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Gum. It's been around for centuries; from the ancient Greeks to the American Indians, everyone's chewed it. But the best kind of gum; bubble gum! wasn't invented until 1928, when an enterprising young accountant at Fleer Gum and Candy used his spare time to experiment with different recipes. Bubble-blowing kids everywhere will be delighted with Megan McCarthy's entertainin Gum. It's been around for centuries; from the ancient Greeks to the American Indians, everyone's chewed it. But the best kind of gum; bubble gum! wasn't invented until 1928, when an enterprising young accountant at Fleer Gum and Candy used his spare time to experiment with different recipes. Bubble-blowing kids everywhere will be delighted with Megan McCarthy's entertaining pictures and engaging fun facts as they learn the history behind the pink perfection of Dubble Bubble.


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Gum. It's been around for centuries; from the ancient Greeks to the American Indians, everyone's chewed it. But the best kind of gum; bubble gum! wasn't invented until 1928, when an enterprising young accountant at Fleer Gum and Candy used his spare time to experiment with different recipes. Bubble-blowing kids everywhere will be delighted with Megan McCarthy's entertainin Gum. It's been around for centuries; from the ancient Greeks to the American Indians, everyone's chewed it. But the best kind of gum; bubble gum! wasn't invented until 1928, when an enterprising young accountant at Fleer Gum and Candy used his spare time to experiment with different recipes. Bubble-blowing kids everywhere will be delighted with Megan McCarthy's entertaining pictures and engaging fun facts as they learn the history behind the pink perfection of Dubble Bubble.

30 review for Pop!: The Invention of Bubble Gum

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lisa (not getting friends updates) Vegan

    This is a terrific idea for a children’s picture book history book; it’s definitely a fun subject for kids. The story of how bubble gum was created is interesting and shows a bit of the history, science, math, business, and a lot about serendipity around the creation of bubble gum and of gum in general. The invention of bubble gum is a good example of how experimentation is often part of new discoveries. The illustrations feel very 1920s and since bubble gum was discovered in the late 20s that i This is a terrific idea for a children’s picture book history book; it’s definitely a fun subject for kids. The story of how bubble gum was created is interesting and shows a bit of the history, science, math, business, and a lot about serendipity around the creation of bubble gum and of gum in general. The invention of bubble gum is a good example of how experimentation is often part of new discoveries. The illustrations feel very 1920s and since bubble gum was discovered in the late 20s that is apropos. All the pictures of gum, bubbles and the gum itself, especially the gumballs, are wonderful. I love how everyone in the gum & candy factory looks happy. The story in the main part of the book is very short but full of information despite its brevity. I was interested in it, but especially glad for the extras in the back of the book. They gave some what I thought was needed depth to the account. Included there is a mini biography about what happened to the man who figured out how to make a gum which could form bubbles when chewed, a bunch of fun facts about gum, and a lists of books and articles than contain quotes used as a part of this book’s story. And, I learned why traditional bubble gum is pink!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    This is a fun picture book that outlines the creation of bubble gum. People had been chewing on various materials for thousands of years, but it wasn't until Walter Diemer concocted a recipe for dubble bubble that bubble gum was born in 1928. It's a product that most children (and even adults) enjoy, so this is a nonfiction book that many children would be interested in reading. The narrative is written in an understandable and not overly detailed way, providing just enough information without b This is a fun picture book that outlines the creation of bubble gum. People had been chewing on various materials for thousands of years, but it wasn't until Walter Diemer concocted a recipe for dubble bubble that bubble gum was born in 1928. It's a product that most children (and even adults) enjoy, so this is a nonfiction book that many children would be interested in reading. The narrative is written in an understandable and not overly detailed way, providing just enough information without being boring or overwhelming. And the illustrations are comic and colorful. The additional biographical data about Mr. Diemer as well as the facts about gum in the back of the book provide additional information on this fun sweet. We really enjoyed reading this book together. This book was featured as one of the selections for the November 2011 Inventors-themed reads for the Picture-Book Club in the Children's Books Group here at Goodreads.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    What fun! After loving McCarthy's Astronaut Handbook I was delighted to discover her latest book featuring that most delightful of creations, bubble gum. This is the story of the man who invented bubble gum in the 1920s and how it saved a company and brightened children's lives. It also shows the history of chewing gum. The story itself was maybe four stars of me, but I really fell in love with the Author's Note, which is full of charming, humorous and fascinating tidbits about bubble gum and re What fun! After loving McCarthy's Astronaut Handbook I was delighted to discover her latest book featuring that most delightful of creations, bubble gum. This is the story of the man who invented bubble gum in the 1920s and how it saved a company and brightened children's lives. It also shows the history of chewing gum. The story itself was maybe four stars of me, but I really fell in love with the Author's Note, which is full of charming, humorous and fascinating tidbits about bubble gum and related insights into culture and history. So, the overall product, five stars! I don't think it's as strong as Astronaut Handbook but if you or your kids enjoy bubble gum or the history of the 1920s then "pop" on over to your library and check out this book ;-) --Sorry for the cheesy pun, but this book just makes me feel like a giggling little kid! --

