counter create hit One Dog at a Time: Saving the Strays of Afghanistan - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

One Dog at a Time: Saving the Strays of Afghanistan

Availability: Ready to download

The remarkable true story of one man’s fight to save the stray dogs of Afghanistan in the spirit of From Baghdad, With Love In the remote outpost of Now Zad, Afghanistan, Pen Farthing and his troop of young Royal Marines survive frequent engagements with the Taliban and forge links with the local community. Appalled by the horrors of local dog fighting, Pen has no choice b The remarkable true story of one man’s fight to save the stray dogs of Afghanistan in the spirit of From Baghdad, With Love In the remote outpost of Now Zad, Afghanistan, Pen Farthing and his troop of young Royal Marines survive frequent engagements with the Taliban and forge links with the local community. Appalled by the horrors of local dog fighting, Pen has no choice but to intervene. Then one of the dogs he frees finds his way into the Marine compound—and into Pen’s heart. Soon other strays are drawn into the sanctuary provided by the makeshift pound, including one young mother who crawls under the compound fence carrying her newborn pups to safety. As his tour of duty draws to an end, Pen cannot leave the dogs of Now Zad to their fates. He begins hatching plans to help them escape to a better life. One Dog at a Time is the gripping account of one man’s courage and humanity, and his fight to make a difference in the most hostile and dangerous environments, one dog at a time.


Compare
Ads Banner

The remarkable true story of one man’s fight to save the stray dogs of Afghanistan in the spirit of From Baghdad, With Love In the remote outpost of Now Zad, Afghanistan, Pen Farthing and his troop of young Royal Marines survive frequent engagements with the Taliban and forge links with the local community. Appalled by the horrors of local dog fighting, Pen has no choice b The remarkable true story of one man’s fight to save the stray dogs of Afghanistan in the spirit of From Baghdad, With Love In the remote outpost of Now Zad, Afghanistan, Pen Farthing and his troop of young Royal Marines survive frequent engagements with the Taliban and forge links with the local community. Appalled by the horrors of local dog fighting, Pen has no choice but to intervene. Then one of the dogs he frees finds his way into the Marine compound—and into Pen’s heart. Soon other strays are drawn into the sanctuary provided by the makeshift pound, including one young mother who crawls under the compound fence carrying her newborn pups to safety. As his tour of duty draws to an end, Pen cannot leave the dogs of Now Zad to their fates. He begins hatching plans to help them escape to a better life. One Dog at a Time is the gripping account of one man’s courage and humanity, and his fight to make a difference in the most hostile and dangerous environments, one dog at a time.

