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The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors

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A collection of 25 essays examining the neuroses of white supremacy.


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A collection of 25 essays examining the neuroses of white supremacy.

30 review for The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors

  1. 4 out of 5

    Eden Adele

    I first read this when I was in college (in the '80s) and I've been fascinated by it ever since. I appreciate her psychiatric approach to tying together the relevance of symbols that are seemingly unrelated. I'm doing it no justice in my explanation, but in actually reading the book - the concept makes much sense. If you're open to thinking of things in ways you probably never did before, this is a great book for you.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Senien Hicks

    I Loved It. I still use it to decode unconscious behavior of our race to this day.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cwn_annwn_13

    This woman is a fringe kook but I have no doubt that mainstream psychiatry has plans to first classify any "racist" feelings among whites as a disorder and eventually even acknowledging that there is such a thing as race. This book also goes a long way to prove what I often say that people who work in the mental health field are quite often mentally unstable themself. The main point Welsing tries to get across in this point is that so called white racism is the result of an concious and subconci This woman is a fringe kook but I have no doubt that mainstream psychiatry has plans to first classify any "racist" feelings among whites as a disorder and eventually even acknowledging that there is such a thing as race. This book also goes a long way to prove what I often say that people who work in the mental health field are quite often mentally unstable themself. The main point Welsing tries to get across in this point is that so called white racism is the result of an concious and subconcious fear of whites that they will be "geneticly annihilated" through race mixing. I would agree with her that this is, and should be, a fear among the remaining sane portion of the white race. But along with this basic thesis, which I believe has some basis she mixes in some completely wacked out anti-white claims that are so screwy its unintentionally funny. Her ideas about sports and balls are particuarly funny with her ramblings about smashing and hitting white balls. There are all kinds of weird sexual interpretations of white behavior in The Isis Papers. She sees white penis everywhere, missiles, architecture, household appliances. She's really obsessed. My own Freudian analysis of Welsing tells me that she is sexually frustrated and would like to be a black dominatrix degrading white males or kicking white guys in the nuts but also feels a conflicting desire to be ravaged and dominated by a white man with a large penis. Welsing also claims that whites subconciously want to be black and gives examples like white hippies being dirty is an attempt to make their skin black and she states that whites like to rub fecal matter on themselves as a way to have brown skin! Not surprisingly she also states right off the bat that the title and idea for the book came from a patient of hers in a Washington D.C public mental health clinic. Her ideas on racial origins are pretty wacky too. She says whites were albinos cast out of the tribe in Africa. Jews get a pass with Welsing. She says they are "mulattos" who are the result of Roman soldiers raping African women. I'm giving this book 4 stars mainly because I love to read fringe theories and ideas. Also for being one of the funniest unintentionally funny books I have read and also she does bring up something that I believe white people are afraid to discuss and that is we will potentially cease to exist if we fully accept universalism and randomly intermarry and breed with other races.

  4. 4 out of 5

    John Glover

    This is a good book that I had years ago, I've lost it or loaned it out so I have purchased it again so I can read it again. It gives insight into racial things in this country.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nikhil P. Freeman

    "Balls theory" was spot on or rather I thought along similar lines myself: the fascination or rather hero worship of men who play around/with balls--whether foot, basket, base or golf. However, the rabid homophobia spoiled it and the melanin equals special powers completely lost me. As dark and lovely as I am, I can attest that melanin does not give a person supernatural powers.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ty

    The book takes a good look at the conditioning of the black mind. As radical as many of Dr. Welsing's theories are, when I began to look at things through her lens, I realized one simply cannot afford to overlook the fact that she is symbolically right.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shante

    This book opened my mind to many issues. The essays make you think.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    POWERFUL!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shannette Slaughter

