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In This Mountain

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The seventh novel of Karon's beloved series is now available in paperback. Father Tim and Cynthia are back home in Mitford, where they find change in the air: a haircut price war that takes no prisoners and a risky new menu item at the Grill.


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The seventh novel of Karon's beloved series is now available in paperback. Father Tim and Cynthia are back home in Mitford, where they find change in the air: a haircut price war that takes no prisoners and a risky new menu item at the Grill.

30 review for In This Mountain

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    I'm not going to rate this book...I'll explain why. I noted in an earlier review that many consider these "women's books". I questioned what makes a book a "woman's book"? Then I found A Common Life: The Wedding Story, the wedding book and I couldn't take it. So I guess I may have gotten my answer though some may not agree. To me that book was so totally an emotional story it seemed estrogen soaked. I put it aside and didn't try to rate or review it. I figured, "hey I get it, some people just wan I'm not going to rate this book...I'll explain why. I noted in an earlier review that many consider these "women's books". I questioned what makes a book a "woman's book"? Then I found A Common Life: The Wedding Story, the wedding book and I couldn't take it. So I guess I may have gotten my answer though some may not agree. To me that book was so totally an emotional story it seemed estrogen soaked. I put it aside and didn't try to rate or review it. I figured, "hey I get it, some people just want a book about the love story". But this one went down the same road. There is just so much and so many examples of Timothy, "saying the wrong thing" and then "tearing up" and Cynthia being "quietly hurt" or both of them being "self-sacrificing" it just got too much for me. I mean my doctor did tell me to cut back on sugar and this thing drips syrup. So I had to put it down. I've liked the stories of the cleric and his wife functioning with their parishioners dealing with problems meeting challenges and so on. The big scene here so far has been Timothy telling off the local newspaper editor because he dared to use a headline "Local Pastor's Wife Gets Award" rather than "Cynthia Gets Award". And then he got a little jealous of Cynthia's literary agent and had to get all teary and beg her forgiveness....and on and on we go. If you enjoy this type story, please enjoy. I may try another "later volume later" but for now the Mitford books have finally managed to make me feel that these last two at least are most definitely aimed at a female audience and males are somewhat superfluous. Oh well, maybe there needed to be a turn to the overtly female for these, I don't know. As I said if it's what you're looking for enjoy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen

    Whenever my life gets too busy, I'm drawn to simple books. Not simple in terms of writing - bodice rippers are for cold winter nights - but simple in terms of plot. This summer, Mitford has been a great source of comfort. In this installment, Father Tim is dealing with life after retirment, and finding it not exactly to his liking. While some of the conflict in this novel is a little too black-and-white to my liking, I really appreciated seeing how several characters were approaching faith. and Whenever my life gets too busy, I'm drawn to simple books. Not simple in terms of writing - bodice rippers are for cold winter nights - but simple in terms of plot. This summer, Mitford has been a great source of comfort. In this installment, Father Tim is dealing with life after retirment, and finding it not exactly to his liking. While some of the conflict in this novel is a little too black-and-white to my liking, I really appreciated seeing how several characters were approaching faith. and wrestling with their views. This novel has several different points of view, which helps shed light on the story. I've seen someone compare the Mitford stories to The Waltons television series. I agree that they are similar in tone and approach. But again, when life gets out of control, it's nice to retreat to a small town with beloved characters, and see how they deal with the ongoing complexities and challenges of living a life of faith.

  3. 4 out of 5

    R.F. Gammon

    Not the best of the Mitford books, but marvelous nonetheless.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Carol Bakker

