counter create hit Will the Boat Sink the Water? UK Edition The Life of China's Peasants - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Will the Boat Sink the Water? UK Edition The Life of China's Peasants

Availability: Ready to download

This is an expose of the inequality and injustice experienced by 900 million Chinese peasants, as told through a series of dramatic personal narratives that describe the arbitrary violence and powerlessness in the face of colossal corruption and grinding poverty." This is an expose of the inequality and injustice experienced by 900 million Chinese peasants, as told through a series of dramatic personal narratives that describe the arbitrary violence and powerlessness in the face of colossal corruption and grinding poverty."


Compare

This is an expose of the inequality and injustice experienced by 900 million Chinese peasants, as told through a series of dramatic personal narratives that describe the arbitrary violence and powerlessness in the face of colossal corruption and grinding poverty." This is an expose of the inequality and injustice experienced by 900 million Chinese peasants, as told through a series of dramatic personal narratives that describe the arbitrary violence and powerlessness in the face of colossal corruption and grinding poverty."

30 review for Will the Boat Sink the Water? UK Edition The Life of China's Peasants

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jaidee

    2 "important information but poorly executed" stars !! I cannot in good conscience give this book more than two stars. This is information that needs to be shared with the world but the experience of this book was mostly tedious and often frustrating. I am unclear whether it is the writing style or could it possibly be the translation? This book cannot afford to be poorly written as it is about the experience of 900 million people in China. Those sheer numbers blow me away. That is the population 2 "important information but poorly executed" stars !! I cannot in good conscience give this book more than two stars. This is information that needs to be shared with the world but the experience of this book was mostly tedious and often frustrating. I am unclear whether it is the writing style or could it possibly be the translation? This book cannot afford to be poorly written as it is about the experience of 900 million people in China. Those sheer numbers blow me away. That is the population of thirty Canadas. Wowowow!! The book is centred in Anhui province. More information on this province can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anhui A population of 58 million and one of the poorest in China. This is about rural China and the peasants that live in abject poverty and since becoming Communist have been been taxed excessively by the local communist thugs often without the consent of the Central government. Whenever the people revolt or want accountability they are beaten, tortured and given trumped up criminal charges. This book has been banned in China but apparently has sold ten million copies on the black market. The main issue I had with this book that it was written in vignettes that were told like moralistic, simplistic and dogmatic fables. The oppressed were all good and noble and the local governments were the devil himself. This constant David and Goliath telling left no room for nuance, understanding and actually made much of these vignettes seem almost unbelievable. When I was a teen I read a fair number of books of Christians that were persecuted in the Soviet Union and the larger than life depictions appealed to my adolescent idealism whereas now I think I would be frustrated and want a more muted and balanced account. The last chapter was the most helpful when finally statistics and possible solutions were presented on these huge and important social problems. I am sorry that so many rural Chinese are suffering so greatly and I strongly feel that there could be a much better sharing of their stories to the rest of the world.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andrés

    While the book is informative, nonetheless the translation was spotty and it suffers from the illness that plagues all journalists: it is more focused on stories than about analysis. Unfortunately, many of these stories already appeared in China's domestic press, so while they may be new to foreign eyes the authors' reporting was not particularly original. In addition, the authors seem to make every person in their reporting two-dimensional: either good or evil. Nuance or careful analysis will n While the book is informative, nonetheless the translation was spotty and it suffers from the illness that plagues all journalists: it is more focused on stories than about analysis. Unfortunately, many of these stories already appeared in China's domestic press, so while they may be new to foreign eyes the authors' reporting was not particularly original. In addition, the authors seem to make every person in their reporting two-dimensional: either good or evil. Nuance or careful analysis will not be found in this book. Unfortunately, these stories initially lack much context: it is not until the fifth chapter that a post-1949 history of Chinese agriculture is given. This makes the stories of countryside tragedy appear as isolated instances of malfeasance rather than as examples of a systemic political problem. While the sixth chapter supposedly offers possible remedies for the problems of China's countryside, in fact they don't. Simply saying that there should be better policies or better cadres implementing those policies is not, in fact, a substantive contribution to the debate. Unfortunately, one suggestion that would have been useful was not proffered: giving Chinese peasants oversight over their local governments by giving them the right to choose their representatives in those governments. It seems to me that many problems in the countryside arise from the fact that cadres are more interested in what their superiors think than in the realities of those they are governing. If your incentive is to impress an official in the faraway provincial capital or even further away national capital, then of course you will do everything in your power to prevent any bad news from escaping your locality. Until this basic dynamic is broken Chinese peasants will continue to be mistreated by the authorities regardless of the political system under which they live.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Rex

