counter create hit The Hour of Sunlight: One Palestinian's Journey from Prisoner to Peacemaker - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Hour of Sunlight: One Palestinian's Journey from Prisoner to Peacemaker

Availability: Ready to download

As a teenager in Palestine, Sami al Jundi had one ambition: overthrowing Israeli occupation. With two friends, he began to build a bomb to use against the police. But when it exploded prematurely, killing one of his friends, al Jundi was caught and sentenced to ten years in prison. It was in an Israeli jail that his unlikely transformation began. Al Jundi was welcomed int As a teenager in Palestine, Sami al Jundi had one ambition: overthrowing Israeli occupation. With two friends, he began to build a bomb to use against the police. But when it exploded prematurely, killing one of his friends, al Jundi was caught and sentenced to ten years in prison. It was in an Israeli jail that his unlikely transformation began. Al Jundi was welcomed into a highly organized, democratic community of political prisoners who required that members of their cell read, engage in political discourse on topics ranging from global revolutions to the precepts of nonviolent protest and revolution. Al Jundi left prison still determined to fight for his people's rights -- but with a very different notion of how to undertake that struggle. He cofounded the Middle East program of Seeds of Peace Center for Coexistence, which brings together Palestinian and Israeli youth. Marked by honesty and compassion for Palestinians and Israelis alike, The Hour of Sunlight illuminates the Palestinian experience through the story of one man's struggle for peace.


Compare
Ads Banner

As a teenager in Palestine, Sami al Jundi had one ambition: overthrowing Israeli occupation. With two friends, he began to build a bomb to use against the police. But when it exploded prematurely, killing one of his friends, al Jundi was caught and sentenced to ten years in prison. It was in an Israeli jail that his unlikely transformation began. Al Jundi was welcomed int As a teenager in Palestine, Sami al Jundi had one ambition: overthrowing Israeli occupation. With two friends, he began to build a bomb to use against the police. But when it exploded prematurely, killing one of his friends, al Jundi was caught and sentenced to ten years in prison. It was in an Israeli jail that his unlikely transformation began. Al Jundi was welcomed into a highly organized, democratic community of political prisoners who required that members of their cell read, engage in political discourse on topics ranging from global revolutions to the precepts of nonviolent protest and revolution. Al Jundi left prison still determined to fight for his people's rights -- but with a very different notion of how to undertake that struggle. He cofounded the Middle East program of Seeds of Peace Center for Coexistence, which brings together Palestinian and Israeli youth. Marked by honesty and compassion for Palestinians and Israelis alike, The Hour of Sunlight illuminates the Palestinian experience through the story of one man's struggle for peace.

30 review for The Hour of Sunlight: One Palestinian's Journey from Prisoner to Peacemaker