30 review for One Dog at a Time: Saving the Strays of Afghanistan

  1. 5 out of 5

    Eva Leger

    I've been pondering what makes a hero while reading this book. We hear about ball players and rappers and the like being heros. A lot of them do good, I know, but does that make them a hero? In my eyes it doesn't. I want my daughter to look up to Pen Farthing. I want him, and others like him, to be her heros. It doesn't matter what side of the war you're on, whether you believe troops should be activated or not, aside from the military standpoint totally, Farthing is still a hero in my eyes. So I've been pondering what makes a hero while reading this book. We hear about ball players and rappers and the like being heros. A lot of them do good, I know, but does that make them a hero? In my eyes it doesn't. I want my daughter to look up to Pen Farthing. I want him, and others like him, to be her heros. It doesn't matter what side of the war you're on, whether you believe troops should be activated or not, aside from the military standpoint totally, Farthing is still a hero in my eyes. So many men before him, and after him, have walked by stray animals without a care in the world. We sit in our warm homes, going to the frig whenever we want to eat or drink, without ever thinking of those doing without. Farthing was stationed in Afghanistan, in one of the most dangerous places in the world today, in some of the most horrendous conditions, and he still found it within himself to help these dogs. By helping those dogs he helped the local people, he helped the country, and he's helped the world. I don't think you can be a dog lover and not cry at points while reading this. I laughed more than a few times as well, it's a beautiful, beautiful story. I do wish there had been more photos. There are some snapshots included on the inside front and back cover but I found this in the library so the dust jacket was glued to the covers and I only was able to see the one half of each page. I saw almost every dog that was imtimately talked about in the story with the exception of Dushka and Patches I think. As a true dog lover it was easy to follow along and know just what Farthing's heart was feeling at certain times. I can't imagine being faced with the choice of who to save and who to leave behind. To even think and type the words it pains me. I can't imagine it. I can't imagine some of the feelings he's had to live with... even though he did all he could. Not everything ended happily-ever-after. He must think about RPG and AK every day. I know I'm not exactly flowing along with this review but I can't help it. I'm going by what I'm thinking and I'm not putting it into any sort of easy order. Farthing's writing is... I'm not sure what it is. It's not the best and it's not the worst. If you pick this up looking for some of the best writing you've ever read you'll probably be disappointed. At the same time though he writes better than I think most people in his situation (not being an author by trade) would. The little stories and anecdotes, the telling of how each dog came into his life, it's all just so beautiful. I don't know why we have to have places and people like these in this world. A huge part of me thinks we should remove all the animals and young children (the ones not old enough to be affected by their parents and elders insane thoughts) and just blow the place off the map. It bothers me that Farthing and his fellow soldiers actually had to halt what they were doing to wait while the Taliban recharged enough to counter another attack. Farthing's wife Lisa should also be mentioned because she's just as much a hero as he. Lisa did much on her end of things to help Pen save these dogs. Together they're helping to make this world a better place. Something that so many people wish for but make no move to actually do. Pen Farthing was wrong about one thing - there are people who would take an Afghan fighting dog. People like me. Nowzad is absolutely beautiful. If you don't know what you're looking at and what to look for he looks frightening. But if you know what to look for you see inside him, you see him smiling, and you see his eyes. There are people out here who will take a chance for dogs like Nowzad. I know that because I'm one of them. I hope, wherever they are, that RPG and AK, and all of the rest of the animals in that awful place and all of the other places like it, find a way to live a happy life. I wish I had the money Oprah or Britney has. Instead of buying Bentley's and diamonds a lot of good could be done. :( If anyone out there is wanting to help Pen & Lisa Farthing have started Nowzad Dogs, a charity which does a number of different things. Among other things they're giving help to soldiers who find themselves in the same spot as Farthing did, with a dog, wanting to help, and not getting any help from others. They're aiding the Afghan rescue that helped Lisa and Pen get the dogs out of Now Zad and have goals to open shelters in Afghanistan and Iraq which will sponser free neutering and spaying of strays, re-homing for the strays, education programs for the children, etc. A lot more important than buying that new book or CD right? My five year old daughter saves her change and allowance for a farm for when she gets older and she's well on her way believe it or not. But she also takes half of it, each time we cash it in, to donate to a different charity or to help in some way. This is going to be where that money goes now and I'm going to do the same with what I can. People always say "every little bit counts" and it's true. If everyone on GR donated $5.00 imagine how much Nowzad Dogs would be able to do. www.nowzaddogs.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Rex

    The story gets 5-stars, the writing gets 3-stars. If there is anything worth saving in Afghanistan, it is the dogs. The British Marine who authored this book tries to do just that. Amidst the boredom, chaos and utter uselessness of our mission in Afghanistan he becomes an unlikely hero to abused, mistreated and suffering stray dogs who randomly wander into his life. He can't save them all, but the dogs seem to give him some purpose for his being there and he soon begins a mission to save at leas The story gets 5-stars, the writing gets 3-stars. If there is anything worth saving in Afghanistan, it is the dogs. The British Marine who authored this book tries to do just that. Amidst the boredom, chaos and utter uselessness of our mission in Afghanistan he becomes an unlikely hero to abused, mistreated and suffering stray dogs who randomly wander into his life. He can't save them all, but the dogs seem to give him some purpose for his being there and he soon begins a mission to save at least a few. Saving strays is hard enough in a "normal" country, let alone a war-torn country w/ no real love of animals at all (some things they do are downright pathetic and sadistic, actually). The story is brisk, easy-to-read, uplifting and heartbreaking all at once. We should leave Afghanistan, for sure, but if we are going to stay we should at least try to save something worth saving - the dogs. As Ghandi once said: “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated” If this is true, it doesn't bode well for Afghanistan, but then again, what does? For more on how you can help: http://www.nowzad.com/

  3. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I put off reading this book as I knew it would take me on an emotional rollercoaster. I have seen the Dog charity Nowzad advertised in Dog magazines asking for help to rescue the dogs in Afganistan, this is the story of how this charity came to be. A British soldier is sent to Fight he leaves his loving wife behind and his 2 dogs, This is also the story of the situation our troops find themselves in, a no win situation, the people of Afganistan need help but are scared to accept foreign help as I put off reading this book as I knew it would take me on an emotional rollercoaster. I have seen the Dog charity Nowzad advertised in Dog magazines asking for help to rescue the dogs in Afganistan, this is the story of how this charity came to be. A British soldier is sent to Fight he leaves his loving wife behind and his 2 dogs, This is also the story of the situation our troops find themselves in, a no win situation, the people of Afganistan need help but are scared to accept foreign help as it will spell sure death from the Taliban.The living conditions the soldiers have to contend with and the comradeship that these men share as they put their lives on the line each day.Pen Farthing comes across a dog being abused by the Afgans, dog fighting is a national sport there and intervenes, he takes the dog (who he later names Nowzad ) back to base and has no idea what to do with it, except feed it and show it affection. Soon he has a band of dogs who seem to know they will be safe with him and manage to work their way into the compound, all of which will face certain death as strays on the street. Obviously when he finishes his tour he worried what will happen to the dogs and the race against time starts to find a charity who will help. His wife at home finds a charity in Afganistan but it is 700 miles from the base. He is not allowed to use military transport, the locals are too scared to work for the Foreigners, this is his heart wrenching story of the race against time to save his band of dogs. You would have to be very hard hearted not to shed a tear at this tale, for the comrades , young men who are killed in the constant attacks, the hard lives of the Afgans , who have a life expectencey of 43 years only, that is how hard life is.Whatever your political views , this books is about a remarkable man who has tried to help the innocent animals in a war ,when every obstacle has been placed in his way and most people would just give up, he has carried on and now has the charity to help other soldiers who find themselves in a similar position, who befriend dogs and don’t want to leave them to their fate.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kirsti