    The book gets 3-stars b/c it is a "black market" book in China about Chinese peasants written by Chinese peasants who lived it. If it was some pencilneck, ivory tower dweeb who wrote it, it would be 2-stars. It's interesting and very enlightening to the plight of the Chinese peasantry (numbering 900million) and tells quite a bit about the HOW and WHY of the Chinese economic boom (as well as the brutal costs). But, it spends too much time "storytelling" about "this bad thing" and "that bad thing" The book gets 3-stars b/c it is a "black market" book in China about Chinese peasants written by Chinese peasants who lived it. If it was some pencilneck, ivory tower dweeb who wrote it, it would be 2-stars. It's interesting and very enlightening to the plight of the Chinese peasantry (numbering 900million) and tells quite a bit about the HOW and WHY of the Chinese economic boom (as well as the brutal costs). But, it spends too much time "storytelling" about "this bad thing" and "that bad thing" that happened to various people in various villages. There's not nearly enough overarching analysis, though I'm not 100% sure that was/is the point. The last chapter wraps a nice bow around all of it to give some analysis, but it is too little too late. A VERY important read for a greater understanding of the brutalities of China today and the "dark side" of their economic "boom". The title comes from the saying that "Water holds up the boat, but it can also sink the boat" with the "water" being the peasants. It seems China's policies are intent on "sinking the water". Sucks to be a Chinese rural peasant, that's for sure.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jose M.

    This was a very educative book in the current political system of China and its history. An eye opener for an average European reader with an interest in political systems and history of different countries. This book shows the other face of China. The one that most people aren't aware of. The other China, the second China. Really, it is another country within China. Another country whose citizens - the peasants - are regarded as second class citizens for the rest of the Chinese people. The book This was a very educative book in the current political system of China and its history. An eye opener for an average European reader with an interest in political systems and history of different countries. This book shows the other face of China. The one that most people aren't aware of. The other China, the second China. Really, it is another country within China. Another country whose citizens - the peasants - are regarded as second class citizens for the rest of the Chinese people. The book shows how, even in the 21st century, there are people in China - the cadres - who rule like in the Middle Ages. And what's more, China is full of them, now more than even. One may think this is because of Communism, but it is actually something a problem that goes back to many generations and dynasties, as the writers show. The first chapters of the book include examples to illustrate how the cadres abuse of the peasants. These examples will make your blood boil if you have any empathy for these people. If you think your own country is corrupted, read this book and you will see what a real problem of corruption is. The last chapters of the book are an analysis of the roots and the consequences of the peasants' burden, and the possible ways this problem can be solved in the future.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    I read this work of reportage for a Chinese history class, and quite honestly it's a book I lend out regularly to people who want to hear about the "average Chinese person" after the communist revolution. I read this work of reportage for a Chinese history class, and quite honestly it's a book I lend out regularly to people who want to hear about the "average Chinese person" after the communist revolution.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lilly Mary

    Understanding a China it would prefer not to discuss - worth a read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Magda

    Quite depressing, because all too real. Like Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quijote's adventures : the same senseless and cyclical repetitions of experience, yet in the case of Will The Boat Sink The Water, the experiences are corrupt, perverse and deadly. The book presented well-researched facts, and, sadly, the facts themselves are dismal. Should people read it ? Yes. I appreciated that it included an index / glossary of the terms used with their corresponding Chinese characters — more books in trans Quite depressing, because all too real. Like Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quijote's adventures : the same senseless and cyclical repetitions of experience, yet in the case of Will The Boat Sink The Water, the experiences are corrupt, perverse and deadly. The book presented well-researched facts, and, sadly, the facts themselves are dismal. Should people read it ? Yes. I appreciated that it included an index / glossary of the terms used with their corresponding Chinese characters — more books in translation should do this.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Meiqimichelle

    Started and finished this book yesterday (silly due dates at silly libraries). This is the English translation of a book called 中国农民问题调查 that made waves in China a few years ago (2004-ish I think). It was banned a month after it was released on the mainland but went on to sell something like 7 million copies in pirated form. Really interesting and heart breaking, the authors investigated cases of local corruption in tax and fee collection in villages across Anhui Province, one of China's poorest Started and finished this book yesterday (silly due dates at silly libraries). This is the English translation of a book called 中国农民问题调查 that made waves in China a few years ago (2004-ish I think). It was banned a month after it was released on the mainland but went on to sell something like 7 million copies in pirated form. Really interesting and heart breaking, the authors investigated cases of local corruption in tax and fee collection in villages across Anhui Province, one of China's poorest. Long story short: peasants have it worse now in many ways than they had before the so-called People's Revolution because of exploiting cadres and their heavy taxes and fees (much heavier than city people's tax burden).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jmurray

