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FIRST PUBLISHED in English in 1958, Two Women is a compassionate yet forthright narrative of simple people struggling to survive in war. The two women are Cesira, a widowed Roman shopkeeper, and her daughter Rosetta, a naive teenager of haunting beauty and devout faith. When the German occupation of Rome becomes imminent, Cesira packs a few provisions, sews her life saving FIRST PUBLISHED in English in 1958, Two Women is a compassionate yet forthright narrative of simple people struggling to survive in war. The two women are Cesira, a widowed Roman shopkeeper, and her daughter Rosetta, a naive teenager of haunting beauty and devout faith. When the German occupation of Rome becomes imminent, Cesira packs a few provisions, sews her life savings into the seams of her dress, and flees with Rosetta to her native province of Ciociara, a poor, mountainous region south of Rome. Cesira's currency soon loses its value, and a vicious barter economy, fraught with shifty traffickers and thieves, emerges among the mountain peasants and refugees. Mother and daughter endure nine months of hunger, cold, and filth as they await the arrival of the Allied forces. Cesira scarcely cares who wins the war, so long as victory comes soon and brings with it a return to her quiet shopkeeper's life. Instead, the Liberation brings tragedy. While heading back to Rome the pair are attacked by a group of Allied Moroccan soldiers, who rape Rosetta and beat Cesira unconscious. This act of violence and its resulting loss of innocence so embitters Rosetta that she falls numbly into a life of prostitution. Throughout these hardships Moravia offers up an intimate portrayal of the anguish wrought by the devastation of war, both on the battlefield and upon those far from the fray.


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FIRST PUBLISHED in English in 1958, Two Women is a compassionate yet forthright narrative of simple people struggling to survive in war. The two women are Cesira, a widowed Roman shopkeeper, and her daughter Rosetta, a naive teenager of haunting beauty and devout faith. When the German occupation of Rome becomes imminent, Cesira packs a few provisions, sews her life saving FIRST PUBLISHED in English in 1958, Two Women is a compassionate yet forthright narrative of simple people struggling to survive in war. The two women are Cesira, a widowed Roman shopkeeper, and her daughter Rosetta, a naive teenager of haunting beauty and devout faith. When the German occupation of Rome becomes imminent, Cesira packs a few provisions, sews her life savings into the seams of her dress, and flees with Rosetta to her native province of Ciociara, a poor, mountainous region south of Rome. Cesira's currency soon loses its value, and a vicious barter economy, fraught with shifty traffickers and thieves, emerges among the mountain peasants and refugees. Mother and daughter endure nine months of hunger, cold, and filth as they await the arrival of the Allied forces. Cesira scarcely cares who wins the war, so long as victory comes soon and brings with it a return to her quiet shopkeeper's life. Instead, the Liberation brings tragedy. While heading back to Rome the pair are attacked by a group of Allied Moroccan soldiers, who rape Rosetta and beat Cesira unconscious. This act of violence and its resulting loss of innocence so embitters Rosetta that she falls numbly into a life of prostitution. Throughout these hardships Moravia offers up an intimate portrayal of the anguish wrought by the devastation of war, both on the battlefield and upon those far from the fray.

30 review for Two Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    Alberto Moravia was, in my opinion, one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. 'Two Women' is about a mother and daughter in wartime Rome, who flee to the countryside. The novel charts the desperation of their fugitive existence and shows the devastation of war, both physically and psychologically. Moravia and his wife themselves spent a year in hiding, which partly explains why 'Two Women' is so realistic and detailed. However, the characterisation is original and shows starkly the differ Alberto Moravia was, in my opinion, one of the greatest writers of the 20th century. 'Two Women' is about a mother and daughter in wartime Rome, who flee to the countryside. The novel charts the desperation of their fugitive existence and shows the devastation of war, both physically and psychologically. Moravia and his wife themselves spent a year in hiding, which partly explains why 'Two Women' is so realistic and detailed. However, the characterisation is original and shows starkly the difference between the pre-war values of a simple woman and the immorality of fascism. It is ultimately a very tragic story and the final chapters are profoundly affecting. It was filmed in 1961 by the Italian neo-realist auteur, Vittorio De Sica, and Sophia Loren won an Oscar for her performance. My only criticism of 'Two Women' is of the layout, where dialogue is not seperated into paragraphs. This made it hard to read at times. My copy was a cheap, Panther reprint from the 1980s and the design was terrible. A revised edition has since been published by Steerforth Italia, and I can recommend their editions as far superior - though a little more expensive, they truly do justice to Moravia's genius.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andy Lewis

