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Captains Courageous: A Story Of The Grand Banks (Forgotten Books)

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A pampered millionaire's son tumbles overboard from a luxury liner and falls into good fortune, disguised in the form of a fishing boat. The gruff and hearty crew teach the young man to be worth his salt as they fish the waters off the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. Brimming with adventure and humor.


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A pampered millionaire's son tumbles overboard from a luxury liner and falls into good fortune, disguised in the form of a fishing boat. The gruff and hearty crew teach the young man to be worth his salt as they fish the waters off the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. Brimming with adventure and humor.

30 review for Captains Courageous: A Story Of The Grand Banks (Forgotten Books)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    Harvey Cheyne Jr. an arrogant fifteen -year- old, greatly disliked by the annoyed passengers, spoiled son of a multi -millionaire railroad tycoon from San Diego, ( my hometown) is being taken to Europe by his parents on a luxury liner, a steamship, set in the late nineteenth century. As they enter the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, a fertile fishing area, Harvey is seasick, not helped by smoking a strong cigar, he needs fresh air fast, going on deck his legs are a bit wobbly, head aching too, a Harvey Cheyne Jr. an arrogant fifteen -year- old, greatly disliked by the annoyed passengers, spoiled son of a multi -millionaire railroad tycoon from San Diego, ( my hometown) is being taken to Europe by his parents on a luxury liner, a steamship, set in the late nineteenth century. As they enter the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, a fertile fishing area, Harvey is seasick, not helped by smoking a strong cigar, he needs fresh air fast, going on deck his legs are a bit wobbly, head aching too, a rough sea's giant wave throws him overboard, the unconscious boy floats on the foaming surface...doomed. Fortunately the fishing- fleet is all around there and a Portuguese fisherman, Manuel, from Madeira Island, (been there also) on a dory, a small fishing vessel used to catch cod, is surprised seeing the strange object, as Harvey will be when he awakes on board the parent boat. At first the teenager doesn't know where... but soon telling the owner captain, Disko Troop, of the seventy- ton schooner, "We're Here ", from Gloucester, Massachusetts, to take him to New York. His rich father will pay him a vast amount of money for this little trip. The skeptical man cannot believe this fair tale from a penniless boy, instead hires him at ten and a half dollars a month as a common fisherman, indignant...yet Harvey needs to eat.The captain's son the same age, Dan is, becomes his best friend, the bright kid learns fast, helping the other eight men on board the boat, they quickly give him their respect, through hard work, in the back-breaking, slimy job, he has rightly earned. The environment turns strangers into friends , then family ( his busy father and emotional mother neglected him), the dangers of the treacherous ocean, where many of the brave die, lost in the thick fogs of the banks, are almost forgotten, for the first time in his life Harvey feels useful, he is contributing to a cause, joining with fellow men...happy, even when he recites stories of his wealth, they the fishermen smile but don't believe, it does not anger Mr. Cheyne anymore, he is a man now...Kipling is a magnificent writer, he shows how people interact with each person in a realistic way, the emotions and dispair of everyday life. This short novel will entertain but also give the reader something to think about , if you give people a chance , most will reciprocate the kindness.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Luffy

    I'm writing this review to honour the likes that my friends have bestowed upon this book. I tried to take part in a bookish bingo challenge, and, patting myself on the back, I got this Rudyard Kipling booklet. How awful could it get, right? It was so poorly paced that I thought I was reading a 900 paged book. Avoid this at all cost.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adam Nelson

