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Mandate for Change, 1953-1956: The White House Years

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The story of Dwight D. Eisenhower's first administration, told by the 34th president of the United States himself. Here, Eisenhower, one of the major figures of the twentieth century, writes an account of the events, as he saw them, leading up to a sweeping mandate, and then pursues the theme of change in the years 1953 to 1956.


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The story of Dwight D. Eisenhower's first administration, told by the 34th president of the United States himself. Here, Eisenhower, one of the major figures of the twentieth century, writes an account of the events, as he saw them, leading up to a sweeping mandate, and then pursues the theme of change in the years 1953 to 1956.

30 review for Mandate for Change, 1953-1956: The White House Years

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Eisenhower actually has a light and smooth style throughout. There is more detail here than I personally desire, but the experience was much more pleasurable than expected.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Million

    Eisenhower's memoir of his first administration, including his time after WWII when he was recalled to Washington to be the Chief of Staff of the Army, then became President of Columbia University, then headed NATO and finally ran as a Republican in 1952. As one would expect, there is a heavy accent on foreign policy/military matters in this book. That was Eisenhower's passion and profession for his entire life. He does a good job of alternating chapters between foreign and domestic issues, with Eisenhower's memoir of his first administration, including his time after WWII when he was recalled to Washington to be the Chief of Staff of the Army, then became President of Columbia University, then headed NATO and finally ran as a Republican in 1952. As one would expect, there is a heavy accent on foreign policy/military matters in this book. That was Eisenhower's passion and profession for his entire life. He does a good job of alternating chapters between foreign and domestic issues, with some political chapters mixed in as well. Still, the chapters concerning politics or domestic issues (there is one chapter or dams and power plants, for example) definitely are lacking the enthusiasm or interest of the author. In those chapters, I think that Ike felt like he had to include them so that readers would get a balanced portrait of his presidency. I do not fault him for not being as interested in such topics; I simply point out that it does show in the writing. Throughout the book, he seems to be defending the record of his administration. I really cannot think of anything where he comes out and admits that he was wrong to do, or should not have done. He defended his handling of McCarthy - which I think was wrong. Instead of confronting him head on and using his (Ike's) enormous popularity to force McCarthy to back down, Ike chose to let McCarthy hang himself. The problem with this decision was that many people were subjected to his witch-hunt style Senate investigations and testimonies. Eisenhower's contempt for Truman is palpable (at the time that this was written, the two former Presidents had not yet reconciled). The most enlightening parts of the book are when he discusses his close association with Winston Churchill, his process of deciding to run in 1952, and the selection of his Cabinet.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve Swanson

    More of a period piece that really good insights into his Presidency. Still, it was like finding something freeze frozen in 1962 when published (anti-communism, the typing pool for speeches, the wonder of TV) that sort of stuff.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brett

  5. 4 out of 5

    Devin

  6. 5 out of 5

    Fiddlinmike

  7. 4 out of 5

    Grand Knuckler

  8. 4 out of 5

    uh8myzen

  9. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne

  10. 5 out of 5

    John Lagana

  11. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  12. 5 out of 5

    David

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen Vice

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tiền Phong

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rjrvt

  16. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mark Wass

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zack

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  20. 5 out of 5

    Robin Bittick

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nate

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brent

  23. 5 out of 5

    Terri

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eddie Fryer

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  27. 4 out of 5

    David Pascarella

  28. 4 out of 5

    Scott Mugno

  29. 5 out of 5

    Punchbag

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matt Walters

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