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    Picture-book author/artist Meghan McCarthy, whose non-fiction selections for the younger set include such titles as Astronaut Handbook and City Hawk: The Story of Pale Male , turns her attention here to the invention of that childhood favorite, bubble gum! Emphasizing that gum itself dates back to the ancients - the classical Greeks liked to chew the sap of the mastic tree - McCarthy focuses her story on the Fleer candy factory, in 1920s Philadelphia, where accountant Walter Diemer became Picture-book author/artist Meghan McCarthy, whose non-fiction selections for the younger set include such titles as Astronaut Handbook and City Hawk: The Story of Pale Male , turns her attention here to the invention of that childhood favorite, bubble gum! Emphasizing that gum itself dates back to the ancients - the classical Greeks liked to chew the sap of the mastic tree - McCarthy focuses her story on the Fleer candy factory, in 1920s Philadelphia, where accountant Walter Diemer became involved (almost by accident) in the effort to come up with a gum that could be blown into bubbles. Persisting, long after everyone else had given up, Diemer eventually hit on the right formula, and Pop!, bubble-gum was born... I hope this admission won't get me kicked out of the candy-loving crowd, but I actually am not that fond of bubble-gum (never have been!), and I loathe the ubiquitous black stains that gum leaves on sidewalks, when carelessly tossed aside. That said, I'm glad that Pop!: The Invention of Bubble Gum was chosen as one of our November selections, over in the Picture-Book Club to which I belong, where our theme this month in "Invention," because the story here really emphasizes the importance of perseverance. I also really liked the message, communicated in Diener's statement about giving pleasure to children, that money isn't always the most important factor, when it comes to the invention of new things. With McCarthy's trademark illustrations - her googly-eyed characters, while not really my style, aesthetically speaking, have been slowly growing on me, to the point that I am becoming fond of them - a simple but engaging story, and an informative afterword, this is one picture-book that I would recommend even to kids who don't normally enjoy non-fiction. And to young bubble-gum lovers, of course!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    This is the only book I’ve ever seen on the invention of bubble gum, so I’m glad McCarthy chose to write about it. Invented by a man named Walter Diemer, what I want to know is this: whatever made him think of blowing bubbles with chewing gum? Did he try it himself with regular chewing gum and think maybe he could improve it? Did some kid give him the idea? Who knew that gum could be so interesting? I didn’t know that chewing gum was thought to have medicinal purposes (treating stomach aches). I This is the only book I’ve ever seen on the invention of bubble gum, so I’m glad McCarthy chose to write about it. Invented by a man named Walter Diemer, what I want to know is this: whatever made him think of blowing bubbles with chewing gum? Did he try it himself with regular chewing gum and think maybe he could improve it? Did some kid give him the idea? Who knew that gum could be so interesting? I didn’t know that chewing gum was thought to have medicinal purposes (treating stomach aches). I have chewed spruce gum, which the Native Americans used. I like the way it leaves your mouth feeling fresh, and wish it were more available. I enjoyed the additional information McCarthy provides at the end of the book about Diemer and about gum. Scientists are working on gum that doesn’t stick! The oldest wad of chewed tree gum dates back some 9,000 years. I could have done without the picture of Post Alley in Seattle, onto which people have been pasting their chewed wads of gum for over 10 years. Ewwww!! Between McCarthy’s appealing illustrations (love those side smiles on her people) and the topic, I know kids will love this book. Highly recommended, preferably read while chewing a large wad of bubble gum.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marjorie Ingall

    First off, Maxine (age 5) LOVES this book. She's wanted to hear it every night, twice, for the last week and a half. We both know it by heart. I think I reviewed Meghan McCarthy's Seabiscuit on goodreads -- McCarthy has a way of drawing faces that's so funny and endearing. And I love that she's made a name for herself in non-fiction picture books -- Max also loved her Astronaut Handbook (about what astronaut training is like) and Josie really liked her book about the War of the Worlds radio broa First off, Maxine (age 5) LOVES this book. She's wanted to hear it every night, twice, for the last week and a half. We both know it by heart. I think I reviewed Meghan McCarthy's Seabiscuit on goodreads -- McCarthy has a way of drawing faces that's so funny and endearing. And I love that she's made a name for herself in non-fiction picture books -- Max also loved her Astronaut Handbook (about what astronaut training is like) and Josie really liked her book about the War of the Worlds radio broadcast. Some kids really like "true" books, and it's great to have a go-to author for the youngest narrative non-fiction fans. AND I like that McCarthy's books have a section of additional info, facts and resources in the back. Maxie loves to have THAT read aloud to her too, a true testament to her engagement. The only thing I found a little frustrating in Pop is that she never says what's IN bubble gum. We follow Walter Diemer's efforts to perfect his recipe, but we never learn what he's DOING or what he's changing over time. What's in the friggin' mixer??