    Maybe it was the 'chinese-ness' of the narrative, but I just didn't like this book. Yeah, they're poor and their lives are difficult, but was expecting a bit more of an overall point from this book. I guess (spoiler alert!!!) the point is that the size of the country, poor infrastructure, bureaucracy and some not so nice provincial officials make life miserable for the chinese peasantry. There's a bit about the history of their plight and the broken promises of the central gov't, but it's just s Maybe it was the 'chinese-ness' of the narrative, but I just didn't like this book. Yeah, they're poor and their lives are difficult, but was expecting a bit more of an overall point from this book. I guess (spoiler alert!!!) the point is that the size of the country, poor infrastructure, bureaucracy and some not so nice provincial officials make life miserable for the chinese peasantry. There's a bit about the history of their plight and the broken promises of the central gov't, but it's just sortof a narrow scope. I didn't end up caring very much. But then again I'm a lousy person.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Phillips

    Considering the amount of time put into research for this book and the importance of the topic, it is a shame that it is so difficult to read. The first half of the book is so laden with cliches and hyperbole that the truly tragic stories are overshadowed. Fact and opinion are mingled, personal stories and interviews are intertwined with economic facts. I'm glad I read the book, as it will serve as a starting point to learn about the peasants of China, but so much more could have been done with Considering the amount of time put into research for this book and the importance of the topic, it is a shame that it is so difficult to read. The first half of the book is so laden with cliches and hyperbole that the truly tragic stories are overshadowed. Fact and opinion are mingled, personal stories and interviews are intertwined with economic facts. I'm glad I read the book, as it will serve as a starting point to learn about the peasants of China, but so much more could have been done with the years of journalistic study.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Daryoush

    This is the worst beach read I ever chose, as it inflamed me against a totalitarian state that kills the spirit and then the body of over 800 million people. Completely incongruous with the sun, sand, sea, and seduction all around me. I couldn't put it down though. Therefore, no flirting on the beach, and thus saving the relationship with the woman who is now my wife. If the reds knew this, would they still ban the book? Probably, and that's why they're reds! This is the worst beach read I ever chose, as it inflamed me against a totalitarian state that kills the spirit and then the body of over 800 million people. Completely incongruous with the sun, sand, sea, and seduction all around me. I couldn't put it down though. Therefore, no flirting on the beach, and thus saving the relationship with the woman who is now my wife. If the reds knew this, would they still ban the book? Probably, and that's why they're reds!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ari

    This book has a great untold stories about China's farmers. There are chapters that explore the suffer of China's farmers (because of the unlimited taxes) in different districts, showing how they manage to survive and how they struggle to get their rights back. In these contents, this book is amazing. But, I'm really confortable with the plot. Ini the middle of the content, I felt so boring because the each story has almost the same matters. This book has a great untold stories about China's farmers. There are chapters that explore the suffer of China's farmers (because of the unlimited taxes) in different districts, showing how they manage to survive and how they struggle to get their rights back. In these contents, this book is amazing. But, I'm really confortable with the plot. Ini the middle of the content, I felt so boring because the each story has almost the same matters.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sav

    I learned a great deal about the Chinese political system. For instance, the US has a three tiered system whereas China has a five tiered system. The burden that the Chinese peasantry must bear to support this bloated bureaucracy is excessive as are the local cadres methods of squeezing the peasants for money. I knew this book would be good since it is banned in China. I was not disappointed. It takes a truthful, fair look at one area of modern China that needs A LOT of improvement.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Krayfish1

    Stories about local government in Anhui gone wrong (tax collecting leading to death and injury) followed by discussion of the huge number of bureaucrats at the township level (1 per 67 or 1 per 40 of the population where the average was 1 per 7000 and 1 per 2000 for most of Chinese history). Interviews conducted in 2001-2004 about events that happened in 1991-1995 turned into a narrative style means it's hard to evaluate how many of the details are accurate. Stories about local government in Anhui gone wrong (tax collecting leading to death and injury) followed by discussion of the huge number of bureaucrats at the township level (1 per 67 or 1 per 40 of the population where the average was 1 per 7000 and 1 per 2000 for most of Chinese history). Interviews conducted in 2001-2004 about events that happened in 1991-1995 turned into a narrative style means it's hard to evaluate how many of the details are accurate.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Max

    Probably. This is a good book, and the final chapter highlights some of the inherent contradictions in solving the problem of the Chinese peasant farmer - tax reformation eases the burden on the peasants but impoverish the rural government at the same time. Definite medicine to counter the "China fever" that affects much of the Western media world. Probably. This is a good book, and the final chapter highlights some of the inherent contradictions in solving the problem of the Chinese peasant farmer - tax reformation eases the burden on the peasants but impoverish the rural government at the same time. Definite medicine to counter the "China fever" that affects much of the Western media world.

