and it was so sad about him and her. Yes, I know that last sentence was a bit confusing, but once you read the book, you'll understand. Arthur went through so much in this last installment and it m The last installment of this series deserved 5 stars for the ending alone. But overall, this was a great book. I loved loved loved how Nix was able to turn everything we thought we knew about EVERYTHING on its head. I NEVER saw that ending coming and I never even assumed that she was she and he was them and it was so sad about him and her. Yes, I know that last sentence was a bit confusing, but once you read the book, you'll understand. Arthur went through so much in this last installment and it made my heart ache to see what Pride can do to an otherwise strong and wise individual. Every doubt and anxiety I had while reading these books were answered and I really appreciated the fact that nothing was changed and Arthur had to suffer such an incredible loss. Most times, books for young children tend to sugarcoat what happens and gives a happily ever after ending, but I think at age 12-14 you really start learning that bad things happen to good people and even if you can change something, it doesn't mean you should. Well done Nix!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    Alas! Due to a gig, I was unable to read Lord Sunday entirely on Sunday. I did read most of it, though, and finished it on my train ride this morning. That was pretty unfortunate, when I got to the part where Elephant plays his part, because it made me cry, as Elephant always has, in this book. I knew Garth Nix wouldn't treat Elephant well. I am shaking my fist at you, sir. Oh, it was meaningful and lovely, and well done: bringing in a soft toy and bringing it to life could easily be over-sentim Alas! Due to a gig, I was unable to read Lord Sunday entirely on Sunday. I did read most of it, though, and finished it on my train ride this morning. That was pretty unfortunate, when I got to the part where Elephant plays his part, because it made me cry, as Elephant always has, in this book. I knew Garth Nix wouldn't treat Elephant well. I am shaking my fist at you, sir. Oh, it was meaningful and lovely, and well done: bringing in a soft toy and bringing it to life could easily be over-sentimental, even for a soft toy lover. But this wasn't. It was just touching, and I ached to be able to bring my own soft toy -- a hippo -- to life. As the end to the series, I found it appropriately exciting, vivid and satisfying. I'm not disappointed it's over -- it was all followed through quite well, and it doesn't leave me wanting, I guess is what I mean. I do want more of Garth Nix's writing, but he ended in just the right place, here.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nick0z

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As a book, it was a great book, but you can't really review the last book in the series on its own. The series finished with an ending. That's about all I can say. It wasn't the great ending that I felt it deserved, but it wasn't a bad ending. I think Garth Nix was just glad to finish the series. Along the way, he would forget about certain things like the Mariner's Medallion. It's described as metallic in this book, but was originally described as bone. Every time something like that came along, As a book, it was a great book, but you can't really review the last book in the series on its own. The series finished with an ending. That's about all I can say. It wasn't the great ending that I felt it deserved, but it wasn't a bad ending. I think Garth Nix was just glad to finish the series. Along the way, he would forget about certain things like the Mariner's Medallion. It's described as metallic in this book, but was originally described as bone. Every time something like that came along, it lessened the credibility and impact of the series. That said, would I read the series again? Definitely. It's a good coming of age series. You feel you could have been or even could be Arthur in such things as his desire to avoid the draft, and his acceptance once he is a part of the army for one example. Nix's imagination for different worlds is amazing. His supporting characters are "real" with dreams and desires of their own. His writing is easy and flows well. Above all, I love the cliff-hangers at the end of most chapters.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Isabel Roman

    Plodding...plodding stuff...secrets oh my! But I can't tell you what they are because then I won't have enough words for my books. Plodding...oh, the ending! Which was crap. I don't want to give any spoilers here, but the end was...it felt like... You know how you have this idea in your head about what's going to happen? And even though you've watched all the science fiction shows and read a large portion of science fiction-y stuff in your life, you think you have this nailed? Or that you a Plodding...plodding stuff...secrets oh my! But I can't tell you what they are because then I won't have enough words for my books. Plodding...oh, the ending! Which was crap. I don't want to give any spoilers here, but the end was...it felt like... You know how you have this idea in your head about what's going to happen? And even though you've watched all the science fiction shows and read a large portion of science fiction-y stuff in your life, you think you have this nailed? Or that you actually KNOW what time travel does to not only your thinking but to the world/universe at large. You know all this and still you read to the end thinking that the story has to follow SOME law of SOME science fiction. But no. It doesn't. And the book ends and you're left thinking What the...? I just read 7 books and spent hours of my life on this series I can never get back and THIS IS THE ENDING? I almost want the plodding back.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Candace

