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Shale is the lowest of the low-an outcast from a poor village in the heart of the desert. In the desert water is life, and currency, and Shale has none. But he has a secret. It's the one thing that keeps him alive and may save all the cities of the Quartern in the days to come. If it doesn't get him killed first. . . Terelle is a slave fleeing a life as a courtesan. She fin Shale is the lowest of the low-an outcast from a poor village in the heart of the desert. In the desert water is life, and currency, and Shale has none. But he has a secret. It's the one thing that keeps him alive and may save all the cities of the Quartern in the days to come. If it doesn't get him killed first. . . Terelle is a slave fleeing a life as a courtesan. She finds shelter in the home of an elderly painter but as she learns the strange and powerful secrets of his art she fears she may have traded a life of servitude for something far more perilous. . . The Stormlord is dying in his tower and there is no one, by accident or design, to take his place. He brings the rain from the distant seas to his people. Without a Stormlord, the cities of the Quartern will wither and die. Their civilization is at the brink of disaster. If Shale and Terelle can find a way to save themselves, they may just save them all. Water is life and the wells are running dry. . .


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Shale is the lowest of the low-an outcast from a poor village in the heart of the desert. In the desert water is life, and currency, and Shale has none. But he has a secret. It's the one thing that keeps him alive and may save all the cities of the Quartern in the days to come. If it doesn't get him killed first. . . Terelle is a slave fleeing a life as a courtesan. She fin Shale is the lowest of the low-an outcast from a poor village in the heart of the desert. In the desert water is life, and currency, and Shale has none. But he has a secret. It's the one thing that keeps him alive and may save all the cities of the Quartern in the days to come. If it doesn't get him killed first. . . Terelle is a slave fleeing a life as a courtesan. She finds shelter in the home of an elderly painter but as she learns the strange and powerful secrets of his art she fears she may have traded a life of servitude for something far more perilous. . . The Stormlord is dying in his tower and there is no one, by accident or design, to take his place. He brings the rain from the distant seas to his people. Without a Stormlord, the cities of the Quartern will wither and die. Their civilization is at the brink of disaster. If Shale and Terelle can find a way to save themselves, they may just save them all. Water is life and the wells are running dry. . .

30 review for The Last Stormlord

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ I yeet my books back and forth ✨ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I was describing this book to someone as Game of Thrones, only set in a desert where magicians are responsible for bringing the rains and water is the ultimate currency. But honestly, that doesn't quite do this book justice, as it's much better written than Game of Thrones and doesn't quite wallow in the physical and sexual violence like GoT does - not to say that this isn't a brutal MF of a book; it is. Set in the Quartern, a desert land Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest I was describing this book to someone as Game of Thrones, only set in a desert where magicians are responsible for bringing the rains and water is the ultimate currency. But honestly, that doesn't quite do this book justice, as it's much better written than Game of Thrones and doesn't quite wallow in the physical and sexual violence like GoT does - not to say that this isn't a brutal MF of a book; it is. Set in the Quartern, a desert land in which water-sensitive magicians called "Stormlords" are responsible for bringing water, THE LAST STORMLORD is about a land in the middle of political and environmental upheaval. All that magic has brought about climate change and water is becoming scarce in a land that desperately needs it. The last stormlord is dying without a replacement, and hostile factions who have been oppressed by the stormlords are rallying forces to seize powers in the void and resort back to scavenging. The two main characters are Terelle and Shale, both teenagers. Terelle is a young woman who was sold into a brothel when she was a child by her cruel stepfather, and now lives in dread of reaching puberty and being auctioned off for her virginity like a prize mare. One day she decides to escape, hoping to become a dancer, and instead discovering that she's capable of much more. Shale, on the other hand, lives in the outskirts of the Quartern, called "the Gibber," in a labor camp where people mine for resin. His father is an abusive alcoholic, but freedom comes when Shale realizes that he has the power to detect and manipulate water. Unfortunately, his powers bring him to the attention of very dangerous people on both sides of the water war who will stop at nothing to capture him alive. Lately, I've found myself reading more and more fantasy by women because for the most part, male fantasy authors don't really deliver what I want: complex, nuanced world-building with a rich tapestry of culture; strong female protagonists who aren't sexualized and whose agency isn't wrapped up with that of the male hero's; and heroes who don't style themselves after the Chuck Norrises or Tyrion Lannisters of the world, punching holes in trucks or laughing drunkenly in the fate of death. THE LAST STORMLORD is set in an original world that deals with poverty, climate change, colorism, racism, sexism, and so much more. Oh, and this book is brutal. I've seen dudes scoff at female fantasy, but there isn't a whiff of romance in this book yet. Shale is a strong character but also flawed realistically. Terelle has agency and interesting powers, and doesn't need no man in her life to tell her what to do. Taquar Sardonyx was an excellent villain (and does it help that he's brooding and good-looking? But ofc.) It's also a pretty grim world, with mages who can bleed all the water out of people and leave them dried out husks; flesh-eating beetles called "ziggers" that like to burrow into people's eyes or noses and eat them alive; child prostitution and slavery and evil nomads who live by honor and enjoy torture as punishment. I also loved the machinations of the royal family. There's definite Cersei/Laisa and Joffrey/Senya parallels, which is maybe why I found them such a pleasure to hate. The Lannisters were always my favorite characters in Game of Thrones just because they were so unabashedly evol. There's a lot of heavy thoughts about power and how sometimes you do harm when doing good, and vice-versa. When I saw that the author lives in Malaysia working on rain forest conservation, the climate change messages made a lot of sense. This is no heavy handed Ferngully - it's very nuanced, and very good. P.S. CLIMATE CHANGE IS REAL AND YOU'RE A FUCKING IDIOT IF YOU THINK OTHERWISE. DON'T @ ME. 4 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stefan