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I think this would be a fascinating topic for children (I'm sure I would have loved to learn about the invention of bubble gum when I was young!). -note this is not about the invention of gum, but *bubble* gum. Though we do get a quick history of how long gum has been around for- I found the story interesting, especially the fact that the inventor wasn't even in R&D and that he kept going when everyone else had given up (there's a great message - though nice and subtly written). However, the whole I think this would be a fascinating topic for children (I'm sure I would have loved to learn about the invention of bubble gum when I was young!). -note this is not about the invention of gum, but *bubble* gum. Though we do get a quick history of how long gum has been around for- I found the story interesting, especially the fact that the inventor wasn't even in R&D and that he kept going when everyone else had given up (there's a great message - though nice and subtly written). However, the whole book left me wanting more. I wanted to know exactly what made the recipe finally work, but apparently it's a secret (which, isn't the author's fault, of course), but there were so many details that I felt were glossed over that I really think could have made this more intriguing for children. That said, there's some good information in the back matter which helps to fill in some of the gaps. But, ultimately if felt more like a biography instead of an insight into bubble gum. So, all in all, if it's a topic that interests you or your child, go for it! But, compared side by side, I much preferred Mccarthy's other book: Astronaut Handbook.

  8. 5 out of 5

    David

    Pop!: The Invention of Bubble Gum by Meghan Mccarthy tells of the invention of bubble gum by accountant Walter Diemer in Philadelphia in the late 1920's. The text in the main part of the book is in a large font that is in a contrasting color to the background. The text should be appealing to young readers. At the end of the book is information on the inventor, fascinating facts about gum, and a bibliography of material that was quoted. The cartoon-like illustrations should appeal to many children, Pop!: The Invention of Bubble Gum by Meghan Mccarthy tells of the invention of bubble gum by accountant Walter Diemer in Philadelphia in the late 1920's. The text in the main part of the book is in a large font that is in a contrasting color to the background. The text should be appealing to young readers. At the end of the book is information on the inventor, fascinating facts about gum, and a bibliography of material that was quoted. The cartoon-like illustrations should appeal to many children, featuring wide-eyed characters with the emphasis on Walter Diemer. This interesting story of the invention of bubble gum contains many intruiging details, yet should be a good choice for reluctant readers, with few sentences per pages plus the cartoon illustrations. This tale of an unlikely inventor and an invention of interest to kids - bubble gum - should attract readers, particularly with tidbits such as the explanation for why bubble gum is pink. I recommend this book for school and public library collections. For ages 4 to 8, inventions, bubble gum, and fans of Meghan Mccarthy.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dianna

    My four-year-old son and I enjoyed reading this book about the invention of bubble gum—not gum, mind you—bubble gum. I especially liked the engaging illustrations, and I liked that it was just the right amount of text—just enough to tell the story well, but not so much that you get bogged down reading it aloud.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Phoebe Fisher

    I chose this book because I thought it would be interesting and a fun read for kids. Prior to reading the book I had no knowledge of how bubble gum was invented. Though this book is informational it does not have the typical elements of an informational book and is written like a traditional children’s book. The book definitely made me want to learn more about the making of bubble gum because there was not a lot of in depth information about it, more of a broad summary. I might use this text in I chose this book because I thought it would be interesting and a fun read for kids. Prior to reading the book I had no knowledge of how bubble gum was invented. Though this book is informational it does not have the typical elements of an informational book and is written like a traditional children’s book. The book definitely made me want to learn more about the making of bubble gum because there was not a lot of in depth information about it, more of a broad summary. I might use this text in my classroom because it is still informational and can be a fun read for students. I am giving this book a 4 instead of a 5 because it did not teach as much as I was expecting.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Codi Rinehart