    Books that make you literally weep into their pages uncontrollably. Yeah, this is that kind of book. There was one moment I completely lost it, and I'm sure when you read this book you'll see what I mean. I was so invested in this story that it sneaked up on me unexpectedly. I've read many animal books, as you might know if you follow my reviews. I've even read animal books about Afghanistan and other war torn countries. But this book was special. It was so personal, so improbable. A dog so many Books that make you literally weep into their pages uncontrollably. Yeah, this is that kind of book. There was one moment I completely lost it, and I'm sure when you read this book you'll see what I mean. I was so invested in this story that it sneaked up on me unexpectedly. I've read many animal books, as you might know if you follow my reviews. I've even read animal books about Afghanistan and other war torn countries. But this book was special. It was so personal, so improbable. A dog so many people would instantly overlook as too far gone is the hero of this story in the form of Nowzad, a fighting dog. With growls and snaps he wins over first Pen, and then the reader also. I wanted all the dogs so desperately to get their happy ending, Nowzad especially. I feel Pen Farthing's pain at the loss of the dogs he couldn't save. This book is an outstanding example of the animal memoir genre, and I'm so glad my library finally has a copy. I read this book with my three dogs curled up around me, as I often do when I read animal books. They make it easier when there are sad parts, so I can look into their eyes whenever I need to. We had the sun, a pack of cheese nibbles and a can of raspberry soft drink. Most importantly, we had each other, which is more then so many dogs out there. I wish this author all the best with his current and future rescues.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Where oh where was this man's editor? This is such a cool story, but the writing is so painful it was hard to get through. The tone is clearly targeted at a young audience, and yet there's so much military jargon tossed in, and so little overall description, it could still be hard to follow exactly what was happening at times. There's some really interesting insights into the day to day life of a British marine in Afghanistan, along with some particularly sharp cultural contrasts in perception o Where oh where was this man's editor? This is such a cool story, but the writing is so painful it was hard to get through. The tone is clearly targeted at a young audience, and yet there's so much military jargon tossed in, and so little overall description, it could still be hard to follow exactly what was happening at times. There's some really interesting insights into the day to day life of a British marine in Afghanistan, along with some particularly sharp cultural contrasts in perception of animals. The ending is harsher than I'd expected with the light voice of the narrator throughout, and I wish the book had spent a more time on the ethics and consequences of the decision to adopt strays on a foreign military base. It's a serious missed opportunity, but the light childish tone did not really lend itself to that kind of discussion. I did a little Googling and discovered that Nowzad is currently a very active organization supporting animal welfare in war zones, which is pretty cool considering its whimsical beginnings as chronicled here.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    What I learned from this book? Well I learned a lot more about the problems facing the people of Afghanistan, a little more about their culture, a lot more about what our troops in Afghanistan face on an almost daily basis, and a great deal about our love for dogs and the lengths we will go to to help them. This book made me smile, it made me angry and it also made me cry.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kath

    This man is a hero in the true sense of the word. He sacrifices his own comfort and material assets in order to make the world a better place for both animals and people. The book is written without a hint of ego and is interesting and emotional because of his description of life as a soldier in Afghanistan as well as his attempts to improve relations and conditions there. I salute him.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    For anyone who knows me, they already know that I am going to love this book because it has dogs! I have great respect for our military, for all military because Pen is from overseas, and I know we would not be where we are today without the men and women who serve. But Pen shows a more humane side to his time in Afghanistan when he shares his story about saving stray dogs while he served there. After reading this you feel as though you know each of the dogs because of the detail he describes the For anyone who knows me, they already know that I am going to love this book because it has dogs! I have great respect for our military, for all military because Pen is from overseas, and I know we would not be where we are today without the men and women who serve. But Pen shows a more humane side to his time in Afghanistan when he shares his story about saving stray dogs while he served there. After reading this you feel as though you know each of the dogs because of the detail he describes them with and you also get a very realistic view of what life is like for those who serve. This is not a glossed over books with nothing but sunshine and rainbows. Life is hard in Afghanistan and with no real breaks in fighting in site yet he still finds a way to connect with even the most difficult dogs. He also expresses his views to the locals and even purchases the first dog which was a fighting dog. I can't wait to read more books by Farthing and if you are overseas or if you have the funding to get one of these dogs, I think it is a great way to spread the love.