    Sometimes you find a fantasy novel that's not extremely original, but is so much plain fun to read that you just can't help but love it. The Last Stormlord by Glenda Larke is one of those books: despite using some recognizable fantasy templates, it's a great story and a book I found extremely hard to put down. Whenever the main character in a fantasy novel is poor and young, you can be almost certain that they're destined for great things later in the book or series. The Last Stormlord uses this Sometimes you find a fantasy novel that's not extremely original, but is so much plain fun to read that you just can't help but love it. The Last Stormlord by Glenda Larke is one of those books: despite using some recognizable fantasy templates, it's a great story and a book I found extremely hard to put down. Whenever the main character in a fantasy novel is poor and young, you can be almost certain that they're destined for great things later in the book or series. The Last Stormlord uses this "Ugly Duckling" trope for not one but two main characters. Terelle is a poor young maid in a snuggery (an elegant euphemism for a brothel), who is looking desperately for escape because the next step in her career path is to become a prostitute. Shale is a poor young boy growing up in a desert village, trying to hide his unique gift — finding hidden water in the desert — from his abusive father. Shale's gift is especially meaningful because in the Quartern, water is the most precious and valuable commodity. The land depends on its Stormlord for rain: he creates rain storms, and the water is collected in an elaborate system of pipes and cisterns that distribute it to the population. The population relies on its leaders for their water rations... and now the last Stormlord is dying. The Last Stormlord's perspective switches back and forth from Terelle to Shale to several rainlords who are trying to cope with the imminent water shortages in various ways, such as looking for a new stormlord, or finding new ways to stretch the limited water supplies (e.g., cutting off the storms for specific parts of the land). Glenda Larke gradually reveals the novel's fantasy world as the story progresses: first the established cities of the Scarpern quarter, then the more primitive and poor Gibber lands where Shale grows up, later the Red Quarter and its nomadic Reduners, and towards the end the White Quarter and its mysterious "Alabaster" inhabitants, with even some hints about the lands beyond the Quartern. There's only one noticeable infodump about the land's history, and it’s short and more or less integrated into the story. The rest of the world's details are gracefully revealed to the reader throughout the story. The Last Stormlord is also extremely well-paced, occasionally skipping a few weeks or months between chapters so the story keeps moving along at a pleasant pace. You won't find 100-page descriptions of a single journey here: this novel is basically all story and zero filler, so the pages just keep turning themselves. I hope this pacing will continue in Stormlord Rising, the next book in The Watergiver trilogy. Plotting is at times a bit transparent and predictable, and a couple of characters have names that are truly cringe-inducing, but despite those minor problems, this novel is easy to love. With its smooth storytelling style that should go over very well with fans of Brandon Sanderson, and an overall theme — water shortage and conservation — that's acutely relevant in today's world (how rare in a fantasy novel!), The Last Stormlord is a tremendously entertaining read that's easy to get sucked into, hard to put down, and never boring. Recommended. (This review was also published at the Fantasy Literature website: www.fantasyliterature.com - come check us out!)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mayim de Vries

    “It’s about justice. And compassion. And children dying.” And also about water. Or rather a land without water and with a bloody power struggle. It might be wrong to write this in the times of the climate change but this was just fun to read. Just a perfect book for a hot summer. I took “The Last Stormlord” on a whim; sometimes this happens that it is neither the author nor the title or the cover art (we have all fallen for that at least once, have we not?) but the book itself. It just jumps out, “It’s about justice. And compassion. And children dying.” And also about water. Or rather a land without water and with a bloody power struggle. It might be wrong to write this in the times of the climate change but this was just fun to read. Just a perfect book for a hot summer. I took “The Last Stormlord” on a whim; sometimes this happens that it is neither the author nor the title or the cover art (we have all fallen for that at least once, have we not?) but the book itself. It just jumps out, off the shelf where it has been patiently sitting for months. And you pick it up for no reason. And start reading. And this is it. I picked the novel without any expectations, but having recently read the “Stormwarden”, I expected a similar story. But if “The Last Stormlord” reminds me of any other book, it is “City of Bones” , an absolute favourite (don’t tell me you have not read it!), that comes to mind. It is mainly because of the world set in a desert-y water-deprived, sparsely inhabited and this mainly in the tiered cities which accumulate power and wealth on top and helpless poverty on the bottom. This is as far as the parallels go. The rest is refreshingly different and that was a pleasant surprise. In this land, that depends on people who are sensitive to water, the last person with the ability to create storms and bring clouds with the life-giving rain is old, and ailing, and has nobody to replace him. Kind of a problem, we agree. But those lofty problems seem to be far off from the leading protagonists. Shale is just the lowest of the low: waterless offspring of an abusive father, the resident drunk of the settlement on the fringes of the (un)civilised world good at making promises, but not good enough to keep them. He will need to learn how to do this. Terelle is different than everyone else she knows because she is able to cry real tears when grieving. In a land where every drop of water is more precious than blood and gold combined, this is something that really sets her apart. As she fights against the future that challenged her childhood (I loved this phrase, Ms Larke!) she discovers what is the meaning of her weeping. Both protagonists are special but they are also crippled which makes them dependent which, in turn, renders them compelling. You might think that this will be the usual YA gig, but it is not. Both MCs do a lot of growing up in this book and there are two more in the trilogy. The coming-of-age arc is only one of many others. There are important elements like population control in the face of resource scarcity, social inequalities embedded in a rigid structure that disables mobility, cultural differences (team Alabaster if you ask) and prejudices, mysteries from the past and legends hoping for better future, and also conquests and love stories. Not only they do some fast growing up, but also there are quite dark scenes and a lot of explicit content (after all Terelle does grow up in a snuggery). It is even more pronounced given that the leading duo is accompanied by a whole host of grownups, of whom some have their own POVs. I totally loved Ryka Feldspar! Short-sightedness and a scholarly mind, can you ask for more? (No.) And also a soft spot for the most handsome male rainlord in the cohort. This just must end with my favourite type of romance! “Tell me you have suddenly developed an overwhelming passion that necessitates a romantic proposal doused in the scent of orange blossom and I shall laugh in your face.” Oh well, yes, the antagonists. I have forgotten. There are two, you know, and even if you combined them into a one person, you’d be hards pressed to find something unusual about them. One is a cruel brute, the other one is power-hungry schemer. Or vice versa. It does not really matter. Any psychopath without feelings who only wears a mask of humanity will do. Definitely a weak spot. Regardless of the deficiencies, the ingenious worldbuilding, gripping story, and an important message in the background made up for a perfect read. I promised myself I will read more of Ms Larke in the future, and this is a promise I intend to keep. Also in the series: 2. Stormlord Rising ★★★☆☆ 3. Stormlord’s Exile RTC

  4. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    This book is good. In fact it is very, very good. On the cover it says " Glenda Larke is magical " and she is. The world she builds in this book is certainly magical - one where water is not just the basis of life but is also daily currency, one where Storm Lords can raise clouds from the ocean and direct the rain to where it is needed and one where anyone who is water sensitive is automatically in a position of power. Such a great story and wonderful characters. I cannot wait to find out what ha This book is good. In fact it is very, very good. On the cover it says " Glenda Larke is magical " and she is. The world she builds in this book is certainly magical - one where water is not just the basis of life but is also daily currency, one where Storm Lords can raise clouds from the ocean and direct the rain to where it is needed and one where anyone who is water sensitive is automatically in a position of power. Such a great story and wonderful characters. I cannot wait to find out what happens next - book 2 here I come!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shari Mulluane

    Wheee! What a great read and a great tale. This story has everything I love about epic fantasy. A unique and well defined magic system. Characters I could both love and hate. A well written and fully realized world I could literally lose myself in. Fantasy just doesn’t get any better than this. Full Review Here Wheee! What a great read and a great tale. This story has everything I love about epic fantasy. A unique and well defined magic system. Characters I could both love and hate. A well written and fully realized world I could literally lose myself in. Fantasy just doesn’t get any better than this. Full Review Here