    I read most of this aloud to my older boys as I was putting them to sleep at night, and I think that's probably the best way to navigate through Kipling's tale. It's a lot of fun, but if you're reading silently, not trying on the accents as Kipling's written them, I think you miss a lot. This book is chock full of sailing terms that Kipling never explains, nor does he provide a glossary, but I liked this. Much of the time, I didn't understand what the characters were talking about in their daily I read most of this aloud to my older boys as I was putting them to sleep at night, and I think that's probably the best way to navigate through Kipling's tale. It's a lot of fun, but if you're reading silently, not trying on the accents as Kipling's written them, I think you miss a lot. This book is chock full of sailing terms that Kipling never explains, nor does he provide a glossary, but I liked this. Much of the time, I didn't understand what the characters were talking about in their daily business of sailing and fishing, but in a way my experience mirrored that of the main character, spoiled landlubber brat who is forced to get his sea legs. Kipling's narration somewhat mirrors the slang and dialect of his characters, so it is very much a character itself, and I'm glad he didn't step out of it to explain the slang and terms. It would have shattered the illusion. A lot of readers don't like this. They want to understand everything they read. I think some literature, like some film, can be an unexplainable but nevertheless vivid experience, like a Terence Malick film with much more humor and swagger. We all celebrate Shakespeare, but if you don't allow the swing and rhythm of his language to envelop you, you're going to work very hard to explain every line to yourself rather than just experience it as it unfolds. This book is the same way.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This book was a refreshing change from modern life. Suddenly I found myself among cod fisherman, learning the ropes alongside our hero, Harvey, and listening to sea ditties (thanks to the vastly entertaining Audible version of this book). Kipling brings pure adventure with his lively plots filled with near misses, ghostly fog, and surly sailors. His skillful writing always makes me pause. There are many interesting turns of phrase but also great variety in the types of sentences, verb selections This book was a refreshing change from modern life. Suddenly I found myself among cod fisherman, learning the ropes alongside our hero, Harvey, and listening to sea ditties (thanks to the vastly entertaining Audible version of this book). Kipling brings pure adventure with his lively plots filled with near misses, ghostly fog, and surly sailors. His skillful writing always makes me pause. There are many interesting turns of phrase but also great variety in the types of sentences, verb selections and wry observations of humanity in his work. I enjoyed this book so much more than I expected to.

  5. 5 out of 5

    7jane

    A story of how one 15-year-old rich boy's moment of bad luck changes his life, from spoiled brat to a mature, better person with solid values who can work well with others and doesn't need to prove his worth with questionable things and boasting. Forced to spend a summer with fishermen (no radios or other ways to communicate where he is) - no chance that the men would drop him off after picking him up from the sea where he had fallen - he gets a good glimpse as he works with them of what their A story of how one 15-year-old rich boy's moment of bad luck changes his life, from spoiled brat to a mature, better person with solid values who can work well with others and doesn't need to prove his worth with questionable things and boasting. Forced to spend a summer with fishermen (no radios or other ways to communicate where he is) - no chance that the men would drop him off after picking him up from the sea where he had fallen - he gets a good glimpse as he works with them of what their life is like... and gradually his flaws are replaced with the things I've mentioned. It's nice to see in the end that even after the summer he stays in contact with them (particularly Dan, a boy near his age who was one of the crew on that boat); he's definitely heading for a better future, a better man that what would've been if he hadn't had that moment of misfortune, falling off the big ship into the life on fishermen's boat called "We're Here". I read this first somewhere around my early teens - no Nancy Drew or other aimed-for-girls books for me, I read adventure, mystery and scifi books most of the time - it was then in its Finnish translation; I still love this book. A great adventure. :)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Second reading November 2016 First reading: August 2014 I didn't really expect to love a sailor's story but clearly I didn't have any idea how much Leadership Education can be cultivated on the dangerous fishing lines of the Atlantic. The book is totally different than anything else I have read by Kipling. It is an American story (as opposed to his more typical Indian writing), high adventure, perfect for boys (I couldn't keep my 7 year old away) (not to say that girls wouldn't enjoy it too) and Second reading November 2016 First reading: August 2014 I didn't really expect to love a sailor's story but clearly I didn't have any idea how much Leadership Education can be cultivated on the dangerous fishing lines of the Atlantic. The book is totally different than anything else I have read by Kipling. It is an American story (as opposed to his more typical Indian writing), high adventure, perfect for boys (I couldn't keep my 7 year old away) (not to say that girls wouldn't enjoy it too) and chock full of timeless lessons in how to become a real man. I cannot more highly recommend this as a Leadership Education classic that is family friendly and accessible as young as 6 or 7 as a family read aloud. I did find that I struggled to understand the lingo on the ship. I purchased the David Stuart Brilliance Audio version from Audible and it came to life for me. Stuart sang, spoke in accents and clearly articulated the jargon in such a way that I intuitively understood more of the meaning than I would have had I just been reading a spine. The audio was a treat!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    Finished reading this with the kids. Enjoyed it, just didn't love it. The last section should have ended about 20 pages earlier. It was like Kipling hit the natural climax for the story and then felt he needed to write another twenty pages to make somebody happy and decided to just phone-it-in (or the equivalent to phoning-it-in would be in 1897). The story was interesting, but just not THAT interesting. I guess I would class this as a minor sea story and a minor Kipling. If you are into Sea Finished reading this with the kids. Enjoyed it, just didn't love it. The last section should have ended about 20 pages earlier. It was like Kipling hit the natural climax for the story and then felt he needed to write another twenty pages to make somebody happy and decided to just phone-it-in (or the equivalent to phoning-it-in would be in 1897). The story was interesting, but just not THAT interesting. I guess I would class this as a minor sea story and a minor Kipling. If you are into Sea Stories AND Kipling, for sure, don't skip this book. Otherwise, I'd stick with Kim and Moby-Dick.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael Gerald

