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Red Robin, Vol. 1: The Grail

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Following the aftermath of BATTLE FOR THE COWL, a new Batman watches over Gotham City. But not everyone is ready to give up on the old one. Someone believes that Bruce Wayne may still be alive...and that someone is Red Robin. But who is wearing the Red Robin costume, and why is he traveling the globe looking for a dead man? Whoever he is, he's not alone in his search and h Following the aftermath of BATTLE FOR THE COWL, a new Batman watches over Gotham City. But not everyone is ready to give up on the old one. Someone believes that Bruce Wayne may still be alive...and that someone is Red Robin. But who is wearing the Red Robin costume, and why is he traveling the globe looking for a dead man? Whoever he is, he's not alone in his search and has been targeted by the League of Assassins. What does Ra's al Ghul want with Red Robin? Why are members of the League of Assassins being targeted for death? And what happened to the life Red Robin left behind?


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Following the aftermath of BATTLE FOR THE COWL, a new Batman watches over Gotham City. But not everyone is ready to give up on the old one. Someone believes that Bruce Wayne may still be alive...and that someone is Red Robin. But who is wearing the Red Robin costume, and why is he traveling the globe looking for a dead man? Whoever he is, he's not alone in his search and h Following the aftermath of BATTLE FOR THE COWL, a new Batman watches over Gotham City. But not everyone is ready to give up on the old one. Someone believes that Bruce Wayne may still be alive...and that someone is Red Robin. But who is wearing the Red Robin costume, and why is he traveling the globe looking for a dead man? Whoever he is, he's not alone in his search and has been targeted by the League of Assassins. What does Ra's al Ghul want with Red Robin? Why are members of the League of Assassins being targeted for death? And what happened to the life Red Robin left behind?

30 review for Red Robin, Vol. 1: The Grail

  1. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    I've been talking to people, letting them know if my comic ever got going and I was approached by DC to take on a character it would be Tim. Not because I love him, but because I believe he hasn't been all that interesting of a character in anything I read. (If you want to hear more about my pitch let me know! I'll post it/PM you!) However, this is the first Tim-only story I read, and I actually dug it! So Tim is lost. His parents are dead, Dick took on Damien as the next Robin, and he is the on I've been talking to people, letting them know if my comic ever got going and I was approached by DC to take on a character it would be Tim. Not because I love him, but because I believe he hasn't been all that interesting of a character in anything I read. (If you want to hear more about my pitch let me know! I'll post it/PM you!) However, this is the first Tim-only story I read, and I actually dug it! So Tim is lost. His parents are dead, Dick took on Damien as the next Robin, and he is the only person to believe Bruce is still alive. So he goes on a search to find him. On the way he's approached by Assassin's hired by none other than Ra. Whom also believes Bruce to be alive and tells Red Robin to join him so they can find him together. It's really interesting to see Tim's inner turmoil. I feel for the guy. He's a young adult/teenager trying to find his place in the world. He won't give up on Bruce because Bruce wouldn't give up on him, and that's something special. I also enjoy the main storyline and a few twist here and there keep it fresh. If you want a pretty darn good Red Robin story this is the one to grab. Reading volume 2 very soon.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    This begins with a Spanish politician's daughter being kidnapped and held for ransom. Red Robin, Tim Drake, takes down armed guards and an incendiary cyborg in order to save her. Red Robin seems skillful but cold and objective, almost stoic. And I'm wondering if I'm going to like this... But then comes the flashback vital to character building, to instilling sympathy in the reader. And I feel for Tim, I really do. Post-Final Crisis and Battle for the Cowl, Bruce is gone and presumed dead. Dick ta This begins with a Spanish politician's daughter being kidnapped and held for ransom. Red Robin, Tim Drake, takes down armed guards and an incendiary cyborg in order to save her. Red Robin seems skillful but cold and objective, almost stoic. And I'm wondering if I'm going to like this... But then comes the flashback vital to character building, to instilling sympathy in the reader. And I feel for Tim, I really do. Post-Final Crisis and Battle for the Cowl, Bruce is gone and presumed dead. Dick takes over as Batman and Damian as Robin, leaving Tim in an awkward place. Dick says he needs Tim but not as Robin, while Damian, like a little shit, is horribly smug toward Tim. Tim naturally is angry, sad, and most of all lost. So he leaves Gotham to (in his opinion) find Bruce who he thinks is still alive. But meanwhile he's fighting crime on his own around the world to (in my opinion) grieve and find existential catharsis, making him maybe one of the most contemplative men of the Bats family yet. I loved everything about this. The artwork is sharp and rich. The characterization and dialog are excellent. Tim is complex, far beyond a punch drunk sidekick. And there's real mystery here. He's mixed up with the League of Assassins and the Council of Spiders while piecing together Bruce's whereabouts, and he's got evidence that's he's still alive. How this series ever went out of print, I do not know. But I'm willing to spend $28 to read Vol. 2.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Following the death of Batman/Bruce Wayne, Dick Grayson assumes the cowl and becomes the new Batman with Damian Wayne as the new Robin. Tim Drake feels that Bruce isn’t dead and begins searching the globe, following his footsteps in Grant Morrison’s story “The Return of Bruce Wayne”, to pick up clues that Bruce is still alive and is slowly making his way, through time, back to present day Gotham. In order to find Bruce though Tim has to ally himself with one of Batman’s greatest foes – Ra’s Al-G Following the death of Batman/Bruce Wayne, Dick Grayson assumes the cowl and becomes the new Batman with Damian Wayne as the new Robin. Tim Drake feels that Bruce isn’t dead and begins searching the globe, following his footsteps in Grant Morrison’s story “The Return of Bruce Wayne”, to pick up clues that Bruce is still alive and is slowly making his way, through time, back to present day Gotham. In order to find Bruce though Tim has to ally himself with one of Batman’s greatest foes – Ra’s Al-Ghul. Chris Yost does a decent job of writing Tim Drake as an interesting character but I think there’s not enough meat for a full blown two volume series here. Yost is basically following in Morrison’s footsteps, but “Red Robin” isn’t necessary to read to follow Morrison’s Batman story arc, it’s more of an add-on for the hardcore Batfans out there who’ll read anything and everything about this series. I like Tim but like Dick Grayson when he was younger and starting out as Nightwing, I think the teen, coming of age heroes are less interesting than when they’re older and have more experience. Here Tim acts exactly his age being melodramatic and hot-headed, making mistakes, and nearly dying for them. That kind of character doesn’t warrant an entire book and the book feels like what it is throughout – side story blown up to become a kind of main story. Tim Drake/Red Robin is an interesting character with some hidden angles that aren’t really gotten into in this book (he’s darker, willing to cross lines Batman can’t) and I think the potential is there to develop him into a more substantial character but he needs his own storylines rather than playing off of Morrison’s Batman story arc that will always have Drake as a secondary character even in his own book. Decent script, decent art, but a book that fails to show Red Robin as a superhero worth reading – yet.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kenny