    If you have not read this one you missing some vial pieces in the psychology of the American born African. Written in easy to digest Essays Frances Cress Welsing has made the information accessible.She's brilliant. Alkebulanbooks.com Book:http://alkebulanbooks.com/index.php?p... If you have not read this one you missing some vial pieces in the psychology of the American born African. Written in easy to digest Essays Frances Cress Welsing has made the information accessible.She's brilliant. Alkebulanbooks.com Book:http://alkebulanbooks.com/index.php?p...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Janelle

    An eye opener that inspired me to read further on dealing with the issue of color. Color is beautiful and the rest of the world knows this. The Symbols that Welsing uncovers are shocking yet so poignant.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Caleak

    We need more enlightment on such issues,plus this blackwoman is a voice for progress those who don't get it just shows their limited understanding of whts going on around them peace i-god!

  12. 5 out of 5

    perez carlos

    very enlighting make u say wow! and yearn to know more

  13. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    This book was probably one of the most powerful texts I've ever read in terms of its complete analysis on how white supremacy's fingers extend into every facet of life that can be controlled, thus producing devastating consequences that are still present through my existence as a 'free' black woman. It's unbelievable to me how much the author's theory makes sense and how it can logically be connected to all subsequent actions that influence both public and private life with different levels of h This book was probably one of the most powerful texts I've ever read in terms of its complete analysis on how white supremacy's fingers extend into every facet of life that can be controlled, thus producing devastating consequences that are still present through my existence as a 'free' black woman. It's unbelievable to me how much the author's theory makes sense and how it can logically be connected to all subsequent actions that influence both public and private life with different levels of harshness based on genetic threat. The constant realization that my history extends to the beginning of humankind and not with the brutal and inhumane institution of black slavery always reminds me that my skin color is a result of the start of humanity and that I should be proud, difficult as it may be living in a world that is oppressive. Anyways, although some points were difficult to agree with and hence, swallow about the author's observations of black existence in the modern world, it made sense...about family structure, about education, about sexuality, about our humanity. This book was written over thirty years ago and it still rings significantly true if not more potent with the extension of time into supposed equality for all. It has inspired to me to learn about my history before white supremacy annihilated it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stacey Flores

    Pyschiatrist Cress Welsing's functional definition of racism - the local and global power system structured and maintained by persons who classify themselves as white, whether consciously or subconsciously determined; this system consists of patterns of perception, logic, symbol formation, thought, speech, action and emotional response, as conducted simultaneously in all areas of people activity (economics, education, entertainment, labor, law, politics, religion, sex and war). The ultimate purp Pyschiatrist Cress Welsing's functional definition of racism - the local and global power system structured and maintained by persons who classify themselves as white, whether consciously or subconsciously determined; this system consists of patterns of perception, logic, symbol formation, thought, speech, action and emotional response, as conducted simultaneously in all areas of people activity (economics, education, entertainment, labor, law, politics, religion, sex and war). The ultimate purpose of the system is to prevent white genetic annihilation on Earth - a planet in which the overwhelming majority of people are classified as non-white (black, brown, red and yellow) by white-skinned people. All the non-white people are genetically dominant (in terms of skin coloration) compared to the genetically recessive white-skinned people. Very interesting book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alogia

    At the point at which the author equated the football field goal as being a psychological representation of the black male (because the football is non-white and large) penetrating the white woman (the white goal posts are the legs of a woman on her back), I began to wonder if this book was not clever satire on psychoanalysis. At the point at which she summated all African religion in a single sentence, and then as corollary stated that the white man is incapable of experiencing true transcend f At the point at which the author equated the football field goal as being a psychological representation of the black male (because the football is non-white and large) penetrating the white woman (the white goal posts are the legs of a woman on her back), I began to wonder if this book was not clever satire on psychoanalysis. At the point at which she summated all African religion in a single sentence, and then as corollary stated that the white man is incapable of experiencing true transcend feeling because of a melanin deficiency, I started to question her sanity.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jinaki

    very early and prophetic insights into African Americans and mental illness (if one is enlightened). A great read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Licia

    Wow, is all can say about his book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Khari