    If you take a look at the informative channels on cable tv like National Geographic, Discovery, and Animal Planet, you will notice that there are a lot of programs about fishing. Deadliest Catch, Monster Fish, Wicked Tuna. Good to see fishermen plying their trade and makes one appreciate a job most people in cities do not give importance to. But a century before these shows, there was a book that portrayed fishing and the folks whose lives depend on it. But it wasn't just a book about fishing; it If you take a look at the informative channels on cable tv like National Geographic, Discovery, and Animal Planet, you will notice that there are a lot of programs about fishing. Deadliest Catch, Monster Fish, Wicked Tuna. Good to see fishermen plying their trade and makes one appreciate a job most people in cities do not give importance to. But a century before these shows, there was a book that portrayed fishing and the folks whose lives depend on it. But it wasn't just a book about fishing; it was also a tale of a coming of age for a spoilt brat who thought himself an untouchable prince. Fallen from a ship where he was a passenger, Harvey Cheyne also fell from the lofty pedestal he was on. Aided by "rough" but worldy-wise fishermen, Harvey Cheyne emerged from a cocoon of luxury and detachment and into the real world where people can be your real teachers, mentors, companions, and friends. Where work is not a source of shame but a virtue worthy to be proud of and not only keeps someone alive, but actually gives you the essence of LIVING. In a modern age of a yawning gap between the haves and the have-nots, Captains Courageous is a fitting book for people to know the importance of hard work for success, especially for persons who were born with silver spoons in their mouths; that real life is not just about having iPhones, iPads, and material things. It is not just about I, I, I. It is also about WE, WE, WE. There is a wide world out there to discover, where life is not just handed to you on a platter. You have to work it and LIVE it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    My son really enjoyed this book. He listened to this is as an audiobook via Librivox.