  1. 4 out of 5

    Steven Fake

    A chronicle of the life of Sami al Jundi, a Palestinian from East Jersusalem. The book is cowritten with Jen Marlowe, who recently coauthored a book with a sister of Troy Davis, the late death penalty icon. Some years ago Marlowe also collaborated on a documentary that highlighted the voices of Darfuris under attack from the Khartoum regime. In other words, Marlowe has solid activist credentials and has been unobtrusively working for justice in diverse areas for many years. It is always inspirat A chronicle of the life of Sami al Jundi, a Palestinian from East Jersusalem. The book is cowritten with Jen Marlowe, who recently coauthored a book with a sister of Troy Davis, the late death penalty icon. Some years ago Marlowe also collaborated on a documentary that highlighted the voices of Darfuris under attack from the Khartoum regime. In other words, Marlowe has solid activist credentials and has been unobtrusively working for justice in diverse areas for many years. It is always inspirational to see the work of activists connect across disparate issues and generational gaps (as happens here when Marlowe thanks the SNCC icon Dorothy Zellner for her copyediting help on the book). As a youth al Jundi spends ten years in prison after a failed attempt at constructing a bomb. His belief in the utility of violent tactics for the Palestinian cause ebbs with time and changing circumstances. Upon his release he becomes excited by the nonviolent direct-action strategy of Mubarak Awad. Marlowe and al Jundi met while both working at Seeds of Peace in Jerusalem. The organization is controversial and many supporters of the Palestinian cause regard it as an archetypical "normalization" group, whitewashing the occupation through diversion. A reviewer on EI criticized the book on precisely this account (http://electronicintifada.net/content... which prompted a response http://electronicintifada.net/content...). The book, however, is far more interesting than this critique implies. For one thing, it does not shy from depicting the decline of Seeds of Peace, and indeed expends considerable space detailing the indefensible compromises and biases that weighed the organization down ever more. Eventually al Jundi is fired from Seeds. Though the book itself does not address it in these terms, the best side of the early Seeds of Peace is what organizing is all about - connecting people with each other to reveal their shared reality and interests. Hosting social events between Palestinians and Israelis to discuss their conflict is inherently subversive of Tel Aviv's agenda. Hard-liners on 'normalization' have no concept of organizing for change and thus oppose such projects. Even in the so-called democracies (really highly stratified polyarchies), guilt for the crimes of governments is not borne equally between citizens and elites. The ordinary people are to be manipulated and managed. Realizing that there is a distinction between the policy makers and the Israeli public, it becomes thinkable to reach out to the ordinary citizens. A key task therefore is to help the Israeli general public understand that national defense and public safety are far down on the agenda for their rulers and that the occupation is inimical to their aforementioned concerns. As the book makes clear, this worthy organizing task was always hindered by what amounted to a pro-Tel Aviv bias at Seeds, a problem that worsens considerably around the time the Second Intifada began. From the beginning, the American founder hewed to a conception of the organization as 'apolitical' - an evident absurdity. Staff members were not even permitted to participate in demos. The depiction of Seeds of Peace serves as an interesting lesson in the possibilities and dangers for similar work to be undertaken. Despite its flaws, it impacted the lives of many children and staff, including Adam Shapiro and Huwaida Arraf, two activists who would later gain prominence in the movement. By the early 2000s some one dozen Israeli former participants were refusing military service. The first half of the book is a rich portrait of life in East Jerusalem from before the creation of the state of Israel through to the First Intifada. He describes visiting and later working in the neighborhood in West Jerusalem now known as Givat Sha'ul where some of his family had been from. They were driven out and the village - Deir Yassin - became known as the site of an infamous massacre in '48. His grandmother begs him to bring a fig back from the village of her youthful memory. These are al Jundi's parents in '67: "They said we have to leave the home. The Al Sharaf Quarter of the Old City will be only for the Jews now. ... We can go to Amman. There are buses at Damascus Gate that will take anyone who wants to Amman. It will be safer for us there. ... How can I leave now? I want to die under these stones. If you want to go to Amman, go alone! I will stay here." Al Jundi later returns to find that his old neighborhood had been leveled and renamed the Jewish Quarter. Visiting the village of Turmus'aya where settlers had recently destroyed no less than 3,000 olive trees, al Jundi finds the oldest man in Turmus'aya surveying the destruction. The loss was far more than merely economic. Through tears the old man tells of the history of the olive grove: "My father and I planted man of these trees. Others were planted by my grandfather or great-grandfather. I have a story about every single one. This tree had my grandfather's name. It was planted by my great-grandfather in honor of his son's birth. This one was for me, when I was born. This tree carried the name of my youngest son. I planted it myself the day he was born." Living in East Jerusalem, he and the rest of the Palestinian residents pay forty percent of the taxes and receive only eight percent of the budget. He recounts working at an Israeli owned cafe as a young man. When he tells his friend that the owners are nice, his friend explains: "Ahh, this is because they are from Argentina. They didn't learn hatred, like everyone else here." Al Jundi's years in prison detail the intensive political and educational environment prevailing in his prison at the time. Years of struggle (repeated hunger strikes and so on) by the prisoners had won them unrestricted access to books and writing implements. The depiction of his prison reading list - and the book-club-on-steroids that went with it - is evocative of a romantic commitment to learning and self-improvement.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeannie

