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Nylon Road: A Graphic Memoir of Coming of Age in Iran

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In the tradition of graphic memoirs such as Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, comes the story of a young Iranian woman’s struggles with growing up under Shiite Law, her journey into adulthood, and the daughter whom she had to leave behind when she left Iran.


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In the tradition of graphic memoirs such as Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, comes the story of a young Iranian woman’s struggles with growing up under Shiite Law, her journey into adulthood, and the daughter whom she had to leave behind when she left Iran.

30 review for Nylon Road: A Graphic Memoir of Coming of Age in Iran

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth A

    2020 Women In Translation Readathon Book #5. Translated from the German by Teresa Go and Miriam Wiesel. This graphic memoir recounts the author's experiences growing up in Iran, and her life as an expat in Switzerland. As we get older we often look back at our younger selves with mixed emotions. The author illustrates this well by being "visited" by various younger versions of herself. We are all amalgamations of our past selves, and I really liked how this was done here. I didn't love the illust 2020 Women In Translation Readathon Book #5. Translated from the German by Teresa Go and Miriam Wiesel. This graphic memoir recounts the author's experiences growing up in Iran, and her life as an expat in Switzerland. As we get older we often look back at our younger selves with mixed emotions. The author illustrates this well by being "visited" by various younger versions of herself. We are all amalgamations of our past selves, and I really liked how this was done here. I didn't love the illustration style, and the non-linear unfolding was a tad jarring in parts, but I really appreciated how well the author explored the myriad themes explored here.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Bashi tells the story of her life by using the slightly schizophrenic plot device of being approached in the present by various "selves" from other points in time. It's ultimately more confusing than anything and gave me no real sense of who she is today. And as her life experiences are so like those of Marjane Satrapi's, yet somehow not as interesting, I wonder what Bashi thought she could add to the dialogue of growing up as a girl in Iran. I'm not trying to look down on her life or anything, Bashi tells the story of her life by using the slightly schizophrenic plot device of being approached in the present by various "selves" from other points in time. It's ultimately more confusing than anything and gave me no real sense of who she is today. And as her life experiences are so like those of Marjane Satrapi's, yet somehow not as interesting, I wonder what Bashi thought she could add to the dialogue of growing up as a girl in Iran. I'm not trying to look down on her life or anything, of course her experiences are to her worth as much as my own life is to me & it's valid that she chose to write a book about them. I've just been there & I've done it already.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    This is a compelling memoir about growing up in Iran under its oppressive theocratic regime. It's impossible to not compare this book to Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, and Nylon Road does suffer in comparison but it is a perspective unique from Satrapi's and certainly worthy of an audience. This is a compelling memoir about growing up in Iran under its oppressive theocratic regime. It's impossible to not compare this book to Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, and Nylon Road does suffer in comparison but it is a perspective unique from Satrapi's and certainly worthy of an audience.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

    Parsua Bashi explores her life growing up in Iran through staged discussions with herself at various ages. The entire narrative is told through a flashback, revealing particular events in Bashi's life which may not have formed her but do define her. I love this set-up. The older I get the more I want to talk to my past selves. My opinions, held so tightly when I was 16, seem naive now that I am 31. Bashi with love and forgiveness argues with her younger selves, challenges their thinking while si Parsua Bashi explores her life growing up in Iran through staged discussions with herself at various ages. The entire narrative is told through a flashback, revealing particular events in Bashi's life which may not have formed her but do define her. I love this set-up. The older I get the more I want to talk to my past selves. My opinions, held so tightly when I was 16, seem naive now that I am 31. Bashi with love and forgiveness argues with her younger selves, challenges their thinking while simultaneously feeling nostalgic for those versions of herself which have passed. While Islamic Iranian culture is explored, the primary focus remains on Bashi, an internal exploration of her world through her eyes. I really appreciated this personalization as too often memoirs can stray a bit too far into cultural analysis without acknowledging the subjective bias inherent in a "memoir". As so many reviews of this graphic memoir mention, no comments on Nylon Road are complete without a comparison to Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, a graphic memoir about growing up in Iran (all hail the similarity). Most reviews will tell you that Persepolis is "better" than Nylon Road; I am neither agreeing nor disagreeing. Satrapi's memoir is certainly more historical and epic and the such not, but that is exactly why I feel it disingenuous to place to important a value on comparing the two. Just because they are both memoirs about girls growing up in Iran does not mean they should be judged against each other. I think it sufficient to say that they are both good. Moving away from the narrative to the images, grays, tans, and white are the only colors used, and I am curious to know why. What is it about this color scheme that appealed to Bashi? And why does it appeal to me? At this point, I don't really have any answers.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Meepelous