    This non-fiction story is definitely a book that children would love to read! Who doesn't want to learn about bubble gum and how it was made and how it has evolved through time? I know I do, everyone loves bubblegum! This is a great read for children in 2nd grade. It is an information picture book that is really intriguing. This story talks about the invention of bubble gum and how it went from being just something that people chewed on in the 1920s to something that can be blown into bubbles. I This non-fiction story is definitely a book that children would love to read! Who doesn't want to learn about bubble gum and how it was made and how it has evolved through time? I know I do, everyone loves bubblegum! This is a great read for children in 2nd grade. It is an information picture book that is really intriguing. This story talks about the invention of bubble gum and how it went from being just something that people chewed on in the 1920s to something that can be blown into bubbles. It talks about how the people in the factory worked hard to make bubble gum what it is today and how the accountant for the factory was actually the one who helped make the gum into 'bubble gum' by doing many experiments to perfect the batch! This story would be great to talk about inventions and experiments. It could tie into a science lesson where the children were learning about experiments and what goes into doing different experiments. This book would also be good to tie into a lesson about effort and having a growth mindset, about never giving up if things don't go as originally planned. This book does a great job showing how persistence and hard work pays off in the end; in this example bubble gum is finally perfected and is now being sold to this day.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Beagle

    Pop!: The Invention of Bubble Gum, is a narrative-nonfiction text recommended to me by the narrative-nonfiction class pinterest board. This book is a picture book that offers a unique perspective on the history of bubble gum, and how it was invented. It shows what it was original used for in an interesting way. This book will keep students interested, by telling them how one of their favorite candies was invented.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karthika

    Much fun! I love the tone and visuals of the book. It's light-hearted and easy to read. I wish it could have listed the one key ingredient that Walter used to make his version of gum that worked: the most important one of them all. This book is a good, fun approach to non-fiction, nonetheless. Much fun! I love the tone and visuals of the book. It's light-hearted and easy to read. I wish it could have listed the one key ingredient that Walter used to make his version of gum that worked: the most important one of them all. This book is a good, fun approach to non-fiction, nonetheless.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gail Cooke

    Author/artist Meghan McCarthy used bold acrylic paints to illustrate her informative story of bubble gum. While kids love what is often a pink square of gum used to chew, blow and pop bubbles, very few mw know its history. Now, thanks to McCarthy they can learn how difficult it was to invent. Our story begins in a factory owned by the Fleer family during the 1920s. This family made large quantities of gum and candy. One employee was Walter Diemer, an accountant who could easily balance a budget Author/artist Meghan McCarthy used bold acrylic paints to illustrate her informative story of bubble gum. While kids love what is often a pink square of gum used to chew, blow and pop bubbles, very few mw know its history. Now, thanks to McCarthy they can learn how difficult it was to invent. Our story begins in a factory owned by the Fleer family during the 1920s. This family made large quantities of gum and candy. One employee was Walter Diemer, an accountant who could easily balance a budget but knew very little about gum. As time passed the office next door to Diemer's became a laboratory occupied by technicians trying to make a new gum. The thought was that gum wasn't really very exciting, "But what if gum chewers could blow bubbles? Now that would be something - a world full of bubble gum blowers!" The technicians didn't have much luck and Fleer was about to give up his idea when Walter was asked to watch a kettle holding a gum experiment. Well, Walter became fascinated - he didn't know what he was doing but he spent a great deal of time "playing with different mixtures." You guessed it - he finally found a mixture that bubbled and popped! POP! THE INVENTION OF BUBBLE GUM also includes a history of chewables, a bio of Walter Diemer, and facts about gum. For instance, who chewed the most gum in 2006? Kids? No! College educated women in their thirties. Young readers can certainly relate to this book's subject and may well enjoy knowing how one of their favorite treats came to be. - Gail Cooke

  15. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Austin

    1) Book summary, in your own words (3 pts) -This book is about exactly what the title suggests, the invention of bubble gum! Kids LOVE gum. But where did gum come from? How is it made? These are all questions this book answers. The illustrations in the book are certain to capture the reader's attention. 2) Grade level, interest level, lexile (1 pt) -2nd grade 3) Appropriate classroom use (subject area) (1 pt) -Entertainment 4) Individual students who might benefit from reading (1 pt) -Students who love 1) Book summary, in your own words (3 pts) -This book is about exactly what the title suggests, the invention of bubble gum! Kids LOVE gum. But where did gum come from? How is it made? These are all questions this book answers. The illustrations in the book are certain to capture the reader's attention. 2) Grade level, interest level, lexile (1 pt) -2nd grade 3) Appropriate classroom use (subject area) (1 pt) -Entertainment 4) Individual students who might benefit from reading (1 pt) -Students who love to know how things are made -Students that love gum -Students with a curious nature 5) Small group use (literaturecircles) (1 pt) -I would have students read through the book in groups and pick out 3 things they found that surprised them 6) Whole class use (read aloud) (1 pt) -I would carpet read to the class. Then give them an assignment where they had to create their own bubble gum recipe with the ingredients that I provided them. I would let the students make their recipe and see who could come up with the best recipe. This could, though it would be a stretch, tie in with science. I could also use it to practice reading comprehension to see who could remember the steps of making gum. 7) Related books in genre/subject or content area (1 pt) -The Gum Chewing Rattler 8) Multimedia connections (audio book, movie) available (1 pt) -Audiobook available.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Marcos