  9. 5 out of 5

    M.L. Sparrow

    For more reviews, check out my blog at http://mlsparrow.wix.com/mlsparrow This is a very touching true story and I applaud Pen Farthing for his amazing efforts to save these dogs. As is mentioned in some reviews of this book, the writing style is very simple but that didn't bother me, I wasn't expecting a work of great poetry when I brought this book. I was expecting an uplifting story about saving dogs, which is what I got, although there were definitely some sad parts in this book and it broke For more reviews, check out my blog at http://mlsparrow.wix.com/mlsparrow This is a very touching true story and I applaud Pen Farthing for his amazing efforts to save these dogs. As is mentioned in some reviews of this book, the writing style is very simple but that didn't bother me, I wasn't expecting a work of great poetry when I brought this book. I was expecting an uplifting story about saving dogs, which is what I got, although there were definitely some sad parts in this book and it broke my heart that not every dog got a happy ending. I loved the ending of this book and I'm so glad Nowzad ended up with Pen! I'm looking forward to reading the next book and hearing about all the others dogs the charity the author started helped. I am planning on grabbing the paperback copy (I read this on i.books), because I believe the paperback versions has pictures in it and I really want to see if the images I have in my head of the dogs are correct! 

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    One of those books you know you will be touched by and crying and yet you read it... I know it's not much of a review but I think I am to upset to write anything else now. Wonderful man and his friends with big hearts and compassion, trying to help dogs in almost impossible to provide any help circumstances... The world needs more Farthings!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Collins

    This was an interesting story incorporating how life for the British troops in Afghanistan worked while incorporating the dog rescue efforts of one soldier, the author of this book. I found it both interesting and informative.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    I rarely am emotionally moved to tears by a book. I can't remember the last time I had to stop just to collect myself. This story is as heartbreaking as it is heartwarming. God Bless you Sgt Farthing, the love and compassion you hold in your heart is only surpassed by the bravery of your spirit.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Janit Jones

    This is my new favorite book. I can't count the number of times I hugged it to my chest and whispered "I love you" to it. It's heart breaking but also inspiring. Pen Farthing is an incredible person for everything he has done.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susan Palmer

    Loved this book, an English marine trying to save dogs while on duty in Afghanistan. Iinteresting combination of combat, duty and off time, and how his interaction with the dogs changed his life. Engrossing read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Madelaine

    Both a fascinating description of what it was like to be deployed in Helmand and how British Servicemen react to the conditions and also a heartwarming tale of animal rescue.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amii

    What an emotional and wonderful journey.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julianna

    Reviewed for THC Reviews "4.5 stars" One Dog at a Time is part war story, part dog story that is by turns both heartwarming and heartbreaking. The author was a Royal Marine deployed to a remote village in Afghanistan. He is obviously a dog lover, but he didn't set out to become a caretaker for the strays of Afghanistan. They simply found and befriended him along the way. In many ways, I think that caring for the dogs became something of an escape for Pen (and many other soldiers and marines on th Reviewed for THC Reviews "4.5 stars" One Dog at a Time is part war story, part dog story that is by turns both heartwarming and heartbreaking. The author was a Royal Marine deployed to a remote village in Afghanistan. He is obviously a dog lover, but he didn't set out to become a caretaker for the strays of Afghanistan. They simply found and befriended him along the way. In many ways, I think that caring for the dogs became something of an escape for Pen (and many other soldiers and marines on the front) from the rigors of fighting. It helps to give them a sense of normalcy and a little companionship in the midst of a war zone. The resilience of these animals and their intuitive sixth sense about which humans can be trusted is utterly amazing. Nowzad, the first dog Pen rescued had been used as a fighting dog by the first group of Afghan National Police (ANP) who shared their compound. It absolutely broke my heart to learn how the dogs ears and tails are lopped off without anesthetic all for the sake of them fighting for sport. I was astounded by how quickly Nowzad began to warm up to Pen after the abuse he'd suffered and probably never having had much positive contact with humans. When the shelling started, he somehow managed to jump a high fence, looking for Pen. In spite of becoming best buds with Pen, Nowzad could understandably still be somewhat unpredictable around other people. I could really sense Pen's frustration over not having enough time to work with Nowzad to unlearn his fighting training. More than once I thought Nowzad might come to a heartbreaking end, because of his history of fighting and seemingly not being able to trust anyone but Pen. Somehow the author was able to look past all this and see the potential in him and give him a chance at a better life. The other dogs, twenty-one in all, somehow found Pen. More than once, he was sure his comrades wouldn't believe that he hadn't purposely brought them into the compound. The dogs just seemed to instinctively know that there was someone inside those walls who would help them. The second dog, RPG, followed Pen to his duty post in the wee hours of the morning, running around him in circles, just wanting someone to play with him. Then there was Jena, the pregnant mom who was being used as a breeder by the ANP. Later even more dogs joined the group including Tali, another momma dog with six puppies and AK, a female dog who'd been bitten by a snake. Then there were Dushka and Patches, two dogs who stayed outside the compound but who often accompanied the marines during their patrols. The way Dushka, another fighting dog, followed their cues, moving when they moved and crouching when they crouched was just too cute. It's amazing how these dogs who were essentially wild street dogs with little experience around humans can pick up on these things so easily. It shows what intelligent creatures they really are and that they have emotions too. Some of the military operations passages moved a little slowly for me, not that the author goes into great detail with these parts but simply because military stuff isn't a primary reading interest for me. However, I was intrigued by the times where they experienced some interactions with the Afghan people. The little children who begged for pens and candy from the marines was equally as heartbreaking as the dog stories. The second group of ANP who came to share their compound were much better than the first. Pen and some of his men were actually able to make friends with them, and even though they still found Pen and “his dogs” to be funny, they helped out with them in more ways than one. It was also interesting to see how the marines spent Christmas day. I was quite saddened to learn that not all the dogs found happy endings, but as the title suggests, perhaps it's enough to save just one dog at a time. I really admire the author's compassionate heart for the animals and his tenacity in trying to give them a better life. Pen has now started a charity, Nowzad Dogs, to help rescue more strays from Afghanistan and Iraq, and is also helping his fellow service members to bring home the dogs that they have befriended too. Overall, I really enjoyed One Dog at a Time and look forward to reading the sequel, No Place Like Home which details the author's efforts to assist more dogs in finding forever homes.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shazza Maddog