    : 2019 :: This book is like Brussels sprouts: at first not a favorite, but soon you find yourself quite attached. A devastating thing happens. Father Tim is hospitalized. He becomes deeply depressed. While the subplots carry the story along and deliver winces and chuckles, I think the Karon's writing about Fr. Tim's descent into depression and slow recovery is the best, albeit not the most pleasant, part. Here are three delights of In This Mountain: — the chapter titles: enticing clues that had me : 2019 :: This book is like Brussels sprouts: at first not a favorite, but soon you find yourself quite attached. A devastating thing happens. Father Tim is hospitalized. He becomes deeply depressed. While the subplots carry the story along and deliver winces and chuckles, I think the Karon's writing about Fr. Tim's descent into depression and slow recovery is the best, albeit not the most pleasant, part. Here are three delights of In This Mountain: — the chapter titles: enticing clues that had me searching — Jan Karon sprinkles poems or lines of poems into her prose in a seamless, winsome way — the structure: some finger-fluttering doubling and reverses When Lace brings Father Tim a gift of cowboy boots I laughed! Being a loafer man for roughly the whole lot of his existence, he was a tad nonplussed. Boots, like capers and eggplant, might be an acquired taste. :: 2014 :: Kudos to John McDonough, whose narration of the Mitford books is superb. Although I've read all of the Mitford books, I'm enjoying listening to them read by McDonough. It is like the joy of wearing your favorite sweater when the weather gets crisp. I'm finding some of Fr. Tim's phrases infiltrating my thoughts: "Consider it done." "Thanks be to God." "I will pray. Faithfully." The literary references and quotes are also highlights.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I found myself reading this book a little bit slower than the others. Often because I know the Scripture the author is quoting, I sort of rush through it. This time I took the time to read it fully, more slowly, and grab the context of how it fits within the situation in the story. Maybe because I read this one a little more slowly, I found that I enjoyed this book more than some of the others. I like how things are going for Father Tim, for Dooley, for Cynthia, for Hope, for George. I'm not sure I found myself reading this book a little bit slower than the others. Often because I know the Scripture the author is quoting, I sort of rush through it. This time I took the time to read it fully, more slowly, and grab the context of how it fits within the situation in the story. Maybe because I read this one a little more slowly, I found that I enjoyed this book more than some of the others. I like how things are going for Father Tim, for Dooley, for Cynthia, for Hope, for George. I'm not sure how many books are in this series, but as I read I keep hoping this is not the last one. (This is not the last one, by the way.) I'm growing very comfortable with this author's particular style of writing. Toward the beginning of the series I was a little bothered by what I considered the over-use of some phrases. Now I'm getting to where I am a bit upset if I don't see one of those phrases (such as, "and he meant it.") How this series didn't get more attention than it did is beyond me. I'm looking forward to my Kindle getting here so I can download the next one!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Trautner

    *This review references an event in a future book* This is the kind of Mitford book I love! The last few I read apparently happened after this one, so I'm reading the series out of order. It doesn't really matter. I remember not liking the ones that take place outside of Mitford as much. This one takes place completely in Mitford, woohoo! I've already read the one where Dooley and Lace get married and I remember being confused, mostly because all the skipping around to different characters and on *This review references an event in a future book* This is the kind of Mitford book I love! The last few I read apparently happened after this one, so I'm reading the series out of order. It doesn't really matter. I remember not liking the ones that take place outside of Mitford as much. This one takes place completely in Mitford, woohoo! I've already read the one where Dooley and Lace get married and I remember being confused, mostly because all the skipping around to different characters and only using pronouns so I never knew who she was talking about. This one, Karon uses proper names to introduce characters, stays with each scene long enough so I know what's going on, and builds up several plot lines smoothly. It's cozy and homey and has a happy ending. Father Tim deals with a bout of depression but gets through it and encourages others. It's all very uplifting.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I love my time 'in Mitford'! The characters feel like people I'd love to get to know, and the setting makes me wish to visit North Carolina at least once before God calls me Home! Ever in a situation when you can just 'see' what's going to happen next (or eventually), but the characters involved just don't see it coming? Yeah, there were several moments like that in this book for me. But, despite my frustration at the character's choices in some parts, I left this journey to Mitford feeling hopef I love my time 'in Mitford'! The characters feel like people I'd love to get to know, and the setting makes me wish to visit North Carolina at least once before God calls me Home! Ever in a situation when you can just 'see' what's going to happen next (or eventually), but the characters involved just don't see it coming? Yeah, there were several moments like that in this book for me. But, despite my frustration at the character's choices in some parts, I left this journey to Mitford feeling hopeful about one character in particular whom I thought would never choose to be redeemed. 4.5 stars

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This bored me the first time around, but moved me to tears on this re-read. Definitely improves upon acquaintance.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Camilla Tilly