    In this, one of the twentieth-century’s great novels, Moravia offers an insight into the Italian experience of the Second World War, an experience virtually unknown in the Anglo-Saxon world. Here we see the struggles of Italians who move to the countryside around Rome to escape the German troops who are nominally their allies. The story centres around Cesira, a woman of the country who lives in wartime Rome, and her naive daughter Rosetta. Fleeing the danger and deprivation of Rome, the two wome In this, one of the twentieth-century’s great novels, Moravia offers an insight into the Italian experience of the Second World War, an experience virtually unknown in the Anglo-Saxon world. Here we see the struggles of Italians who move to the countryside around Rome to escape the German troops who are nominally their allies. The story centres around Cesira, a woman of the country who lives in wartime Rome, and her naive daughter Rosetta. Fleeing the danger and deprivation of Rome, the two women return to the village of Cesira’s childhood in search of food and safety, only to find that even here, war has left its footprint. As they cope with this new reality, the women encounter the kindness and cruelty, warmth and exploitation of their countrymen as a population displaced to the mountains does whatever it takes to survive in the harsh environment. All the while, Cesira frets for her daughter, concerned that Rosetta’s child-like ignorance will leave her vulnerable, while simultaneously guarding her innocence and reputation. The novel is a brilliant exposé of the effects of war on even the most honourable, while the dénouement is at turns shocking, saddening and oddly uplifting. The eponymous ciociara of the Italian original (La Ciociara after Ciociaria, the area in which the narrative takes place, and the ciocia, a local traditional shoe), refers to Cesira, but comes also to represent both Rosetta and the state of Italy as a whole. In turns both brutal and delicate, this is a wonderful novel which deserves far greater exposure in the English-speaking world, as does its author.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Klára Votavová

    Moravia seems to be a master of great endings. Nothing particularly happens in most chapters of the book, but the last three or four chapters are amazing. The author faithfully describes how war can change a mentality of a girl just like the mentality of a whole society. I do recommand it, you will not regret reading the 'quite okay' majority of the book to get to the amazing finale! Moravia seems to be a master of great endings. Nothing particularly happens in most chapters of the book, but the last three or four chapters are amazing. The author faithfully describes how war can change a mentality of a girl just like the mentality of a whole society. I do recommand it, you will not regret reading the 'quite okay' majority of the book to get to the amazing finale!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    Cesira and her 13-year-old daughter, Rosetta, flee from the allied bombs in Rome during the second world war. They travel to the village where Cesira was born. During their journey and in the village, the mother does everything to protect Rosetta. However, on one occasion they both get raped by soldiers hiding in a church. This cruel event is too much for the always powerful fighting Cesira and she suffers from a breakdown. During their stay in the village, a young intellectual, Michele falls in Cesira and her 13-year-old daughter, Rosetta, flee from the allied bombs in Rome during the second world war. They travel to the village where Cesira was born. During their journey and in the village, the mother does everything to protect Rosetta. However, on one occasion they both get raped by soldiers hiding in a church. This cruel event is too much for the always powerful fighting Cesira and she suffers from a breakdown. During their stay in the village, a young intellectual, Michele falls in love with Cesira who does not know how to reply to the advances of such a gentleman.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rostyslav

    A very thorough and humane description of the effects that war has on souls of all those whose life it touches. The story is told from the perspective of an uneducated and earthly woman amidst the chaos of the WWII. Every time the story risks to become too slow or, at times, gloom, Moravia introduces an unexpected turn of events or, more often, unexpected feelings and thoughts that are provoked by the events. As often happens in his books, despite all the suffering, or perhaps, to some extent be A very thorough and humane description of the effects that war has on souls of all those whose life it touches. The story is told from the perspective of an uneducated and earthly woman amidst the chaos of the WWII. Every time the story risks to become too slow or, at times, gloom, Moravia introduces an unexpected turn of events or, more often, unexpected feelings and thoughts that are provoked by the events. As often happens in his books, despite all the suffering, or perhaps, to some extent because of it, there still remains place for optimism and hope.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Suburbangardener