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Now Zad is a village that the Royal Marines were protecting during the year of 2006. Farthing was the sergeant in charge of approximately twenty other men, reporting to his C.O. Farthing writes of heat and mud, of days where the weather is freezing in the morning and raining in the afternoon, all to fall to freezing temperatures again at night. He writes about helicopter drops, and attacks by the Taliban during all times of day; of a Christmas and New Years spent at Now Zad. He writes about the Now Zad is a village that the Royal Marines were protecting during the year of 2006. Farthing was the sergeant in charge of approximately twenty other men, reporting to his C.O. Farthing writes of heat and mud, of days where the weather is freezing in the morning and raining in the afternoon, all to fall to freezing temperatures again at night. He writes about helicopter drops, and attacks by the Taliban during all times of day; of a Christmas and New Years spent at Now Zad. He writes about the ANP, Afghani National Police, and how he doesn't understand the Afghan culture. And he writes about dogs. Farthing tries, at first, to avoid the strays hanging around the compound. He repairs the main gate to keep the dogs out but shortly after his arrival in Now Zad, and while on patrol, he runs into the ANP team that is stationed in the Royal Marine's compound, fighting dogs in the street. Farthing rushes in, the dogs escape, and the ANP are unhappy their dog ran away. Farthing says he expected to get called before his C.O., but nothing was ever said. Instead, while patrolling the compound, Farthing finds the larger of the two fighting dogs holed up in a hovel. Farthing gives the dogs a few biscuits and decides to leave it where he found it, despite the 'no dogs in the compound' rule. The big fighting dog, with his ears cropped next to his head and still bleeding, his tail chopped off to a mere stump, is named Nowzad by Farthing and Dave, one of his men. This is the start of a dog rescue group within the Royal Marines, with Farthing's wife, Lisa, back in England, the ANP, and a rag tag dog rescue group in northern Afghanistan, in an attempt to get Farthing's pack out of Now Zad. Farthing's dogs range from the delicate female, Jena, to the darter, RPG. AK, Tali, Dushka and Patches round out the pack. Tali comes and goes as she pleases, even in and out of the main gate, though her puppies slow her down and sometimes, they all need to be rescued. RPG and AK are incredibly playful, and likely to burst out at the slightest chance. Dushka is another fighting dog, who goes with the men when they patrol, and Jena figures out how to break out of the kennel so she can mooch sausages from the unit's chef. These dogs give Farthing, Dave, John and others of his men a chance to give of themselves, since the local Afghani will have nothing to do with them for fear of retaliation of the Taliban.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lis Carey