    Poor Tim Drake/Robin. Your mother is dead, your father is dead. Bruce Wayne & Dick Grayson, Batman & Robin, took you in when you had no one; Bruce made you his adopted son. Tim Drake became Tim Wayne. But now, Bruce Wayne is gone. Everyone believes him dead. But you know better. He’s alive. Bruce Wayne is alive. You know it in your heart of hearts … but no one believes you. Wait -- there is one man who has believes you -- one of Bruce Wayne’s greatest enemies, Ra’s al Ghul. Thus, the first volume o Poor Tim Drake/Robin. Your mother is dead, your father is dead. Bruce Wayne & Dick Grayson, Batman & Robin, took you in when you had no one; Bruce made you his adopted son. Tim Drake became Tim Wayne. But now, Bruce Wayne is gone. Everyone believes him dead. But you know better. He’s alive. Bruce Wayne is alive. You know it in your heart of hearts … but no one believes you. Wait -- there is one man who has believes you -- one of Bruce Wayne’s greatest enemies, Ra’s al Ghul. Thus, the first volume of Red Robin begins. In the aftermath of Final Crisis and Batman: Battle For The Cowl, the Batman books were shaken up considerably. Dick Grayson became Batman, and Damian became Robin. That left the former Robin, Tim Drake, without a hero identity. He became Red Robin, a hero originally created by Alex Ross for his classic graphic novel, Kingdom Come (interestingly enough, in that book Dick Grayson was Red Robin), and off to find the Batman Tim went. On the original Robin title, writers like Chuck Dixon and Fabian Nicieza spent years transforming Tim Drake from a teenage hero to a mature, credible detective. The Grail follows that pattern as Tim travels the world (Madrid, Paris, Berlin, Baghdad) searching for clues to Bruce Wayne’s whereabouts. Along the way, Tim reluctantly partners with members of Ra’s al Ghul’s League of Assassins (one of which is a bald woman named Prudence). That partnership forces Tim to ask himself just how much he’s willing to straddle the line between good and evil in order to achieve his desired end. The Grail is a lot of fun to read, especially if you’ve followed the Tim Drake character over the years. As Tim makes this heart-wrenching transition in his life, he has a few heart-to-heart talks with Wonder Girl, The Spoiler, and even comes to blows with Dick Grayson and Damian. The more you read it, the more you realize this is the next logical chapter in the character’s life. Yost also conveys Tim’s loneliness and isolation very well. Most of the people in his life think he’s crazy or in denial for believing Bruce Wayne is still alive. But he believes it with such passion and intensity that he ostracizes himself from the people he cares about, and that conflict and frustration come off really well. This book has a really nice feel to it. Tim is isolated, but he also has some of his trademark wit so the book doesn’t turn into a giant sob story. The Grail is a good read. It won’t exactly blow you away, but it’s good storytelling, with good characterization and good art. As a reader, that’s what I wanted to see out of this book. Tim Drake has been one of DC’s most intriguing characters in recent years. The Grail doesn’t drop the ball in that respect.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jedhua