    I never thought that I would rate a Jan Karon this poorly but this book just made me depressed and I wanted it to end as soon as possible. Father Tim is nearing 70 and he has diabetes type 2. Still he does not do anything to preserve his life. He is packing his things to go to the mountains in Tennessee with his wife Cynthia where they will live in a hut with cement floor and try to be an inspiration to children and youth in that area. But they never get there. He doesn't exercise, he doesn't eat I never thought that I would rate a Jan Karon this poorly but this book just made me depressed and I wanted it to end as soon as possible. Father Tim is nearing 70 and he has diabetes type 2. Still he does not do anything to preserve his life. He is packing his things to go to the mountains in Tennessee with his wife Cynthia where they will live in a hut with cement floor and try to be an inspiration to children and youth in that area. But they never get there. He doesn't exercise, he doesn't eat well, he decides to cut back on his insulin even though the doctor want to up the dose instead, he breaks his glucometer and doesn't buy a new one and when out driving in the woods, he stops to buy water at a petrol station and when told water is in the back, he settles on a coca cola instead. Result? He crashes in to a stop sign in Mitford, seriously injures a Baptist pastor and kills the pastors dog while he himself goes in to a coma that almost kills him. When he wakes up to life again, he can't shake depression. And reading about a depressed episcopalian priest in his late 60s was not really my thing. Usually these books are cozy and uplifting but this was not so in this book. Two ex-convicts that have made changes in their lives, are no longer that welcome in Mitford. Two old maids are depressed and go through religious doubts. Bill, the joke teller gets a heart attack. The list of misery is endless. This book is too much about depression, too much about disease, too much about people wondering what God wants them to do. I am a deeply religious person but this was way too much Hallelujah for me! Yes, we are supposed to always have God in our thoughts but we don't have to stop at every shop, every corner to say a prayer with people! In this book I really did NOT find myself "At home in Mitford"!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I have enjoyed all 6 of the previous Mitford books but this one is my favorite for so many reasons. There were too many wonderful messages & lessons to share them all but all basically saying "count your blessings", "stop and smell the roses", "listen that you may hear"... -The joy of receiving a brief phone call from your grown child sharing a momentous event -Why does it take an accident or illness to slow us down enough to appreciate the people, places & events around us? -The love and companio I have enjoyed all 6 of the previous Mitford books but this one is my favorite for so many reasons. There were too many wonderful messages & lessons to share them all but all basically saying "count your blessings", "stop and smell the roses", "listen that you may hear"... -The joy of receiving a brief phone call from your grown child sharing a momentous event -Why does it take an accident or illness to slow us down enough to appreciate the people, places & events around us? -The love and companionship a pet adds to our lives -An open heart can find good in all situations -Spontaneity can be enjoyed at any age -No one is perfect -Friendship is a give and take. Sometimes you are needy and sometimes you are needed. -Life goes on. -Absence does make the loving heart grow fonder. -You don't need an invitation to "life"...everyone is invited. Absolutely Five Stars!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joy Gerbode

    Although I love this entire series, this is the BEST. I LOVE the Father's message on giving thanks, and want to commit the entire message to memory so I can remind myself daily. I have also been further encouraged to take care of my own diabetes due to Father Tim's struggle with the dreaded disease. This is absolutely a wonderful book of inspiration, both spiritually, and healthwise.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    ❤️ Loved re-visiting this beautiful story! Everyone in Mitford has problems & baggage. Cynthia’s first love betrayed her with other women. Miss Pringle also suffered from rejection & betrayal. Joke-teller Uncle Billy suffered under abandonment & cruel poverty. Teenage Lace was viciously abused before Harley, Father Tim, Hoppy & Olivia gave her a new life. As a teen, George Gainor lost his family in a tragic accident. Fearful Hope can’t understand the meaning of her name or the meaning of life. O ❤️ Loved re-visiting this beautiful story! Everyone in Mitford has problems & baggage. Cynthia’s first love betrayed her with other women. Miss Pringle also suffered from rejection & betrayal. Joke-teller Uncle Billy suffered under abandonment & cruel poverty. Teenage Lace was viciously abused before Harley, Father Tim, Hoppy & Olivia gave her a new life. As a teen, George Gainor lost his family in a tragic accident. Fearful Hope can’t understand the meaning of her name or the meaning of life. Of course, there’s Dooley, Father Tim’s beloved adopted son, who is just beginning to trust his heart to others. And Father Tim, who as a boy suffered indifference, rejection & abandonment from his own father, has a heart big enough to take in all of them. The author does not dwell on the grisly details but so vividly captures her characters’ heart wounds, fears, dreams, fledgling hopes, loves, and courageous first steps that often even the humorous scenes spark tears for me. At this point in the series, Father Tim is in the midst of helping Dooley find the other Barlowe siblings and help them make new lives. Even though I know what’s coming, I enjoy the journey!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Susan Snodgrass