    Pen Farthing is a British marine and a dog lover who was deployed to Afghanistan in 2006. He quickly discovered that the dogs of Afghanistan were in as much need of help as the people, and had less ability to fend for themselves. It starts with rescuing one abused dog from ANP (Afghan National Police) officers who plan to use him in a dog fight. Then he breaks up an actual dog fight and allows the two dogs to escape, much to the annoyance of the ANP and AFA (Afghan National Army) participants an Pen Farthing is a British marine and a dog lover who was deployed to Afghanistan in 2006. He quickly discovered that the dogs of Afghanistan were in as much need of help as the people, and had less ability to fend for themselves. It starts with rescuing one abused dog from ANP (Afghan National Police) officers who plan to use him in a dog fight. Then he breaks up an actual dog fight and allows the two dogs to escape, much to the annoyance of the ANP and AFA (Afghan National Army) participants and spectators. When one of those escape fighting dogs turns up inside the base, Pen can’t turn his back, and soon he has named the fighting dog Nowzad, built a run to contain him, and is working, in the spare time he doesn’t have, on training the dog. But he’s not crazy, so he also calls his wife, back home in the UK, and asks her to find a rescue organization in Afghanistan who can take Nowzad. While he’s waiting, of course, one dog becomes two, and two dogs become three, and then he rescues a pregnant female, and another female with her puppies squeezes through the gates… At this point, his wife and quite a few of his fellow Marines would dispute my statement that he’s not crazy, but his wife and a couple of those Marines are as devoted to dogs as he is, and they keep trying. This is set in a war zone, and firefights, injuries, and deaths happen. Some of this is pretty disturbing, especially if you came for a dog story, but it’s an essential part of Pen’s experience. It’s both why the dogs are in need of saving, and what makes it so hard to do. It’s an excellent and moving story. Recommended. I borrowed this book from the library.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lynne

    About: While serving for the Royal Marines in Afghanistan, the author intervenes when he comes upon the scene of a local dog fight. One of the freed dogs finds his way into the Marine compound where Farthing is staying and eventually so do several other strays. Farthing, with a soft spot for dogs, can't resist caring for them, some of whom are pregnant, and as his tour of duty comes to an end he enlists his wife's help to rescue them. Did you know...that dogfighting, a centuries-old tradition, is About: While serving for the Royal Marines in Afghanistan, the author intervenes when he comes upon the scene of a local dog fight. One of the freed dogs finds his way into the Marine compound where Farthing is staying and eventually so do several other strays. Farthing, with a soft spot for dogs, can't resist caring for them, some of whom are pregnant, and as his tour of duty comes to an end he enlists his wife's help to rescue them. Did you know...that dogfighting, a centuries-old tradition, is one of Afghanistan's most popular sports, and that owners cut off their dogs' ears and tails with a knife (no anesthetic) so no superficial wounds will be inflicted because of a torn ear or tail and the fights can then last longer? Overall: It was okay. Liked...the courage the author showed in standing up to the dogfights and in caring for the dogs at the Marine compound, as it was not exactly in line with the rules but because he was a higher rank he got away with it. I liked the dramatic ending the best, when he had to organize the dogs' difficult trip out of Afghanistan. I also liked the few pictures on the front and back inside covers. Didn't like...that it dragged on. Yes he had a huge heart and yes he went to a lot of trouble to save a few dogs in the compound when his duty was over, but not enough content to warrant a book. Source: Library Why I chose: The cover. I couldn't resist. And of course the subtitle: Saving the Strays of Afghanistan. Always a sucker for animals. Especially strays. Recommend: Eh. Rating: 3 / 5