    Originally published in German in her country of residence Switzerland, the edition I read was published on November 10th 2009 by St. Martin’s Griffin in English. As far as warnings go. There’s definitely some nonsexual nips action going on, mostly to contrast western cliches against Iranian modesty standards. and there is some cartoon barby doll detail level nudity to represent the level of vulnerability and fragility our main protagonist is feeling. As a work of personal memoir, the line between Originally published in German in her country of residence Switzerland, the edition I read was published on November 10th 2009 by St. Martin’s Griffin in English. As far as warnings go. There’s definitely some nonsexual nips action going on, mostly to contrast western cliches against Iranian modesty standards. and there is some cartoon barby doll detail level nudity to represent the level of vulnerability and fragility our main protagonist is feeling. As a work of personal memoir, the line between plot and creator bio is rather blurry, so here goes. Flipping over to the back of the book we get the following description. “In the tradition of graphic memoirs such as Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis comes the story of a young Iranian Woman’s struggles with growing up under Shiite law. Her journey into adulthood, and the daughter whom she had to leave behind when she left Iran. Beautifully told and poignant, Nylon Road is a powerful work about the necessity of freedom.” And as we already see, there’s a lot of comparisons between Satrapi and Bashi because people don’t read enough comics! IMHO the comparison is rather shallow, but such is life. For starters, the person we meet at the start of the story is a grown woman with more life behind her then I (at least) initially realized, living in Sweden. As the story line progresses, Bashi keeps running into premonitions of herself from various points of her life triggered by various things that are going on in her present life. Sometimes the premonitions are more curious and sometimes they are more accusatory, but with each experience we learn a bit more about who Bashi is and who she has been. Both a source of strength and weakness. The way that the story jumps around can be a bit more confusing then necessary. It also felt like maybe some of the speech bubbles were laid out backwards maybe? But I could honestly also relate to it pretty hard, in that I’ll be going around my daily life and then feel myself suddenly pulled back through time by a feeling or memory from my past that has been triggered by something in the present. But circling back to the comic at hand, this jumping around in time does allow us to effortlessly focus in only on things that are important, and maybe condense feelings and ideas that actually happened little by little over a longer period of time. Linearly or not, it was very interesting to watch how Bashi’s thoughts and ideas shifted and changed over time. It also felt like there was a limited amount of “oh my old ideas were so bad and now I’m perfect” in that Bashi is able to express understanding for herself at each point and keeps judgement to a minimum. My only complaint was, early on, it felt like the word freedom was going to be bandied around too much in the sense that freedom equals capitalist choices, but I felt like ultimately it wasn’t nearly that bad. How is gender and sexuality presented? Pretty well I think. Obviously there’s the veil, but Bashi doesn’t spend a lot of time obsessing about the obvious cliches and does offer some nuance to the situation. For better or for worse, sexuality (straight or otherwise) is not really touched upon that much besides talking about the outline of Bashi’s straight marriage. Which is something, but really not at the same time. Class wasn’t really touched on in any overt ways, although I guess some subliminal messages could perhaps be drawn out of how well off Bashi’s family seems ultimately. She and her brothers have a lot of choice, and while this does not solve all of her problems by any means, I can only imagine how much more difficult getting out of the country would have been without it. Ability vs disability is not touched on at all. Otherwise, to compare Nylon Road to something not Persepolis, can I direct any of you to read A Game for Swallows: To Die, to Leave, to Return by Zeina Abirached, this other book that inevitably also gets compared to Persepolis is about the Civil War in Lebanon.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Bashi begins her story as an adult trying to adjust to life (language, friends, etc.) in Switerland. In each following chapter, she is visited, confronted, and forced to defend her decisions to ghosts of her former self. Everyone will mention Persepolis when they mention this so I've got to give it to Bashi for throwing in a panel of her reading it. Cool Parsua, cool. While it is a memoir about growing up in Iran, it's just as much--perhaps more--about defending your current life to your past self Bashi begins her story as an adult trying to adjust to life (language, friends, etc.) in Switerland. In each following chapter, she is visited, confronted, and forced to defend her decisions to ghosts of her former self. Everyone will mention Persepolis when they mention this so I've got to give it to Bashi for throwing in a panel of her reading it. Cool Parsua, cool. While it is a memoir about growing up in Iran, it's just as much--perhaps more--about defending your current life to your past self. In Bashi's case, this meant lots of anger showed up, almost surprising amounts. Suppose I should wait until I'm 40 to see if I've turned into someone current Jess would hate. Pretty good. Worth checking out from the library and reading. Between 3/4 stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Darcy Roar

