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Stink: Solar System Superhero

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Look! Up in the sky! Is it a falling leaf ? A speck of dust? A speeding mosquito? No, it's Stink Moody, Solar System Superhero! When Stink learns that Pluto has flunked out of the Milky Way for being too shrimpy, he feels like he might just explode with a Big Bang. Stink has no choice but to take a stand for the sake of little planets (and little people) everywhere. Will he b Look! Up in the sky! Is it a falling leaf ? A speck of dust? A speeding mosquito? No, it's Stink Moody, Solar System Superhero! When Stink learns that Pluto has flunked out of the Milky Way for being too shrimpy, he feels like he might just explode with a Big Bang. Stink has no choice but to take a stand for the sake of little planets (and little people) everywhere. Will he be smart enough to defeat a panel of big-shot scientists? Will he be strong enough to beat know-it-all Riley Rottenberger and her "Team KPB"? Will he succeed in rescuing Pluto from a fate worse than being swallowed by a black hole? Start the countdown for a funny (and very informative) out-of-this-world adventure--and prepare to have your universe rocked!


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Look! Up in the sky! Is it a falling leaf ? A speck of dust? A speeding mosquito? No, it's Stink Moody, Solar System Superhero! When Stink learns that Pluto has flunked out of the Milky Way for being too shrimpy, he feels like he might just explode with a Big Bang. Stink has no choice but to take a stand for the sake of little planets (and little people) everywhere. Will he b Look! Up in the sky! Is it a falling leaf ? A speck of dust? A speeding mosquito? No, it's Stink Moody, Solar System Superhero! When Stink learns that Pluto has flunked out of the Milky Way for being too shrimpy, he feels like he might just explode with a Big Bang. Stink has no choice but to take a stand for the sake of little planets (and little people) everywhere. Will he be smart enough to defeat a panel of big-shot scientists? Will he be strong enough to beat know-it-all Riley Rottenberger and her "Team KPB"? Will he succeed in rescuing Pluto from a fate worse than being swallowed by a black hole? Start the countdown for a funny (and very informative) out-of-this-world adventure--and prepare to have your universe rocked!

30 review for Stink: Solar System Superhero

  1. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    We listened to the audiobook on a long drive with our kids. It was a really fun story. It's a great read aloud or listen to the audiobook (the reader was really good! Her kid voices were so fun.) I would definitely recommend this one for young readers. Stink is a fun character.