    Kind of depressing. Actually, very depressing, but still a good book about life in occupied Italy during WWII.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Omar Wajdy

    I Just adore this novel and I keep reading it over and over again

  8. 4 out of 5

    Realini

    La Ciociara aka Two Women, based on the novel by Alberto Moravia A different version of this note and thoughts on other books are available at: - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... and http://realini.blogspot.ro/ Two Women is one of the best films ever made. You can find it on the New York Times’ Best 1,000 Movies Ever Made list: - http://www.listchallenges.com/new-yor... The film has won: - The Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading role and the BAFTA in the same category for Sophia Loren La Ciociara aka Two Women, based on the novel by Alberto Moravia A different version of this note and thoughts on other books are available at: - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... and http://realini.blogspot.ro/ Two Women is one of the best films ever made. You can find it on the New York Times’ Best 1,000 Movies Ever Made list: - http://www.listchallenges.com/new-yor... The film has won: - The Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading role and the BAFTA in the same category for Sophia Loren - The Golden Globe for Best foreign Language Film - The Cannes Film Festival award for Best Actress Sofia Scicolone- as Sophia Loren was born- is one of the most magnificent, talented, resplendent actresses. Her roles are memorable: - La Ciociara, A Special Day, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow – I have noted on the latter- are just a few examples As for the genius directing this masterpiece, Vittorio de Sica will always be remembered for other works of art like: - Bicycle Thieves, Miracle in Milan, Umberto D., Marriage Italian Style, The Garden of Finzi Conti In La Ciociara, Sophia Loren is superb in the role of Cesira, who is the anxious mother of a teenager: Rosetta. The action takes place during the World War II, under the bombardments and within the terror of conflict. At the start, after a terrible bombing taking place over Rome, Cesira decides to take her daughter, who has a weak heart away. First the mother meets with an old friend and we realize that the husband that Cesira had married was not good enough for her. The Two Women embark on a train ride, to seek safety in the countryside that would offer protection. Or so they hope. They have to abandon the train as it has stopped and they continue their journey, coming across partisans. Notwithstanding the righteousness of the cause of fighting against the Nazis, these show a dark side when facing the Two Women. They want the Two Women to be their servants, using the disturbing logic that if their cause is good, serving them is the right thing. But Cesira is a Wonder Woman, gifted, proud, brave, determined, a role model, gritty and insubordinate. Her short answer if: No Way!! She meets an idealist, Michele, who is portrayed by a restrained Jean Paul Belmondo, in a rather unusual role for him. Michele falls in love with Cesira, who in turn jokes with her teenage daughter that she would allow Rosetta to marry the young man, if only the thirteen year old would be just a little older. Food is running short in this village where Cesira was born and there is a scene that I recollect on the subject. The worried mother tries to get some food from a shepherd that has an interesting attitude towards prices: - If I sell you at my price, you would be angry with me and if I sell you at your price, then I would be mad at you… Therefore, the Two Women have to travel back to Rome and on the way tragedy strikes- in what manner I will not say. It is just that relativity is in evidence again: - As in the case of the partisans who wanted servants just because they were on the right side, here again- allied soldiers are responsible for an outrageous act which would be called a war crime today. This is a stupendous movie.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Inês