    My Brief Bookshelf Overview: gave-up-before-finishing, hell-of-a-ride, unrealized-potential Additional Notes: This collection contains Red Robin issues #1-5. Tries and (mostly) fails to be serious, though not altogether a waste of time.

  6. 4 out of 5

    gingey reads

    I think I just don't have enough context to properly appreciate this? May return to it after I understand more of WHAT IS HAPPENING. Other thoughts: - TIM MY POOR KID I BELIEVE IN U - damian no - this isn't news but i'm still batfam trash - also this was scheduled to arrive on tim's birthday and i am very sad that it arrived late.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Diego López Ocón

    This just wasn't enough, the story is short and it only moves a little bit from what is going to be the big picture. (The Return of Bruce Wayne)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kati

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Art by Ramon Bachs: Great action sequences and vibrant pictures. The only weak point, for me that is, are the faces of the characters: their features are very rough, not sharp enough, not... well, pretty enough, to be honest. Story by Christopher Yost: Fascinating story, well written and perfectly interconnected, not told in a linear way, but every scene has its own place. It's a character piece and at the same time, there's a large picture that you don't see until you have all the pieces. I'm lov Art by Ramon Bachs: Great action sequences and vibrant pictures. The only weak point, for me that is, are the faces of the characters: their features are very rough, not sharp enough, not... well, pretty enough, to be honest. Story by Christopher Yost: Fascinating story, well written and perfectly interconnected, not told in a linear way, but every scene has its own place. It's a character piece and at the same time, there's a large picture that you don't see until you have all the pieces. I'm loving this story of Tim Wayne, formerly known as Tim Drake. He has lost everything: his father is dead, his best friend Conner aka Superboy is dead, Bruce aka Batman - Tim's adoptive father - is dead and he has lost his status as Robin to Damien Wayne, an obnoxious brat that Dick, the new Batman, chose as his Robin. Tim's the only one who believes that Bruce is still alive, somewhere, but his friends think he needs psychiatric help, that he lost it after Bruce died. And consider the irony - the only one who believes him is Ra's al Ghul and his League of Assassins that Tim ends up leading against the Council of Spiders. Yes, for Tim, everything is about shades of grey these days...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    Their was only one major problem I had with Chris Yost's storytelling. There's no doubt that Yost understands the character of Tim Drake, and the obvious similarity - personality and mindset - he has with Batman. But when it comes to the execution of the story, I was confused on plenty of occasions. Yost constant use of flashbacks - especially when it didn't further the plot - threw off the pace of the story completely. I think there were parts of the story were the flashbacks weren't even proper Their was only one major problem I had with Chris Yost's storytelling. There's no doubt that Yost understands the character of Tim Drake, and the obvious similarity - personality and mindset - he has with Batman. But when it comes to the execution of the story, I was confused on plenty of occasions. Yost constant use of flashbacks - especially when it didn't further the plot - threw off the pace of the story completely. I think there were parts of the story were the flashbacks weren't even properly stated to inform that reader it's even a flashback. I could wrong, maybe I should read it again. But from the first read, I cannot say I enjoyed it very much.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kerry

    Hmmm... not sure what to say. It could be that I'm just not feeling very well and can't focus ont the book, but I'm just bored and right now I can't finish it. Not sure what I expected, but maybe I will revisit it some day.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Khunsa