    2019: feelings are still solid. I needed to re-listen to this one even just because last time I was speeding through the end so much that I didn't take time to properly think about it. I love this book series and I wish it had better covers and was more popular. I'm giving this one five stars because this so perfectly capped the series, and I enjoyed the whole thing thoroughly. The way things tied together, the ENDING which I loved, and didn't see coming (not all aspects of it, anyway) and the e 2019: feelings are still solid. I needed to re-listen to this one even just because last time I was speeding through the end so much that I didn't take time to properly think about it. I love this book series and I wish it had better covers and was more popular. I'm giving this one five stars because this so perfectly capped the series, and I enjoyed the whole thing thoroughly. The way things tied together, the ENDING which I loved, and didn't see coming (not all aspects of it, anyway) and the entirety of the world building in general. I still found the Abhorsen books more personally resonant (Lirael especially) but this series was so good and I've already been recommending it to my students. Can safely name Garth Nix as one of my favourite authors now.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kelly H. (Maybedog)

    I was concerned with how Nix would end the series. I was afraid he would take the easy way out and have everything just be a dream or a magic wand would return everything to normal. But instead he came up with an interesting and appropriate ending for this excellent series.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wewewe

    Quite unexpected... :)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Valfe

    This a review for the series as a whole. I read the first book when it came out (I was close to the target age), and at the time didn't have any interest in continuing the series. Now, at the urging of a friend, I've finished the whole series on audiobook, and in conclusion... I have mixed feelings. I'm glad I stuck it out to the end of the series, but it sometimes did feel like sticking it out, rather than reading something I enjoyed. My feelings about Keys to the Kingdom are essentially the same This a review for the series as a whole. I read the first book when it came out (I was close to the target age), and at the time didn't have any interest in continuing the series. Now, at the urging of a friend, I've finished the whole series on audiobook, and in conclusion... I have mixed feelings. I'm glad I stuck it out to the end of the series, but it sometimes did feel like sticking it out, rather than reading something I enjoyed. My feelings about Keys to the Kingdom are essentially the same as my feelings about classic Doctor Who. There are a lot of fantastic ideas, creative settings, and interesting characters with interesting development... but getting to them kind of feels like panning for gold. There's a lot of boring dirt to sift through for the occasional speck. That "dirt" here usually involves very visual actiony fights that felt like the same kind of padding as the endless running through corridors in Classic Who. I don't find fight scenes inherently interesting; they have to be very well written and show us something about the characters, and these largely did neither. And the areas in the House seemed cool and creative, but they were mostly used as background for the action sequences and never quite felt to me like they had any depth (also as was often the case in Classic Who.) However, the overarching plot and Arthur's personal story made it worth it. I think this is the only middle grade portal fantasy I've ever read where I actually bought that the protagonist just wanted to go home and be normal. His family is quirky, loving, and fairly well-developed, he already lost a family once, and the House isn't a particularly nice place to be, especially for a mortal. That struggle between his desire for a mortal life and the obligations to his denizen friends (view spoiler)[that forced him to gradually abandon his mortality, watching in horror as his mind and body became less and less human, (hide spoiler)] was very compelling. And the grand, mythological nature of the overarching plot was interesting and satisfying. (view spoiler)[The series is a creation myth, and when I step back and look at it as a whole, it feels resonant and meaningful the way a myth should. (hide spoiler)] A note about the ending: (view spoiler)[this is getting into hairy philosophical territory, but I'm kind of horrified that the entire universe and all the characters we've come to know and love were destroyed, and copies created in their place. The copies won't know any different, but they're not the same people! The Architect was willing to destroy the entire universe just to allow herself to die, and even with a replacement universe and Architect, that feels supremely selfish. (hide spoiler)] Miscellaneous other notes: - I really liked that the "normal" Earth Arthur came from was not quite our own. - Arthur Penhaligon's name is an obvious reference to King Arthur, but the stories don't really parallel each other enough for that to make sense to me. Maybe I'm missing something. - I expected the purpose of denizens being mostly immortal to be that the author could write lots of fights without having to kill too many people, and boy was I wrong.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Derrick