    Pop!: The Invention of Bubble Gum is a great non-fiction book that is sure to delight any young reader. The story of an accountant turn bubble gum inventor. The illustrations are fun and the cover is charming with all those bubble gum chewers. I enjoy reading picture books that include more in depth history at the end of the story. I think I may have enjoyed reading this part more than the actual story itself. I am from WA state so seeing the picture of Post Alley in Pike's Place Market in Seatt Pop!: The Invention of Bubble Gum is a great non-fiction book that is sure to delight any young reader. The story of an accountant turn bubble gum inventor. The illustrations are fun and the cover is charming with all those bubble gum chewers. I enjoy reading picture books that include more in depth history at the end of the story. I think I may have enjoyed reading this part more than the actual story itself. I am from WA state so seeing the picture of Post Alley in Pike's Place Market in Seattle made it that more interesting. People have been making gum deposits on the walls since the early 90's. Another excellent choice of the Children's Picture Book Club November theme, Inventors, found here: http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/6...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Julie Feldman

    Fiction "Twin Text": Trouble Gum, Mathew Cordell, 2009 Rationale: In Meghan McCarthy's Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum readers learn a simple version of how bubble gum was first invented and sold. With the story Trouble Gum, readers see how bubble gum can be fun to have, and what trouble it can cause. Together the books relate to the experience of blowing a bubble. Trouble Gum extends the non-fiction selection by showing readers examples of how bubble gum can be used for fun. Text Structure: Chro Fiction "Twin Text": Trouble Gum, Mathew Cordell, 2009 Rationale: In Meghan McCarthy's Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum readers learn a simple version of how bubble gum was first invented and sold. With the story Trouble Gum, readers see how bubble gum can be fun to have, and what trouble it can cause. Together the books relate to the experience of blowing a bubble. Trouble Gum extends the non-fiction selection by showing readers examples of how bubble gum can be used for fun. Text Structure: Chronological Sequence Strategy Application: Venn Diagram - Students will compare and contrast how gum was used or created after reading both texts. Review Citation: (2009, August 10). Horn Book Guide. http://www.booksinprint.com.leo.lib.u...#

  18. 5 out of 5

    Donalyn

    A devoted gum chewer, I enjoyed this book about the history of bubble gum. Human beings have chewed gums and resins for centuries, but the development of bubble gum didn't occur until the early 20th Century. Readers will learn how Dubble Bubble, the first bubble gum was invented. Round, brightly-colored illustrations and bubbles decorate the pages evoking the shapes and colors of our favorite gum. The back of the book contains additional facts about gum and resources. A devoted gum chewer, I enjoyed this book about the history of bubble gum. Human beings have chewed gums and resins for centuries, but the development of bubble gum didn't occur until the early 20th Century. Readers will learn how Dubble Bubble, the first bubble gum was invented. Round, brightly-colored illustrations and bubbles decorate the pages evoking the shapes and colors of our favorite gum. The back of the book contains additional facts about gum and resources.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Randie D. Camp, M.S.

    McCarthy’s fun informational book on Walter Diemer and his determination to invent bubble gum is sure to hold the interest of young readers. They will be able to relate to having ideas that do not seem to work and will hopefully learn that determination is key to success. Typically, we tend to focus on a handful of inventors and so many creative people, like Diemer, go unnoticed; this book breaks that cycle. I will be looking forward to McCarthy’s future works.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    This book was listed as the School Library Journal's Best Nonfiction Books in 2010. This book is geared towards boys and girls in kindergarten through second grade. It is appealing due to its story of how bubble gum was created and its colorful illustrations. It is a very cute story that most bubble gum blowers would enjoy learning about. This book was listed as the School Library Journal's Best Nonfiction Books in 2010. This book is geared towards boys and girls in kindergarten through second grade. It is appealing due to its story of how bubble gum was created and its colorful illustrations. It is a very cute story that most bubble gum blowers would enjoy learning about.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Jackson

    I found this book to be so entertaining! I loved learning all of the the crazy fun facts about gum. Who knew that it has been around in various forms for centuries! This book was great, and I feel that the most approriate audience for this book would be elementary school aged students; however, as an adult, I found it to be a great read as well.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Roberts