  10. 4 out of 5

    K.M. Weiland

    Now, I know its not fair to judge a book on its movie (or vice versa), but I totally did. I love the adaptation of this story so much, but the book just doesnt live up. No Harvey/Manuel relationship, and Harveys character arc happens in the space of a single chapter in the first quarter of the book. The rest is all interesting and colorful accounts of fishing lifeand some didactic moralizing later onbut it doesnt live up to Freddie Bartholomew and Spencer Tracy. Now, I know it’s not fair to judge a book on its movie (or vice versa), but I totally did. I love the adaptation of this story so much, but the book just doesn’t live up. No Harvey/Manuel relationship, and Harvey’s character arc happens in the space of a single chapter in the first quarter of the book. The rest is all interesting and colorful accounts of fishing life—and some didactic moralizing later on—but it doesn’t live up to Freddie Bartholomew and Spencer Tracy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    'Master-man. Man-master,' said he. 'You remember, Dan Troop, what I said? On the We're here?' 'Well, I won't go so far as to deny that it do look like it as things stand at present,' said Dan. 'She was an able packet, an' one way an' another I owe her a heap _her and dad.' 'Me too,' quoth Harvey Cheyne.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Free download available at Project Gutenberg.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    3.5 Stars I wish I could say I really liked this, but I can't. I liked it, I know that is splitting hairs, but it just doesn't leave me feeling wow. I loved the adventure, the fishing, and the rugged life of being at sea. I was not convinced that a (view spoiler)[a spoiled rotten rich kids attitude could be changed 180 degrees with one sock on the nose. (hide spoiler)] This is a rare case of the movie being better than the book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Vincent

    Like a lot of reviewers here I was SUPPOSED to read this book in grade school, but that never happened. I tried again my junior year of college and stopped 40 or 50 pages into it. So now at forty years old I decided I would finally read it cover-to-cover, no matter what. The copy that I read is literally the same 1964 version that I started some 30 years ago. The yellow pages and old-fashioned library smell of the book actually added to the experience. When I finish a really good book I always Like a lot of reviewers here I was SUPPOSED to read this book in grade school, but that never happened. I tried again my junior year of college and stopped 40 or 50 pages into it. So now at forty years old I decided I would finally read it cover-to-cover, no matter what. The copy that I read is literally the same 1964 version that I started some 30 years ago. The yellow pages and old-fashioned library smell of the book actually added to the experience. When I finish a really good book I always feel a sense of sadness because I will miss the characters and I will never find out the details of the rest of their lives. With Captains Courageous I found myself 30 pages from the last page wishing it would end. Unfortunately the last 30 pages are also the least exciting of the book. Once the story is removed from the boat itself, the pages just drag on and on. Don’t get me wrong, I did not hate this book. It was a good story with likeable and original characters. But the dialogue was difficult to follow and on occasion there seems to be just page after page of meaningless narration. Another oddity of this book is that the most monumental moments seem to be given the least amount of attention. While descriptions of the fog may go on for hundreds of words, catastrophic events are nothing more than a blip on the page. I found myself constantly backing up to re-read passages and asking myself, “Did someone just drown?” and then a few chapters later, “What happened? Did a boat just sink?” And then onto another 1500 words about Harve’s rowing technique. Again, I did not hate this book and I am glad that after 30 years of failed attempts I did finally finish it. But when I sit down to read tonight, part of me will be glad that I’ve moved on to something else.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I read this book year's ago--in junior high school. I can't remember much--it was one of those adventure sort of novels that we were always reading to keep the boys involved in class. You know what I mean--Lord of the Flies, Call of the Wild, Adventures of Huck Finn...I read all of these when I was 12 or so. Only later in high school, did I delve into books more my taste, books not so decidedly action-adventure. The only reason I'm writing this review, or even including this on my book shelf for I read this book year's ago--in junior high school. I can't remember much--it was one of those adventure sort of novels that we were always reading to keep the boys involved in class. You know what I mean--Lord of the Flies, Call of the Wild, Adventures of Huck Finn...I read all of these when I was 12 or so. Only later in high school, did I delve into books more my taste, books not so decidedly action-adventure. The only reason I'm writing this review, or even including this on my book shelf for that matter, is the funny memory I have related to this book. It's my 10-year high school reunion this year, so I'm having some flashbacks lately...bare with me. Anyway, one day, Mrs. Bixel my 8th-grade English teacher (honors of course!) was out sick. Our assignment: silent reading of Captains Courageous. Well, you can imagine, we didn't do much reading--laughing, sitting under our desks, throwing papers, leaving to wander the halls, etc., etc., etc. I can't remember the substitute teacher, but she wrote a scathing report and must have written up virtually the entire class. Kids who never served detention were written up, really, we must have been awful. I just remember laughing uncontrollably thinking we were so clever and then the next day, like a bad hangover, dealing with the sober facts of Mrs. Bixel's return. She was furious. I had never seen her so angry. I remember, head bowed, studying intently the cover to my copy of Captains Courageous (this one I've selected is NOT the same cover by the way). I think the crux of the matter: Captains Courageous is a bit of boring read and not appropriate for 8th graders forced to silent read for an hour.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chucky