    'And while I'm at it, Father, please......show me how to put and end to this darkness, or if You choose to let it go on, give me a brighter spirit to endure it.' Mitford is the best place in Fiction Land. Ever. Jan Karon surely wrote under the anointing of the Holy Spirit as she wrote these books. I have loved Mitford ever since the first word I read in At Home In Mitford. Currently, I am on my third reading of these powerful and spiritually nourishing books. In this one, Father Tim walks through 'And while I'm at it, Father, please......show me how to put and end to this darkness, or if You choose to let it go on, give me a brighter spirit to endure it.' Mitford is the best place in Fiction Land. Ever. Jan Karon surely wrote under the anointing of the Holy Spirit as she wrote these books. I have loved Mitford ever since the first word I read in At Home In Mitford. Currently, I am on my third reading of these powerful and spiritually nourishing books. In this one, Father Tim walks through a powerfully dark valley, at times despairing of seeing the light again. But God comes through for Father Tim as he continually prays the prayer that never fails: 'Thy will be done.' And on page 305, we see God minister to him in an awesome way. Then, beginning on page 310 and ending on 314, we read the most wonderful and spirit moving sermon ever. I have marked that passage and flagged so much and read it so many times, the book is separating from the spine! I highly recommend this series of books. They are the best!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    Library copy. Mitford series #7. Love this series. And I probably say this every time, this title is better than the last, deeper, more moving, more engaging, inspiring. My favorite characters in this title (beside Father Tim and Barnabas) are Uncle Billy, Buck Leeper and Dooley Barlow. I was not so keen on Hope and Helene, and there seem to be more protagonists in this one. The crux of the story, which I won't spoil but it involves a Stop sign, is so well done and realistic and makes the reader Library copy. Mitford series #7. Love this series. And I probably say this every time, this title is better than the last, deeper, more moving, more engaging, inspiring. My favorite characters in this title (beside Father Tim and Barnabas) are Uncle Billy, Buck Leeper and Dooley Barlow. I was not so keen on Hope and Helene, and there seem to be more protagonists in this one. The crux of the story, which I won't spoil but it involves a Stop sign, is so well done and realistic and makes the reader think in real life terms. I was deeply moved by Father Tim's sermon, the one he struggled so over, based on the verse in 1 Thessalonians. Rare and precious is the work of fiction that creates change in the reader. I've been to Mitford once again -- what an adventure! Can't wait to read #8. Highly recommend this series to all readers.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Phillips