    This book from Moravia talks about Secira and her daughter Rosetta, who left Rome to go to the countryside to escape the harsh consequences of the war, despite ended up being followed by them. This narrative is told in the perspective of Secira, a ciociara, a woman born and raised in the countryside (an allusion to the geographic region Ciociaria - the original title of this book). It is through her eyes that we experience the hurdles that the Italian people had to endure during wartime. Secira This book from Moravia talks about Secira and her daughter Rosetta, who left Rome to go to the countryside to escape the harsh consequences of the war, despite ended up being followed by them. This narrative is told in the perspective of Secira, a ciociara, a woman born and raised in the countryside (an allusion to the geographic region Ciociaria - the original title of this book). It is through her eyes that we experience the hurdles that the Italian people had to endure during wartime. Secira is extremely provincial and she's very proud of it. Despite having simple and traditional values, and lacking some general culture, she knows how to survive and, most importantly, she knows how to read people due to her profession as a merchant, which was oftentimes handy. The narrative is very simple to follow, which blends with the character and personality of the narrator's humble origins. And it is in this simplicity that we see how war can take from you virtually everything. There is a very meticulous concern to details, visible throughout the whole narrative, which emphasises the toll the war must have had on the author himself. The final chapters overwhelmed me with emotions, despite being "predictable" (because history taught us this) was at the same time unpredictable and left me restless. The only issue I had while reading La ciociara was simply how dense some chapters were. Moravia doesn't waste your time while reading and no chapter is simply a filler. This being said, most chapters, besides being longer than what I'm used to (averagely 30 pages per chapter), were also filled with information that you needed to read very attentively. If it wasn't for the lockdown I fear I might never have time to even pass to the second chapter. However, it was truly an amazing book, that I recommend vividly to everyone who has a morbid fascination for WWII.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Liz Goodacre

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Deeply moving story of life for italians escaping Rome for the mountains to avoid air raids, but so much more too, a mother daughter relationship and the impact of the brutality of war on their relationship and outlook on life. Looking forward to discovering the iconic 60s film version.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ben Stanley

    Great account of occupied Italy in later WW2, with a focus on the absolutely human desperation of civilians - and how war takes virtually everything away.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gergő Tóth

    Classic novel about the ordinary and infamous face of war.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Willis

    This one will stay with me for a long time.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Juliana Provvidenza

    Absolutely obsessed with Italian writing- there is something so unique and beautiful about it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Yeshmanthi Ekanayake

    Another window to the second world war as it raged through Italy. The story is told by a woman named Cesira, who has to fight against the world to keep herself and her daughter alive. A book with so much hope and many characters to witness reality.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ramona Boldizsar

    La Ciociara! I must confess I had a hard time dealing with this book. I borrowed it from a class mate and I was at school, trying to get rid of boredom. I started reading the book and it seemed so annoying and boring from the first pages that I thought I would just drop it. I didn’t, though, because I was really bored and wanted to cool off my mind (of school, of course ) so in the end I kept reading and reading, even though I still didn’t seem to like it. Now that I’ve read the book, I know what La Ciociara! I must confess I had a hard time dealing with this book. I borrowed it from a class mate and I was at school, trying to get rid of boredom. I started reading the book and it seemed so annoying and boring from the first pages that I thought I would just drop it. I didn’t, though, because I was really bored and wanted to cool off my mind (of school, of course ) so in the end I kept reading and reading, even though I still didn’t seem to like it. Now that I’ve read the book, I know what ‘went’ so ‘wrong’ from the first pages: it’s the author’s style. I just don’t get it, or more like I don’t want to get it and it doesn’t fascinate me at all. I don’t appreciate Alberto Moravia’s style, but I don’t want to criticize it either. It’s only personal. He’s not my type of writer. The first pages were almost insupportable for me: all those details about Cesira’s hair and lifestyle described by the narrator (1st person narration) were odd, stupid and selfish and I found myself pretty disgusted because of them. What was so interesting about her black hair and about the fact she was such a great woman, I couldn’t understand. All I did was to picture in my mind a stupid, peasant-like Italian woman. And that’s pretty much I have to say about her, to tell the truth because I don’t find her interesting at all. Still… I rated the book with 4 stars from 5, which means I must’ve loved it, in a way or another. I don’t like the style, I really don’t appreciate all those details and the way Alberto Moravia wrote his book: Cesira seems to talk about herself like such a goody-goody, it seems to me some sort of a soap-opera style and it makes me want to close the book and throw it somewhere on the floor. That’s a fact. Even so, I still like it, not the style, not the characters, but what happens in the book. I tend to fall in love with books about Wars, especially if it’s about World War I and World War II. Now, La Ciociara isn’t a book about World War II in its essence, its not about fights in particular or about politics, even though it talks about them as well, because it’s the War, after all. The book, as I said, talks about another thing. The book talks about the consequences of war and it describes the story of ‘Two Women’, a Mother and a Daughter. All those things they go through don’t tend to get me interested in, because the characters are grey and uninteresting as far as I’m concerned. What I like, though, it’s the atmosphere of World War II. (view spoiler)[ I like the tragedy conveyed in the book. I must confess, even though it might sound a little bit sadistic, that I enjoyed the part when Rosetta was raped. I don’t like rapes and I find them tragic and disgusting. Even so, that was one of the best and realistic parts of the book. It described in a perfect way the atmosphere that existed in the period of World War II and its desperation. (hide spoiler)] I liked the book’s realism and its events. I liked the ending, when all seemed so destroyed, so real and tragic. The last pages were incredibly wonderful written in comparison with the first ones, even though –as I already said- I don’t like the style. Alberto Moravia’s way of writing – I don’t fancy with it, but the facts he’s written about in this book –well, that’s another story. I liked that. I liked the topic, the plot. I liked the ending, it fascinated me because of its tone of realism and tragedy: it’s the War, that’s what’s happened, people cried, people died, people changed, it’s World War II. O could say I rated the book for its topic and its ending that I quite believe to be marvelous, in a way or another; not sweet, of course, but sad, tragic and real.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Quinn Slobodian