  6. 5 out of 5

    Maria V. Snyder

    I've been staying away from Epic Fantasy novels for a number of years. I look at the thick, one to two inch spines and return the book to my shelf. I just didn't have the time nor the mental dexterity to keep track of a ton of characters, the history of the world, and the political wrangling like Game of Thrones, by George R.R. Martin. I recently went on a vacation to the beach and I picked up my copy of The Last Stormlord, by Glenda Larke and put it in my suitcase. I'm so glad I did! Yes, she has I've been staying away from Epic Fantasy novels for a number of years. I look at the thick, one to two inch spines and return the book to my shelf. I just didn't have the time nor the mental dexterity to keep track of a ton of characters, the history of the world, and the political wrangling like Game of Thrones, by George R.R. Martin. I recently went on a vacation to the beach and I picked up my copy of The Last Stormlord, by Glenda Larke and put it in my suitcase. I'm so glad I did! Yes, she has multiple characters and lots of politics, but I loved the main protagonists and was willing to read through all those lovely world building details because they were so fascinating. In this world, the Stormlord takes water from the sea, forms clouds and sends it to one of the four quarters of the world, which would be a barren desert if not for the Stormlords, so they get rain to fill their wells and water their crops. However, the last one is dying and the need to find a new one is becoming very urgent. But there are others who think returning to the time of random rain will be better - and these others are plotting to stop those efforts. In this world, water is critical and those who don't have any status are considered waterless and must beg and steal for water. If you read this book, have a glass of water nearby - the descriptions and the plight of the people made me thankful for the ease in which I can access water. Of course this is the first book in a trilogy and I've ordered the other two already! They're hard to get so I have to wait a couple weeks! If you like epic fantasy that's not as dense or as sad as Game of Thrones - I'd suggest you read this book - you won't regret it!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shaitarn

    5 stars. What a book, what an amazing book! This was a re-read and I loved it just as much as I did the first time! This, boys and girls, is how you do unique world building! FRTC very soon!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Traci Loudin

    This book rocks. It's adeptly written. The world lives and breathes, as do the characters. If I hadn't already set up the rest of my TBR list through the rest of the year, I'd be going straight onto the next book. In many ways, this first book is a coming of age story for the waterless boy who was once known only as Shale and for the almost-courtesan Terrelle. From the beginning, I was terrified the author would track into horrifying territory with the child courtesan, yet Terrelle deftly avoids This book rocks. It's adeptly written. The world lives and breathes, as do the characters. If I hadn't already set up the rest of my TBR list through the rest of the year, I'd be going straight onto the next book. In many ways, this first book is a coming of age story for the waterless boy who was once known only as Shale and for the almost-courtesan Terrelle. From the beginning, I was terrified the author would track into horrifying territory with the child courtesan, yet Terrelle deftly avoids her fate... and winds up out of the frying pan and into the fire. Or so it would seem. And poor Shale's life is none too easy either. The magic of the stormlords is intriguing, but even more intriguing is the mysterious magic the water painters seem to have... Unfortunately, most of those mysteries aren't revealed in this book, but you come to learn enough to whet your appetite for more books. This is also one of the best romantic subplots I've ever seen, by which I mean, it doesn't do all the annoying stuff romance novels do. Ryka and Kaneth's dialogue is so realistic, the conflict so tragic. And yet it never overwhelms the main plot or steals focus from the actual story. Nor are there any embarrassingly graphic love scenes to skim while reading in public. (I like to read on my lunch breaks, thankyouverymuch.) Torture warning: There are a few graphic descriptions of an infant's death and a man being tortured. But she kept the descriptions of the man's torture fairly contained compared to what she could've done. Oftentimes it's the other characters thinking about the dead/injured and the aftermath that's more gruesome. No rape in this book, thankfully. Most of the plot resolves itself by the end, but yes, it's definitely a cliffhanger in many regards. Not because plot lines are unresolved, but because even bigger wheels have begun to turn. And you're left wondering whether certain secondary characters are still alive. So if you absolutely hate cliffhangers, don't read this book until you have the second in hand.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    3.5 Not sure whether I'll continue or not. Unfortunately the characters I like the most are minor characters so I'm not sure how much I'll see of the later on. (view spoiler)[ One died too....so there's that. (hide spoiler)] . Of the two main characters there is one that I really can't stand. Terrell. I pretty much didn't agree with a majority of the choices she made throughout the book. Such as in the beginning. Now I understand and get why she would want to escape the life that was to be her fut 3.5 Not sure whether I'll continue or not. Unfortunately the characters I like the most are minor characters so I'm not sure how much I'll see of the later on. (view spoiler)[ One died too....so there's that. (hide spoiler)] . Of the two main characters there is one that I really can't stand. Terrell. I pretty much didn't agree with a majority of the choices she made throughout the book. Such as in the beginning. Now I understand and get why she would want to escape the life that was to be her future, but the uncertainty that came when she ran away? She became one of the waterless. If Russet hadn't helped her she likely wouldn't have lasted that long. I just didn't connect with her. Also not a huge fan of the waterpainting magic. Shale I liked more and he definitely grew up throughout the book, but after reading the description for the next book I'm just not too sure if I care enough to continue from here.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lexie

    Its been so long since I've read a straight fantasy that I've almost forgotten what its like. Don't get me wrong I love my urban fantasies, my romance fantasies...but I miss my straight ones. Glenda Larke is a favorite of mine from her 'Isles of Glory' books (of which I still haven't read book 3...), I'd even put her on par with my enjoyment of the Mistborn books or Tredana books honestly. Stormlord starts out rather bleakly. Terelle has a dark future ahead of her as a handmaiden in Madame Opal's Its been so long since I've read a straight fantasy that I've almost forgotten what its like. Don't get me wrong I love my urban fantasies, my romance fantasies...but I miss my straight ones. Glenda Larke is a favorite of mine from her 'Isles of Glory' books (of which I still haven't read book 3...), I'd even put her on par with my enjoyment of the Mistborn books or Tredana books honestly. Stormlord starts out rather bleakly. Terelle has a dark future ahead of her as a handmaiden in Madame Opal's snuggery. As a handmaiden she's basically little better then a Geisha--she is company for men, sings, dances, plays musical instruments--but with the added duty of being a pleasing companion in bed as well. Mind you she's only 12 years old, her father sold her into this life and her older half-sister Vivie keeps telling her to suck it up and go with the flow. From there we head to where Nealrith, son of Granlon (a cloudmaster, ie: very important guy), is visiting the water cisterns with Kaneth, his friend. Things are bad, the water levels being no where near where they should be. The solutions presented by Kaneth are both impossible and morally black, but the options are few. Is it better to be rid of a great many to save a few or should they all perish the same, slow, death? There is a number of different intrigues going on--politically, personally and wide spread. Its not just that the water shortage problem is just now occurring, the problem is that its happening when there hasn't been enough Stormlords. In the last decades only a handful or so of potentials have been born and through disease, death and inability none of them are suitable for the position. As one should expect from Larke's writing the narrative is lush with details. The layers of society are pretty simple to understand, but the world itself is more complex. From the religion (there is the Sunlord and the Raingiver--both practical given the world and concerns) to the social hierarchy (the more water sensitive you are, the better off you will be) Larke weaves an intricate net of survival. I found myself liking Kaneth and Ryka despite some of my earlier misgivings. Kaneth is something of a playboy, until recently not prone to overthinking matters or worrying over the future. Current situations being what they are he's beginning to take a more active stance. Is it too late however? Ryka is a bookish woman with a slightly bitter attitude towards men (and Kaneth in general) and marriage. She is however someone you want beside you, she is intelligent, quick-witted and thinks on her feet. She's fiery as well, but that can sometimes be to her detriment. I am, of course, impatient to read the next volume. With the North American release not until March 2010 (cry with me) and the subsequent volumes not being released until March and September 2010 in Australia, it feels like a loooong wait. I will say this, I like the Australian cover much more then the US one. I think it fits better. The US/Orbit cover looks kind of like Gail Z. Martin's Necromancer cover and I don't think green is the best color to have.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laylah Hunter