  2. 4 out of 5

    L13_Terry

    Judy Moody's younger brother, Stink, has had his own adventures and missteps chronicled by author Megan McDonald for the last eight years now. They are, in a word, delightful. If older sister Judy's moodiness and snippy way of viewing the world didn't snare readers, this fifth book in the 'Stink' installment of books is sure to do just that. More down-to-earth and matter-of-fact than his sometimes overly emotional sister, Stink still possesses the wit and the reluctance to interact meaningfully Judy Moody's younger brother, Stink, has had his own adventures and missteps chronicled by author Megan McDonald for the last eight years now. They are, in a word, delightful. If older sister Judy's moodiness and snippy way of viewing the world didn't snare readers, this fifth book in the 'Stink' installment of books is sure to do just that. More down-to-earth and matter-of-fact than his sometimes overly emotional sister, Stink still possesses the wit and the reluctance to interact meaningfully with members of the opposite gender that young readers can most assuredly relate to. Geared toward young readers who have recently entered the world of chapter books (2nd and 3rd graders), author Megan McDonald has created a protaganist for boys that is in every way equal to the wildly popular 'Judy Moody' series that was, for a time, all but required reading for (mostly) seven, eight, and nine year-old girls. While still present in the Stink books, Judy takes a backseat to her younger brother in the 'Stink' series. In her own inimitable way, Judy somehow manages to offer necessary and appropriate advice through her sneers and jeers, as only a big sister could. In this-the 5th installment of the series- Stink: Solar System Superhero- Stink and his buddies are embroiled in a feud with some of the female members of their class over the recent demotion of Pluto from planetary status to just a floating space rock with a 6-digit number for a name. The larger font size makes this a perfect book for a first-time reader of chapter books, as do Peter Reynolds' spirited illustrations throughout the text. Readers are also treated with snippets of 'fascinating facts' about the planets Stink's class studies at the conclusion of each of the chapters. The school setting of this story creates a familiarity for the reader that will allow meaningful connections and inferences to be made by even the most inexperienced readers of the early chapter book. Teachers and parents alike can help children extend their reading and interest in Stink's endeavors by visiting the website created by the book's author and publisher: (www.stinkmoody.com). This site will no doubt keep many children's interest and curiosity piqued until Megan McDonald releases the next book in this humorous and true-to-life look at growing up in today's world as an early elementary school student.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    Reason for Reading: My son enjoys these books, his dad reads them to him at bedtime and I thought it was time I saw what they liked about these books so much. A totally enjoyable experience from start to finish! Stink is a regular kid, with regular kid problems and fears but when he gets an idea he becomes determined and full of spunk. Stink is flabbergasted when he gets his science test back and is told Pluto is no longer a planet, even Judy, his older sister, can't believe it. Stink gets his fa Reason for Reading: My son enjoys these books, his dad reads them to him at bedtime and I thought it was time I saw what they liked about these books so much. A totally enjoyable experience from start to finish! Stink is a regular kid, with regular kid problems and fears but when he gets an idea he becomes determined and full of spunk. Stink is flabbergasted when he gets his science test back and is told Pluto is no longer a planet, even Judy, his older sister, can't believe it. Stink gets his facts straight and insists that even if it is a "dwarf" planet then it still is a planet. When the resident Space expert in his class teases him and regales him with all the reasons why Pluto is not a planet, the teacher breaks in and explains that they both are right. Scientists took a vote to send Pluto packing, but some scientists still believe Pluto should counted as a planet. She then assigns Stink and "Space Camp" Riley to a debate the next week and their class will have their own vote on whether Pluto is a planet. A truly delightful book. As my first introduction to Stink, I was taken with him right away and can understand why my son enjoys his books so much. At the end of each chapter was a comic page with information about each of the planets in order based on the mnemonic saying "My Very Excellent Mother Just Served Us Nine Pizzas" which was very interesting and extremely humorous. I have to say I particularly liked the stance the author took on Pluto, acknowledging the ongoing debate, showing both sides equally. (I wish all books on science topics did the same!). An amusing and entertaining first chapter book, that could be read aloud to younger children and will hold the interest of older reluctant readers. I'll have to make sure I get books 1-4 read before another new one comes out as I won't be missing out on Stink's adventures any more!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alice

    I read this with my son when he was in 4th grade. On the plus side, it is a fun book in a fun series. It was a fun way to review the planets. The key conflict of the book: Does Pluto belong? The kids in Stink's class VOTE "yes" that Pluto should be a planet. This was not the outcome I was expecting! Basing a planet's definition on emotion and popular vote is hardly scientific. Until I pointed it out, my son had no problem with this method, reinforcing the idea that we should base definitions on I read this with my son when he was in 4th grade. On the plus side, it is a fun book in a fun series. It was a fun way to review the planets. The key conflict of the book: Does Pluto belong? The kids in Stink's class VOTE "yes" that Pluto should be a planet. This was not the outcome I was expecting! Basing a planet's definition on emotion and popular vote is hardly scientific. Until I pointed it out, my son had no problem with this method, reinforcing the idea that we should base definitions on how we FEEL and what we think is "fair" (like Pluto CARES that it has been demoted to a dwarf planet) instead of scientific definitions and logical arguments. The other idea is "power to the people / kids": your opinion is as important as the scientist's. I appreciate this, as scientists find out all the time that the theories they present to the public as "facts" they must later revise or completely change when new things come to light. I get tired of a few scientists theories being the only way of looking at things when many competing theories are out there or will be out there with new findings. (Check out different children's books on dinosaurs over the last 50 years for example. Or space.) However, arguing against SCIENTIFIC PRESUMPTION (we know more than you, so you have to take our most popular theory as true) with POPULAR PRESUMPTION (we feel like you are wrong, so our theory must be valid too) does not make me feel better. DON'T believe everything you are told, but DO use reason to understand the scientific world, not feelings. Sloppy thinking, Stink.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    My Walker rep gave me her sample copy of this book because I became ridiculously excited by the idea of someone finally sticking up for Pluto. I have been selling Megan McDonald's Judy Moody series for years and never given her books much thought - I am very bad at taking an interest in books that I don't personally want to read (bad bookseller!!!). However - in this I was pleasantly surprised! It had none of the stupidity and potty humour that I've come to expect of books targeted at this age gro My Walker rep gave me her sample copy of this book because I became ridiculously excited by the idea of someone finally sticking up for Pluto. I have been selling Megan McDonald's Judy Moody series for years and never given her books much thought - I am very bad at taking an interest in books that I don't personally want to read (bad bookseller!!!). However - in this I was pleasantly surprised! It had none of the stupidity and potty humour that I've come to expect of books targeted at this age group but instead a shockingly funny, and very informative (I even learned a few things - which, considering I spend the better part of my work life on Wikipedia reading about the solar system is really saying something!) little story about a boy who just didn't *get* why Pluto couldn't be a planet anymore. After getting a bad grade on his science test, Stink sets off to find out just why Pluto got kicked out of the solar system. Since he doesn't think that a weird orbit is good enough reason to discriminate against anyone, his teacher allows him to have a class debate to determine whether Pluto should be a planet or not. Campaigning against the loss of My Very Excellent Mother Just Served Us Nine Pizzas and inventing a Honk if You Love Pluto bumper sticker (where can I get one of these??), Stink makes a compelling argument -but does he win? I think you should read and find out!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shelli

