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The Inclusion Paradox: The Obama Era and the Transformation of Global Diversity

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It turns out that the warm, let's-all-get-along connotations of inclusion are misleading. Achieving true inclusion is hard. Very hard. Harder than achieving awareness. Harder than achieving tolerance and sensitivity. Harder than diversity itself. In The Inclusion Paradox: The Obama Era and the Transformation of Global Diversity Andres Tapia, Hewitt Associates' Chief Divers It turns out that the warm, let's-all-get-along connotations of inclusion are misleading. Achieving true inclusion is hard. Very hard. Harder than achieving awareness. Harder than achieving tolerance and sensitivity. Harder than diversity itself. In The Inclusion Paradox: The Obama Era and the Transformation of Global Diversity Andres Tapia, Hewitt Associates' Chief Diversity Officer, reveals how in these times of unprecedented peril and opportunity, diversity's demographic tsunami is accelerating today's social, economic, and political tectonic shifts. In the book, he explores what is required to move into the next generation of diversity work in ways that get past the tired and cliched approaches. He makes the case for making inclusion relevant for all, including the white male, and breaks ground by challenging the notion that the melting pot leads to inclusion. On the contrary, Tapia makes the case that "equality" often does not equal "same." The Inclusion Paradox also focuses on the cultural implications of the Obama Era in the United States and around the world. More than a political point in time, the Obama Era is a cultural marker that succinctly captures the various global trends converging at this time in history. The Inclusion Paradox will enable readers to contribute strategically and practically to the urgent work of making diversity and inclusion relevant to business and organizational success around the world."


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It turns out that the warm, let's-all-get-along connotations of inclusion are misleading. Achieving true inclusion is hard. Very hard. Harder than achieving awareness. Harder than achieving tolerance and sensitivity. Harder than diversity itself. In The Inclusion Paradox: The Obama Era and the Transformation of Global Diversity Andres Tapia, Hewitt Associates' Chief Divers It turns out that the warm, let's-all-get-along connotations of inclusion are misleading. Achieving true inclusion is hard. Very hard. Harder than achieving awareness. Harder than achieving tolerance and sensitivity. Harder than diversity itself. In The Inclusion Paradox: The Obama Era and the Transformation of Global Diversity Andres Tapia, Hewitt Associates' Chief Diversity Officer, reveals how in these times of unprecedented peril and opportunity, diversity's demographic tsunami is accelerating today's social, economic, and political tectonic shifts. In the book, he explores what is required to move into the next generation of diversity work in ways that get past the tired and cliched approaches. He makes the case for making inclusion relevant for all, including the white male, and breaks ground by challenging the notion that the melting pot leads to inclusion. On the contrary, Tapia makes the case that "equality" often does not equal "same." The Inclusion Paradox also focuses on the cultural implications of the Obama Era in the United States and around the world. More than a political point in time, the Obama Era is a cultural marker that succinctly captures the various global trends converging at this time in history. The Inclusion Paradox will enable readers to contribute strategically and practically to the urgent work of making diversity and inclusion relevant to business and organizational success around the world."

30 review for The Inclusion Paradox: The Obama Era and the Transformation of Global Diversity