    This was a very affecting book. It took me a long time to read, but in the end, I feel I know Sami, and wanted to know what he is doing now. So I googled him, but could not find anything current, except that I did see an ad for a personal appearance by him and Jen Marlowe here in the States, but it is over. It has 336 pages, and they are larger than the average paperback. In addition, I read 2-3 books at a time, so I renewed it from the library three times. I really don't want to take it back, a This was a very affecting book. It took me a long time to read, but in the end, I feel I know Sami, and wanted to know what he is doing now. So I googled him, but could not find anything current, except that I did see an ad for a personal appearance by him and Jen Marlowe here in the States, but it is over. It has 336 pages, and they are larger than the average paperback. In addition, I read 2-3 books at a time, so I renewed it from the library three times. I really don't want to take it back, as I'd like to show it to people, and tell them how important a book it is, and that they too should read it. Sami is a truly unusual person, and was very honest about his disappointments and triumphs. I want to continue rooting for him!! I have a friend who goes to Palestine with Christian Peacemaker Teams periodically, and she tells me that the situation keeps getting worse for the Palestinians. It makes me angry at the Israeli government, and at our government for so one-sidedly supporting Israel. I need to look up Seeds of Peace and see if they are still existant. The leaders need to read this book!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    Is your reading taste restricted to cheery and carefree stories? If so, forget about The Hour of Sunlight. Take a look at the title and read between the lines. Many hours of darkness make a person grateful for just one hour of light. The darkness in this compelling memoir has overshadowed Palestinians for my entire life. I’ve taken an interest in it since I first connected with my pen-pal, who lived near Bethlehem, 55 years ago. A few years ago, I pored over this situation in earnest while resea Is your reading taste restricted to cheery and carefree stories? If so, forget about The Hour of Sunlight. Take a look at the title and read between the lines. Many hours of darkness make a person grateful for just one hour of light. The darkness in this compelling memoir has overshadowed Palestinians for my entire life. I’ve taken an interest in it since I first connected with my pen-pal, who lived near Bethlehem, 55 years ago. A few years ago, I pored over this situation in earnest while researching the plight of Palestinians for my book, From the Lives We Knew. So much loss, so much pain, so much despair, so much grief, so much rage, so much bitterness! Even so, an hour of sunlight. Which is what political prisoners look forward to in Israeli jails. As a Christian, my mind resonates with the metaphor. “The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.” Not that this story includes more than a passing mention of Christians, but that verse from John’s gospel nearly sums up the narrative. Nearly. Sami Al Jundi is from one of those Palestinian families that held on to their home near Jerusalem in 1948 only to find themselves displaced by Israeli forces in 1967. They remain in the Jerusalem area after that and struggle against restrictions and harassment. By the time Sami is a teenager, he consents to help two friends construct a pipe bomb with match heads and nails. Sorry to say, it blows up as they’re making it. One of the friends dies, the other is seriously wounded, and Sami is injured as well. For this attempted crime, he spends 10 years in prison. After weeks of unspeakable torture and brutality, he eventually begins a more tolerable life as a political prisoner and is amazed to encounter a well-organized prison social structure which emphasizes education. He acquires the unrecognized equivalence of a graduate education in history and political science during his years in prison. He also develops a strong commitment to non-violence. After his release, he gets involved with the Palestinian Center for Nonviolence, where he meets Jewish people who share his interest in a peaceful resolution to the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. Eventually, he meets Ned Lazarus, an American Jew. Ned draws Sami in with an organization called Seeds for Peace. Its purpose is to bring young Israeli and Palestinian students together for dialogue and shared experiences. The young people attend a summer camp in Maine, but until Ned and Sami devise a follow-up strategy, camp is the limit of their shared experience. The reader will follow Sami’s leadership with Seeds of Peace for nearly ten years (1996-2006), a roller-coaster of hopes and dreams fulfilled and dashed. Through the lens of the story of Seeds of Peace, the reader will also learn details of the history of Israeli-Palestinian relations during this tumultuous decade. If you have any interest in what the conflict in the Middle East is like, particularly from a Palestinian perspective that is neither unsympathetic to Israeli families nor uncritical of the Palestinian Authority, I strongly recommend The Hour of Sunlight. It has been a couple of years since I’ve read any book this soul-stirring.