    The time has come for you to take a side. Do you agree with scientist who ruled in 2009 that Pluto should no longer be considered a planet? Or do you think this lovable little dwarf should be reinstated back to planet status? Join Stink and his friends in this planetary debate. Learn or refresh your knowledge on our solar system while choosing which side you are on.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I'm happy to have come across this series. The books are perfect early chapter readers for my six year old son. He appreciates the humor and I appreciate the gentle messages and cohesive narratives. On to Stink #6!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    Stink, while at the nurse's office missed out on an important fact needed for his science test. This led to a great debate in class if Pluto should still be considered a planet or just the number 134340. Stink's team versus the class know-it-all, Riley Rottenberger, and her team debate the issue, and the class votes to decide which team presents the best argument. Facts about the planets in the solar system are discussed using the mnemonic My Very Excellent Mother Just Served Us Nine Pizzas!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sheri S.

    Kind of a fun book...I think Stink is sort of growing on me. One of the redeeming factors of these books are the factoids they contain related to the title of the book. I remember enjoying learning about the solar system as a kid, and imagine I probably would have liked this book as a kid. The interactions between the children in the book are amusing, especially the argument about whether Pluto is a planet or not.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    This book may be a bit dated since it's about the demise of Pluto as a planet, yet it is a great way to discuss the planets of the solar system and what constitutes a planet with your children. There is really fun humor, and I like how Stink so earnestly defended Pluto's right to be a planet. His debate with Riley was a bit educational and entertaining. Most of all, I like the Stink book series because my son Joshua actually wants to read them, and reading isn't his favorite thing to do.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laila (BigReadingLife)

    My son said this one was his favorite of the series so far. It's all about how Pluto was declassified as a planet. Stink identifies with Pluto because of his short stature. So the class debates whether or not Pluto should still be called a planet. I like how McDonald sneaks in some planetary facts at the end of each chapter.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    I think this was probably my favourite in the series so far because of all of the interesting info about the planets. I thought it was a little silly to "vote" with the kids on whether Pluto was still a planet, and the tactics of the kids were sometimes quite mean (not the best role model for kids reading the book), but I still enjoyed it with my son.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    This book was just the right level for my second grade son, and it was funny, and he loved the darling illustrations, but I did not like this book. I didn't like the meanness in this book, or the sneakiness, or the end result of the 'vote'.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Namba

    stink is a good complement to judy. in this book, he finds injustice in the fact that Pluto has lost its status as a planet. it's a good campaign and I like how he resolves his differences with Riley in the end.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Angela Mitchener

    My boys love these. They’re still not my favorite, especially considering the ways in which characters treat each other at times. But their interactions often spark little teachable moments, so that’s good. I do still love all the English idioms that are embedded throughout.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

    Little man enjoyed and was really cheering for Pluto, right alongside Stink. I liked that it gave a mnemonic for the planets, which didn't include Pluto. I have been concerned, since all I learned included Pluto. I recommend, as does he!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Carl Tolle

    i rate this book five stars because it was a good book. If you like stink you will like this one. My favorite part was when stink made a team to stand up for pluto.