    Set in the last winter of the Second World War, the book tells the story of a woman and her daughter who are forced to live in a windowless, floorless, lightless shack in a peasant family's back yard near starvation for half a year waiting waiting waiting for the English to arrive and deliver them. Moravia and his wife had to do the same in reality and you can imagine him, the author, lying in the agony of hunger and cold and fear, counting the sensations like sheep, writing them down in his hea Set in the last winter of the Second World War, the book tells the story of a woman and her daughter who are forced to live in a windowless, floorless, lightless shack in a peasant family's back yard near starvation for half a year waiting waiting waiting for the English to arrive and deliver them. Moravia and his wife had to do the same in reality and you can imagine him, the author, lying in the agony of hunger and cold and fear, counting the sensations like sheep, writing them down in his head to distance himself from the weight of the days' endlessness. The testament to his success in later reanimating those days was that I woke up every morning while reading this book filled with honest joy that I was living in peacetime. The rueful ricochet, last echo of the Futurists' macho reckless bluster, rings back in the final chapters of the book when the woman hears the American cannons and says to herself: "I felt liberation as a happiness which made me rejoice even in the death that the gun dispensed, and made me hate for the first and only time in my life, and made me enjoy the destruction of other people with the same feeling with which one enjoys the coming of spring and flowers and fine weather." A humbled Moravia, whose own biography was not as free of collaboration with Fascists as his blurb would make it seem, puts the echoes of Marinetti shame-faced in the mouth of his female peasant protagonist in the wake of the war and lets them sit there.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    A humble and masterful narrative, where a highly intelligent writer has allowed only his marginally educated protagonist to speak. There is no arrogant intellectualized voice-over, except perhaps in a few minor flashes of condecension from the college boy Michele. But his persona is intricately examined, and folded deep within the narrative. So ultimately the hard-won insights into human nature during the sufferings and deprivations of war come to us slowly and in simple phrases. And the insight A humble and masterful narrative, where a highly intelligent writer has allowed only his marginally educated protagonist to speak. There is no arrogant intellectualized voice-over, except perhaps in a few minor flashes of condecension from the college boy Michele. But his persona is intricately examined, and folded deep within the narrative. So ultimately the hard-won insights into human nature during the sufferings and deprivations of war come to us slowly and in simple phrases. And the insights are more durable and more revealing because of this humble style... but still, I found the book a bit of a drag. Undoubtedly well written, but it did not ever really involve me emotionally or intellectually, and so it remains something I respect but would not ever re-read nor recommend.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ira Bajpai