    Interesting history of the invention of Double Bubble and biography of the inventor. Comically illustrated. Written in an engaging style. Fun facts.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    This book manages to serve a few tasks.  For one, it introduces its readers (not all of whom are likely to be young, although many of them will be) to the invention of bubble gum, and for another it manages to provide the context of chewing gum and the trial and error process of scientific experimentation.  The book also provides something of a corporate history that demonstrates the importance of product development for the survival of at least some kinds of companies.  I am reminded of the res This book manages to serve a few tasks.  For one, it introduces its readers (not all of whom are likely to be young, although many of them will be) to the invention of bubble gum, and for another it manages to provide the context of chewing gum and the trial and error process of scientific experimentation.  The book also provides something of a corporate history that demonstrates the importance of product development for the survival of at least some kinds of companies.  I am reminded of the response of people when the company that made Twinkies went out of business and there was a rush for some people to hoard the snack until the recipe and trademark for that particular snack was sold to another company.  The same sort of thing happened to Double Bubble, the original bubble gum, a fact which is alluded to in this book, which merely states that the invention of bubble gum allowed the Fleer company to stay in business for another 70 years or so after its invention, implying that the company was no longer a going concern.  As it happens, Tootsie Roll owns the rights to Double Bubble, which is still going strong and still an enjoyable bubble gum. This book, though, is less a corporate history than a look at how a mild-mannered accountant become a noted inventor.  Our story begins with a family owned business named Fleer that is having some financial trouble but which makes candy and chewing gum in the Philadelphia area.  The chance arrival of a research lab next to Walter Diemer's office and his own curiosity lead him over the course of a few months to first create a bubble gum that works but quickly gets too hard and then, with the addition of some secret ingredients and pink food coloring, becomes a massively popular item that instantly makes the company far more profitable.  The author demonstrates how Diemer did not become wealthy off of his invention, because he did it for the company, but managed to parlay his creative genius into a position as an executive within the company who likely had little financial trouble despite the loss of intellectual property rights for working within a company.  The book ends with a discussion of the historical sources and context of chewing gum and bubble gum, the former of which has a history which goes back deep into ancient history. There are at least a few obvious lessons that a young (or not-so-young) reader can take from this drawing, which is gorgeously drawn as the author manages to do in general.  For one, the author realistically portrays creativity as involving a lot of hard work and experimentation.  For another, the author portrays creativity as something that is within the reach of anyone who has sufficient persistence and imagination, something that will likely encourage many people who are not necessarily thought of as being creative.  After all, financial bean counters are not viewed as creative types, and yet a young accountant invented bubble gum.  If he can do that, then certainly such creativity can be found among others.  We are often all too quick to take for granted people who work in jobs that we consider boring and fail to consider just how inventive and creative as people they may be, and that is a lesson this book seeks to counteract.  The author also demonstrates that successful creativity can be the difference between a company's survival and failure, a reminder of the high-stakes nature of research and development in the corporate world.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lily

    “Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum”, written and illustrated by Meghan McCarthy, relays the story of how bubble gum was invented, just as the title implies. The text begins by establishing its setting: a factory, owned by the Fleer family, on a small street in Philadelphia, during the 1920s. A lot of gum (not bubble gum) and candy was made in this factory. One of the factory’s workers was Walter Diemer, a young accountant. Walter’s office was right next to the factory’s laboratory, in which the c “Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum”, written and illustrated by Meghan McCarthy, relays the story of how bubble gum was invented, just as the title implies. The text begins by establishing its setting: a factory, owned by the Fleer family, on a small street in Philadelphia, during the 1920s. A lot of gum (not bubble gum) and candy was made in this factory. One of the factory’s workers was Walter Diemer, a young accountant. Walter’s office was right next to the factory’s laboratory, in which the company was attempting to re-invent gum. After a long time of no progress, Walter decided that he would try-out some experiments of his own, in an attempt to create a revolutionary type of chewing gum. Walter went through many trials and had achieved many half successes, but eventually, in 1928, Walter finally succeeded in creating the bubble gum that is so popular today. The resolution of “Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum” details what happened to Walter and his bubble gum after it was distributed to the population. Initially, what stood out the most to me about “Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum” were the cartoon-like illustrations. I felt that it was very clever of Meghan McCarthy to illustrate her book with cartoons because cartoon images have a lot of appeal with younger readers. This appeal is necessary to draw in kids who may be reluctant to reading informational texts, which they may feel are boring and less exciting than other picturebooks. However, the vibrant and lively illustrations of “Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum” are able to remain eye-catching and anything but boring, while still allowing the text to convey accurate information. Overall, I found this book to be exciting and informational at the same, therefore, I would highly recommend it to others. Two elements of “Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum” that helped to create deeper meaning in the picturebook were the use of chronological order and a closed ending. The chronological structure of the text is able to convey that the invention of bubble gum was something that took time to carry-out and needed to be perfected. Furthermore, the closed ending of the story is great because it allows readers to take a glimpse into the life of Walter Diemer after he created something that people treasure so much. The nicely-tied ending of the story allows readers to know that Walter never profited a lot from his invention of bubble gum, but he was simply happy to have made others happy with his invention of a new treat; therefore, leaving readers with no unresolved questions.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Reagan Murphy