  4. 4 out of 5

    marcus miller

    Sami al Jundi shares an honest, sometimes raw look at his life, telling stories of his parents, his families forced relocation, his life as a refugee and as a resident of Jerusalem under occupation. Al Jundi describes the events which led to his ten year prison sentence and the formative "university" system created by Palestinian prisoners. Here al Jundi reads about Gandhi and eventually moves away from accepting violence to adopting Gandhi's ideas of nonviolent resistance. After completing his Sami al Jundi shares an honest, sometimes raw look at his life, telling stories of his parents, his families forced relocation, his life as a refugee and as a resident of Jerusalem under occupation. Al Jundi describes the events which led to his ten year prison sentence and the formative "university" system created by Palestinian prisoners. Here al Jundi reads about Gandhi and eventually moves away from accepting violence to adopting Gandhi's ideas of nonviolent resistance. After completing his prison sentence, al Jundi comes into contact with the Palestine Center for the Study of Nonviolence and through contacts there becomes involved with the group Seeds of Peace. The stories of bringing Israeli and Palestinian youth together and trying to build relationships in the midst of the Intifadah, Israeli attacks on Lebanon, Ramallah and Gaza, Palestinian suicide bombers, are on the one hand heartwarming and at the same time exhausting. It is easy to see why workers burned out from the difficult task. The last part of the book details al Jundi's growing disillusion with Seeds of Peace as new directors are appointed and the group changes directions. Eventually al Jundi is fired and he ends by questioning the time and commitment he gave the group. Without knowing more of the story it seems Seeds of Peace decided to focus more on fundraising and less on doing the hard work of bringing Israeli and Palestinian youth together.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mckenzie

    Mckenzie The Hour of Sunlight: One Palestinian’s Journey from Prisoner to Peacemaker This book is powerful and worth reading. The book starts with Sami's view of the world growing up, and his experiences as a child of two blind parents. Even the early part of the book he’s growing up with the clash between Israel and the Palestinians. As he gets older he and his friends become increasingly involved in the struggle against the occupation. Eventually he joins two of his teenaged friends, and they en Mckenzie The Hour of Sunlight: One Palestinian’s Journey from Prisoner to Peacemaker This book is powerful and worth reading. The book starts with Sami's view of the world growing up, and his experiences as a child of two blind parents. Even the early part of the book he’s growing up with the clash between Israel and the Palestinians. As he gets older he and his friends become increasingly involved in the struggle against the occupation. Eventually he joins two of his teenaged friends, and they end up making a pipe bomb, which they intend to plant at a fruit and vegetable market. But even as he's building bombs, he's also working at an Israeli sandwich shop and developing a crush on a young Argentine Jewish woman. He’s learning that not all Israelis are evil, making the situation even more difficult on him. He wants the occupation to stop, and he wants to apart of that progress, but he’s learning there are two sides to the story. The first bomb doesn’t go off so the three friends start building a second one, and the pipe bomb goes off while they're building it. Sami and the one friend who survives both wind up in prison, after an interrogation, which definitely crosses the border into torture. Once he enters the Israeli prison, known as "university," (because of the system of self-improvement and education developed there by Palestinian political prisoners) he starts moving from violently trying to get rid of the Israeli occupation, to finding peaceful solutions to help everyone. “Books expanded my world far beyond the prison walls. I read an average of three hundred pages each day. History, psychology, and philosophy were the serious studies. Poetry, romance stories, and French and Arabic literature were my escape. Writers were like prophets to me. Their characters dwelled inside me as if their experiences were my personal memories. I often crouched against the door of the cell until the small hours of the morning, book in hand, to make use of the small, striped square of light spilling in from the corridor.” The bonds that form among the political prisoners make them family. He recounts the hunger strikes for better living conditions, the experiences of mistreatment and suffering. He also realizes that the guards are prisoners as well, and while there he becomes as close to friends as a prisoner and guard of different faiths can. When he became a teacher he wanted to teach peace, this was hard when Fatah supporters who still felt the need fight got put in the prison. “I wanted to teach my students about Gandhi. I was drawn to the idea of "White Revolution," the phrase we used for Gandhi's tactics against the British occupation of India. I wanted them to read about the Hindu man who came to Gandhi, blood still staining his hands from having murdered a Muslim child. Gandhi instructed the man to find a Muslim orphan of the same age and raise him, providing him with a father's love and an Islamic education for twenty years. I had contemplated the anecdote for months when I first encountered it. How easy it was to destroy a soul, the baby had been murdered in a matter of moments, and how much time, effort, and love was required to build a soul.” Sami learns not only from his fellow prisoners, but also from his family. While Sami is in prison his mom does as much as she can. She visits prisoners in Lebanon who have no one to visit them, visits the elderly, and learns Hebrew, so she can understand what the soldiers are yelling at the kids during the protest, and help them avoid getting arrested. When Sami got out of prison, he slowly began to form relationships with Israelis despite the tremendous difficulty involved in finding common ground. His friends, who have been involved with the struggle for Palestinian liberation, don't entirely understand what he's doing or why. Later Sami becomes involved with the Seeds of Peace Center for Coexistence (http://www.seedsofpeace.org/?page_id=...). Through Seeds of Peace Israeli and Palestinian kids, whose initial friendships have been nurtured at a summer camp in Maine, beginning to interact back home as well. As the peace progresses Palestinian kids visit Israeli homes for the first time, and vice versa. We watch as the Israeli and Palestinian kids come to love and understand one another. As the kids become good friends, they travel together, in their green Seeds of Peace t-shirts, to Jordan to see Egyptian singer Ehab Tawfik, who sees them in their matching garb, asks who they are, and then after a tense moment, urges the enormous crowd to join him in chanting in support of peace. It seems as soon as peace is starting to spread violence mounts, and suicide bombings intensify, border control becomes tighter and Palestinian kids can no longer enter East Jerusalem. Some Seeds in Gaza make video messages for their Israeli counterparts, trying to explain their shattered lives. Some Israeli Seeds, for their part, struggle with whether, and how to do their compulsory army service.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andy Oram