    I found this book to be interesting and confusing. Bashi's story is gripping to be sure, but her method of telling is confusing. She tells the story as an adult being visited by her various younger selves. While this method shows how much people can change and rehash past event, it's also very visually confusing and unclear. I found this book to be interesting and confusing. Bashi's story is gripping to be sure, but her method of telling is confusing. She tells the story as an adult being visited by her various younger selves. While this method shows how much people can change and rehash past event, it's also very visually confusing and unclear.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

    I think this is her talking to her alter self! I just felt it was confusing at times!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nic

    Nylon Road is a graphic novel/memoir about the author's childhood and early womanhood in Iran, between the early 1980s and the early 2000s. Comparisons with Persepolis are inevitable, something Bashi acknowledges with a panel of herself reading Satrapi's memoir, but unfair; the two books are very different beasts. Where Persepolis seeks to tell (and contextualise) the story of the Iranian Revolution as much as it does that of Marjane, Nylon Road has a thoroughly personal focus. It's non-linear i Nylon Road is a graphic novel/memoir about the author's childhood and early womanhood in Iran, between the early 1980s and the early 2000s. Comparisons with Persepolis are inevitable, something Bashi acknowledges with a panel of herself reading Satrapi's memoir, but unfair; the two books are very different beasts. Where Persepolis seeks to tell (and contextualise) the story of the Iranian Revolution as much as it does that of Marjane, Nylon Road has a thoroughly personal focus. It's non-linear in structure, each chapter revolving around a conversation between Bashi - living in Switzerland - and one of a variety of her younger selves. This narrative device fractures our sense of not just the author-protagonist - whose priorities and outlook change significantly over the course of her life - but also of (middle-class) life in Iran. We're shown a number of different ways to understand her experiences and the society around her, as repression expands and recedes, and as her own political and religious views evolve; in keeping with the book's central theme of the importance of free speech and (in particular) the freedom to disagree, Bashi spends quite a bit of time arguing with her younger selves. Sometimes this is born of a perspective they lacked at the time; sometimes it comes from a hard-won and potentially fragile emotional distance (regarding the loss of her daughter in her divorce); sometimes it's a product of her new life, distant from Tehran (derided as cushioned privilege by her 18-year-old self, fresh from the deprivation of the mid-80s, but experienced as dislocation and ambivalence by present-Bashi). On balance, I preferred the context, the art, and the (bitter) humour of Persepolis - but Nylon Road remains a compelling and valuable portrait of one woman's experience of totalitarianism.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sean Kottke

    One of this year's Read Harder challenges is to read a memoir by someone from a religious tradition (or lack of religious tradition) that is not your own. I wanted to do a graphic memoir, but was coming up short in my thinking as I've read so many, but noticed this book, which had been sitting on my shelf for over a decade. Perfect choice! Through a series of dialogues with herself at earlier ages, Bashi explores her evolving feelings about Iranian culture and gender relations, the post-revoluti One of this year's Read Harder challenges is to read a memoir by someone from a religious tradition (or lack of religious tradition) that is not your own. I wanted to do a graphic memoir, but was coming up short in my thinking as I've read so many, but noticed this book, which had been sitting on my shelf for over a decade. Perfect choice! Through a series of dialogues with herself at earlier ages, Bashi explores her evolving feelings about Iranian culture and gender relations, the post-revolution Iranian government, the complex distinctions between the terms Persian and Arabic (which I've frequently heard asserted, but rarely explained with the clarity offered here), and the place of Islam in Iranian thought and society. Her positions are nuanced, emphasizing the need for Iranians to be able to evolve their own future and not to be imposed from without by the West. The narrative device is well done, even if it gets talky in places.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Benedict

    Gets a bit outrageous in a good way, on the topic of violence and fashion (in clothing).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bryanzk

    Just love this book. The perspective, the thinking process and the story are combined together perfectly.