    Gave up on this one about 80% of the way through when I realized I wasn't enjoying it and hadn't been for a while. I get uncomfortable pretty fast with books that need to spend a lot of time on reminding you that the characters have suffered! so! much! -- not uncomfortable in a "this is disturbing" way, more in a "what, don't you trust me to sympathize with the characters?" way. Some interesting political maneuvering, and I love the sensual attention paid to the desert itself, but the main charac Gave up on this one about 80% of the way through when I realized I wasn't enjoying it and hadn't been for a while. I get uncomfortable pretty fast with books that need to spend a lot of time on reminding you that the characters have suffered! so! much! -- not uncomfortable in a "this is disturbing" way, more in a "what, don't you trust me to sympathize with the characters?" way. Some interesting political maneuvering, and I love the sensual attention paid to the desert itself, but the main characters interested me less and less as the story made it more and more clear that their role was to be poor innocents in tragic circumstances who were constantly manipulated by bad men.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Hayden

    This book is set in a world where rain doesn't come regularly and water is a very precious item. Rains are scheduled by the Cloudmaster, or Stormlords. Water has to be separated from the sea, as a pure water vapor, then the cloud is moved up toward the moutain ranges so the water runs down toward all the cities again or to the regions to get the water. The water is released as rain and stored in cisterns to be rationed out. However, you learn there are many people who don't have water rights and This book is set in a world where rain doesn't come regularly and water is a very precious item. Rains are scheduled by the Cloudmaster, or Stormlords. Water has to be separated from the sea, as a pure water vapor, then the cloud is moved up toward the moutain ranges so the water runs down toward all the cities again or to the regions to get the water. The water is released as rain and stored in cisterns to be rationed out. However, you learn there are many people who don't have water rights and have to buy the water, one way or another. We start with Terelle in a snuggery with her sister, where their fathers sold them to. Terelle is twelve and has no desire to be paid to sleep with different men every night. Then we meet Shale a Gibber who's father named him Shale because he felt he was as useless as a heap of shale. We take a journey through the lives of these two characters, along with others, as they grow up and learn who they are. In the first 100 pages I felt I meet all the important characters through the writing of different view points; Terelle, Shale, and from some of the rainlords too. I enjoyed reading these different views because I got to see the world and learn about the world from different happenings and sides. I also got to see what the characters where thinking when they meet, then when they separated again. The world ended up being a great attraction for me in this book. There are different cultures and beliefs of religion. Along with these different cultures you see there is a "magic" here, that centers around water - water sensitives. These are people who can sense and even manipulate water. There are different levels of ability and there are different types of manipulation. One is to make the storms or sense water, another is to manipulate paint through water - which can also affect the future. I think my favorite at the moment is the waterpainters. Although, how Shale learns to use his water sense is amazing too. In those first 100 pages not only did I get to see the world at different views and the separation created between all the people, but also the problems that exist in the world now. The shortness in Stormlords and available pure water. I did have one question which kept nagging at me as I read with the characters mentioning there use to be random rains and now they had to have a Stormlord to keep water coming for the people, and the land being rather dry. What was so wrong with random rains, if it had supplied plenty of water and to have lots more vegetation growing? You do find out later in the book some history about the random rains and why the stormlords are needed. Glenda Larke has created a great world here with different cultures and characters, from Reduners, Albasters, Gibbers, and Scarpens - and we can't forget the Watergivers. Glenda has supplied us with a map and she makes great use of her whole world. I felt as if I watched these characters grow up over the span of about six or seven years in this world and even adjust to the world for who they are. I got to know them and the world together. After reading this book, I started to think on how careful the charcters where with their water and how sparingly they used it. Made me think about how we take advantage of always having it. I am really looking forward to book 2, Stormlord Rising. I am attached to these characters and this world and just have to know how it all works out for them.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bea

    3.5 stars First of all, this book deals with a very intersting and important topic: the shortage of water. What does a society look like if water is the most precious good? Which measures are morally acceptable if the population outgrows the ressources? I really enjoyed seeing these issues (that might become more and more relevant in our real world!) being depicted in a fantasy book. I also really liked the worldbuilding. When it comes to the plot, I'm a little bit torn. There were two povs I reall 3.5 stars First of all, this book deals with a very intersting and important topic: the shortage of water. What does a society look like if water is the most precious good? Which measures are morally acceptable if the population outgrows the ressources? I really enjoyed seeing these issues (that might become more and more relevant in our real world!) being depicted in a fantasy book. I also really liked the worldbuilding. When it comes to the plot, I'm a little bit torn. There were two povs I really loved and devoured (Terelle and Shale) but unfortunately in my opinion there was also a lot of filler, especially in the first half. I found myself skimming over parts of the noble rainlords storylines as I didn't find the plot and the characters that interesting. I think this book could have been shortened. The second half was better and also more fast paced. Overall, I didn't like it quite enough to give it 4 stars, that's why I rounded down the rating.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sara J. (kefuwa)

    You know it's a good book when your brain space after reading it is still filled with the images of the world inside the book and the faces of the characters you come to love and hate. This is a great fantasy yarn with some typical fantasy elements, an interesting premise, great characters & world building. I breezed through this book and usually that indicates how good the story telling is for me. Some really great characters & relationships in this too. Jumped straight to Book #2 after this one. You know it's a good book when your brain space after reading it is still filled with the images of the world inside the book and the faces of the characters you come to love and hate. This is a great fantasy yarn with some typical fantasy elements, an interesting premise, great characters & world building. I breezed through this book and usually that indicates how good the story telling is for me. Some really great characters & relationships in this too. Jumped straight to Book #2 after this one... Addendum: The main form of transport in this book is what sounds like giant centipedes... and honestly that is just all kinds of nasty for me! Giant centipedes. SHUDDER. But after reading this, yeah(!), giant pedes! Why not! Any book that can make me say yes(!) to giant pedes is... wow. Haha. Although I would probably still go batsh!t crazy on encountering a real centipede. =_=