    The author's sincerity throughout his political, family, and intellectual struggles makes this a very appealing book. His story fits with what I've read elsewhere about the Arab experience in Israel and Palestine: the persecution, expulsions, punishments in jail, disagreements and corruption among Palestinian factions, etc. My impression of the fiasco he reports in Seeds of Peace lies somewhere in the middle of the spectrum between the benign and the nasty. The benign assumption is that organiza The author's sincerity throughout his political, family, and intellectual struggles makes this a very appealing book. His story fits with what I've read elsewhere about the Arab experience in Israel and Palestine: the persecution, expulsions, punishments in jail, disagreements and corruption among Palestinian factions, etc. My impression of the fiasco he reports in Seeds of Peace lies somewhere in the middle of the spectrum between the benign and the nasty. The benign assumption is that organization was traveling along the familiar path from from a small, passion-driven institution to a larger, bureaucracy-laden institution--but even by that standard its failure is obvious. The nasty assumption is that the organization got caught in a conspiracy with the Likud-dominated government, abetted by a radical Palestinian party. I tend to think that the leadership just looked at the difficult conditions created by the second Intifada and Israeli response, and decided that the original mission of getting Jews and Arabs to appreciate each other was hopeless and gave up on it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    "The Hour of Sunlight" was amazing. Autobiographies aren't what I usually read, but Sami's story is incredible. I can sympathize with his original methods for liberating Palestine, it's very clear how his childhood and his parents' history led him to those tactics. The book is really well-written, the dialogue is engaging, the people in Sami's life are interesting. Still, near the end I wanted it to be over because it was so depressing, the bureaucracy, the manipulation, the betrayals, the disapp "The Hour of Sunlight" was amazing. Autobiographies aren't what I usually read, but Sami's story is incredible. I can sympathize with his original methods for liberating Palestine, it's very clear how his childhood and his parents' history led him to those tactics. The book is really well-written, the dialogue is engaging, the people in Sami's life are interesting. Still, near the end I wanted it to be over because it was so depressing, the bureaucracy, the manipulation, the betrayals, the disappointment, the failure of an organization that did so much good. I wanted the story to end like a fiction novel, where good and peace triumphs over hatred and greed. Still, despite the last bit being depressing, I give it 5 out of 5. Interesting, intelligent, well-written, informative, educational, eye-opening. This is one of my new favorite books.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Foxglove