  13. 4 out of 5

    M

    The story is a bit slow but the illustrations are BEAUTIFUL.

  14. 4 out of 5

    bet mercer

    (not quite a 4 star for me, but definitely more than a 3)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maribeaux

    I happened to find this copy at my local library and thought to read it since it was short. Unfortunately it was not worth my time. Just a bad copy of Persepolis, except with a bunch of garbage opinions that the author holds and doesn't explain. Let alone the fact that the whole dissociative personality disorder theme created a bad narrative and a shallow metaphor. I happened to find this copy at my local library and thought to read it since it was short. Unfortunately it was not worth my time. Just a bad copy of Persepolis, except with a bunch of garbage opinions that the author holds and doesn't explain. Let alone the fact that the whole dissociative personality disorder theme created a bad narrative and a shallow metaphor.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    This is a story about a grown expatriated woman in Europe recounting her previous "selves" growing up in Iran, from the time of the Shah to modern times. While the storytelling and especially the ending (which was poor, honestly) were not five-star entries, the insight went far beyond my expectations. What it was like growing up before and after the fall of Tehran/the Shah, having the relatively free Iranian society turn into a strict fundamentalist regime, the teenage rush of finding your oppos This is a story about a grown expatriated woman in Europe recounting her previous "selves" growing up in Iran, from the time of the Shah to modern times. While the storytelling and especially the ending (which was poor, honestly) were not five-star entries, the insight went far beyond my expectations. What it was like growing up before and after the fall of Tehran/the Shah, having the relatively free Iranian society turn into a strict fundamentalist regime, the teenage rush of finding your opposing political parties (apparently Communism was "cool" compared to the current environment), etc. Being a young woman who likes fashion, art, having liberal parents in a increasingly dangerous conservative society. Getting married to a man with the wrong set of values in a society that promotes those values. She mentions the idea that perhaps the entire fundamentalist government is just a veil to keep the people focused on religious issues rather than freedom issues. The more that Iran is villified for its "backward" views on equality and strict religious adherence, the more the government benefits by convincing their people that they are the one true shining beacon in a corrupt world. Not a new concept, but new to me in applying it to Iran and perhaps much of the middle east. Not to say that there haven't been equally corrupt governments run on anti-religious platforms either, but perhaps the end result and ruling parties are often the same behind closed doors. She also makes interesting comparisons and similarities between oppressed Iran and free countries, between political zealots, religious martyrs, and trend-followers. It's a very fun book to read as her grown wisdom confronts her younger more zealous, naive, or limited past selves. I found the art attractive, more than most "alternative" graphic novels. (I admit, I looked up the author herself based on her "self-portraits" in the book and she is surprisingly just as attractive.) It opened my mind about middle eastern cultures and government and the people within them in a way few mediums can. Five stars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Fredrik Strömberg