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    I wasn't sure what to expect when I began reading Saving Cinnamon. This book is not just another rescue dog/American soldier story. It is its own unique story because this dog gets lost on her way home to be with the soldier and his wife who have adopted her. The author of this book is the sister of the soldier who rescued Cinnamon. He had made previous arrangements to bring her home safely from Afghanistan but a dog handler failed this poor dog and he failed this soldier, too. I am wondering ho I wasn't sure what to expect when I began reading Saving Cinnamon. This book is not just another rescue dog/American soldier story. It is its own unique story because this dog gets lost on her way home to be with the soldier and his wife who have adopted her. The author of this book is the sister of the soldier who rescued Cinnamon. He had made previous arrangements to bring her home safely from Afghanistan but a dog handler failed this poor dog and he failed this soldier, too. I am wondering how do you find a lost dog in a war theater? But Christine Sullivan took on this immeasurable task, kept hitting the keys on her keyboard to send emails and made the calls necessary to set up an incredible "find and rescue" mission that just simply amazes me. The war in Afghanistan is horrible so I am glad that soldiers are finding something redeemable in this tragedy by reaching out to dogs and bringing them home to the United States. Christine Sullivan takes us every step of the way on her journey to find Cinnamon and to bring her home. When I read the excitement that surrounded Cinnamon's arrival in the United States I was jumping up and down with joy, too, because the author has done a wonderful job building me up to this moment. I love happy endings and this book not only gives me that with another soldier/dog love story it also shows me that there are people all over this world who care about dogs and really care about their safety and well being. I hope many people will take the time to read this amazing story because I don't think they will be disappointed.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    This is the last of my dog-books (real physical books) that I bought last year in a sudden dog-frenzy. Finally got around to reading this. This book was a lot easier to read, compared to From Baghdad, With Love. I guess these books are pretty standard. Soldier gets posted in the middle of war-torn nowhere. Soldier befriends dog, or dog befriends soldier. Mutual good feelings. Soldier can't think of abandoning dog. This is basically the whole premise of this book. Only that, there's more to this basi This is the last of my dog-books (real physical books) that I bought last year in a sudden dog-frenzy. Finally got around to reading this. This book was a lot easier to read, compared to From Baghdad, With Love. I guess these books are pretty standard. Soldier gets posted in the middle of war-torn nowhere. Soldier befriends dog, or dog befriends soldier. Mutual good feelings. Soldier can't think of abandoning dog. This is basically the whole premise of this book. Only that, there's more to this basic story. Somehow, various other dogs know of this safe "haven" and try to move into this "Kennel" of sorts in this one base. So much so that, a new mommydog actually squeezed her puppies through the fence into the base. The book tells of how Farthing spends his days taking care of the dogs, building the runs, serving food (as a stand-in chef), how the base celebrated Christmas... and his attempts at sending the dogs to a rescue in Kandaar so that they can be later be adopted elsewhere. While the ending is considered "happy", there are some sore spots. I fell in love with Dushka immediately, but her end felt really... unfair. Patches must have been frightened seeing that (we don't know if s/he did though). RPG and AK are two mysteries as well... It is just so sad to hear that not all dogs made it to the rescue. Definitely recommended. I liked this book so much that I already bought the second book (Kindle Format) Farthing now has his own charity. Nowzad Dogs.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Misty Melsheimer

    While this book may not win any awards for literary style, it could easily win an award based on heart. What a lovely, heartwarming (& equally heart wrenching) memoir. I was anxious throughout the reading, wondering what would happen to these poor creatures. Even knowing at the outset of the book that Pen founded a charity for dogs in Afghanistan, I couldn’t help but worry about the fates of these delightful 4 legged pals of his. Rescuing these dogs seemed such an impossible task, and with the a While this book may not win any awards for literary style, it could easily win an award based on heart. What a lovely, heartwarming (& equally heart wrenching) memoir. I was anxious throughout the reading, wondering what would happen to these poor creatures. Even knowing at the outset of the book that Pen founded a charity for dogs in Afghanistan, I couldn’t help but worry about the fates of these delightful 4 legged pals of his. Rescuing these dogs seemed such an impossible task, and with the addition of each dog and 2 litters of puppies, I just couldn’t imagine how they were going to make it happen. There are some moments that had the tears flowing (& still, days later, weigh on my heart), but really, this book has the best possible outcome given the circumstances. It’s worth mentioning that I thought the author did an admirable job at keeping the dogs at the forefront of the story without minimizing the conflict in Afghanistan. It’s a tricky balance to write about a topic such as animal welfare, in a country that is war torn and experiencing much more immediate problems than a stray dog population. I thought he was quite sensitive to the war and the state of the country and its citizens, yet maintained his voice and told the story he wanted to tell. Bravo! Truly a fantastic memoir that any dog lover will embrace. Keep the tissues handy!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Enrique028

    I so wanted to read this book for such a long time...I lost the title once and then I found it again to realised then it did even had a second book [which I am starting to read straight away] and I have to say it didn't disappoint me! Yes, it is about dogs, very much in need dogs and it will require a lot of love and understanding for our incredible canine friends but it is also about Mr Farthing and his Kilo Company journey in a ravaged and war affected and alien land. It is Pen Farthing incred I so wanted to read this book for such a long time...I lost the title once and then I found it again to realised then it did even had a second book [which I am starting to read straight away] and I have to say it didn't disappoint me! Yes, it is about dogs, very much in need dogs and it will require a lot of love and understanding for our incredible canine friends but it is also about Mr Farthing and his Kilo Company journey in a ravaged and war affected and alien land. It is Pen Farthing incredible story of his life leading his Company of Marines through their 6 months deployment in Afghanistan , their difficulties and their longings and how this incredible Gentleman gets involved with those strays Dogs and how the Dogs get involved with him. He brings out the Dogs character quite easy with snaps from them. It is a sort of happy-ish book cuz there are terrible things happening and also incredibly beautiful things happening and a sort of Happy Ending. If only RPG and AK would have made it to the end...but then, just maybe, it wouldn't have been real life.

