counter create hit Selected Poetry - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Selected Poetry

Availability: Ready to download

Thomas Hardy is among the best-loved of the great English poets, perhaps drawing his great popularity from the elegaic tone of much of his finest verse and the universality of his subject matter: birth, childhood, love, marriage, age, and death. Those elegies inspired by the death of his first wife Emma are some of his best, and are well represented in this new selection o Thomas Hardy is among the best-loved of the great English poets, perhaps drawing his great popularity from the elegaic tone of much of his finest verse and the universality of his subject matter: birth, childhood, love, marriage, age, and death. Those elegies inspired by the death of his first wife Emma are some of his best, and are well represented in this new selection of his verse. Prepared by Samuel Hynes, the editor of the definitive Oxford English Texts Complete Works of Thomas Hardy, this volume includes a selection of Hardy's poetry that spans his life, verses that influenced later poets as diverse as Robert Graves and Philip Larkin, Ezra Pound and W.H. Auden. About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.


Compare

Thomas Hardy is among the best-loved of the great English poets, perhaps drawing his great popularity from the elegaic tone of much of his finest verse and the universality of his subject matter: birth, childhood, love, marriage, age, and death. Those elegies inspired by the death of his first wife Emma are some of his best, and are well represented in this new selection o Thomas Hardy is among the best-loved of the great English poets, perhaps drawing his great popularity from the elegaic tone of much of his finest verse and the universality of his subject matter: birth, childhood, love, marriage, age, and death. Those elegies inspired by the death of his first wife Emma are some of his best, and are well represented in this new selection of his verse. Prepared by Samuel Hynes, the editor of the definitive Oxford English Texts Complete Works of Thomas Hardy, this volume includes a selection of Hardy's poetry that spans his life, verses that influenced later poets as diverse as Robert Graves and Philip Larkin, Ezra Pound and W.H. Auden. About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

30 review for Selected Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Johns

    I know a little too much about Thomas Hardy, thanks to a college seminar on his life and work. It's my humble opinion that some of Hardy's poetry is genius, like Neutral Tones. Much of his poetry is heavy with regret, memory, bleakness, mourning, and lots of other profound emotions. There are some happier poems, but don't read Hardy for a pep talk on love or human nature. I am particularly drawn to his poetry about war (what my senior paper was all about), and recommend you read "Poems of War and I know a little too much about Thomas Hardy, thanks to a college seminar on his life and work. It's my humble opinion that some of Hardy's poetry is genius, like Neutral Tones. Much of his poetry is heavy with regret, memory, bleakness, mourning, and lots of other profound emotions. There are some happier poems, but don't read Hardy for a pep talk on love or human nature. I am particularly drawn to his poetry about war (what my senior paper was all about), and recommend you read "Poems of War and Patriotism" in Moments of Vision, "The Man He Killed", and "Channel Firing" among many others. Hardy was an old man by the time World War I was raging and he was tired of man's self destruction. So take some time and sit with Mr. Hardy. If you've loved and lost, then he's the man for you.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alice Lippart

    An enjoyable collection. Definitely found some new favorites!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    While I haven't actually finished this book, one is never really done with a book of poetry. This is a decent collection with all the "Poems of 1912-1913" from "Satires of Circumstance" included. Hardy as a poet is very different from Hardy as a novelist, the way most of us know him. His poems are almost invariably short, some are beautifully ambiguous, others as direct and clear as lightning across the night sky, a few are playful ("The Ruined Maid"). A few are famous, like "Channel Firing" and While I haven't actually finished this book, one is never really done with a book of poetry. This is a decent collection with all the "Poems of 1912-1913" from "Satires of Circumstance" included. Hardy as a poet is very different from Hardy as a novelist, the way most of us know him. His poems are almost invariably short, some are beautifully ambiguous, others as direct and clear as lightning across the night sky, a few are playful ("The Ruined Maid"). A few are famous, like "Channel Firing" and "The Darkling Thrush". Hardy's novels were written for serial publication so they tend to be padded with extraneous sub-plots and minor characters who don't do much--it was simply the way novels had to be written then, first to run in monthly installments in one of the "better" magazines, then as three volume works for the lending libraries which accounted for a significant part of sales. In his verse, though, we see that Hardy could make every word count. He wrote like both an artist and a craftsman. Some of the same themes run through the novels and the poems--the unavoidable and often malignant role of fate or chance in the lives of people; the beauties and terrors of rural working class life; the realization that once one turns away from what is most important his life will become meaningless, something Hardy called "the tragedy of the moment". He might have been ironic (although I don't think so) when he did a calculation on the proofs of "Human Shows" and found that only about two-fifths of them were "poems of tragedy, sorrow or grimness". Hardy saw tragedy as part of everyday life, not somethng that affected only noble or dramatic lives.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Knapp

    One of the great poets in English -- but definitely a "glass half-empty" sort of guy. The jacket copy for the Oxford World's Classics paperback puts it nicely: "His verse touches all the common themes of existence: birth, childhood, love, marriage, ageing, death. If his age brings anything to them, it is an old man's ironic, elegiac sense that hopes are likely to be defeated and losses sustained, and that the world was not designed for human happiness." Well . . . that's certainly one point of vi One of the great poets in English -- but definitely a "glass half-empty" sort of guy. The jacket copy for the Oxford World's Classics paperback puts it nicely: "His verse touches all the common themes of existence: birth, childhood, love, marriage, ageing, death. If his age brings anything to them, it is an old man's ironic, elegiac sense that hopes are likely to be defeated and losses sustained, and that the world was not designed for human happiness." Well . . . that's certainly one point of view. See also "The Middle Years" by Henry James. But see. "As the legend has it, [Saint John Chrysostom] crossed the Czarena for neglecting the needs of the poor, and she sentenced him to be dragged to death behind a chariot. The saint was deeply revered by the Russian people, and they lined the road for their last glimpse of him. It is reported that the last words he spoke were, 'Thanks, thanks for everything. Praise, praise for it all!'” http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10... It takes all kinds.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Aken

    Fairly typical Victorian mawkish stuff, I thought.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Dalby

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bluejeans&Moonbeams

  8. 4 out of 5

    Abby Taylor Pugh

  9. 5 out of 5

    El Chacal

  10. 5 out of 5

    Art Foley

  11. 4 out of 5

    Artfulreads

  12. 5 out of 5

    Phil

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marg

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  15. 5 out of 5

    Manik Sukoco

  16. 5 out of 5

    BookScout

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rinzu Rajan

  18. 5 out of 5

    Helen Russell

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mathilde

  21. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nate

  23. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Gilfilen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lacey

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ramzzi Fariñas

  26. 4 out of 5

    Pj

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joe Archer

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  30. 5 out of 5

    Polly Thomas

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.