  16. 5 out of 5

    John

    The first few chapters are horrifying stories about what peasants have been going through over the last ten years including over-taxation, corrupt leaders, murders, other bad things... The last two chapters, I thought lacked direction. And the message about what the peasants should do was only suggested at the last few pages. Left me wanting more. The translation is mediocre.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Very important stories about how China's government can easily become corrupt on the local, village level as the power officials wield approaches 'absolute' given the lack of checks and balances. But help me god, it is boring - largely a recitation of all the petty squabbles that only Chinese villagers could have. Very important stories about how China's government can easily become corrupt on the local, village level as the power officials wield approaches 'absolute' given the lack of checks and balances. But help me god, it is boring - largely a recitation of all the petty squabbles that only Chinese villagers could have.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    This book is maybe a little too serious for the casual reader with no knowledge of modern China. It is, however, very important for the world to read in order to understand the plight of China's peasants and to see that the images of development in the news really only represent the situation for those lucky enough to hold an urban residence permit. This book is maybe a little too serious for the casual reader with no knowledge of modern China. It is, however, very important for the world to read in order to understand the plight of China's peasants and to see that the images of development in the news really only represent the situation for those lucky enough to hold an urban residence permit.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sunny San

    Hmm... Such a controversial book... :) The authors are vvv brave 2 write all datas 'n crucial information regarding China's governmental bureaucracy in grassroots level... Yup... We may see the other side of China centralized government... Overall, it enriches our perspective in understanding China's internal society... Hmm... Such a controversial book... :) The authors are vvv brave 2 write all datas 'n crucial information regarding China's governmental bureaucracy in grassroots level... Yup... We may see the other side of China centralized government... Overall, it enriches our perspective in understanding China's internal society...

  20. 5 out of 5

    ben

    This book gives a very good, and very real description of the sad state of China's peasants. It also came with a heavy cost. The authors were persecuted and the books were quickly banned in China. It is should be shocking to read. This book gives a very good, and very real description of the sad state of China's peasants. It also came with a heavy cost. The authors were persecuted and the books were quickly banned in China. It is should be shocking to read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Britt

    Written by two journalists in China. A worthy topic that deserves more serious attention (justice and rights in an oppressive and corrupt system) but an absolutely awful translation and a disappointing lack of serious methods.

  22. 4 out of 5

    bangkit aditya

    Hohoho, this one would knock PRC government down. This is extremely a great investigation report. The author captured the uneasiness of Chinese peasants, how they've been exploited bluntly by the village party official. Thank god that the Chinese government has done much about it today! Hohoho, this one would knock PRC government down. This is extremely a great investigation report. The author captured the uneasiness of Chinese peasants, how they've been exploited bluntly by the village party official. Thank god that the Chinese government has done much about it today!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    I knew that it would be depressing, and it was. I think that it is a good book to read and spread the knowledge of how life is for Chinese peasants, but it also seemed slow and hard to follow at times.

  24. 4 out of 5

    David

    Worried about China's hegemony? Have no fear. Thuggery is the rule, communism is just the front. Speak out and you'll get dragged out of bed in the middle of the night for a good ass kicking, then you'll get arrested for disturbing the peace. Implosion. That's China's next act. Worried about China's hegemony? Have no fear. Thuggery is the rule, communism is just the front. Speak out and you'll get dragged out of bed in the middle of the night for a good ass kicking, then you'll get arrested for disturbing the peace. Implosion. That's China's next act.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hengky

    like the other countries, even china, the asian growing tiger, have their own problem. Mostly, this book tell us about the poverty and corruption in some village.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tobias

    Read my review here. Read my review here.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Yuniasih Hernawanti

    bored to read... farmer torture... suffering behind successful...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alvin

    Whoa. How many people's eyes need to be opened about the poverty in China? And I thought Mexico was bad. Corruption in rural China needs to end. Cut back on the governmental layers. Whoa. How many people's eyes need to be opened about the poverty in China? And I thought Mexico was bad. Corruption in rural China needs to end. Cut back on the governmental layers.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Great insight into the two separate societies that exist in China today. Highlights the ever widening gap between the rich and the poor.

  30. 4 out of 5

    J M

    Must read for anyone attempting a better understanding of China's internal challenges and the plight of peasants in the developing world at large. Must read for anyone attempting a better understanding of China's internal challenges and the plight of peasants in the developing world at large.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.