  15. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    Spoiler-FREE review of ‘The Last Stormlord’ “I shall come back. I’ll find a way. Somehow I’ll find a way. I swear it.” 4.0/5.0 The Last Stormlord, by Glenda Larke, is the first of book of the Stormlord series. The books centers around a young boy named Shale, growing up in a poor community and a young girl named Terrell trying to escape a life in an upscale brothel. It focuses on a world where water is a luxury and is used as the currency throughout the society. Where bathing and washing Spoiler-FREE review of ‘The Last Stormlord’ “I shall come back. I’ll find a way. Somehow I’ll find a way. I swear it.” 4.0/5.0 The Last Stormlord, by Glenda Larke, is the first of book of the Stormlord series. The books centers around a young boy named Shale, growing up in a poor community and a young girl named Terrell trying to escape a life in an upscale brothel. It focuses on a world where water is a luxury and is used as the currency throughout the society. Where bathing and washing are considered only for the privileged and the poor are scraping by one drop at a time. The story starts in a precarious time where the last living Stormlord is dying and the nation is trying to find someone who has talent (and the right magic) to succeed him so that the people in this society can continue to thrive. The setting of the book is described in a remarkable fashion and I felt the world really came alive within it. While the book takes place in several different cities and hovels, Larke really puts time and care about setting the reader up. But no matter how good the setting was, what really shined and captivated my attention was the characters. I thought the characterization was amazing in this book. Not only Shale and Terrell, but everyone was so vibrant and had so much depth. From the Rainlords in Breccia to the girls in the Snuggery. Every single character seemed carefully crafted and they never swayed from who they really were. It was really fun to read and I loved to see what was going to happen to each and every one of them. The story itself was actually very interesting and fun. The first half of the book was dedicated to setting and characters so regardless to say it was slow in its own way. Because this was to give characters and cities its depth the pace can be forgivable. Once part 2 of the story hits, I found it picked up and was hooked. There still was not a lot of action but the pace still increased. I thought the story was extremely unique and original. I loved the premise Overall, I thought the book was pretty great. The slow first half is overshadowed by a fantastic cast of character, amazing setting, and unique intriguing story. If you are looking for a new fantasy to dig into, I would not hesitate to give this gem a shot. “One day, I will, I swear, he said to himself. A place where I belong, which is truly mine. I will build it myself, for me and those I love.”

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ithlilian

    What does it take for a book to win 5 stars from me? Quite a bit. The Last Stormlord excels in some of my favorite areas. First, it grabs your attention from the start. I love it when a book jumps right in with the daily life of a character. This one starts out in a snuggery where our main character is working to pay off her water debt. What is a snuggery and what is a water debt you say? Well a snuggery is the nicest word I've ever seen for a brothel and a water debt is what you have to pay bac What does it take for a book to win 5 stars from me? Quite a bit. The Last Stormlord excels in some of my favorite areas. First, it grabs your attention from the start. I love it when a book jumps right in with the daily life of a character. This one starts out in a snuggery where our main character is working to pay off her water debt. What is a snuggery and what is a water debt you say? Well a snuggery is the nicest word I've ever seen for a brothel and a water debt is what you have to pay back for a childhood of someone feeding you, clothing you, and giving you water. The Last Stormlord takes place in a desert environment where everything is based on water. It makes sense that the magic system is based on water. It also makes sense that water is in short supply and has to be rationed out. I think the world was portrayed very well and was fully developed. Also, I felt that Terelle was likable from the start. I understood where she was coming from and why she behaved the way she did. She felt mature for her age, but that makes sense because of her upbringing. The author gives us the lay of the land, the history, and the terminology from the mouths of the main characters, and that is another thing I greatly appreciate. I don't like long introductions where the narrator describes what each area is, who lives there, what they believe, and how everything works. Please let us figure that out for ourselves as we need it. We aren't studying for a test here. I did get a bit upset when the viewpoint changed to Shale because I was enjoying Terelle's story so much, but thankfully all of the viewpoints in this story are equally compelling. Shale is also the victim of bad circumstances, and his childhood is not the greatest. He is also a bit mature for his age, but I didn't mind it. I like that the characters have strength. The third main character introduced is our villain. It may be a bit of a spoiler to say who that is, so I will just say that he's pretty evil. He is motivated by the same thing that motivates all stereotypical villains, and that is power. In that aspect he is a bit one dimensional, but I did understand his motivation. The current stormlord is dying and is too weak to make the decisions that need to be made, so I see why he could want to take over. Even though the villains are evil, I still found them likable, just like all of the other characters. I also loved that most of the characters can be irritating. Everything does not work out nicely for everyone, and everyone is not a stereotypical hero. It's realistic, and that's another thing I love in my fantasy. In summary, The Last Stormlord has likable characters that are not perfect and a great setting with an interesting magic and belief system. It's character based instead of quest based and there is so much left to explore. I can't wait to find out how everything progresses in book two.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    I don’t even know how long this book has been sitting on my TBR list, why do I always let the good ones sit on my shelves? Right from the beginning The Last Stormlord had me hooked. Which considering I started it at about 11pm might not have been a good thing. For the most part I really enjoyed the characters. Each character was different, and many of them driven by different motives. Which I enjoyed learning about. The world also fascinated me, though we only got to really learn about two sectio I don’t even know how long this book has been sitting on my TBR list, why do I always let the good ones sit on my shelves? Right from the beginning The Last Stormlord had me hooked. Which considering I started it at about 11pm might not have been a good thing. For the most part I really enjoyed the characters. Each character was different, and many of them driven by different motives. Which I enjoyed learning about. The world also fascinated me, though we only got to really learn about two sections of the Quartern. However, I can definitely see why this book might not be everyone’s cup of tea. Little happened in the first half/tree quarters of the book. Part of the reason that was probably had to do with we were given a number of different POVs. There was: Terelle, the ex-slave/artist’s apprentice (who didn’t meet the artist until probably more than a hundred pages in); Shale, a water-sensitive, who we spend years with him simply learning about his water abilities and him learning how to be literate. I don’t really remember a POV directly from the titled character however, we were given them from the people around him: his son Rainlord Nealrith, his bratty granddaughter (the only character I truly disliked), and two other rainlords who are good friends of his son. Easily, easily, I gave this book a 5/5. I couldn’t wait to learn about the rest of the Quartern (and beyond) and couldn’t wait to find out what happens next, after all the book does end at a bit of a cliff hanger. I can see myself rereading this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maddy ✨this book needs more ducks✨