    BEST TIM DRAKE COMIC EVER.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Red Robin was an American comic book ongoing series published in 2009. It features former Robin, Tim Drake under the identity of Red Robin. The debut of the series follows the events of Batman R.I.P., Final Crisis, and Battle for the Cowl in which the original Batman, Bruce Wayne, apparently died at the hands of Darkseid. He is the only one that believes Bruce Wayne is still alive and leaves Gotham City to begin a global search for evidence supporting his theory and hope. Red Robin: The Grail col Red Robin was an American comic book ongoing series published in 2009. It features former Robin, Tim Drake under the identity of Red Robin. The debut of the series follows the events of Batman R.I.P., Final Crisis, and Battle for the Cowl in which the original Batman, Bruce Wayne, apparently died at the hands of Darkseid. He is the only one that believes Bruce Wayne is still alive and leaves Gotham City to begin a global search for evidence supporting his theory and hope. Red Robin: The Grail collects Red Robin #1–5 of the 2009 on-going series. This trade paperback covers one and a quarter storylines: "The Grail" and "Council of the Spiders". "The Grail" is a four-issue story (Red Robin #1–4). It has Tim Drake as Red Robin searching the world for clues that Bruce Wayne as Batman is still alive. Despite the fact that Bruce Wayne as Batman was seemingly killed by Darkseid in Final Crisis, many don't believe his claims of Bruce Wayne being alive. This obsession drew the attentions of Ra's al Ghul of the League of Assassins. Cameo appearances of Dick Grayson as Batman, Stephanie Brown as Spoiler, and Cassie Sandsmark as Wonder Girl makes an appearance to help Tim Drake, but he refuses their help. "Council of Spiders" is a four-issue story. However, only the first one is published in this trade paperback (Red Robin #5) has Tam Fox, the daughter of Lucius Fox, who was sent by her father to find the missing Tim Drake. While doing so, she encounters the Council of Spiders, which made Tim Drake as Red Robin vow to end Ra's al Ghul and his League of Assassins. Christopher Yost penned the entire trade paperback, and for the most part, I rather liked the storyline. It jumps into action having Tim Drake as Red Robin searching for clues that Bruce Wayne may still be alive with flashbacks to how he got to his mission. It reflects how Tim Drake as Red Robin broke ties with Dick Grayson as Batman as he heads on a mission that he too doubts. This attracts the attention of Ra's al Ghul and his League of Assassins. Ramon Bachs is the penciler for the entire trade paperback. Since he was the only penciler, the artistic flow of the trade paperback flowed exceptionally well. For the most part, I enjoyed his penciling style, it accentuates the narrative extremely well. All in all, Red Robin: The Grail is a wonderful start to what would hopefully be an equally wonderful series.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Palmieri

    Red Robin #1-5. I loved this series when it first came out, so I'm happy to find it mostly holds up. Yost understands Tim and does well with the concept: he is the only person who believes Bruce is still alive, so he goes on an international quest to prove it while getting involved with Ra's Al Ghul and yheeague of Assassins. This volume alternates between scenes of the action-packed and espionage-soaked present, scenes from the recent past to show how and why Tim left his past in Gotham behind, Red Robin #1-5. I loved this series when it first came out, so I'm happy to find it mostly holds up. Yost understands Tim and does well with the concept: he is the only person who believes Bruce is still alive, so he goes on an international quest to prove it while getting involved with Ra's Al Ghul and yheeague of Assassins. This volume alternates between scenes of the action-packed and espionage-soaked present, scenes from the recent past to show how and why Tim left his past in Gotham behind, and scenes developing the growing threat of the Council of Spiders. Yost's understanding of Tim is best displayed in the narration, where his smarts and his headstrong nature are played well against his endless compassion for those around him. He's a man on a mission, but one who has people at the heart of everything he does. This is also a nice progression from recent events for the character: he's now out on his own, playing by his own rules. Ramon Bachs's art is generally good in composition and figure work, but the digital inks by colorist Guy Major look rough and unfinished. Major was the colorist on the Robin book for a long time, but never an inker; I wonder if this was a new style DC wanted to try at the time. This art is what brought the rating down from a 4 to a 3 for me. Looking forward to the next volume, which concludes Yost's year-long story!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alexa Wayne

    I never thought I'd be a fan of Tim Drake. Jason Todd being my favorite of the Robins when he became Red Hood, I wondered how Tim Drake would grow out of being Robin. However, I became intrigued, so for my birthday I bought all four volumes of Red Robin and started reading them in one sitting. I wanted to know where the story was going and how he would outsmart a few villains and prove that Bruce Wayne was in fact, still alive. Amazing! I recommend this to everyone and give Drake a chance!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris Browning