    Oh, my how I love this series. It took me less than 2 weeks to read this, and that is not bad considering I have to work and I am reading another book for our book club. I love Mitford and oh how I wish I could live there, or in a town like it. Oh, to live in a town where you can walk to stores and buy almost everything you need, and to have neighbors that are really friends. Father Tim has some very serious problems in this book of the series. Oh, how my heart ached for him and since my husband a Oh, my how I love this series. It took me less than 2 weeks to read this, and that is not bad considering I have to work and I am reading another book for our book club. I love Mitford and oh how I wish I could live there, or in a town like it. Oh, to live in a town where you can walk to stores and buy almost everything you need, and to have neighbors that are really friends. Father Tim has some very serious problems in this book of the series. Oh, how my heart ached for him and since my husband also has diabetes it really hit home and caused me some anxiety. I do worry about my husband and pray he continues to take care of himself. "At times God puts us through the discipline of darkness to teach us to heed Him. Song birds are taught to sing in the dark, and we are put into the shadow of God's hand until we learn to hear Him. . . . Watch where God puts you into the darkness, and when you are there keep your mouth shut. Are you in the dark just now in your circumstances, or in your life with God? Then remain quiet. . . . When you are in the dark, listen, and God will give you a very precious message for someone else when you get into the light." (pg 178) "' 'The significant, life-forming times are the dull, in-between times.' A pretty simple statement, but profound if we think it through. I used to believe the life-forming times were the times on the mountain, the great hurrahs . . .' 'The glad hosannas . . .' 'Your buddy. Oswald Chambers-you knows I read him avidly in prison-said something like, 'The height of the mountain is measured by the drab drudgery of the valley.' He went on to say it's in the sphere of humiliation that we find our true worth to God, that there's where our faithfulness is revealed.' 'I'm ashamed to confess it, but I thought I knew my true worth t oGod. I thought my faithfulness had long ago been revealed to Him. I didn't think He'd . . . require anything more.' There. He'd said it. 'Perhaps you should be glad He's requiring more. It seems to me He doesn't ask more of just everybody.'" (pg 229-230) Father Tim... on bitterness... "He pondered his own axe blade. Over the years, time and time again, he would forgive his father, then the bitterness would seep back into his soul like a toxin. Often, it lingered and did its damage for months before he came awake to the Enemy's ruse, whereupon he forgave Matthew Kavanagh yet again. Without faith, his soul may not have survived the blade. but like the tree, God had enabled him to grow, even flourish, around it." (pg 242) Father Tim continued to feel the darkness... until... "'Lord,' he said, 'speak to me, please. I can't go on like this. Speak to me in a way I can understand clearly. I've read your word, I've sought Your counsel, I've whined, I've groveled, I've despaired, I've pled-and I've waited. And through it all Lord, You've been so strangely silent.' He sat for a time, in a kind of misery he couldn't define; wordless, trying to listen, his mind drifting. Then as last he drew a deep breath and sat up straighter, determined. 'I will not let You go until you bless me!' he said, startled by his voice in the silent room. He took his Bible from beside his chair and opened it at random. Stop seeking what you want to hear, Timothy, and listen to what I have to tell you. He felt no supernatural jolt; it happened simply. God had just spoken to his heart with great tenderness, as He'd done only a few times in his life before; it produced in him an utter calm. 'Yes,' he said. 'Thank you. Thank you.' Where the book had fallen open in his lap, he began to read with expectation and certainty. He found the passage only moments later. Instantly, he knew: He'd discovered at last what God had held in reserve expressly for him, expressly for now, and expressly for tomorrow morning. The peace flowed in like a river." pg 305. Do you want to know what God revealed to him? I won't tell. I recommend if you haven't read this series that you start at once. There is great peace and there is much wisdom in these books as well as troubles and trials, fun and lightheartedness. Ultimate Popsugar Reading Challenge prompt(s) – The next book in a series you've started.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Teri-K

    This is one of my favorite in the series. I like the balance of plot and character, humor and pathos. We enough of the minor characters - including Dooley - to make me happy but the focus is still firmly on Father Tim. In this book Father Tim and Cynthia are back in Mitford and everything looks rosy. They're preparing to head to rural Tennessee to work with children, Dooley is finishing his first year of college, George (from the first book) is being released from prison - it all looks fine. But This is one of my favorite in the series. I like the balance of plot and character, humor and pathos. We enough of the minor characters - including Dooley - to make me happy but the focus is still firmly on Father Tim. In this book Father Tim and Cynthia are back in Mitford and everything looks rosy. They're preparing to head to rural Tennessee to work with children, Dooley is finishing his first year of college, George (from the first book) is being released from prison - it all looks fine. But just like real life, some things begin to go wrong and Father Tim has to deal with a number of disappointments, the greatest one being in himself. I love Christian books that show characters who are trying to live a godly life but don't always succeed. I appreciate watching them come to terms with their failures and learn to trust God through them. To me the biggest message of Christianity is that God loves us - even when we mess up. Father Tim knows this, but it's a message that has to be relearned sometimes. I'll admit the timing of my revisiting this book was unique, as my husband's dog, the last pet still alive since his death, died the day I listened to the section where (view spoiler)[ Father Tim let his diabetes get out of control while driving and killed the Baptist preacher's dog. (hide spoiler)] I appreciated again the Karon doesn't push her scenes for maximum emotional effect, but lets the reader bring their own feelings to play themselves. So I was able to keep listening and reach a better spot emotionally. :) Towards the end I loved the sermon Father Tim preached from Thessalonians, too. Is there any other lesson we need any more than that? I had given this book 4 stars, but perhaps it deserves 5. I really don't know how it could be any better. NB- You could read these books out of order, but why would you want to? Their effect is greater if you follow chronologically. Also, the narrator of the e-books is great, so try listening to them sometimes.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    I had started reading Jan Karon's Mitford Series on her eighth and ninth releases ("Shepherds Abiding" and "Light From Heaven"), not realizing at the time it was a series. I loved the entire series and began reading the others in order. Problem was, I had several unanswered questions from the two books I listed. This was the last one in the series that I had not read and it tied all of the unanswered questions together. I believe Jan Karon is a brilliant writer with a true understanding of peopl I had started reading Jan Karon's Mitford Series on her eighth and ninth releases ("Shepherds Abiding" and "Light From Heaven"), not realizing at the time it was a series. I loved the entire series and began reading the others in order. Problem was, I had several unanswered questions from the two books I listed. This was the last one in the series that I had not read and it tied all of the unanswered questions together. I believe Jan Karon is a brilliant writer with a true understanding of people's personalities. She is able to transfer these thoughts on paper like no other author I've read. Her take on the thoughts and issues that Father Tim had / has were wonderful. There are so many times that we set clergy up on a pedestal and believe they can do no wrong and that we can't converse with them. Granted, Father Tim did "no wrong" - but it was great to see him as a human - and one you would feel very comfortable relating to. If you read her series, begin with her first (At Home In Mitford).

