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Museum of Antiquity; A Description of Ancient Life: The Employments, Amusements, Customs and Habits, the Cities, Places, Monuments and Tombs, the Literature and Fine Arts of 3,000 Years Ago

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: Scaurus, at Rome, were placed, as we learn from Pliny, in the atrium of his house. The walls were painted with landscapes or arabesques?a practice introduced about the time of Augustus? or lin Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: Scaurus, at Rome, were placed, as we learn from Pliny, in the atrium of his house. The walls were painted with landscapes or arabesques?a practice introduced about the time of Augustus? or lined with slabs of foreign and costly marbles, of which the Romans were passionately fond. The pavement was composed of the same precious material, or of still more valuable mosaics. The tablinum was an appendage of the atrium, and usually entirely open to it. It contained, as its name imports, f the family archives, the statues, pictures, genealogical tables, and other relics of a long line of ancestors. Alae, wings, were similar but smaller apartments, or rather recesses, on each side of the further part of the atrium. Fauces, jaws, were passages, more especially those which passed to the interior of the house from the atrium. xxxvi. 1. f From tnbula, or tabella, a picture. Another derivation is, '.quasi e tabulis com- pactum, because the large openings into it might be closed by shutters. VESTIBULE OF A POMPEIAN HOUSK. DINING HALLS. 31 In houses of small extent, strangers were lodged in chambers which surrounded and opened into the atriurn. The great, whose connections spread into the provinces, and who were visited by numbers who, on coming to Rome, expected to profit by their hospitality, had usually a hospitium, or place of reception for strangers, either separate, or among the dependencies of their palaces. Of the private apartments the first to be mentioned is the peristyle, which usually lay behind the atrium, and communicated with it both through the tablinum and by fauces. In its general plan it resembled the atrium, being in fact a court, open to the sky in the middle, and surrounded by a colonnade, but it was larger in its dimensions, and the centre court w..


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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: Scaurus, at Rome, were placed, as we learn from Pliny, in the atrium of his house. The walls were painted with landscapes or arabesques?a practice introduced about the time of Augustus? or lin Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: Scaurus, at Rome, were placed, as we learn from Pliny, in the atrium of his house. The walls were painted with landscapes or arabesques?a practice introduced about the time of Augustus? or lined with slabs of foreign and costly marbles, of which the Romans were passionately fond. The pavement was composed of the same precious material, or of still more valuable mosaics. The tablinum was an appendage of the atrium, and usually entirely open to it. It contained, as its name imports, f the family archives, the statues, pictures, genealogical tables, and other relics of a long line of ancestors. Alae, wings, were similar but smaller apartments, or rather recesses, on each side of the further part of the atrium. Fauces, jaws, were passages, more especially those which passed to the interior of the house from the atrium. xxxvi. 1. f From tnbula, or tabella, a picture. Another derivation is, '.quasi e tabulis com- pactum, because the large openings into it might be closed by shutters. VESTIBULE OF A POMPEIAN HOUSK. DINING HALLS. 31 In houses of small extent, strangers were lodged in chambers which surrounded and opened into the atriurn. The great, whose connections spread into the provinces, and who were visited by numbers who, on coming to Rome, expected to profit by their hospitality, had usually a hospitium, or place of reception for strangers, either separate, or among the dependencies of their palaces. Of the private apartments the first to be mentioned is the peristyle, which usually lay behind the atrium, and communicated with it both through the tablinum and by fauces. In its general plan it resembled the atrium, being in fact a court, open to the sky in the middle, and surrounded by a colonnade, but it was larger in its dimensions, and the centre court w..

9 review for Museum of Antiquity; A Description of Ancient Life: The Employments, Amusements, Customs and Habits, the Cities, Places, Monuments and Tombs, the Literature and Fine Arts of 3,000 Years Ago

  1. 5 out of 5

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    Robert Schneider

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