    More like a 2 1/2 really - it's got some good bits to it, but only seems to really become engaging when it is more Gotham/ Batman family heavy. Some of the art towards the end is insane - there's one particular picture of Pru in the fourth issue where her limbs look like she's been badly mangled off frame and now has only arms that stop at her elbow - but weirdly the insane art in the last two issues is a good deal more likable than the blandly dull stuff in the first three issues. Weird

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Decent story with some teen angst and solid art. Unfortunately, there are too many characters to keep track of for the uninitiated.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ziad

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Tim drake is truly the best Robin. He’s the smartest, strongest and kindest. Best bat family member!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Justice

    This just in: Tim Drake-Wayne is precious. It's official. All four batboys are my fave.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Aurora

    How do I read it tho ?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Yuri

    I didn't know tim drake was such a bad ass

  21. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    I adore Tim Drake - this was heartbreaking and hopeful and fantastic to read

  22. 4 out of 5

    Frank M

    Turned out to be one of my favorite DC series.

  23. 5 out of 5

    kat cariaso

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Such a fun and great addition to pre-52 Bat family era. I'll be honest and say I haven't read Morrison's runs (I'm reserving this for the summer since his love of convoluted plots begs a lot of time spent reading; time that I don't have at the moment) which means I'm a bit out of the loop for certain events that happen during and around this run, but the only thing you need to know going in this is that Batman died following the events of Final Crisis and was sent to the past and cursed to live Such a fun and great addition to pre-52 Bat family era. I'll be honest and say I haven't read Morrison's runs (I'm reserving this for the summer since his love of convoluted plots begs a lot of time spent reading; time that I don't have at the moment) which means I'm a bit out of the loop for certain events that happen during and around this run, but the only thing you need to know going in this is that Batman died following the events of Final Crisis and was sent to the past and cursed to live multiple lifetimes - no one believes Bruce is alive aside from Tim. (I would recommend reading the entirety of Grant Morrison's run on Batman, starting from Batman and Son down to Batman Inc - it would provide a lot more complex and prove to be a lot more impactful if read alongside this since I've had to glean from extra information due to my lack of prior knowledge of key events) It's such a smart decision for DC editorial to have Tim take on the weight of this mission of finding Bruce as it seems rightful that the Robin prior to Batman's death would be the same Robin that would keep on holding on to the hope that Batman lives on. Tim is also the same Robin who had delegated the famous line "Batman can't be without his Robin" so it's fitting for him to be the one who also embodies the idea that "Robin can't be without his Batman" because his transition from Robin to Red Robin and his incapability to accept Bruce's death seems to scream that ideal. And I love that. Tim also skirts around some moral scruples in the first couple issues which prove to be a refreshing read. He teams up with Ra's Al Ghul out of necessity and he begins to question his own integrity and his willingness to compromise with murderers - it spurs a lot of questions surrounding his inner need to honor Bruce's legacy by honoring the no-kill code. It's a lot of fun to delve in to this issue surrounding doing what you were taught vs. what you believe to be right, because it also delves in to the question of whether Tim should be his own man vs. the man Bruce taught him to be. #26 seems to cement the idea that Tim is capable of being his own man who makes his own choices, while also giving us a bit of a hint of a possible capability to kill - which is an interesting take to Tim's view on moralities as he struggles to either kill the man who murdered his father or spare him. While he did choose to spare him, Yost still leaves an idea of "what if?" as Tim concludes that everything we do in life to become our own person is all based on decisions - it's just about picking and choosing to live with them. Tim is a man built on (smart) choices and self-made decisions, all outside of his nurture - and that's where he shines. (Also sidenote: Whereas Dick is cemented one side of the spectrum of "absolutely no killing" and Jason has embraced the idea of killing out of necessity, Tim still being "on the fence" could be an interesting take to his character since he's able to both sympathize with Jason and Dick at the same time. Could be an interesting segway in to his ability to form relationships with both, no?) Also, this is an exploration in to Tim becoming the man he wants to be as he recognizes his place in Gotham outside his former Robin cowl. It's a really cool thing to see him grow from the "smart" Robin to someone who has figured out his place in the extended Bat family as he makes a name for himself with the integration of his own HQ and his own independent abilities/mission to undermine various criminal and assassin organizations - and it's cool to see him all do it in regular Batman-like fashion with the gadgets, contingency plans, contingency plans for the contingency plans, the wit, and the smarts. He's clearly picked up the most from his time with Bruce with his tendencies to rely on his detective skills rather than his physical prowess (Jason) or his capability to think on his feet (Dick). It's really a testament to just how much of a respectable character Tim is in the DCU - he's all in all the more accessible, fun version of Bruce Wayne aged down to 17 years old and if you're in to that, you should love this run.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ottery StCatchpole