    Alberto Moravia is in my opinion few of the writers who are truly aware of human emotions and behaviour in the times of famine and adversities. The way he brought out every character linking a perticular incident to it is absolutely remarkable. From the pains and fears of a mother to a daughter who starts of at one infinity and ends up at another is a true beauty that came out from Moravia's brains. How he connected all the dots through out the novel weaving a story that entirely grips you is be Alberto Moravia is in my opinion few of the writers who are truly aware of human emotions and behaviour in the times of famine and adversities. The way he brought out every character linking a perticular incident to it is absolutely remarkable. From the pains and fears of a mother to a daughter who starts of at one infinity and ends up at another is a true beauty that came out from Moravia's brains. How he connected all the dots through out the novel weaving a story that entirely grips you is beyond description. What a war does to different sections of the society or for that matter different men from different races is aptly brought out. Just the touch of feminism, took this novel to a whole another level. If you're a fan of war-time novels this is a must read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Uana Raluca

    At first the book is really boring, but once you get past the dull bits you can discover a lovely and interesting narrative line. The book will fill you up with emotions and harsh life/war details. And in the center amongst all the bitterness you will find the woman. Frail and powerful at the same time. Ready to give up her life in order to protect her daughter from famine and war atrocities. To protect the only thing that in her eyes remained pure.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sylvie

    I wanted to read this before I saw the world premiere of the opera but since everyone had the same idea, I had to read some in the original Italian and some in translation to get it done without library fines. I really like this author and hope to seek out more of his work. This particular story reminded me very much of Irène Némirovsky’s Suite Française. The last few chapters pack a tremendous punch.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Naveen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I like this book so much. The account and effects of war is told through a Lady of age 37 something. She is a very possessive of her daughter who is beautiful and sort of innocent. The people she met throughout the war, including Giovanni to Rosario, are well depicted through the eyes of Ciociaria. The Interesting character has been Michele who was with the Women during their stay at Sant'Eufemia. I like this book so much. The account and effects of war is told through a Lady of age 37 something. She is a very possessive of her daughter who is beautiful and sort of innocent. The people she met throughout the war, including Giovanni to Rosario, are well depicted through the eyes of Ciociaria. The Interesting character has been Michele who was with the Women during their stay at Sant'Eufemia.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dustyn Hessie

    This book is not like Moravia's other novels (Girl Indiferente and Boredom, in particular). The prose was dry and the characters weren't very insightful. It's not a bad book (I could never say that about one of Moravia's books), but it's a lot more boring than his books, even though it is one of Moravia's writing styles to move slowly and unveil the truth gradually, but poignantly. This book is not like Moravia's other novels (Girl Indiferente and Boredom, in particular). The prose was dry and the characters weren't very insightful. It's not a bad book (I could never say that about one of Moravia's books), but it's a lot more boring than his books, even though it is one of Moravia's writing styles to move slowly and unveil the truth gradually, but poignantly.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Miloš

    A very good portrait of war terror from a woman's perspective. Written very ably gives us a picture of WW2 in Italy from the perspective of a young widow with a daughter in the vulnerable age. A novel filled with mud, blood, tears and pain ends with hope. A very good portrait of war terror from a woman's perspective. Written very ably gives us a picture of WW2 in Italy from the perspective of a young widow with a daughter in the vulnerable age. A novel filled with mud, blood, tears and pain ends with hope.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jairo Tenorio

    Very good narrative and interesting story, although with an end too much depressing But I thing that suffering probably happened to many people during the war, specially the fate of the woman, la Ciociara, and her daughter. Five stars rating indeed.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Zbyněk Juřica

    This book is just way longer than it needs to be. Not bad but nothing that I would read twice. It describes the times at WW2 pretty authentically. Everything is very rough and coarse. The ending was a little flat and dissapointing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    baran Sadr Amirebrahimi

    A very sad book which left a great impression on me

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

    Absolutely read this novel. Then watch the film with Sophia Loren. You won't regret either. Absolutely read this novel. Then watch the film with Sophia Loren. You won't regret either.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Isabel

    I love books about the Second World War, and this book was amazingly well written. I could feel I was in Italy during the war and the distress and pain that those people went through. Great book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sergiy Kuzmenko

    Simple and profound book. One of the greatest books about the cruelty of war.

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