    A page turner with a premise that's oodles of fun. I could almost feel the desert sun beating down on my back as I read this in the cold dead of night. And those giant, wriggly centiped-y things? Love them! Ryka is my heroine of the year. She's smart, capable, isn't conventionally attractive, but best of all never pulls the 'she was beautiful all along but didn't notice' trope... and STILL gets to win the sexy man at the end! That's a rare gem (the only other literary example I can think of is Di A page turner with a premise that's oodles of fun. I could almost feel the desert sun beating down on my back as I read this in the cold dead of night. And those giant, wriggly centiped-y things? Love them! Ryka is my heroine of the year. She's smart, capable, isn't conventionally attractive, but best of all never pulls the 'she was beautiful all along but didn't notice' trope... and STILL gets to win the sexy man at the end! That's a rare gem (the only other literary example I can think of is Divergent), because the incurable dork winning the hottie is an overused cliché when the genders are reversed (Spiderman, Transformers, basically every movie ever), but is a boon rarely granted to female characters. And oh, the shipper feels! They buoyed me through most of this novel. On the other hand, Shale and Terelle's ...'romance'... left me feeling distinctly 'meh'. Though they are clearly being set up for great things in the sequels, they spent an awful lot of time just sitting around, while the adult rainlords got to do all the action-y plot things.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathy (Kindle-aholic)

    Great characters, not battle heavy, but still with a sense of danger throughout. It's the first book in the series, so there is a lot of setting the stage, getting introduced to a lot of characters, but I never felt overwhelmed or lost. It also didn't "stall" in the middle, but kept my attention the whole time. It flowed very well. I also liked that it didn't take forever for the characters to start to intersect. If you are a big fan of war driven fantasy, then you'll probably be disappointed. I Great characters, not battle heavy, but still with a sense of danger throughout. It's the first book in the series, so there is a lot of setting the stage, getting introduced to a lot of characters, but I never felt overwhelmed or lost. It also didn't "stall" in the middle, but kept my attention the whole time. It flowed very well. I also liked that it didn't take forever for the characters to start to intersect. If you are a big fan of war driven fantasy, then you'll probably be disappointed. I'm not, I prefer character-driven fantasy, so this was right up my alley. Will read the next one.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brian Taylor