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. To be honest, I'm pretty jaded with comics right now, and DC Comics in particular given everything that has happened to my beloved characters who once formed Young Justice, the remnants of which can still be seen lingering in Teen Titans once scribed by ne'er-do-well Geoff Johns. Okay so he does do well on occasion for instance the aforementioned Titans, and Green Lantern (or so I've heard). Honestly, I don't care for how Johns writes most DC characters, too much like he's writing a movie and d To be honest, I'm pretty jaded with comics right now, and DC Comics in particular given everything that has happened to my beloved characters who once formed Young Justice, the remnants of which can still be seen lingering in Teen Titans once scribed by ne'er-do-well Geoff Johns. Okay so he does do well on occasion for instance the aforementioned Titans, and Green Lantern (or so I've heard). Honestly, I don't care for how Johns writes most DC characters, too much like he's writing a movie and doesn't want to alter them or make them in any way shape or form be important outside of their flat iconic OLD representations. Essentially what I'm saying is, Johns writes Superman like if he were writing the 80 some year old legend that is ... rather than, the adventures of Kryptonian come to earth Clark Kent/Superman. That said, thankfully his hands are nowhere in this book. Still, I was expecting the worst. I didn't, here again before I read this, like the idea of my favorite Robin, Tim Drake, becoming this Red Robin persona. The artwork however, was irresistible. Ramon Bachs does a brilliant job of portraying Tim and Ra's al Ghul, and all the other characters that enter into the story. The books starts off nicely illustrated, this is clearly not someone who has never penciled a comic book or who is finding his feet on the art. He takes the character and makes him his own. And while the inks by Art Thibert seriously detract from the look of that issue, that's really more Mr. Thibert's fault than Ramon Bachs. Art Thibert having such a stylized, a la Jim Lee style of inks. Whatsoever he inks looks like he inked it and doesn't always work with the penciller he's inking. Still the book is beautiful in spite of that little artistic mishap. As to the story, which was not what I was expecting, Chris Yost, in my opinion shot it out of the park. Not only is this first story arc not presented in chronological order, as most comics today are. He doesn't just throw in the broken flashbacks into the story for the sake of some minor reveal but he purposely plays with them all so as not to reveal everything at once. His fractured flashback storyline works really well to not only give us a sense of how lost Tim feels now that Bruce Wayne is allegedly dead and he's lost the mantle of Robin now that Dick Grayson has given it to Bruce Wayne's son, but he also uses it as a way to reveal the major villain in the story, heightening the mystery of the character, making us wonder how broken Tim and Dick's relationship really is. Cutting between the present action and flashing back to what happened to lead him down this path, Yost doesn't lay all of his cards out on the table but slowly interests us in the story, while making sure we still care about Tim Drake. He shows us how Tim feels, feeling at times betrayed by former friends and allies, wondering what exactly it means to suddenly be Tim Wayne, when there's no Bruce Wayne to be his father figure and with it he plays up Tim's sense of loneliness and his separation from all the old familiar things. Chris Yost is taking this character to new places but he's letting us see and know where he came from, giving us glimpses of who Red Robin used to be, and how he's struggling to find a new identity. All in all this book has renewed my interest in the character of Tim Drake even if he's no longer Robin. Yes, he's maturing, and Tim's growing up but this is the same Tim who pines for his friends Conner, and talks to Cassie a.k.a. Wonder Girl and was Batman's protege. Rather than just dropping in and changing everything Yost is respectfully letting us bid farewell to the old Robin and helping us welcome in Red Robin and writing a heck of a good adventure story, even throwing in some current events without making them the center of the tale and trying to pontificate his own world views as way too many Marvel comic books nowadays do.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rob S