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I absolutely love Kipling! A spoiled little rich boy on a cruise with his mother falls off a cruise liner & is rescued by a fishing boat. They don't believe him to be the rich kid that he claims & forces him to work for his keep just like everyone else on board for the entire fishing season as they're not able to simply abandon the season just to take him home. Thus begins his education into manhood & character. The book has a wonderfully uplifting ending & unlike many of the I absolutely love Kipling! A spoiled little rich boy on a cruise with his mother falls off a cruise liner & is rescued by a fishing boat. They don't believe him to be the rich kid that he claims & forces him to work for his keep just like everyone else on board for the entire fishing season as they're not able to simply abandon the season just to take him home. Thus begins his education into manhood & character. The book has a wonderfully uplifting ending & unlike many of the other reviewers who seem intent on demanding equity in society, I find the book incredibly charming, uplifting, & encouraging. Life is not fair nor is it easy or equitable. Some start out life with advantages that others don't get. It is what it is! The lesson is what do we do with what we're given. I realize some people have deep resentment for being forced to read this book in school. I wish I had read it sooner & feel as if it should indeed be required reading. Another reason I feel so strongly about this is the fact that so many today are incapable of comprehending the English language as it was written by such as Kipling, Keats, Shelley, Shakespeare … They're slothful illiterates & I have no sympathy for any one of them when they are incapable of understanding simple English!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    The 1937 version of Captains Courageous is one of my favorite films. I shouldnt have been surprised that the book is considerably different from the movie. One notable difference is that Manuel has such a minor role in the book. The other main difference is that in the book, Harvey almost immediately changes his behavior after being picked up by the fishing ship. Still the heart of both are the same a spoiled young man learning responsibility and team work. The 1937 version of Captains Courageous is one of my favorite films. I shouldn’t have been surprised that the book is considerably different from the movie. One notable difference is that Manuel has such a minor role in the book. The other main difference is that in the book, Harvey almost immediately changes his behavior after being picked up by the fishing ship. Still the heart of both are the same – a spoiled young man learning responsibility and team work.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    What a lovely, entertaining story. I found Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling by chance. Kipling might be better known for The Jungle Book and Kim but this story was great. It starts with a bang. Young 15 year old Harvey Cheyne, son of a wealthy family and spoiled, is on a sea voyage with his mother when they hit a storm in the Grand Banks off Newfoundland, and he is washed overboard. Luckily for Harvey, the fishing fleet is working at the Grand Banks as well and one of the fishermen, out in What a lovely, entertaining story. I found Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling by chance. Kipling might be better known for The Jungle Book and Kim but this story was great. It starts with a bang. Young 15 year old Harvey Cheyne, son of a wealthy family and spoiled, is on a sea voyage with his mother when they hit a storm in the Grand Banks off Newfoundland, and he is washed overboard. Luckily for Harvey, the fishing fleet is working at the Grand Banks as well and one of the fishermen, out in his dory, sees Harvey in the water and saves him. Harvey wants the crew of the We're Here to take him back to the mainland so he can contact his father. They don't believe he is from a wealthy family and can't afford to leave the prime fishing season for such a long period. So Harvey finds himself forced earn his keep working on the fishing boat. The boat is crewed by a wonderful diverse bunch of characters and Harvey soon makes friends of all of them, especially Dan, the son of the ship's master, Disco Troop. We follow Harvey and the crew as they spend the season out on the banks with the other fishing boats, learning about the people, how hard the job is, but how there is such wonderful camaraderie between the crew members. It's a brave, daring book but at the same time, it's also folksy and friendly. We watch Harvey grow as a human being, from a selfish spoiled boy to a hard-working young man. It's an excellent coming of age story, a pure joy to read. Fair warning, it will take a mite to get used to the language as it was written in 1896 and there is a fair bit of local dialect. It doesn't take away from the joy of the story. Well worth reading (5 stars)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lara Lleverino