    Great ending to a very good series. This book definitely felt like part 2 of book 6, and I still think they should have been combined into one, but it was still wonderful especially since I read them back to back.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kereesa

    Well. Didn't expect a lot of that. Still not over most of it. He was going to chain him to a clock?! (view spoiler)[EMILY!!! LEAF I'M SO HAPPY YOU'RE NOT GOING TO BE A DOOR PERSON! SUZY ILU (hide spoiler)] Just so much. I can't wait to read this again. Well. Didn't expect a lot of that. Still not over most of it. He was going to chain him to a clock?! (view spoiler)[EMILY!!! LEAF I'M SO HAPPY YOU'RE NOT GOING TO BE A DOOR PERSON! SUZY ILU (hide spoiler)] Just so much. I can't wait to read this again.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Bounds

    Thanks, again, Garth Nix.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kifflie

    A re-listen. Astonishing world-building and intriguing characters. This remains one of my favorite children's fantasy series, and Alan Corduner's narration is first-rate.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Abbie

    Great story, couldn't put it down. Lots of action and magical right to the end. Highly recommend this series

  23. 5 out of 5

    Micah Grant

    Good finish to the series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Pearl

    This series ended with a bit of a whimper. Too many ideas that were never fully fleshed out. Just eh.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kiran Kuriakose

    This book is like a painting that was painted by the most talented painter on this planet. Just in a ideal way, as in literature. Arthur is such an amazing character. He is brave and an easy to love character. In this outstanding conclusion to the Keys To The Kingdom series, many truths are revealed and many positions are claimed. A true literature master piece. I could not let go of this book. If I remember correctly, I stayed up till about 2 in the morning just to read the ultimate ending to a This book is like a painting that was painted by the most talented painter on this planet. Just in a ideal way, as in literature. Arthur is such an amazing character. He is brave and an easy to love character. In this outstanding conclusion to the Keys To The Kingdom series, many truths are revealed and many positions are claimed. A true literature master piece. I could not let go of this book. If I remember correctly, I stayed up till about 2 in the morning just to read the ultimate ending to an epic series. Simply outstanding.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Liam

    I would say this book was for the most part, the poorest of the series. It lacked clear direction in the plot (which often meandered around aimlessly) and had one of the biggest cop-out endings ever (though part of the ending redeemed the book a bit). It also lacked the charm of the previous books; it just felt soulless. I enjoyed the series itself greatly, and found most of the books up to this one to be quite good considering the targeted audience (I particularly enjoyed "Drowned Wednesday"). H I would say this book was for the most part, the poorest of the series. It lacked clear direction in the plot (which often meandered around aimlessly) and had one of the biggest cop-out endings ever (though part of the ending redeemed the book a bit). It also lacked the charm of the previous books; it just felt soulless. I enjoyed the series itself greatly, and found most of the books up to this one to be quite good considering the targeted audience (I particularly enjoyed "Drowned Wednesday"). However I feel like Garth Nix ran into trouble concluding the series, and rather than push the deadlines to add some polish, he just spewed out his draft. There was a lot that could have been cut, shortened, as well as quite a lot that could have been added. In a way, it's not entirely Nix's fault; I feel like however much I enjoyed the aesthetic of "The Keys to the Kingdom", the formula had been fairly exhausted by this book (Arthur get's separated from his allies and must make do in the enemy trustee's domain on his own). However, up until Lord Sunday, Nix had done a great job of putting a new spin on it, so my sympathy is fairly limited. The book itself was still a fairly captivating read; I didn't find myself necessarily bored by it, though I was frequently frustrated by fairly unimaginative plot directions that could have been so much more. There were a few parts that redeemed this book for me, the scene in which the final part of the Will is released (which without going into details, was really well executed), and the rather bleak "pre-ending". What immensely irritates me is how that pre-ending is abruptly reversed almost immediately, in the space of a few lines of dialogue. It literally executed the definition of a "Deus Ex Machina" ending. It was honestly something you'd expect from a Goosebumps-type pulp novel. Everything after that initially bleak ending is complete rubbish, the cheese-factor was incredibly high. Lord Sunday himself was not a particularly interesting character, and had surpisingly little involvement in the plot compared to previous books. He was just sort of "there" for the last few chapters and really didn't play a huge part in the story. Arthur also degenerated as an interesting character, as his appeal lay within his acting as a channel for the reader. So when the plot itself is interesting, he in turn is an interesting character. However without a solid plot for us to experience through him, you realize he's not particularly complicated either. I mean we know virtually nothing about his interests or background, his personality is rather repetitive (him constantly reminding us how he doesn't really want power) and lacks much depth. All in all, although still worth reading, this book could have been so much better. There were so many things that could have easily been better handled that were not.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Arminzerella