    Bubble gum is something everyone has heard of, and most everyone has tried; but how many people know how bubble gum was actually created? Pop!: The Invention of Bubble Gum is a nonfiction text that explains how the fun, chewy treat was made. Just as it takes a lot of hard work and perseverance to blow the perfect bubble gum bubble, it took Walter Diemer a lot of hard work and perseverance to create the delicious treat. I would recommend Pop!: The Invention of Bubble Gum as a read aloud for studen Bubble gum is something everyone has heard of, and most everyone has tried; but how many people know how bubble gum was actually created? Pop!: The Invention of Bubble Gum is a nonfiction text that explains how the fun, chewy treat was made. Just as it takes a lot of hard work and perseverance to blow the perfect bubble gum bubble, it took Walter Diemer a lot of hard work and perseverance to create the delicious treat. I would recommend Pop!: The Invention of Bubble Gum as a read aloud for students in grades K-8. This unique book is very engaging, as most children do not know who created bubble gum, even though many of them chew it very often! This text follows Walter Diemer, an accountant, as he works to create bubble gum. Walter failed many times before he was able to successfully create the yummy treat. I think teachers could use this book to illustrate the lesson of never giving up. If Walter Diemer had given up after the first time of failing, or even after the second time, the renowned candy, bubble gum, wouldn't even exist! This book allows students to see that it is acceptable to make mistakes and to see the amazing things that can come if one keeps trying. This book was a WOW book for me because it is a very unique text, but also very relevant to many children. This book explains the process in which bubble gum was created. The creation of bubble gum was never something I was curious about; however, after reading the title of this text, I immediately became intrigued! I think this text will have the same affect on young students. I also love the lesson that readers can learn from Walter Diemer. Diemer was someone who was a determined and worked hard to reach his goal. Even after failing several times, he kept trying. His perseverance and hard work eventually paid off; his name goes down in history as the man who created bubble gum. I think young students can learn a lot from Diemers example. They can learn that mistakes are going to happen and that is all right. They can learn that hard work and perseverance can turn into something great. I think students will learn from the lesson taught in in this book, as well as enjoy every minute of learning about the creation of bubble gum.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Samantha N

    1. Pennsylvania Young Reader's Choice Award 2. Ist- 3rd Grade 3. Pop! The invention of Bubble Gum is a nonfiction picture book about the invention of bubble gum based on the real events of Walter Diemer. During the 1920’s the Fleer company put a lab in their Philadelphia candy factory to work on a top secret invention. This narrative takes readers on an adventure of exploration of recipes.In a whimsical manner this story displays the perseverance of Walter Diemer and the creation of his ingenious 1. Pennsylvania Young Reader's Choice Award 2. Ist- 3rd Grade 3. Pop! The invention of Bubble Gum is a nonfiction picture book about the invention of bubble gum based on the real events of Walter Diemer. During the 1920’s the Fleer company put a lab in their Philadelphia candy factory to work on a top secret invention. This narrative takes readers on an adventure of exploration of recipes.In a whimsical manner this story displays the perseverance of Walter Diemer and the creation of his ingenious invention.Students will enjoy the brilliantly hued pictures about the history of gum and the interpretations from past centuries. This playful book will have your students entertained as they learn new facts about bubble gum through these engaging illustrations. 4.This book is a wonderful pictorial about new discoveries. The outlined creation of bubble gum will be a influential addition to a nonfiction classroom library for primary grades. Used in a read- aloud children will learn the process of the scientific method. Teachers can use this material to begin an open ended discussion about the content of the book. Asking some probing questions about the main points of the book will engage student involvement. 5.Pop!The Invention of Bubble Gum Themed lessons: Bubble blowing contest (1st- 3rd Grade)- After the read aloud have students participate in a fun experiment of bubble blowing. Provide students with five different brands of gum. In a whole group have students create a hypothesis. After have them taste and blow bubbles to see which gum has the most elasticity. Create a chart of students observations for a shared discussion after the experiment. Writers Workshop(1st- 3rd grade)- After reading the books have students engage in a writers workshop to create their own experiments. Remind students that the key to a good experiment is a detailed plan of execution. Have students provide a picture of their project plans when the summary is completed.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlin Schraeder