    This is the Tim Drake (sorry, Tim Wayne) I grew up with and miss. Don't get me wrong, I also happen to love the New 52 but I also love Tim Drake having his own solo title and the years of experience to go along with it for him as a character. The one downside to the New 52 is the continuity that was lost with characters like Tim Drake. A young boy who discovered who Batman was, became Robin, became one of the greatest detectives of all time to the point that Bruce Wayne (Batman) said he would be This is the Tim Drake (sorry, Tim Wayne) I grew up with and miss. Don't get me wrong, I also happen to love the New 52 but I also love Tim Drake having his own solo title and the years of experience to go along with it for him as a character. The one downside to the New 52 is the continuity that was lost with characters like Tim Drake. A young boy who discovered who Batman was, became Robin, became one of the greatest detectives of all time to the point that Bruce Wayne (Batman) said he would be surpassed by him, lost his father, lost his best friend, lost his girlfriend (supposedly, but she came back - comics for you), and in Volume 1: The Grail is treated by everyone he loves as insane for thinking that his adopted father (Bruce Wayne) is dead (he's not, again comics). Did I mention that everyone thinks he's insane? Because that's kind of important. Tim Drake (sorry, again, Tim Wayne) is still reeling from the potential loss of his adopted father and mentor, Bruce Wayne. He has become violent, emotional, and angry at the circumstances where everyone he trusts and loves treats him like he belongs in the nut house (although not *that* nut house ). The reader follows Tim in these first five issues as he searches for evidence that Bruce is still alive. Over the course of the volume, the reader is treated to flashbacks of some great conversations that Tim has with the people he cares about (Dick, Stephanie Brown, Wonder Girl) and how ultimately he realizes he is utterly alone in his mission. Props to Yost for the line from Wonder Girl "What happens when Robin needs a Robin?" in trying to comfort him in a futile effort. The main thing that differs Red Robin from other comics is that Tim Wayne makes no bones that he's no longer Mr. Nice Robin. He's self-aware and fully admits that he's compromising his ethics and even his morals over the course of the volume by semi-teaming up with Ra's Al Ghul, a literal deal with the devil. Tim isn't afraid to say "Red Robin isn't a hero" and it's the whole reason why he chose that costume. As we read about Tim looking for clues, we are taken all over the world. Gotham City, Washington D.C., Spain, Berlin, Prague, Paris, and Baghdad. Tim's passport is going to have a number of stamps by the time he's done to say the least. Simultaneously, Red Robin finds himself in a middle of a war between the League of Assassins and a group known as the Council of Spiders. And Ra wants Tim's help. Again, this is only Volume 1. I throughly enjoyed this story and I also throughly enjoyed the art. The covers are fantastic. Fans both new and old alike will find enjoyment with this story. I'm hoping that when Tim gets his own solo title again (eventually, hopefully, please?) that it lives up to this level of quality.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    tim!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!111

  27. 5 out of 5

    M.C. Crocker

    When approaching this comic I admit that I was rather excited. I have a dear friend who likes to write fan fiction and it was this comic book that inspired her wonderful work, which I am still hounding her to finish. I will start off by admitting that I sometimes like stories with a darker edge, and this is no doubt a darker story, which I love. The main premise of this story is that Batman has died and Dick is the new Batman. Tim believes that Batman is still alive and is looking for proof of th When approaching this comic I admit that I was rather excited. I have a dear friend who likes to write fan fiction and it was this comic book that inspired her wonderful work, which I am still hounding her to finish. I will start off by admitting that I sometimes like stories with a darker edge, and this is no doubt a darker story, which I love. The main premise of this story is that Batman has died and Dick is the new Batman. Tim believes that Batman is still alive and is looking for proof of that and the story follows Tim’s that adventure as he takes on the mantel of Red Robin. As he goes searching he finds himself compromising in ways he never thought he would and is going down an ever slippery slope as he compromises more and more. In the end, he winds up involved with Ra’s Al Goul. It is a powerful story that makes me not be able to do anything but love Tim. Having read my friend’s story pertaining to this set of comics I was familiar with some character names and what happened in this story but I was not disappointed in the least and I was finding myself sitting on the edge of my seat and wanting to read more. I certainly felt the emotions that were supposed to be felt at various points in the story and I loved every minute of it. I am looking forward to getting my hands on the continuation of this story as well as some back issues of other comics that helped to set this story up. It is easy to say that I have fallen in love with this story arch and I would certainly recommend it to other people. Really in some ways I feel that this is a decent launching platform into Batman comics so to speak as long as you are okay kind of jumping mid story. This comic gives you a lot of back story and the only thing I felt I was missing was knowing who some characters were as who Stephanie was in her vigilante form and being familiar with the Teen Titans but at the same time I don’t feel that it detracted from the story too much. Really I would give this comic book a rating of 4 out of 5 pages.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Justyn Rampa