    This book is evidently inspired by Marjane Satrapi's comics. Bashi even makes a wink at this obvious link, by having herself reading Persepolis in a scene within the diegesis of the story. And the connections between Satrapi and Bashi are also evident. Bash is about the same age as Satrapi, she has also escaped from Iran to the West, and she has also made an autobiographical graphic novel about her horrendous experiences. In some ways, what Bashi has gone through is worse than what Satrapi talks This book is evidently inspired by Marjane Satrapi's comics. Bashi even makes a wink at this obvious link, by having herself reading Persepolis in a scene within the diegesis of the story. And the connections between Satrapi and Bashi are also evident. Bash is about the same age as Satrapi, she has also escaped from Iran to the West, and she has also made an autobiographical graphic novel about her horrendous experiences. In some ways, what Bashi has gone through is worse than what Satrapi talks about in her seminal book, but Bashi is not as good a storyteller, and thus her book has not had the same impact. Bash uses a narrative trick of having earlier versions of herself turn up more or less physically in her life, arguing about what she's doing and thinking, from their perspective. This sounds like a neat, Freudian idea, but it doesn't really work. It makes you start thinking that the character might actually be schizophrenic, when she has to hide in the bathroom of a friend to be able to talk to her younger self without looking like a lunatic. And her visual storytelling is crammed with details and too much text, making each page feel text heavy and hard to get through. There's easily material for a book twice the size of what it turned out to be here, for it to flow more easily. All this distracts from what is a really interesting story. I, as a father of two, was especially taken by the chapter about the main character having to leave her five year old daughter to her former husband. That story alone could have been made into a whole book, but is now run through all too quickly, which feels unsatisfactory to say the least. Reading this book makes me realise just how good Satrapi is a telling a story. Persepolis is touching, poignant, artistic, intelligent, and at the same time quite an easy read, even for those not used to graphic novels.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    This graphic novel had some real high points and I can totally see myself using it as a teaching tool. I think Bashi addressed some important ideas and entertained the complexity of what it means to have an open mind. She made some excellent points about the different rules we play by when we set expectations of asking the East for an open mind though those same ideas wouldn't be tolerated in the West (ref: slavery fashion line). Though there were some gems (the rant on Persian contributions and This graphic novel had some real high points and I can totally see myself using it as a teaching tool. I think Bashi addressed some important ideas and entertained the complexity of what it means to have an open mind. She made some excellent points about the different rules we play by when we set expectations of asking the East for an open mind though those same ideas wouldn't be tolerated in the West (ref: slavery fashion line). Though there were some gems (the rant on Persian contributions and the distinction between Persians and Arabs), the storyline was quite weak and hard to follow. The idea was interesting- the main character meets herself during different periods of her lifetime and they engage in a dialogue where her present character is always trying to 'teach' her other character something. Sometimes she is successful and other times her other self makes more compelling arguments. I think the execution of this plot was not done as well as it could have been. At times it was confusing and forced. Overall, I think there are parts of this novel I would use to illustrate complex ideas of identity (ethnic and religious) as a perspective that matters.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Following in the footsteps of "Persepolis," Bashi recounts her childhood during the Iranian Revolution. Having emigrated to Switzerland, she is busy making new friends, learning the language and adjusting to her newfound freedom as an independent woman. One day Bashi discovers a small girl in her kitchen, and realizes it’s actually herself as a small girl. Throughout the story she is visited by multiple apparitions of herself, in various stages from adolescence through young adulthood. They remi Following in the footsteps of "Persepolis," Bashi recounts her childhood during the Iranian Revolution. Having emigrated to Switzerland, she is busy making new friends, learning the language and adjusting to her newfound freedom as an independent woman. One day Bashi discovers a small girl in her kitchen, and realizes it’s actually herself as a small girl. Throughout the story she is visited by multiple apparitions of herself, in various stages from adolescence through young adulthood. They remind her of where she came from, how she formed her political opinions, and how easily she's forgotten the challenges of life under Shiite rule. They also like to ridicule her for her mistakes, including a poorly planned marriage, and losing custody of her daughter. Bashi offers a charismatic look at the limitations on women’s individual rights in the Middle East. Creative and poignant illustrations and story boards.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sj

    Unfortunately for me, I don't know much about the history of the world. Fortunately for me, there are books like Nylon Road that can give me insight in to things that have happened in other countries. I found this book to be so insightful and interesting. I have read Persepolis (both 1 and 2), so I know a very tiny bit about some of the things that happened in Iran as a result of the Iran/Iraq war. Parsua Bashi does a great job of giving a brand new perspective. I really enjoyed how Bashi told h Unfortunately for me, I don't know much about the history of the world. Fortunately for me, there are books like Nylon Road that can give me insight in to things that have happened in other countries. I found this book to be so insightful and interesting. I have read Persepolis (both 1 and 2), so I know a very tiny bit about some of the things that happened in Iran as a result of the Iran/Iraq war. Parsua Bashi does a great job of giving a brand new perspective. I really enjoyed how Bashi told her story in terms of past versions of herself coming to "haunt" her current self. I love the "arguments" the the past versions would have with the current version of Bashi. I thought it was a very creative way to tell the story and it helped me understand the story in a deeper way. I love this book. I would definitely recommend it to others.