  18. 4 out of 5

    HaloLove

    Awesome read! What a fantastic fun educational read! My kids loved it and it was too much fun having them argue and take sides with Riley and Stink! Thumbs ups!!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Oliver

    Super awesome!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Really great way to learn about planets with a pretty thorough, for kids, explanation why Pluto was cut.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Fatima

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It was so nice of Stink's classmates (aka Jupiter jerks) to vote for Stink!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Richard Edwards

    Great book. Lots of facts for kids and the sort of adventure an elementary school student would have.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    It was a little easy to read but it was actually pretty interesting to learn some stuff about pluto and to learn stuff about the solar system.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lori C

    Chapter Book Fiction Grades 1-3 Stink: Solar System Superhero is a funny and engaging read and is perfect for lower elementary readers. Megan McDonald cleverly depicts interactions between students in a way that is relatable and entertaining. The conflict between the students about the status of Pluto was resolved in a healthy way that served as a good example for students. Being able to argue a point of view in a respectful way is a valuable skill and having books that illustrate it well is very Chapter Book Fiction Grades 1-3 Stink: Solar System Superhero is a funny and engaging read and is perfect for lower elementary readers. Megan McDonald cleverly depicts interactions between students in a way that is relatable and entertaining. The conflict between the students about the status of Pluto was resolved in a healthy way that served as a good example for students. Being able to argue a point of view in a respectful way is a valuable skill and having books that illustrate it well is very useful.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Genre: Realistic Fiction (Fiction) Fountas and Pinnell Guided Reading Level: O Summary: Stink gets a big red X on his Science test because he never heard the teacher say that Pluto is no longer considered a planet. He is outraged that Pluto has been demoted to dwarf planet status and is determined to reverse Pluto's fortune. However, Riley Rottenberger, his classmate, firmly believes that Pluto should not be considered the same as other solar system planets like Saturn and Jupiter. The book ends Genre: Realistic Fiction (Fiction) Fountas and Pinnell Guided Reading Level: O Summary: Stink gets a big red X on his Science test because he never heard the teacher say that Pluto is no longer considered a planet. He is outraged that Pluto has been demoted to dwarf planet status and is determined to reverse Pluto's fortune. However, Riley Rottenberger, his classmate, firmly believes that Pluto should not be considered the same as other solar system planets like Saturn and Jupiter. The book ends with both students presenting their hilarious arguments in a classroom debate. Will the students vote for Pluto as a planet? Or will Riley's scientific presentation win the day? Why I Liked/Disliked the Book: I learned quite a few scientific facts about the planets in our Solar System while reading about the silly ways Stink and Riley try to one up each other. I liked how Stink and Riley's argument showed that scientific facts can be debated. What This Book Made Me Think About: Books really need to have conflict to be interesting. If this were only about how Stink loved Pluto it would not be so fun. But because Riley believes so strongly that she must convince Stink he is wrong the story becomes interesting and silly. Both kids go overboard with their attempts at convincing each other (and the rest of the students) that they are right. Their enthusiasm for their beliefs make for a great story.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ensiform

    The irascible and short second grader, Stink Moody, is outraged when he learns that Pluto is no longer considered a planet. Friend of all things small (like James Madison, the shortest and best president), Stink takes up the cause for Pluto. Stink gets into a feud over this issue with a classroom rival, Riley, who has been to space camp and so comes off as a know-it-all, until his teacher suggests a debate. Stink wins the debate but learns a bit about not judging people until you get to know the The irascible and short second grader, Stink Moody, is outraged when he learns that Pluto is no longer considered a planet. Friend of all things small (like James Madison, the shortest and best president), Stink takes up the cause for Pluto. Stink gets into a feud over this issue with a classroom rival, Riley, who has been to space camp and so comes off as a know-it-all, until his teacher suggests a debate. Stink wins the debate but learns a bit about not judging people until you get to know them, and sees Riley in a new light. This book contains the usual cheerful silliness of the series, and I enjoyed the real-life moral of looking to other people’s motives. There isn’t exactly a healthy respect for scientific opinion, though, which is a minus. It doesn’t matter how Stink and his pals feel about Pluto. The teacher should have given them the facts of how Pluto no longer fits the scientific consensus of the definition of planet. It’s just a kid’s book, but it’s rather dangerous to venerate popular sentiment over science. We’re all entitled to our own opinions, but not our own facts.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Molly (Conan the Librarian) Crumbley