    I found Dr. Welsing's writing very dense and difficult to get through. Much of here theories were far-fetched in my opinion.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dante Taylor

    She did her homework on the subject matter. Very interesting insight into the white supremacist psyche.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Phaedra

    Excellent read. It address the reason racism exists and much more.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shila

    I’m not sure if I’ll ever be able to engage in a political conversation with anyone ever again who hasn’t read and fully dissected this book. Don’t read it in a state of denial, but from a state of wanting to “know” what is going on out here in this world. I will say, it is not for the faint of heart. You have to be ready to receive truth. That means, this knowledge is not for you to agree with or disagree with. Just receive it. Let it sit with you. Open your mind. Open your heart. See.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    Dr. Frances Cress-Welsing was speaking from a Psychiatric understanding of the many suggestions all around us for decades, even centuries, but on the subconscious mind. Not necessarily the conscious mind. I am not a racist either. I am white and see way too many little suggestive themes all around us, that just may have effect on the mind and behaviors of many, but stemming from the subconscious. Genetically I do see many authentic qualities in black men and women that I can not help but admir Dr. Frances Cress-Welsing was speaking from a Psychiatric understanding of the many suggestions all around us for decades, even centuries, but on the subconscious mind. Not necessarily the conscious mind. I am not a racist either. I am white and see way too many little suggestive themes all around us, that just may have effect on the mind and behaviors of many, but stemming from the subconscious. Genetically I do see many authentic qualities in black men and women that I can not help but admire. Such as, in general a 40yr old white guy can appear older than a 60yr old black guy. I for one wish I had that type of aging to my skin and over all look. Honestly. They are genetically superior, and there are just way too many good points made in her work. Work done decades ago I add, to not have all honest thinking minds to ponder her claims. May not be a great read in general, only due to the shock one must admit, if one is open minded.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kisha

    Very deep is all I can say. Once you get past the 1st two chapters, you are on your way. There are a few bumps here and there, but in the end you will be amazed and want to pick up more literature like this.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Africanpersonalities2000

    very blunt in her approach, good for women who need a strong voice and desires a command of the reading language. She is a linguist of great character. peace and light

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brautha Minister

    Awesome guide to understanding White Supremacy culture/system

  26. 4 out of 5

    Angela Chester

    The book was amazing. The more I read, the more I wanted to read. Anyone who doesn't like this book is narrowed minded and sees only their view of the world. I would recommend this book to everyone!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Muhammad Bilal

    A Must read for all people. Great incite from the author. Excellent book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mykie

    Dr. Welsing passed away on January 2nd, 2016, so I decided to pick this book up again in her honor. She was a pioneer in her own right as well as a very important figure in the African American community. The work she did throughout her life was amazing and note-worthy. I admire Dr. Welsing, but this book, not so much. There is a lot of good in the book, but also a lot of imbalance in terms of structure and delivery as well as some theories that are far-fetched and based on nothing but assumptio Dr. Welsing passed away on January 2nd, 2016, so I decided to pick this book up again in her honor. She was a pioneer in her own right as well as a very important figure in the African American community. The work she did throughout her life was amazing and note-worthy. I admire Dr. Welsing, but this book, not so much. There is a lot of good in the book, but also a lot of imbalance in terms of structure and delivery as well as some theories that are far-fetched and based on nothing but assumptions rather than factual evidence. And this is where my confusion lies because the book also contains some well-evidenced and accurate theories as well. So my low rating is mainly based on my confusion. I wish I could have had an opportunity to have a conversation with Dr. Welsing before she passed. So much I'd like to ask and clear up related to this text. As an avid reader and reviewer, I've established a rating scale that I either apply to, or consider in, my reviews: content, delivery, relevance and impact. The racism conversation is, sadly, still as relevant today in 2016 as it was in 1991 when this book was written. Much of the content is important. So two stars there. But the book is lacking in the areas of delivery and impact. For example, this book contains lots of conversation about symbols and what they mean. And it contains lots of conversation about racism and why it exists, but the book never effectively ties the two together in a way that makes sense. It's almost like reading two separate books at the same time. As a reader, this, alone, left me feeling empty at the end and like my time had been wasted. Something is missing from the text that ties it all together. In order to get from this book what you need to get, you must approach it from the right angle. If you don't, you'll be so lost in the numerous typos, editing errors and disorganization of the text that you won't have the energy to absorb the analysis for what it's worth. So approach it from the right angle. The right angle, in my opinion, starts with understanding the title and what the author is intending to do with it. Isis was an African Goddess who was married to a powerful African God. After her husband was murdered by his own brother, Isis sought the truth and justice in this regard. It's important to note that Dr. Welsing was big on symbolism. With that said, this book, Isis, is an effort to highlight that truth and justice for people of color are overshadowed and overpowered by racism. This is the basis of this text. It's also important to note that Dr. Welsing was a psychiatrist and dedicated most of her life to analyzing, associating and theorizing behaviors, causes and impacts. Therefore, this reads like a psychoanalysis rather than a text for leisure. I'd imagine that it is good material for psychology students. And the "Papers" part of the title is because this text is a collection of essays Dr. Welsing wrote over the course of her career. In summary, I found this book to be poorly written, often times unrealistic, imbalanced and contradictory. You can't be passionate for justice for a group of people and be discriminatory against another group. Hence the fact that Dr. Welsing was homophobic.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karla Guady