    Hey, everyone. I’m back with another Fantasy book review. I just finished Glenda Larke’s The Last Stormlord and am looking forward to picking up the sequel! I think many of you will like it too. From the publisher: Shale is the lowest of the low-an outcast from a poor village in the heart of the desert. In the desert water is life, and currency, and Shale has none. But he has a secret. It’s the one thing that keeps him alive and may save all the cities of the Quartern in the days to come. If it do Hey, everyone. I’m back with another Fantasy book review. I just finished Glenda Larke’s The Last Stormlord and am looking forward to picking up the sequel! I think many of you will like it too. From the publisher: Shale is the lowest of the low-an outcast from a poor village in the heart of the desert. In the desert water is life, and currency, and Shale has none. But he has a secret. It’s the one thing that keeps him alive and may save all the cities of the Quartern in the days to come. If it doesn’t get him killed first… Terelle is a slave fleeing a life as a courtesan. She finds shelter in the home of an elderly painter but as she learns the strange and powerful secrets of his art she fears she may have traded a life of servitude for something far more perilous… The Stormlord is dying in his tower and there is no one, by accident or design, to take his place. He brings the rain from the distant seas to his people. Without a Stormlord, the cities of the Quartern will wither and die. Their civilization is at the brink of disaster. If Shale and Terelle can find a way to save themselves, they may just save them all. Water is life and the wells are running dry… All Shale ever wanted was a drink... The Last Stormlord spins a tale of those with water and those without. Water is like money in Glenda’s world. The Stormlord can make it rain where they wish, giving them supreme power. I can honestly say I can’t remember a story quite like this concept wise. Rainlords can sense water and manipulate it but can’t make rain clouds making them slightly less powerful than Stormlords. Imagine if you could take the water from an enemy’s body and instantly kill them. Yeah, that happens. At it’s core, The Last Stormlord is about poverty and how society treats her less privileged citizens. Glenda does a fantastic job painting a picture of desperation as two of the main characters grow up waterless and destitute. In this story magic is used to help bring water to the people. There are no wizards or sorceresses. That was one of the things I really liked about this book: the practical application of magic. Instead of horses, our characters ride myriapedes. This is a nice touch for a desert community. Glenda really did a fantastic creating a vivid, if desperate, world for her characters. This is Fantasy like you’ve never seen before. I believe that’s a good thing. The stars of this story are the women. Each one was unique, lifelike, and totally believable. They all have their own problems, strengths and weaknesses. I found myself drawn to Ryka in particular. My only gripe was I wanted more chapters with her in them. Don’t get me wrong, all of Glenda’s characters are great but there’s something a little better with her female characters. You won’t find any damsels in distress in this book either, which I really enjoyed. These ladies are smart and have practical goals. They don’t want to be waterless ladies prostituting themselves for a sip of water. The guys aren’t too shabby either. What I really like was how Shale, born in poverty, never forgot where he came from. Even as his talents are discovered and he’s exposed to the good life, he longs for the simpler days of his youth. Living with an abusive father also taught him how to read people’s intentions from body language and the look in their eyes. Speaking from experience, I’d say Glenda nailed these things. I guess that’s why I can relate to Shale. Every time he gets what he thinks he wanted, it turns out not to be as great as he thought it would be. I enjoyed going along for the ride as Shale grew into a man. I’ll definitely be reading the next book in the series. What I liked: •The concept. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a Fantasy book quite like this. Everything revolves around water. You either have it, or you die. Awesome. •The magic system. Our characters can sense water, manipulate it, and even extract it from various sources. Those who can do all three have considerable influence and often rule over those who don’t. The magic has a practical applications directly helps the citizens of these countries. •The female characters. These women are sharp, fierce, and can hold their own. It’s easy to believe that the poor would be sold for water or forced to sell their bodies for water. Glenda explores every aspect of being a woman in a world ruled by water which adds to the overall quality of the story. •Shale’s depth. It was refreshing to find a character with a multitude of layers that seemed real. Nothing was overdone. Everything in Shale’s life contributes to the person he becomes. I really liked that even after he left his life of poverty he never forgot those hard learned lessons. •The class system. There are poor places without much water and there are places with plenty of water. As you can imagine, when water starts becoming scarce the poor are the first to feel the pinch. I could easily see this happening. •The desperation. From the first page to the last, Glenda did a fantastic job of showing how desperate everyone can be when their water was threatened. It adds a whole new layer to the story. We get to see what governments do when the water starts running out. Foreigners are thrown out, water stealers have their hands cut off and are thrown out, while others are crucified as a warning to not steal any water. •The racism. I know racism is bad, mmkay! But in a desperate world where water is in short supply, it’s easy to believe the people who don’t look like, think, or act like those controlling the water would be looked down upon. Different races are treated poorly and even slaughtered. They are the first ones to lose their water allotment as well. It was handled the right way and only adds to the bleak nature of this story. Kudos to the author for building such a complex, yet totally approachable world. •The ending. While it is a to be continued ending, there is a brilliant twist which was hinted at several time throughout the book. Well played, Glenda! What I didn't like: •The pacing. While the pacing isn’t slow, it isn’t the quickest read either. It moves along at a steady pace. Some spots feel a little longer than others. •I would have liked a little more action. While there is quality action, much of the time it’s mentioned as happening elsewhere instead of readers being exposed to it. •Why didn’t Shale assert himself more? Shale is no dummy. He knows how important he is. You would think that he would use that power rather than not at all. It didn’t make sense to me especially when the welfare of those he loves is in jeopardy. •How much power one of the main villains had…even after everyone knew he had done some really bad things. It just didn’t make sense why nobody would do anything to stand up to this guy, not even the citizens he’s governing…and mistreating. I wasn’t buying it. Overall: I’m giving The Last Stormlord four out of five stars. If you’re tired of the same old archetypes questing for the same mythical sword in your epic fantasy, you’re in for a treat with this book. Glenda Larke’s Stormlord series is off to a great start. Fresh concepts coupled with strong narrative breathe new life into a sometimes tired Fantasy genre. If the second book is anything like this one, you can count me in. Pick up a copy for yourself, or a friend. Best $7.99 I’ve spent in a while.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Rating: 8/10 You can read my full length review of this book at Another World. Below is an overview of my thoughts about it. OVERVIEW This first instalment of The Stormlord Trilogy is the book that finally made me consciously realise why fictional bad guys always lose/fail: they are idiots whose hair-brained schemes invariably seem calculated to ensure defeat. Needless to say, the character revealed to be “the bad guy” of the story is most definitely from this school of villainy. But leaving aside Rating: 8/10 You can read my full length review of this book at Another World. Below is an overview of my thoughts about it. OVERVIEW This first instalment of The Stormlord Trilogy is the book that finally made me consciously realise why fictional bad guys always lose/fail: they are idiots whose hair-brained schemes invariably seem calculated to ensure defeat. Needless to say, the character revealed to be “the bad guy” of the story is most definitely from this school of villainy. But leaving aside the incompetence of the antagonist, and the fact that the book is guilty of one of my biggest literary bugbears (the story ends on a cliffhanger), there is so much to like about The Last Stormlord. Of the things Glenda Larke gets right with her book, the imaginative world-building is the most noteworthy. The unique setting is both fascinating and wonderfully conceived. Not only does it provide a convincing backdrop for Larke’s narrative, it is also such an immersive world that really adds to the story. But great settings are wasted if not populated with compelling characters. Fortunately, characterisation is another of the author’s strengths. There is an abundance of excellent characters on show all throughout the book, though it must be said that I found the adult supporting characters much more interesting than either of the two adolescent protagonists. In particular, there are two female characters who intrigued me greatly, and I hope they will both play more prominent roles during the remaining books of the trilogy. When all is said and done, The Last Stormlord is a memorable tale with an engaging plot, laden with political intrigues and mystery. The only thing that detracted from my enjoyment of the story (aside from the cliffhanger ending) was the predictability of the narrative. Nonetheless, I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend the book to readers who enjoy adult fantasy stories.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    A great read can show up unexpectedly. Browsing shelves of a used book store this review took a chance on a book by an author he had never heard of. 1/3 in, a new love is discovered. Something of a Dune vibe, water is king and everything revolves around it. The only water available is the undrinkable sea, moved and purified to the cities on the loam by Stormlords. At the time of the book, the world is down to one man with this power, and his time is running short. Though never gratuitous with the A great read can show up unexpectedly. Browsing shelves of a used book store this review took a chance on a book by an author he had never heard of. 1/3 in, a new love is discovered. Something of a Dune vibe, water is king and everything revolves around it. The only water available is the undrinkable sea, moved and purified to the cities on the loam by Stormlords. At the time of the book, the world is down to one man with this power, and his time is running short. Though never gratuitous with the violence, the author can be brutal at times. A high death count and lack of hope is seen throughout the narrative. Traditional trappings are avoided though, the young girl raised to be a prostitute takes a different path than expected, people with revenge on their mind actually refrain from going on a rampage, etc. The main character, Shale, grows with the story. Terelle seems to lose "screen time" as the story progresses, but has a great story growing that is hopefully expanded on in the second book. The various secondary characters are a strength, with completely different motives, they are not repetitive nor cliche. Really impressive, 4.5 stars. A new favorite, and here is hoping the series continues to excite. Pros: Great world building, strong support characters, entertaining story. Cons: Some lag in the middle, the politics of the land are not as well done as other areas of the book, some questions on why food is never in short supply when water is. review blog

  23. 5 out of 5

    Beaulah Pragg

    When I read the pitch for this book, I wasn't entirely sure whether it was something I wanted to read or not, but within the first page, I was hooked. Terelle is living in a 'Snuggery', a polite word for a brothel, and desperately doesn't want to grow up to be one of Madam Opal's girls - but the clock is ticking and her fate is fast approaching. I immediately wanted to know how she would escape. Through her eyes, I came to know the world of the Quarten, desperately dry and entirely dependant on t When I read the pitch for this book, I wasn't entirely sure whether it was something I wanted to read or not, but within the first page, I was hooked. Terelle is living in a 'Snuggery', a polite word for a brothel, and desperately doesn't want to grow up to be one of Madam Opal's girls - but the clock is ticking and her fate is fast approaching. I immediately wanted to know how she would escape. Through her eyes, I came to know the world of the Quarten, desperately dry and entirely dependant on the Cloud Master for water and therefore life. From there, I was introduced to Shale, a young boy with a sense for water - far more powerful than most in the Quartern, though he doesn't know it. He's just a worthless peasant without his own water allotment. I had thought, changing view points, that I would miss Terelle too much, but the book is written skillfully. I didn't end up minding the transitions at all. I was especially pleased when Shale and Terelle finally met up and were forced to rely on each other. It is the promise of this friendship (and hopefully one day relationship) that makes me eager to read the next book in the series. Glenda Larke has successfully merged the politics of an entire civilization with the emotions and lives of a few characters we really care about. This book makes you confront your own accepted morality and wonder what you would do in their place. With so many lives hanging by such a fine thread, it is the difficult decisions that make these characters heroic yet powerfully human. A great read. I definitely recommend it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lilyan