  25. 5 out of 5

    ElenaSquareEyes

    One Dog at a Time is an incredible true story. It’s sometimes surprising as there are surely bigger problems than stray dogs that are forced to fight but at least Pen Farthing and the other soldiers can do something for the dogs, while differing cultures, the short amount of time troops are stationed in the area and the Taliban often stop them helping the people of Afghanistan. As well as Pen’s encounters with different dogs you also get to see what the everyday life of the military in a remote o One Dog at a Time is an incredible true story. It’s sometimes surprising as there are surely bigger problems than stray dogs that are forced to fight but at least Pen Farthing and the other soldiers can do something for the dogs, while differing cultures, the short amount of time troops are stationed in the area and the Taliban often stop them helping the people of Afghanistan. As well as Pen’s encounters with different dogs you also get to see what the everyday life of the military in a remote outpost in Helmand Province is like. There’s the constant threat of the Taliban and people you’ve come to know do get hurt and killed. But also there’s the camaraderie between the soldiers and how they learn to deal with the elements and how they interact with the Afghani Police. One Dog at a Time touches all the emotions; shock, outrage, sadness and joy as you follow Pen as he tries to help these dogs in a place where there’s not a lot of hope. I’d recommend One Dog at a Time: Saving the Strays of Helmand to any dog or animal lover in general.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sam Herbert

    I'm really conflicted about this book. I bought it because, as a dog-mad person, I knew I would love the story. It's about a marine serving in Afghanistan who looks after the stray dogs in his compound and tries with all his might to get them to a rescue centre, despite all the pitfalls that inevitably come with it. But the book is quite badly written, and it failed to hook me, which is why it took me so long to finish it. I was determined to push on, and when I reached the end, I weeped into th I'm really conflicted about this book. I bought it because, as a dog-mad person, I knew I would love the story. It's about a marine serving in Afghanistan who looks after the stray dogs in his compound and tries with all his might to get them to a rescue centre, despite all the pitfalls that inevitably come with it. But the book is quite badly written, and it failed to hook me, which is why it took me so long to finish it. I was determined to push on, and when I reached the end, I weeped into the final pages. It's both heart-wrenching and heart-warming, and the uncertainty about some of the dogs and their outcomes is agonising. But the writer of this book is an absolute hero and the very, very end of the book will have you beaming from ear to ear.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sammi McSporran

    This is a wonderful book. Truly heartwarming and inspiring, Pen's story is one that will touch your soul. As a fellow dog lover, and an animal rescue worker myself, this book really struck a chord with me. It really demonstrates so clearly the reason we work so hard to save animals, and the ups and downs of the rollercoaster ride that can be getting an animal to a happy home. I smiled, I cried, I still feel worried and wonder about the dogs of Helmand that couldnt be saved, but also happy that Pe This is a wonderful book. Truly heartwarming and inspiring, Pen's story is one that will touch your soul. As a fellow dog lover, and an animal rescue worker myself, this book really struck a chord with me. It really demonstrates so clearly the reason we work so hard to save animals, and the ups and downs of the rollercoaster ride that can be getting an animal to a happy home. I smiled, I cried, I still feel worried and wonder about the dogs of Helmand that couldnt be saved, but also happy that Pen is being the hero this story shows him to be and continuing his rescues, giving so many the chances at life they would otherwise never have. One Dog at a Time is a gorgeous read, and I would definitely recommend it to dog lovers! Five Stars.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chase

    This book (One Dog At A Time) By Pen Farthing covers a time period of 20-24 years. Something significant about Pen in this time period is that he goes to war, and rescues dogs. Some exciting events are when Pen helps rescue a dog and her pups from die in a drain, and when an enemy mortar lands in the compound that starts a big fight, and the last event is when he rescues a dog named NowZad from a dogfight. I felt that there was some info that needed to be in the book that could of made it better This book (One Dog At A Time) By Pen Farthing covers a time period of 20-24 years. Something significant about Pen in this time period is that he goes to war, and rescues dogs. Some exciting events are when Pen helps rescue a dog and her pups from die in a drain, and when an enemy mortar lands in the compound that starts a big fight, and the last event is when he rescues a dog named NowZad from a dogfight. I felt that there was some info that needed to be in the book that could of made it better. In this book there were a few boring parts, but over all it was a really good book. I felt like this book should be inspiring to all people. This book will really inspire and surprise you. Every book has boring parts, but to counter act that you need... I would recommend this book to all people.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    I am so glad that Pen Farthing wrote this book! I hope that those who read it, like me, are inspired to help these dogs (and other animals). There are moments of love, trust and bonding that are so touching and heartfelt among moments of sadness, despair and anger. These soldiers who bond with and sacrifice so much to help these poor souls are heroes. These dogs are also heroes, providing these soldiers with some comfort while fighting for all of us.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    This book accurately portrays the sad situation in Afghanistan. The story is told well and realistically, and shows parts of the war in Afghanistan with parts of the war being both tedious and dangerous. It is a heartwarming and sad tale for the poor people and animals of that country. It is good to know there are still people who despite all the world's troubles, still care for the lesser animals of the earth.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.