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Surbaugh

    I read a review of this book that said, essentially, that in this one Father Tim is too emotional and the whole story is too feminine. (I’m gonna skip right over the blatant misogyny of that statement.) This installment of the Mitford series is a beautiful and surprisingly nuanced portrayal of a man working through some serious trauma brought on by chronic illness. Jan Karon’s exploration of depression and isolation is graceful and relatable to anyone who experiences mental illness. My largest cr I read a review of this book that said, essentially, that in this one Father Tim is too emotional and the whole story is too feminine. (I’m gonna skip right over the blatant misogyny of that statement.) This installment of the Mitford series is a beautiful and surprisingly nuanced portrayal of a man working through some serious trauma brought on by chronic illness. Jan Karon’s exploration of depression and isolation is graceful and relatable to anyone who experiences mental illness. My largest critique of the book is that Father Tim doesn’t keep taking his depression medication and is eventually spiritually cured. I do wish that the stigma against medication for mental health wasn’t perpetuated and that Father Tim didn’t keep calling himself “weak” for experiencing depression. But despite these flaws, the plot and writing of this book is just as strong as the first in the series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Janice

    I last visited Mitford over seven years ago. The truth be told, I thought I had completed the series with A New Song, Father Tim's retirement and interm on the isle of Whitecap. It was a pleasant surprise to discover I had missed more adventures with my old friends. Well, seven years is a long time to be apart. People change. Was it me? Had my tastes changed? Or was it Ms. Karon's writing? I found I had to push myself to get through the first third of the book. Then, for whatever reason, perhaps I last visited Mitford over seven years ago. The truth be told, I thought I had completed the series with A New Song, Father Tim's retirement and interm on the isle of Whitecap. It was a pleasant surprise to discover I had missed more adventures with my old friends. Well, seven years is a long time to be apart. People change. Was it me? Had my tastes changed? Or was it Ms. Karon's writing? I found I had to push myself to get through the first third of the book. Then, for whatever reason, perhaps reacquainting myself with the Mitford folk, or possibly the pace of the story line picking up, I found the last half of In This Mountain much more enjoyable. Very delightful. In fact I'm looking forward to starting on Shepherds Abiding later today.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jerusha Santiago

    I enjoyed this book more than any of the previous & I have thoroughly enjoyed the whole series so far. Their personal struggles & interactions then from those internal struggles are quite relateable & realistic. I enjoyed this book more than any of the previous & I have thoroughly enjoyed the whole series so far. Their personal struggles & interactions then from those internal struggles are quite relateable & realistic.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Margo

    (Re-reading.) A delightful continuation of many Mitford story lines, but of course tempered with the events of life, and a significant and unexpected trauma for Father Tim. His "In everything, give thanks" sermon in Ch. 19 hit me at an appointed moment. I should probably read that part every day.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    What a great series!! It has been a while since I have read a Father Tim book and this was a pleasure to read!! Very enjoyable!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sylvia

    I loved this book!! Great story!! Loving this series!! Can't wait to read the next book in the series!! Loving this author's books!!