  21. 4 out of 5

    May

    Highly reminiscent of Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, Nylon Road tells the story of a young woman's struggle of growing up in Iran and her eventual move to Switzerland as she tries to assimilate into her new homeland. What sets Parsua's story apart is that Parsua was once a wife and a mother in Iran before she moved, thereby adding additional layers of guilt and inner turmoil to her story and leaving the reader to wonder whether or not she will ever really come to terms with what she has had to gi Highly reminiscent of Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, Nylon Road tells the story of a young woman's struggle of growing up in Iran and her eventual move to Switzerland as she tries to assimilate into her new homeland. What sets Parsua's story apart is that Parsua was once a wife and a mother in Iran before she moved, thereby adding additional layers of guilt and inner turmoil to her story and leaving the reader to wonder whether or not she will ever really come to terms with what she has had to give up to pursue her new life. A fascinating memoir that helps to shed more light on a part of world that some of us still don't understand in spite of the constant media attention directed towards the region.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emilia P

    So, I really appreciate Bashi's project here -- to tell her own pretty heavy story through meeting her former selves (young and idealistic, losing custody of her child, middle-aged and bitter, with all shifting politics that go along with it, etc). And her illustrative style was pretty good, and definitely emotional, too. But her narrative effort was not nearly intentional enough for me and left me feeling confused and all mixed up about what happened in her life and how she felt about it. Which So, I really appreciate Bashi's project here -- to tell her own pretty heavy story through meeting her former selves (young and idealistic, losing custody of her child, middle-aged and bitter, with all shifting politics that go along with it, etc). And her illustrative style was pretty good, and definitely emotional, too. But her narrative effort was not nearly intentional enough for me and left me feeling confused and all mixed up about what happened in her life and how she felt about it. Which, judging from her conclusion, she totally is. But that's the point of stories! To work that stuff out! If there had been a bit more narrative flow and something of a resolved feeling, it would definitely be an incredible story. As it was, it was pretty good.

  23. 5 out of 5

    David Corleto-Bales

    At first I thought this would be another in a long line of typical "Growing up in Iran" memoirs that seem to be in rage nowadays, but was pleasantly surprised at Bashi's take on her past. She looked back at her life, (now at 40 and in Switzerland) and tries to reassess events with her earlier selves, (age 13 or 20, etc.) who appear to her and challenge her comfortable "bourgeois" current European lifestyle. A lot of feminism and criticism of Iran's Islamic republic. She runs into Persian chauvin At first I thought this would be another in a long line of typical "Growing up in Iran" memoirs that seem to be in rage nowadays, but was pleasantly surprised at Bashi's take on her past. She looked back at her life, (now at 40 and in Switzerland) and tries to reassess events with her earlier selves, (age 13 or 20, etc.) who appear to her and challenge her comfortable "bourgeois" current European lifestyle. A lot of feminism and criticism of Iran's Islamic republic. She runs into Persian chauvinists, (typically living outside of Iran) who criticize everyone else for Iran's problems. In some ways, similar to other memoirs, but startlingly unique and well-recommended.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Scottsdale Public Library

    This graphic memoir has obvious things in common with Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, though Booklist states correctly that Nylon Road complements Satrapi’s memoir without imitating it. The author/protagonist, an Iranian woman now in her early forties, is visited in each chapter by past selves from different periods of her life. As each period plays out on the page, the two selves discuss – often argue over - the choices she made at that time: as an idealistic teen, an unhappily married mother, a This graphic memoir has obvious things in common with Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, though Booklist states correctly that Nylon Road complements Satrapi’s memoir without imitating it. The author/protagonist, an Iranian woman now in her early forties, is visited in each chapter by past selves from different periods of her life. As each period plays out on the page, the two selves discuss – often argue over - the choices she made at that time: as an idealistic teen, an unhappily married mother, a new immigrant to Europe. Often humorous, sometimes heartbreaking, keenly insightful—and a super-quick read! -Kate D.-