    It was by chance I read this book at the same time I finished both The Secret Garden and A Little Princess and not long after reading Carry On Mr Bowditch. Kiplings own story mirrors that of A Little Princess in that his birth to early years were spent in India in the care of his Ayah and later years in a merciless England. The story itself mirrored Bowditch in that it took place in the oceans of North America and on a ship. I found the book enjoyable if a bit difficult to read given the strange It was by chance I read this book at the same time I finished both The Secret Garden and A Little Princess and not long after reading Carry On Mr Bowditch. Kiplings own story mirrors that of A Little Princess in that his birth to early years were spent in India in the care of his Ayah and later years in a merciless England. The story itself mirrored Bowditch in that it took place in the oceans of North America and on a ship. I found the book enjoyable if a bit difficult to read given the strange spelling that reflects all the various dialects. I suspect with a good narrator it would make a great audiobook. The book was a great promoter of the idea that hard work makes a successful person versus being handed everything one could want. I really waffled on giving this book four stars and really wanted to give it 3.5 as it was good and wholesome but just didn't blow my socks off. I learned some shipping/sailing terminology but other than that it was just good. I think it would be interesting to a preteen to early teenage boy if they could wade through the dialects.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Will

    It is good to read the true classics now and then, and I had not read Kipling in a long time. Began this book on my phone, continued on my computer, and finally got this paperback copy at my local library, thank God. I have to say I find reading ebooks a particularly unsatisfactory experience. As for the book, it is thoroughly enjoyable. I need not restate the plot, but I wonder how many of us living in the US today could live that kind of life, particularly young teenagers? I know there are It is good to read the true classics now and then, and I had not read Kipling in a long time. Began this book on my phone, continued on my computer, and finally got this paperback copy at my local library, thank God. I have to say I find reading ebooks a particularly unsatisfactory experience. As for the book, it is thoroughly enjoyable. I need not restate the plot, but I wonder how many of us living in the US today could live that kind of life, particularly young teenagers? I know there are kids who do it, on farms and fishing boats, but ours is now a world where stoplights tell you in a computer voice to "Wait," and everything we eat has to have a nutrition statement. In certain respects this is not an easy read. Like John Buchan and other authors of that period Kipling used a form of written vernacular to show accents, in this case that of New England fishermen. I don't know if Kipling is still required reading, but he is certainly a very fine author and this is a truly great book. Recommended.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emily L

    Captains Courageous will always be one of my favorites from fond memories of my dad reading it aloud to us as children. Now I've just finished reading it aloud to my own family from an identical antique copy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Great Book Study

    There is nothing a season at sea can't cure - especially a bad attitude. My review: Captians Courageous

  23. 4 out of 5

    Roberta

    Loved it! In some ways, it reminded me of an early version of "The Perfect Storm" (great book!) by Sebastian Junger. Maybe a little "Moby Dick" thrown in; although, M.D. was much more technical and quite a bit longer.... : )