  24. 5 out of 5

    B

    I love my visits to Mitford. Fr. Tim hits a particular dark time in relation to his diabetes regimen. We all do it in our own way - I feel fine and don't want to be tied down to things I "Have To Do" in order to live. Freedom from specific diets, freedom from specific exercise regimens or a day without meds that in themselves may cause problems. Then we go on that eating binge, stop exercising for a while or make up our own meds schedule without the Dr's official okey dokey and the darkness lurk I love my visits to Mitford. Fr. Tim hits a particular dark time in relation to his diabetes regimen. We all do it in our own way - I feel fine and don't want to be tied down to things I "Have To Do" in order to live. Freedom from specific diets, freedom from specific exercise regimens or a day without meds that in themselves may cause problems. Then we go on that eating binge, stop exercising for a while or make up our own meds schedule without the Dr's official okey dokey and the darkness lurking in the periphery creeps in slowly ready to consume our joy. I was going through one of these verge of darkness due to my own choices when I picked up this book that had been on my shelf for quite a while. Reading about hope and strength shining through and winning out helped me change my focus and work through my stubbornness. I'm still stubborn but I now have a little more balance to offset the obstinacy. This is only one of the story lines in the 7th book in the Mitford series. I ran to the library for the 8th because there is another storyline on the verge of exploding onto the pages...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

    This volume, I think, would really appeal to someone who has experienced a lingering health trial or to someone who has supported a loved one endure an unexpected change in health. I loved how this work showcased the little miracles that occur in our lives, so much more often than we give them credit or fail to recognize them. This book points them out and celebrates the peace and solace that they bring. Even after finishing seven books in the series, I appreciated that there is always more to l This volume, I think, would really appeal to someone who has experienced a lingering health trial or to someone who has supported a loved one endure an unexpected change in health. I loved how this work showcased the little miracles that occur in our lives, so much more often than we give them credit or fail to recognize them. This book points them out and celebrates the peace and solace that they bring. Even after finishing seven books in the series, I appreciated that there is always more to learn about the book's stock and minor characters. Hope Winchester is one about whom I enjoyed learning more as she develops her professional/amicable relationship with George Gaynor and questions her perceptions about God. I also liked how Cynthia is able to reap the benefits of her celebrity as an author and illustrator of children's books. Although this book covers topics that are gritty and somber, Karon refuses to dwell on the heaviness of them all and focuses on the impenetrable spirit to overcome and conquer.

  26. 4 out of 5

    viemag

    I have slowly been re-reading Jan Karon's Mitford Series featuring Father Tim and just finished re-reading this installment. I found this installment to be a little more serious then some of the earlier books in that it dealt with Father Tim's car accident and depression. I felt the author gave a realistic picture of what can happen as a person suffers from depression and recovers and although her portrayal was not light hearted the book did include several light hearted moments when readers can I have slowly been re-reading Jan Karon's Mitford Series featuring Father Tim and just finished re-reading this installment. I found this installment to be a little more serious then some of the earlier books in that it dealt with Father Tim's car accident and depression. I felt the author gave a realistic picture of what can happen as a person suffers from depression and recovers and although her portrayal was not light hearted the book did include several light hearted moments when readers can chuckle at the goings on of the other characters living in Mitford. I have always enjoyed this series and re-reading the series brings back pleasant memories, laughter, and enjoyment.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sheri Hathaway

    I have great respect for Jan Karon as an author. She has amazing skill for bringing to life her characters from this small town, making readers feel like they are friends. Common, everyday problems (getting a good hair cut), are part of the life of the residents of Mitford, along with the other, bigger challenges such as feelings of insecurity, insufficiency, and hatred are worked through in all the characters, and interwoven among it all is the Christian doctrine and message. Truly a satisfying I have great respect for Jan Karon as an author. She has amazing skill for bringing to life her characters from this small town, making readers feel like they are friends. Common, everyday problems (getting a good hair cut), are part of the life of the residents of Mitford, along with the other, bigger challenges such as feelings of insecurity, insufficiency, and hatred are worked through in all the characters, and interwoven among it all is the Christian doctrine and message. Truly a satisfying read. I'm hooked on Karon's books and am reading through the series.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Fredell Boston

    In this book, Father Tim has retired from his regular pastorate at Lord's Chapel and is acting as supply for the diocese. He and Cynthia sign up to go to the mountains to serve a mission pastorate there, but Father Tim's diabetes acts up and they are unable to go. What ensues is relate-able to all those fans of Karon and her characters. They live and react and behave as we all do when struck with personal tragedies or misfortunes.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cyndy

    This book is another winner in the series. I especially love Father Tim's character. In this book he struggled with a depressive period that gave me great insight into the spiritual side of that condition. Each character comes alive for me and I just can't wait to read the next book in the series!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Fosnight Regester

    What is this, my eighth time through the series? I love picking up the Mitford books every few years, especially when ministry life is busy and painful. Father Tim and the gang offer not only a welcome temporary escape from the real world, but also wisdom, perspective and peace I carry back with me into it.

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