    Did more to depress me that most books. Basically reiterated that both sides are doomed. As long as Al Jundi considers those who throw stones martyrs, as long as he sees all of the country as occupied, we're not seeing much chance of peace. Left wing Zionist Peter Beinart himself acknowledges "Virtually every Palestinian I’ve ever met considers Zionism to be colonialist, imperialist, and racist. When liberal American Jews think about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, they think about Isaac and I Did more to depress me that most books. Basically reiterated that both sides are doomed. As long as Al Jundi considers those who throw stones martyrs, as long as he sees all of the country as occupied, we're not seeing much chance of peace. Left wing Zionist Peter Beinart himself acknowledges "Virtually every Palestinian I’ve ever met considers Zionism to be colonialist, imperialist, and racist. When liberal American Jews think about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, they think about Isaac and Ishmael: brothers reared in the same land, each needing territory their progeny can call home. Palestinians are more likely to think about South Africa: a phalanx of European invaders, fired by religious and nationalistic zeal, dominating the indigenous population." Not much to dialogue about, so I don't see a hopeful future.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristi

    Excellent read-compelling, surprising, moving. Sami, a Palestinian living in East Jerusalem, takes you through the arc of his life (and that of his family), which includes forcible relocation, years in an Israeli prison, a remarkable intellectual awakening, and ultimately a deeply held commitment to non-violence and passionate dedication to building peace. That conviction is constantly tested by the brutalities of the occupation and the conflict with its incessant violence, hatred, and tragedy. Excellent read-compelling, surprising, moving. Sami, a Palestinian living in East Jerusalem, takes you through the arc of his life (and that of his family), which includes forcible relocation, years in an Israeli prison, a remarkable intellectual awakening, and ultimately a deeply held commitment to non-violence and passionate dedication to building peace. That conviction is constantly tested by the brutalities of the occupation and the conflict with its incessant violence, hatred, and tragedy. There are also bitter personal betrayals and disappointments, and since this is a real-life story, there isn't a final triumphant ending. The writing is straight-forward, the voice understated, which amplifies the power and credibility of the story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Skuplik

    Jen Marlowe is an immensely talented writer and journalist; when I saw that she co-authored this book, I knew I would enjoy it. This is a great book for anyone with interest in culture, people, and the Middle East in general. More books like this need to be written, and more than anything, more stories like this need to be told. Great book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Acacia

    the first two thirds of this book were better than the last third learning about the life sami made for himself in prison and that society was insightful. his life with seads of peace was interesting, but he got too bogged down in office politics for it to be readable. worth reading the first and skimming the last.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    An amazing book to introduce the Israeli- Palestinian conflict in human terms. As a memoir, the story was not bogged down by politics, but rather, it pulls the reader through years of suffering and impresses the reader with the hopelessness of the situation, unless the conflict is addressed individually, one person at a time, as Seeds of Peace originally functioned.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Because of my interest in peace building between Palestine and Israel I was drawn to this book. It is a powerful story ( non fiction) of a Palestinian's struggle to create some form of peace for himself and for this friends, family and for Israelis Well written and bitter sweet..

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kasey

    On the plus side and most importantly, this book helped me understand more about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. As it is a true story, you can't judge the plot much, but there were just too many names and it rambled too much for me to rate it higher.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sonia

    One chapter in and I was hooked. Interesting to hear a point of view from a different side of the Arab/Israeli conflict.

  16. 4 out of 5

    VaughanPL

    click here to find it in the catalogue. click here to find it in the catalogue.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

    A well-written and personal story of the depressing realities involved in being a Palestinian in East Jerusalem.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Gore

    Excellent compelling story on life inside the occupied territories and one man's journey and struggle towards making peace there a reality.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    What an awesome story and it surely continues. There is only lacking a certain aspect of conclusion and the ending thread of hope was but a bit too short.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This book was incredibly interesting. It surprised me and I loved every page.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura Mcdougall

  22. 4 out of 5

    J. Belle

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joy

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tara

  25. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

  26. 4 out of 5

    lorena boyd

  27. 4 out of 5

    Fred

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Jacobs

  29. 5 out of 5

    Meghan Bosch

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dez

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.