    After the events of Batman RIP and Battle for the Cowl, Tim Drake is the only one to believe that Bruce Wayne is still alive. This belief alienates him from everyone else in the Bat family as they believe his delusional behavior is part of his grieving. So everyone is trying to help him, but no one really does except when aid comes in the form of an unusual ally. I won't reveal who that ally is, but suffice to say that character has really been plucked back up in the past several years and has be After the events of Batman RIP and Battle for the Cowl, Tim Drake is the only one to believe that Bruce Wayne is still alive. This belief alienates him from everyone else in the Bat family as they believe his delusional behavior is part of his grieving. So everyone is trying to help him, but no one really does except when aid comes in the form of an unusual ally. I won't reveal who that ally is, but suffice to say that character has really been plucked back up in the past several years and has been included in several major storylines. Personally, I never really cared for that particular character but they are being used to great effect presently. Christopher Yost was a bit ambitious in his storytelling and probably way overused flashbacks and just general messing with linear storytelling. He didn't label things very well and expected people to remember where certain stories fell in the chronology. I've seen this done to great effect before, but that was not the case in the Grail. Mostly is was jarring and unnecessary and probably worked to take away nearly one whole star for me. However, the good is that we get to see Tim Drake, the most likely intellectual successor to Batman, at work here trying to prove to himself and the world that his adopted father, Bruce Wayne, is still alive. The story takes some nice twists and turns and the art grew on me after a while. I also think it says something that Tim Drake is a strong enough character to handle his own series. I think I prefer the way Scott Lobdell writes him in the New 52 Teen Titans a bit more than Chris Yost, but I do enjoy the character immensely when he is written well which he is in The Grail. Looking forward to the next volume!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lenny

    Of all the current Batman series, Red Robin is my favorite. I knew that after Bruce's death, Dick Grayson would become Batman, and Damien would take up the mantle as Robin; but what about Tim Drake? Chris Yost delivers an solid story about Tim's beginnings as Red Robin. Tim is resolute that Bruce is still alive and deserts Gotham, becoming the new Red Robin and searching the world for clues of Bruce's whereabouts. No one believes him; Tim is on his own, and he knows that the Red Robin costume is Of all the current Batman series, Red Robin is my favorite. I knew that after Bruce's death, Dick Grayson would become Batman, and Damien would take up the mantle as Robin; but what about Tim Drake? Chris Yost delivers an solid story about Tim's beginnings as Red Robin. Tim is resolute that Bruce is still alive and deserts Gotham, becoming the new Red Robin and searching the world for clues of Bruce's whereabouts. No one believes him; Tim is on his own, and he knows that the Red Robin costume is tarnished. He is now willing to cross several lines and make compromises, especially when Ra's al Ghul takes an interest in him. Tim forges his own path and makes his own name as Red Robin; his growth and development as a character is unique among the other Bat-family members right now, a testament to Yost's excellent writing. Also, Ra's is just badass. Also, I really like the introduction of Tam Fox, Lucius Fox's daughter who is sent to find Tim after he goes missing. She adds a nice element to the story, and it gets better in the next installment. The only problem I had, like Jackie said, was the use of flashbacks, constantly going forward and backward in time. I had to reread certain sections to understand the continuity, definitely not a good sign; it was used a bit too often. Like I said, The Grail is a solid beginning, and gets the ball rolling for the second half of this arc, "Collision," which comes out next month. Don't miss this!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This trade collects Red Robin issues #1-5. In the aftermath of Final Crisis Gotham City sees the beginning of a new Batman and Robin. But the former Robin, Tim Drake, isn't ready to move on. Instead he embraces a tarnished alter ego and sets out on a quest that will require a steady stream of compromised ideals. But he won't give up, because he's the only one who doesn't believe Bruce Wayne is dead. Time Drake has always been a favorite of mine and he really got a chance to shine given a new direc This trade collects Red Robin issues #1-5. In the aftermath of Final Crisis Gotham City sees the beginning of a new Batman and Robin. But the former Robin, Tim Drake, isn't ready to move on. Instead he embraces a tarnished alter ego and sets out on a quest that will require a steady stream of compromised ideals. But he won't give up, because he's the only one who doesn't believe Bruce Wayne is dead. Time Drake has always been a favorite of mine and he really got a chance to shine given a new direction in this solo series. Scenes alternate between his current travels and flashbacks showing his departure from Gotham, nicely explaining the current status quo and adding depth to the story while keeping the action high and the pace quick. A major Batman villain gets involved and several hard choices await the new Red Robin. It helps to have some prior knowledge of the Bat-universe and the happenings at the time this series started, but Yost does a good job of filling in enough to keep new readers from being too lost. Overall a fantastic start for Tim's solo adventures that I'm enjoying just as much on subsequent reads.

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