    Fascinating theories, rollercoaster of a read. I found myself oscillating between rolling my eyes at the absurdity of Cress' unbacked claims to incessantly reading on, wide eyed and transfixed. I took a hiatus after chapter 10 and came back to the second half of the book about a month later and I found that the break served the rest of my reading well. I am not sure if it was me or the current sociopolitical state or that Cress becomes more subtle and nuanced as the essays progress but I found t Fascinating theories, rollercoaster of a read. I found myself oscillating between rolling my eyes at the absurdity of Cress' unbacked claims to incessantly reading on, wide eyed and transfixed. I took a hiatus after chapter 10 and came back to the second half of the book about a month later and I found that the break served the rest of my reading well. I am not sure if it was me or the current sociopolitical state or that Cress becomes more subtle and nuanced as the essays progress but I found the second half of the book much more realistic and relatable, although still outlandish. While she is a huge advocate of anti-oppression for black people and people of color she propagates stereotypes and oppressive ideologies surrounding women and homo/non-hetero sexuality. The abolition of one type of oppression while upholding/validating other forms is just as harmful as not combatting oppression at all. Ultimately, her theories contain nuggets of truth and wisdom amount mountains of outlandish and even counterproductive claims. Although at times I did wonder 'this is so insane and out there maybe just maybe it is the core of ultimate truth when it comes to race relations and oppression.' This will not be my go to book on race theory. But it definitely made me rethink many of the stances I currently hold, which is always helpful.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Too Many Thoughts

    Firstly I'd like to clearly state that those who think that ALL white people are racist and ALL have plans to tear down the black and other non-white races then they SHOULD NOT read this. This book SHOULD NOT prompt you to treat white people badly, as not ALL white peoplea are racist. OK, that aside this book did have some really interseting ideas. I didn't read through all of it chronologically as it isn't a fictional books but a compilations of papers regarding white supremisy alongside it's ca Firstly I'd like to clearly state that those who think that ALL white people are racist and ALL have plans to tear down the black and other non-white races then they SHOULD NOT read this. This book SHOULD NOT prompt you to treat white people badly, as not ALL white peoplea are racist. OK, that aside this book did have some really interseting ideas. I didn't read through all of it chronologically as it isn't a fictional books but a compilations of papers regarding white supremisy alongside it's causes and effects. Great, great book. Not exactly one of my usual reads, but very informative and EASY TO UNDERSTAND. Some non-fiction books have language that the average person doesn't understand making it very daunting and hard to try and get through the book and often results on the reader giving up on it. This book, however, was not extremely hard to follow.

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