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Andres Tapia has lived diversity and inclusion, not only as a Peruvian married to an American living in Chicago, but also as a chief diversity officer for Hewitt, and eventually CEO of Diversity Best Practices. More than that, Tapia believes that the hard work of inclusion in our businesses and other organizations is worth it--that when we call out and welcome the differences that our diverse population bring, this has a multiplier effect in our organizations in terms of the performance of our p Andres Tapia has lived diversity and inclusion, not only as a Peruvian married to an American living in Chicago, but also as a chief diversity officer for Hewitt, and eventually CEO of Diversity Best Practices. More than that, Tapia believes that the hard work of inclusion in our businesses and other organizations is worth it--that when we call out and welcome the differences that our diverse population bring, this has a multiplier effect in our organizations in terms of the performance of our people and performance in the marketplace. This is very different from the guilt or quota driven or advocacy driven approaches to diversity and inclusion. Tapia distinguishes diversity and inclusion as follows: diversity is the mix and inclusion is making the mix work. The first part of the book focuses on the rapidly changing landscape in our country where whites will be a minority by 2040 or sooner, where we elect an African American president and operate in a global marketplace. Tapia would argue that in this landscape, the organizations that do inclusion well are those that will thrive--that we need the differences we all bring. Part Two recognizes a simple truth--we often think of difference as evil or incompentence, rather than as just different. Part Three then goes on to "call out" the differences that exist in our cultural landscape: white and minority ethnic, women, millenials, disabled, LGBT, and artists. Each of these chapters identifies key cultural differences and the challenges of inclusion in each group. I was most struck by the fact that as groups, whites differ from African Americans on six of seven cultural dimensions (and from most of the rest of the world): universalist vs. particularist, task vs. relationship, individualist vs. communal, sequential vs. synchronous, internal vs. external control, and neutral vs. affective. Tapia's point is that neither of these is "better" but rather that understanding that the way others engage the world, and then creating systems and working relationships that leverage these differences is key to good inclusion. Part Four looks at organizations and their policies and systems and how inclusion can become part of the fabric of organizational life. His chapter on retention of people of color was especially striking in his emphasis on four pillars: community, recognition, mentoring, and advancement. There was a discussion of risk-taking that noted that organizations tend to advance those taking calculated risks and that whites tend to follow this approach while others either are more cautious or more risky, and the importance of working with this during mentoring and advancement processes. There will be those that balk at the material on LGBT inclusion. Throughout, Tapia emphasizes that we do not need to give up the ways we differ to recognize and work with the differences in others--at least in businesses and other organizations in the public sector. He does not address faith communities that have moral reservations around sexuality and gender identity questions, except to infer that one's views might change as one relates with LGBT persons. He doesn't address the question that is peculiar to inclusion work with persons in this group of how inclusion works where one may show deep respect for the whole person and their gifts, where one can be a genuine ally in many regards, while retaining moral reservations about sexual practices and gender expression. Exploring how this might work would actually be more consistent with his approach of "calling out differences." Overall, however, I have to admit that I liked this book more than I thought I would. Its emphasis on calling out difference, and the opportunities for the advancement of organizational mission through inclusion, as well as the specific practical recommendations were all quite helpful. Tapia's passionate enthusiasm for the opportunities that arise out of inclusion work is infectious and helps one move from a "have to" to a "want to" mentality.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I saw the author speak and he was fascinating and entertaining. He has a knack for telling an enlightening story in a way that connects with the audience. Although I found the book a little slow to start, by chapter 4 it got quite interesting. I highly recommend this book as a stimulus to all of us to try to open our eyes to our unconscious cultural assumptions. Although on some level I was already somewhat aware of some of the different perspectives (individualistic/communitarianism, internal/e I saw the author speak and he was fascinating and entertaining. He has a knack for telling an enlightening story in a way that connects with the audience. Although I found the book a little slow to start, by chapter 4 it got quite interesting. I highly recommend this book as a stimulus to all of us to try to open our eyes to our unconscious cultural assumptions. Although on some level I was already somewhat aware of some of the different perspectives (individualistic/communitarianism, internal/extermal control as examples) he was able to open my eyes quite a bit to how those things can manifest in the world of work and the larger world. The book was a bit of a hybrid, and not quite what I expected. It is neither a how-to nor a memoir, but has elements of both. I did find myself sometimes wishing for more of the stories that really illuminated his points. Also, Mr. Tapia comes from the world of large corporate consulting, with more infrastructure and resources. As someone who works in a small office I also frequently wished for more on how his concepts might translate to the smaller scale. And here's a video of him speaking: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DB6UFu...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Wilson

    I am working with Andres but that is not why I am showcasing his book here. I think it truly is one of those rare books that you are surprised is so relevant to so many areas in your life. I found that the book was a page turner from the beginning. I discovered a great number of things I thought about other cultures and people that were incorrect. It also helped me understand how, as Andres put it, "Diversity is the mix. Inclusion is making the mix work." I now have much better strategies for le I am working with Andres but that is not why I am showcasing his book here. I think it truly is one of those rare books that you are surprised is so relevant to so many areas in your life. I found that the book was a page turner from the beginning. I discovered a great number of things I thought about other cultures and people that were incorrect. It also helped me understand how, as Andres put it, "Diversity is the mix. Inclusion is making the mix work." I now have much better strategies for leveraging the strengths of people who are "different" from me and that includes people who are from different countries to people who are "differently abled" like handicapped individuals. There is also an excellent chapter on 20-Somethings (Millennials)that was very enlightening.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tedjimsmith

    Our regional vice president gave this to all the managers and asked them to read it. At first it felt like homework but eventually I was able to get into this book. The ideas that struck me the most is that the world is upside down. Our grandparents' view of the world has flipped. I also appreciated the vision that as the baby boomers begin to retire they will leave enormous holes in leadership and experience. Businesses need to begin now to prepare for the looming void. Business will continue to Our regional vice president gave this to all the managers and asked them to read it. At first it felt like homework but eventually I was able to get into this book. The ideas that struck me the most is that the world is upside down. Our grandparents' view of the world has flipped. I also appreciated the vision that as the baby boomers begin to retire they will leave enormous holes in leadership and experience. Businesses need to begin now to prepare for the looming void. Business will continue to evolve with technology and the diverse workforce. Soon women and minorities will become the majority of the workforce. Change or be left behind.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kyoungjin Lim

    Diversity can make a better world when we deal it with the concept of "trans~," not merely with "multi~."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jose Guardado

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lfoote01

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ela

  10. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bill Florio

  12. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Lewis

  13. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

  14. 4 out of 5

    Andres Carter

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  16. 4 out of 5

    Randy Pease

  17. 5 out of 5

    Karen Ziehm

  18. 5 out of 5

    John

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mansey Amin

  20. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Rubin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Margie Adler

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brandi

  23. 5 out of 5

    Karlie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Disa Brummet

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andres Carter

  26. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Marineau

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Adam Dickens

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Johnson

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