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Arthur has been gradually turning into a denizen after using the keys to perform various acts of sorcery to protect himself and his friends – there’s very little left that’s human about him. In some ways this is good, because he can heal almost instantaneously (and there are a lot of things that are out to get him), but it’s also bad, because his denizen nature is arrogant and cruel and prone to outbursts of rage. While Arthur pursues the last part of the Will and the Seventh Key (which he must Arthur has been gradually turning into a denizen after using the keys to perform various acts of sorcery to protect himself and his friends – there’s very little left that’s human about him. In some ways this is good, because he can heal almost instantaneously (and there are a lot of things that are out to get him), but it’s also bad, because his denizen nature is arrogant and cruel and prone to outbursts of rage. While Arthur pursues the last part of the Will and the Seventh Key (which he must wrest from Lord Sunday), the House is being ripped apart by Nothing and its denizens are embroiled in a bitter war to gain control. Even with the other keys at his disposal, Arthur is hard-pressed to outwit and defeat Lord Sunday. And the resulting victory is far less sweet than he’d imagined. It has been so long since I read the penultimate book in this series that it took me awhile to get into this. I wasn’t sure where it had left off, and there wasn’t a lot of supplementary information to help me figure it out (this is not a series where you can just start in the middle). I almost gave up about half way through, figuring that I’d have to go back and read it from the beginning, but things picked up a little bit when Arthur was taken prisoner in the Incomparable Gardens, so I soldiered on. I still think it would be worth going back to reread this series, particularly since there is so much I’ve forgotten about the House and how it works. The ending was a bit heavy on the explanation (it felt like a reprise of the last Matrix movie, where the Architect – hey, also the Architect! – goes on and on about what the Matrix is and how the system works, except in this case it’s a lengthy diatribe about the creation and existence of the House and the universe). This series is not as satisfying or as detailed as the world Nix creates in the Abhorsen books, but it’s still good. I listened to the audio edition of this in November of 2019 and enjoyed it moreso than the print edition. Noticed that there are similarities to "The Neverending Story" - a Nothing consumes everything and only a boy remains to rebuild it all. Arthur as the Architect is both powerful and sad - he's lost his innocence and his childhood. Maybe he gets a chance to get some of that back when he splits his mortal self off from his all-powerful architect self - to return to Earth/the secondary realms - and live out the rest of his life. But things can't ever be truly as they were before all of the shenanigans with the House started. There are casualties, like Arthur's mother. A rather dark series for kids.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Parcoast

    So this was a great series. Everything I have read from Garth Nix has been great, and he writes to his audience very well. As with any fantastical fantasy finale, there are fine scientific points I could pick at when it comes to his ultimate resolution. But really, that is half the fun of reading a fantasy series. It is not unlike the past-time of some history buffs I know who wonder what it would have been like if something slightly different had happened at some point in the past. It is fun to So this was a great series. Everything I have read from Garth Nix has been great, and he writes to his audience very well. As with any fantastical fantasy finale, there are fine scientific points I could pick at when it comes to his ultimate resolution. But really, that is half the fun of reading a fantasy series. It is not unlike the past-time of some history buffs I know who wonder what it would have been like if something slightly different had happened at some point in the past. It is fun to toss around, but in the end, what happened IS the end. I have one criticism, and I feel strongly enough that I almost wanted to mark this down by a star because of it. (It retained all five stars based on how much I enjoyed the entire series when it was all said and done.) This book is just plain too short. I know that is an odd situation in this day and age where final installments probably average 50% more pages than book 1 (my observation, not scientific data), but this is one book that would have been better with a bit more to it. It is just all over so quickly, simply and cleanly that maybe I just wasn't ready for it. It was very lightweight, but then again, that also earns Nix praise for continually delivering to his young adult audience. Overall summary: Five stars. Enough said. Update from July 2019 reading: So I've been moving through this series so fast that I didn't stop and write as much as I would have hoped as this story arc wrapped up. I have a few questions I jotted down though: -Why did the architect leave in the first place? The explanation seems fuzzy to me. -Are wings on the denizens suppose to suggest angels? Hasn't Nix introduced "angels" into other stories of his? -Why didn't the papers of peoples lives come up again late in the series? It seemed like a powerful magic feature that was mostly ignored. I don't know if these were good questions or not, but they must have impressed me as I was reading it. I will let my first review stand on this series though, as I did enjoy it quite a bit on this second time through.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Nelson