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book fits under the genre non-fiction because it is the real story of how bubble gum was invented. This book is about a man, Walter Dimer, who was an accountant for a factory that produced chewing gum and candy. While he was working, there was a laboratory next to his office that was coming about. He asked what they were trying to make and it was bubble gum. The factory wanted to try to make gum that could blow bubbles. Over time they could never get it right but one day one of the workers This book fits under the genre non-fiction because it is the real story of how bubble gum was invented. This book is about a man, Walter Dimer, who was an accountant for a factory that produced chewing gum and candy. While he was working, there was a laboratory next to his office that was coming about. He asked what they were trying to make and it was bubble gum. The factory wanted to try to make gum that could blow bubbles. Over time they could never get it right but one day one of the workers asked Walter to watch something quick while they had to run and do something and Walter became very interested in the gum making. Over time the workers gave up but Walter decided he wanted to get it. Eventually Walter figured out how to make bubble gum and had other workers test it out. On the first try it got hard too quick then he kept trying and finally got it down. He went and sold a few samples at a little corner store and it sold immediately. Eventually it was being sold by truck loads everywhere. Walter became the president of the company then retired but never became rich because of his invention but he was okay with that because he made kids happy around the world. I liked this book because it was a cute little story of the invention of bubble gum. The illustrations were simple yet detailed and went with the story very well. In the back of the book are a lot of cool facts about gum which I think anyone would love to read. I would recommend this book to anyone because I bet not a lot of people know how bubble gum was invented and it’s a cute easy read for kids as well.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Kues

    Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum follows Walter Diemer, an accountant for a chewing gum company, as he tries to create a new type of gum. He accidentally formed a gum that could blow bubbles, but was hard the next day. After more experimentation, he finally found the perfect formula, and Dubble Bubble gum was invented! He taught others how to blow bubbles as he sold his candy in local drugstores. The book provides additional information about types of gum, and chewing it, as well as other facts Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum follows Walter Diemer, an accountant for a chewing gum company, as he tries to create a new type of gum. He accidentally formed a gum that could blow bubbles, but was hard the next day. After more experimentation, he finally found the perfect formula, and Dubble Bubble gum was invented! He taught others how to blow bubbles as he sold his candy in local drugstores. The book provides additional information about types of gum, and chewing it, as well as other facts about the history of gum. This informational text is a WOW book because it presents what students would typically think of as boring information, in a fun way. Almost all students chew gum, and this book provides just enough information without being overwhelming or boring for younger students. It shows readers that failure is often a part of success, and that making something cool is not the only thing to consider when inventing or creating something. This book can be used in elementary classrooms to teach sequencing, main idea, or just as a read aloud. Students would be able to understand it easily and teachers can integrate science by testing various brands of bubble gum to see which made the biggest bubbles, or which stayed chewy the longest.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Haught

    Summary: This non-fiction book called "Pop!" tells the story of a man named Walter Deiemer, the man who invented Bubblegum. This book goes through the process of Walter making and figuring out how gum works. It also gives background to how gum was made in earlier centuries and how other people used to chew gum before they could blow bubbles. Walter tries and tries to make the gum with bubbles and eventually adds some flavor and color to his new invention. Analysis: I really enjoyed reading this sto Summary: This non-fiction book called "Pop!" tells the story of a man named Walter Deiemer, the man who invented Bubblegum. This book goes through the process of Walter making and figuring out how gum works. It also gives background to how gum was made in earlier centuries and how other people used to chew gum before they could blow bubbles. Walter tries and tries to make the gum with bubbles and eventually adds some flavor and color to his new invention. Analysis: I really enjoyed reading this story. This non-fiction book taught me something I did not know before and it incorporated pictures and words that are normally found in a fiction book. The illustrations were interesting to look at, and the story was overall fun to read. How I can use this book: I am not exactly sure how I could use this book in my classroom, but it is definitely an interesting read. Perhaps in a science lesson I could talk about the importance of trying even though you might fail. Time and time again we see important scientists and inventors who failed many times before eventually getting to the solution that they needed. It is always important for children to know that it is okay to not be successful every time.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nea

    Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum is a non fiction book for ages four to eight years old. Summary: The story tells of Walter Diemer and working for the Fleer factory and his invention of bubble gum! Evaluation: Pop! captured the reader primarily based on its title. Bubble gum for kids has always been exciting even for me as an adult. I love popping and blowing big bubbles. This story teaches of hard work. Walter tried and tried and tried again before he finally got it. Walter never got rich or to Pop! The Invention of Bubble Gum is a non fiction book for ages four to eight years old. Summary: The story tells of Walter Diemer and working for the Fleer factory and his invention of bubble gum! Evaluation: Pop! captured the reader primarily based on its title. Bubble gum for kids has always been exciting even for me as an adult. I love popping and blowing big bubbles. This story teaches of hard work. Walter tried and tried and tried again before he finally got it. Walter never got rich or too famous for what he did but it brought him happiness to know that he accomplished something and did something with his life. He was happy with the little things and being able to make children smile. They use really simple language for children to easily understand. The illustrations are bright and colorful with pinks and green and blues. The illustration reminds you of like a portrait painting. I think the main reason why the book is so effective is because the subject matter and how the subject matter is so relatable to children even now because the bubble gum industry has grown so much.

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