    I'm half way through Stormlord Rising, so am a bit confused about which incidents occurred in which book. The Last Stormlord started off slow, as is common with most first fantasy novels considering they all require world building. Albeit slow, the world building was very smooth; Glenda neither threw random facts at us nor did she obscure anything leaving us clueless. I enjoyed getting to know the Quartern's inhabitants, we were mainly introduced to the Scarpen and the Gibber, while The Red Quar I'm half way through Stormlord Rising, so am a bit confused about which incidents occurred in which book. The Last Stormlord started off slow, as is common with most first fantasy novels considering they all require world building. Albeit slow, the world building was very smooth; Glenda neither threw random facts at us nor did she obscure anything leaving us clueless. I enjoyed getting to know the Quartern's inhabitants, we were mainly introduced to the Scarpen and the Gibber, while The Red Quarter and the White quarter remained shrouded in mystery. Which I thought was a good tactic as it spurred me on to the next book. The characters are very black and white. I didn't wonder about any of them, it was pretty obvious which ones were the bad guys and which ones the good guys right from the start. Their behavior was very typical. Furthermore, the dialogue, I felt, veered towards the juvenile. Most of the characters were approaching their 30's, yet their conversations felt like dialogues between preschooler at time. This was pretty much my only issue with the book. Other then that I really enjoyed it. Terelle's story line was of particular interest to me, as well as watching Shale grow up. I wish Larke explored Terelle's and Shale's relationship deeper to avoid the unbelievable feelings that develop later on. I'm loving Stormlord Rising even more and am excited to finish the series. Definitely recommended.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kivrin

    Loved this book. The world is wonderfully imaginative--a land where water is rare and precious; every interaction revolves around obtaining and keeping water; for hundreds of years there have been stormlords who could bring in clouds and enough rain to keep people alive; but the last stormlord is dying and the world will die with him unless something is done. The characters are richly developed. The heroes are flawed--I found myself arguing with my favorite characters not because they were being Loved this book. The world is wonderfully imaginative--a land where water is rare and precious; every interaction revolves around obtaining and keeping water; for hundreds of years there have been stormlords who could bring in clouds and enough rain to keep people alive; but the last stormlord is dying and the world will die with him unless something is done. The characters are richly developed. The heroes are flawed--I found myself arguing with my favorite characters not because they were being stupid (yay!), but because they were having completely realistic doubts and fears and making human mistakes. The villains are just as interesting. I love evil villains, but I find them more interesting when they can also be likable and express opinions that are perfectly logical and even defensible (to a point!) The action was pretty much non-stop, and I liked that the author took some large jumps in time so that the characters grew up quickly. Already ordered the next book in the series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gemma

    I only really picked this book up because I liked the cover but it has turned out to be one of my favourite reads of the year so far. The world built is detailed and it's structure well explained. The idea of a world where the water supply and distribution is entirelty controlled by man is really interesting and the issues it throws up are believable despite the fantastical nature of the story. The characters are fantastic too; they are complex and their opinions and motives are not always black I only really picked this book up because I liked the cover but it has turned out to be one of my favourite reads of the year so far. The world built is detailed and it's structure well explained. The idea of a world where the water supply and distribution is entirelty controlled by man is really interesting and the issues it throws up are believable despite the fantastical nature of the story. The characters are fantastic too; they are complex and their opinions and motives are not always black and white. This lead to me not really knowing which characters to root for initially but that became clear as the story progressed and I found myself really feeling the main protaganists' plight. I am very impatient to read the rest of this trilogy and hope it lives up to my now high expectations.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Delandro

    This book started quite slow for me. But everything begins to suck you in... there are little introductions to major characters and unexpected encounters just when you think that a character is one of the good guys... it turns out to be wrong. two main sets of hero/heroine and their characters are fully developed and slightly flawed but trying their best Some years pass and the bad guys fall out with each other and then all hell breaks loose... the safe city is over run and good guys fall. At the end, This book started quite slow for me. But everything begins to suck you in... there are little introductions to major characters and unexpected encounters just when you think that a character is one of the good guys... it turns out to be wrong. two main sets of hero/heroine and their characters are fully developed and slightly flawed but trying their best Some years pass and the bad guys fall out with each other and then all hell breaks loose... the safe city is over run and good guys fall. At the end, someone reveals that they are not intending to follow the escape plan devised for all turn the page END OF BOOK Damn now on the hunt for the next book at the library website - it is on the shelf... now waiting for lunch time to run down there and get it.:)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm not sure it's worth three stars except that in the end the story got exciting, so it's probably worth more than two stars. But then it ended with a cliff hanger! I HATE cliff hangers. The stuff with the water was inventive and original. I liked the hero, Shale. Not so much the heroine, Terrelle. The most vivid scene was the death of Shale's baby sister which was truly horrific and haunts me still. I didn't like that at all. The characters were cardboard. Emotion zilch. Meh. Next book is not I'm not sure it's worth three stars except that in the end the story got exciting, so it's probably worth more than two stars. But then it ended with a cliff hanger! I HATE cliff hangers. The stuff with the water was inventive and original. I liked the hero, Shale. Not so much the heroine, Terrelle. The most vivid scene was the death of Shale's baby sister which was truly horrific and haunts me still. I didn't like that at all. The characters were cardboard. Emotion zilch. Meh. Next book is not yet published, so that by the time it comes out I will not be tempted to buy it to satisfy my curiosity about what comes next.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gemski

    After reading 100 pages into this book I still wasn't getting a real feel for it and began to become a little discouraged. Larke was setting up her world with such vividity - but nothing yet had really happened. Hindsight is such a wonderful thing and ultimately I felt relieved that I stuck at it and read on. This book was gripping, especially around about page 200 - the characters came alive on the page and the reality of The Quatern was amazing! Glenda Larke writes on the dark and gritty side After reading 100 pages into this book I still wasn't getting a real feel for it and began to become a little discouraged. Larke was setting up her world with such vividity - but nothing yet had really happened. Hindsight is such a wonderful thing and ultimately I felt relieved that I stuck at it and read on. This book was gripping, especially around about page 200 - the characters came alive on the page and the reality of The Quatern was amazing! Glenda Larke writes on the dark and gritty side of fantasy - in which people are becoming desperate and others have amazing powers. The ending leaves a lot of loose ends that need tying up and I cannot wait for the next book to do just that!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Candace Drabøl

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was amazing! I had been at a loss without a good story to throw myself into for such a long time and this has done nothing but assure me there are still amazing authors out there. Glenda Larke has created a fantastic world with believable characters. Even better, the characters have depth and can be related to. I cannot wait to read the conclusion of this series. One thing I personally didn't like nor will I get used to is the changing of Shale's name to Jasper. Even in my mind I see Jasper a This was amazing! I had been at a loss without a good story to throw myself into for such a long time and this has done nothing but assure me there are still amazing authors out there. Glenda Larke has created a fantastic world with believable characters. Even better, the characters have depth and can be related to. I cannot wait to read the conclusion of this series. One thing I personally didn't like nor will I get used to is the changing of Shale's name to Jasper. Even in my mind I see Jasper and read as Shale as the original name I thought was much more suited to the character. I think Meyer has ruined the name Jasper for me now.

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