  24. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I don't know that this is Kipling's best; I think I like the Mowgli stories better. Still an enjoyable read, easy to identify with Harvey. I think he learned faster than most would that his wealth was pretty meaningless on board the 'We're Here.' Most poignant moment: The loss of the Jennie Cushman. This showed more than anything else, I think, how Harvey had changed.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    This was good sea-going fun. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    Captains Courageous is a wonderful classic by Rudyard Kipling about which too many people have forgotten. The plot is straightforward: a spoiled rich boy falls overboard and is picked up by a fishing boat where he learns some fast and hard life lessons. It is part adventure and part cautionary tale. It delivers its message without being overbearing or boring though. It is a short and fast paced novella that could easily be read in a day. There are two things I will mention though. The first is Captains Courageous is a wonderful classic by Rudyard Kipling about which too many people have forgotten. The plot is straightforward: a spoiled rich boy falls overboard and is picked up by a fishing boat where he learns some fast and hard life lessons. It is part adventure and part cautionary tale. It delivers its message without being overbearing or boring though. It is a short and fast paced novella that could easily be read in a day. There are two things I will mention though. The first is that there are a lot of maritime terms that will leave the non-sailing-enthusiasts confused. This isn't the book to try to figure your boom from your bow. The second thing is that Kipling's phonetic writing of Massachusetts accents can be a bit hard to wade through at times. But it did not detract from the story for me. It was a heartfelt, easy read and a nice change of pace. This review fulfills the "Book from an Author You Love That You Haven't Read Yet" category of the Popsugar reading challenge. http://www.popsugar.com/love/Reading-...

  27. 4 out of 5

    HBalikov

    This is Kipling's only novel concerning North America. It is consistent with his others in the underlying theme that experience is the great teacher. Harvey Cheyne is a coddled adolescent whose parents' wealth he takes for granted. The bulk of the story concerns his going over the rail on an Atlantic steamship crossing and being rescued by the crew of a Great Banks fishing boat. Kipling has done a lot of research on North Atlantic fishing and the New England fishing crews. He gets the details This is Kipling's only novel concerning North America. It is consistent with his others in the underlying theme that experience is the great teacher. Harvey Cheyne is a coddled adolescent whose parents' wealth he takes for granted. The bulk of the story concerns his going over the rail on an Atlantic steamship crossing and being rescued by the crew of a Great Banks fishing boat. Kipling has done a lot of research on North Atlantic fishing and the New England fishing crews. He gets the details right (as he does with his shorter description of American railroads late in the story). Much of the plot is predictable and the details not nearly as interestingly presented as Patrick O'Brian does in his books called the Aubrey-Maturin series. Glad I read it, but the old movie with Spencer Tracey was quite adequate.

  28. 4 out of 5

    dead letter office

    There's not really any content to this. It's an adventure story set on the high seas, but I guess I like Stevenson's ocean tales much better. It's also kind of an afterschool-special level morality tale about the importance of self-sufficiency and the value of hard labor in forming character. Outdated mytholgizing of American independence and toughness. It just feels dated (not just the language but the whole point of the story) and kind of embarrassing. Not as bad as The Man Without a Country, There's not really any content to this. It's an adventure story set on the high seas, but I guess I like Stevenson's ocean tales much better. It's also kind of an afterschool-special level morality tale about the importance of self-sufficiency and the value of hard labor in forming character. Outdated mytholgizing of American independence and toughness. It just feels dated (not just the language but the whole point of the story) and kind of embarrassing. Not as bad as The Man Without a Country, but in the same family of cringey old morality fiction where the morals in question now seem pretty dubious.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    I'm sure I'd have liked it more when I was young but at my age it didn't do much for me. It seems clearly a kid's book, but without the adventure of something like Treasure Island. The fact that it's written in dialect too makes it difficult to read in places. The basic plot is that a spoiled rich kid falls overboard and is picked up by a fishing ship. He ends up having to serve on the ship and learn to do hard work, but it all came a bit easily and there really weren't any grand adventures. We I'm sure I'd have liked it more when I was young but at my age it didn't do much for me. It seems clearly a kid's book, but without the adventure of something like Treasure Island. The fact that it's written in dialect too makes it difficult to read in places. The basic plot is that a spoiled rich kid falls overboard and is picked up by a fishing ship. He ends up having to serve on the ship and learn to do hard work, but it all came a bit easily and there really weren't any grand adventures. We mostly got to see him doing the day to day work of a fisherman. Definitely not Kipling's best work.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cricket Muse

    I realized I had read CC previously some time ago as I anticipated certain plot points as the story developed. Not much for dialectal dialogues, as in Twain or Dickens, but it does have memorable character development and is a classic Bildungsroman. This always struck more of a Jack London story and I'm always surprised when I see Kipling on the cover.

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