    I’ve finally reached the end of the series! I read this entire book in a day, and was surprised by how much I enjoyed it — the last few books weren’t my favorites, so I was dreading having just an okay ending to this series, but Last Sunday definitely doesn’t disappoint. It’s perfectly completes the series and makes those last few just-okay books worth it. This book is basically just all action. The lines have been drawn, the war has started, and now Arthur has to figure out how to save everyone I’ve finally reached the end of the series! I read this entire book in a day, and was surprised by how much I enjoyed it — the last few books weren’t my favorites, so I was dreading having just an okay ending to this series, but Last Sunday definitely doesn’t disappoint. It’s perfectly completes the series and makes those last few just-okay books worth it. This book is basically just all action. The lines have been drawn, the war has started, and now Arthur has to figure out how to save everyone and get the will and key from Lord Sunday. Lord Sunday is the perfect “final boss” so to speak; his magic is way more powerful than the other trustees and he does not play around. He doesn’t want to give Arthur the will and does everything in his power to make sure he doesn’t get it. I love how Arthur is put in super difficult situations, so he needs to think of creative solutions and try his hardest. It made for a page-turning story, because I just couldn’t wait to find out how he got out of a particularly dangerous situation. On the other side, Leaf and Suzy are fighting another war, trying to find their way to Lord Sunday’s chambers and escape from the Nothing that is quickly eating up the entire House. They come together to find their friend so they can help him with the final battle. I really enjoyed that they put their rivalry on hold to help their greater cause, though there are glimpses of it throughout their interactions. Overall, it was suspenseful, the characters continue to be amazing and surprising, and I absolutely was NOT expecting the ending. Of course, with the description listed above and with various hints throughout the series, I knew that it wasn’t as straightforward as it all seemed, but I wasn’t expecting the entirety of it. Definitely recommend this series if you enjoy adventurous middle grade fantasies. It’s a delight. Also posted on Purple People Readers.

  30. 4 out of 5

    TJ Anderson

    I was actually really impressed with the ending to this series. I've liked the whole series. Definitely a good read for anyone who like the Harry Potter like genre. *If you are planning on reading the series and don't want a spoiler. Don't read past this point* I really enjoyed the book, and as I was nearing the end I thought I was going to be sorely dissapointed. In some of the other novels it seemed as if everything fell into place just in the niche of time, and it was seeming as if this was go I was actually really impressed with the ending to this series. I've liked the whole series. Definitely a good read for anyone who like the Harry Potter like genre. *If you are planning on reading the series and don't want a spoiler. Don't read past this point* I really enjoyed the book, and as I was nearing the end I thought I was going to be sorely dissapointed. In some of the other novels it seemed as if everything fell into place just in the niche of time, and it was seeming as if this was going to happen here as well. But when push came to shove the world came to an end. I really liked it but I thought it might be a little too deep for children to understand. Arthur had gained the power of all of the keys and was then made the architect of the house, so he was able to put the universe back together in the state it was just before it was destroyed. So it seemed like the author had undone all of the bad, and had reinforced the unrealistic ending of fairytales that everything ends well. Not so, the version of the world that he could restore it too did not include his mother. In order to restore the world as it was he had to accept the fact that his mother was dead, and that he could not undo the bad things that had happened on earth during the last 6 books. Although it was a mostly happy ending I think it did a great job of teaching that things can end well but we have to accept the fact that not everything will end well.

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