    Honk if you love Pluto!In the latest offering from Megan McDonald’s Stink series, Stink Moody and his friends take a stand in the name of science. When Stink finds out that Pluto is too small and shrimpy to be considered a planet anymore, he, kind of a shrimpy kid himself, can’t believe how unfair those scientists are.How can they possibly kick Pluto out after all these years? Challenging the facts and their know-it-all classmate rotten Riley Rottenberger, Stink and company stage playground prote Honk if you love Pluto!In the latest offering from Megan McDonald’s Stink series, Stink Moody and his friends take a stand in the name of science. When Stink finds out that Pluto is too small and shrimpy to be considered a planet anymore, he, kind of a shrimpy kid himself, can’t believe how unfair those scientists are.How can they possibly kick Pluto out after all these years? Challenging the facts and their know-it-all classmate rotten Riley Rottenberger, Stink and company stage playground protests and write their own play, concluding with a classroom debate that pits acceptance against science. Peter H. Reynolds’s illustrations are whimsical and eye catching, and Stink proves to be a winning and funny character. Each chapter is peppered with fun facts about the different planets that make up our solar system, including the very contemporary discovery that Pluto is actually a dwarf planet.Stink makes science fun and exciting for young readers. This review originally appeared on abookandahug.com

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Stink Moody is back and better than ever, trying to save Pluto from losing its status as a planet. Stink feels a certain kinship with Pluto as he is the smallest in his class as well and doesn't think anyone or anything should be picked on just because of their size. His class is divided on this problem of galactic proportions so the teachers tells them to organize their arguments and present them to the class. The class will vote and whoever wins will determine how their own class treats Pluto, Stink Moody is back and better than ever, trying to save Pluto from losing its status as a planet. Stink feels a certain kinship with Pluto as he is the smallest in his class as well and doesn't think anyone or anything should be picked on just because of their size. His class is divided on this problem of galactic proportions so the teachers tells them to organize their arguments and present them to the class. The class will vote and whoever wins will determine how their own class treats Pluto, no matter what the scientists say. As always the author tells a fun story that teaches the reader as well. This particular book has tons of information about the solar system and also demonstrates how a classroom debate might work. Some parents are turned off by the title characters name, but don't be. Stink (and Judy) Moody books area great for beginning chapter book readers.

  29. 4 out of 5

    babyhippoface

    It's no wonder kids love Stink books: large type, funny stories, the occasional bathroom humor, and an average kid like them. In this addition to the series, Stink is furious when Rotten Riley (who thinks she's 'all that' because she went to Space Camp) tells him that his second-favorite planet, Pluto, is no longer a planet! That can't be! An argument ensues, and their clever teacher uses the opportunity to organize a debate on whether or not Pluto should be allowed to be a planet again. Both si It's no wonder kids love Stink books: large type, funny stories, the occasional bathroom humor, and an average kid like them. In this addition to the series, Stink is furious when Rotten Riley (who thinks she's 'all that' because she went to Space Camp) tells him that his second-favorite planet, Pluto, is no longer a planet! That can't be! An argument ensues, and their clever teacher uses the opportunity to organize a debate on whether or not Pluto should be allowed to be a planet again. Both sides tackle the task with enthusiasm, and the results (while a little unrealistic) are highly entertaining. Kids will love this one!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dolly

    I didn't realize that this was book #5 of the series until I went to post this review. We have some catching up to do! This is a really fun book that teaches about science without being overly didactic. We loved the Pluto debate, and I liked the somewhat subtle lesson on inclusiveness. It's a fast read and we like that it's a continuation of the Judy Moody series, with these books being (of course) from her brother's perspective. I'm sure we will read the earlier books in this series as well; aft I didn't realize that this was book #5 of the series until I went to post this review. We have some catching up to do! This is a really fun book that teaches about science without being overly didactic. We loved the Pluto debate, and I liked the somewhat subtle lesson on inclusiveness. It's a fast read and we like that it's a continuation of the Judy Moody series, with these books being (of course) from her brother's perspective. I'm sure we will read the earlier books in this series as well; after all, we have to figure out what's the deal behind the name, "Sophie of the Elves!"

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