  25. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Andrikus

    A very Satrapi-esque work. I might have liked this better had it been written in a chronological manner. Instead, the author Parsua Bashi has chosen to pen it in a slightly confusing, soul-searching kind of way: at one scene she's confronting her past when she was 35, the next she jumps to when she was 13. But overall, this graphic novel is just as insightful(if not more) as the "Persepolis" in portraying the historical pain-in-the-arse that every Iranian had to endure during the era of Cultural A very Satrapi-esque work. I might have liked this better had it been written in a chronological manner. Instead, the author Parsua Bashi has chosen to pen it in a slightly confusing, soul-searching kind of way: at one scene she's confronting her past when she was 35, the next she jumps to when she was 13. But overall, this graphic novel is just as insightful(if not more) as the "Persepolis" in portraying the historical pain-in-the-arse that every Iranian had to endure during the era of Cultural Revolution and Iran-Iraq war.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Bashi forces the comparison between her memoir and Persepolis. It's on the cover, it's in end material, she reads Persepolis IN the memoir, but Nylon Road is no Persepolis. Not much story here, untied ends. She draws well but we don't really get to know her very well. It's more commentary than story, meditations on various things... but feels.. not just spare, but missing lots of information/story. The central conceit is interesting. Having moved to Zurich from Iran, learning the language, encou Bashi forces the comparison between her memoir and Persepolis. It's on the cover, it's in end material, she reads Persepolis IN the memoir, but Nylon Road is no Persepolis. Not much story here, untied ends. She draws well but we don't really get to know her very well. It's more commentary than story, meditations on various things... but feels.. not just spare, but missing lots of information/story. The central conceit is interesting. Having moved to Zurich from Iran, learning the language, encountering culture shock, she begins to meet her former selves, that help het comment on the present as she encounters it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Advanced readers that I usually receive are duds. I was plesantly surprised to get a graphic novel in the mail. I love how there are history lessons to be had in powerful drawings now. i.e. Persepholis, Maus, and Pride of Baghdad. This is a girl struggling with her identity in Iran. She wants to value here heritage, yet is also wanting to move ahead in life, from the old ways. Told very personally by the author. I really hope this GN does well once published. I think this is a story everyone can Advanced readers that I usually receive are duds. I was plesantly surprised to get a graphic novel in the mail. I love how there are history lessons to be had in powerful drawings now. i.e. Persepholis, Maus, and Pride of Baghdad. This is a girl struggling with her identity in Iran. She wants to value here heritage, yet is also wanting to move ahead in life, from the old ways. Told very personally by the author. I really hope this GN does well once published. I think this is a story everyone can identify with, from Iran or not.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    In a way I feel bad for Nylon Road because it will always be that other Iranian coming of age graphic novel. I think that if I read this before I read Persepolis I might have liked it more, but the bar was set going in and it really didn't achieve the same level of storytelling and visual appeal for me. Different person, different experiences and it's not that Bashi's story was necessarily less compelling, I just didn't think it was as much of a voyage. Regardless, I think that it is still worth In a way I feel bad for Nylon Road because it will always be that other Iranian coming of age graphic novel. I think that if I read this before I read Persepolis I might have liked it more, but the bar was set going in and it really didn't achieve the same level of storytelling and visual appeal for me. Different person, different experiences and it's not that Bashi's story was necessarily less compelling, I just didn't think it was as much of a voyage. Regardless, I think that it is still worth a read (especially if you haven't read Persepolis.)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Sammis

    The graphic novel format has become an inviting medium for women to write their memories. Parsua Bashi's memoir, Nylon Road is another tale of growing up female in Iran. Readers who enjoyed the Perseopolis books will like Nylon Road. What sets Bahsi's memoir apart is the dialog she has with herself at different ages. She examines and reexamines the decisions in her life against the person she was at different stages in her life. Bashi's also more critical of her move to Europe. She records her cul The graphic novel format has become an inviting medium for women to write their memories. Parsua Bashi's memoir, Nylon Road is another tale of growing up female in Iran. Readers who enjoyed the Perseopolis books will like Nylon Road. What sets Bahsi's memoir apart is the dialog she has with herself at different ages. She examines and reexamines the decisions in her life against the person she was at different stages in her life. Bashi's also more critical of her move to Europe. She records her culture shock and the prejudice she experience (some actual, some imagined).

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    Amazing! Of course, it's easy to compare to Persepolis because that came first--but this does have variations. It's told from the perspective of a mature woman, and it isn't just her story or the stories of the people she knows, but also includes treatises of sorts on the author's philosophies about things. Brilliant revelations and commentary about greed for power, Persian history, societal conformism, etc. Libraries should add this more widely to their collections (no, you can't just do with P Amazing! Of course, it's easy to compare to Persepolis because that came first--but this does have variations. It's told from the perspective of a mature woman, and it isn't just her story or the stories of the people she knows, but also includes treatises of sorts on the author's philosophies about things. Brilliant revelations and commentary about greed for power, Persian history, societal conformism, etc. Libraries should add this more widely to their collections (no, you can't just do with Persepolis!).

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