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34 review for Native North America

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cobertizo

    "Según un relato Tsimshian, Txamsem (Cuervo) tiende una trampa al gran jefe del cielo para arrebatarle su posesión más querida, la luna, a fin de que los pobladores del mundo, que hasta entonces han vivido en una especie de crepúsculo eterno, consigan la luz. Cuervo se convirtió en una aguja de pino junto a la charca en la que bebía la hija del jefe del cielo. Ésta la trago, quedó embarazada y parió a Cuervo con forma de niño. Cuervo se unió a la familia del jefe cielo y convenció a este último "Según un relato Tsimshian, Txamsem (Cuervo) tiende una trampa al gran jefe del cielo para arrebatarle su posesión más querida, la luna, a fin de que los pobladores del mundo, que hasta entonces han vivido en una especie de crepúsculo eterno, consigan la luz. Cuervo se convirtió en una aguja de pino junto a la charca en la que bebía la hija del jefe del cielo. Ésta la trago, quedó embarazada y parió a Cuervo con forma de niño. Cuervo se unió a la familia del jefe cielo y convenció a este último para que le permitiese jugar con una pelota hecha con una vejiga, recipiente donde guardaban la luna. Cierto día la familia se olvidó de vigilar al niño, que hizo rebotar la pelota hasta atravesar la puerta. Una vez fuera visitó sus viejas ropas de Cuervo y, vejiga en mano, regresó volando al mundo de los humanos. Más adelante Cuervo pidió a un grupo de seres espectrales que le entregasen parte de los peces que acababan de capturar. Como se negaron, Cuervo se enfureció y revntó la vejiga porque sabía hasta que punto los seres espectrales odiaban la luz. La vejiga se partió, la luna escapó y la luz inundó el firmamento, lo que supuso el primer amanecer del mundo"

  2. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    This is an excellent guide to those interested in beginning native studies. Split into sections on subjects and topics of both historical and contemporary origins, it is a good overview to add to any collection or consumption of knowledge regarding First Nations Peoples. I am stressing that this is a good introduction to Native North American studies because it is not immensely detailed. It speaks generally about common practices and beliefs (usually by region, but sometimes overall if the pract This is an excellent guide to those interested in beginning native studies. Split into sections on subjects and topics of both historical and contemporary origins, it is a good overview to add to any collection or consumption of knowledge regarding First Nations Peoples. I am stressing that this is a good introduction to Native North American studies because it is not immensely detailed. It speaks generally about common practices and beliefs (usually by region, but sometimes overall if the practice is widespread or common), and does a great job using the occasional example to give the reader a more in-depth look into a certain Nation, Tribe, Clan, or individual person. I think this book is a great reference where one can look further into topics, Nations, or practices that interest them using the tools the author provides as a starting point. One could easily branch off into more detailed or specific books or topics using just this one source. On the actual content, I found it to be concise, easy to understand, and an accurate guide to the histories (including trials, wars, wrongs, and recoveries) of First Nations peoples in North America (the United States and Canada, for this book). I also thoroughly enjoyed that the author took time to talk about contemporary life that is perhaps less touched on; newspapers and other media, dramas and plays, art and (or perhaps, versus) souvenirs, the tourist trade, schooling and education, and the maintenance of culture in the face of continuous pressure to assimilate. Being an easy read, I think anyone could use this book and enjoy it by itself, or for further research. Kids can use it for, or to begin, school projects or assignments, and adults can use it to further their understanding of the true American Indian.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sara Jane Blackman

    Clearly a lot of research went into writing this book, but it felt like reading a high school text book. Nothing ever went deeper than surface level, which to be fair, how else could you write a book about every Indian tribe found in the Americas and NOT be a bit shallow (unless you want to end up with a very, very large book)? I wasn't terribly impressed; the most interesting thing I could say about the book was that it was published in London and I had fun with European spellings and punctuati Clearly a lot of research went into writing this book, but it felt like reading a high school text book. Nothing ever went deeper than surface level, which to be fair, how else could you write a book about every Indian tribe found in the Americas and NOT be a bit shallow (unless you want to end up with a very, very large book)? I wasn't terribly impressed; the most interesting thing I could say about the book was that it was published in London and I had fun with European spellings and punctuation.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katie Eames

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Rhaney

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tommie Martin

  8. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carole

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sally Newton

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Stubbs

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rem

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rem

  14. 5 out of 5

    Luke

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gil

  17. 4 out of 5

    Aletheia

  18. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeigh Schmed

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jason Manford

  21. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Feliciano

  22. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Bonar

  23. 5 out of 5

    Daran

  24. 5 out of 5

    KtsK

  25. 4 out of 5

    Samantha McGuire (Mirror Bridge Books)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Iryna

  29. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Phillips

  30. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  32. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

  33. 5 out of 5

    Linda Donohue

  34. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

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